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Diseases » Pancreas conditions » Glossary
 

Glossary for Pancreas conditions

  • Abdominal pain: A condition which is characterized by the sensation of pain that is located in the abdomen
  • Accessory pancreas: A small clusters of pancreas cells that are detached from the pancreas and found in the wall of the stomach or intestines. The defect causes no problems and is an incidental finding.
  • Acute Pancreatitis: Sudden severe inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • All Disease Categories: All major disease categories
  • Annular pancreas: An abnormality where a ring of pancreatic tissue forms around the duodenum and can block the flow of food through the digestive system. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of constriction. Partial obstruction may not be detected until adulthood.
  • Ataxia -- diabetes -- goiter -- gonadal insufficiency: A rare disorder characterized by diabetes, goiter, insufficient hormone production by the gonads and progressive ataxia.
  • Atherosclerosis, premature -- deafness -- diabetes mellitus -- photomyoclonus -- nephropathy -- degenerative neurologic disease: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Atherosclerosis- deafness -- diabetes -- epilepsy -- nephropathy: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Bird-headed dwarfism with progressive ataxia, Insulin-resistant diabetes, goiter and primary gonadal insufficiency: A rare disorder characterized by diabetes, goiter, insufficient hormone production by the gonads and progressive ataxia.
  • Campomelia Cumming type: A rare syndrome characterized by limb and multiple abdominal organ abnormalities. The disorder results in death before birth or soon after.
  • Cardiomyopathy diabetes deafness: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of heart muscle disease, diabetes and deafness.
  • Cataract -- intellectual deficit -- anal atresia -- urinary defects: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by cataracts, mental retardation and genitourinary tract abnormalities and absent anal opening.
  • Chest pain: Pain in the chest area.
  • Chronic Pancreatitis: Chronic ongoing inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Decreased sugar tolerance in diabetics: A decrease in the bodies ability in diabetes to lower the blood sugar levels
  • Developmental delay -- epilepsy -- neonatal diabetes: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by developmental delay, epilepsy and early-onset diabetes.
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Diabetes Insipidus: Rare pituitary disorder often affecting the kidneys.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 10: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 11: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 12: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 13: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q34.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 15: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 15 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 17: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 17 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 18: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 18 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31.1-q33.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 19: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 19 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q24.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11p15.5.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 20: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 20 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 21: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 21 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 22: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 22 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 23: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 23 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q27.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 24: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 24 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q26.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 5: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 6: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 7: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 8: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 81 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25-q27.
  • Diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, mitochondrial form: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness which results in mitochondrial defects.
  • Diabetes like foot weakness: Weakness due to lesions in the muscles of the feet.
  • Diabetes mellitus, permanent neonatal -- pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis: A rare syndrome characterized by the abnormal development of the cerebellum and pancreas which results in diabetes mellitus.
  • Diabetes mellitus, transient neonatal: A form of infant diabetes that starts usually in the month of life but then usually disappears within a year. The condition predisposes the infant to diabetes later in life.
  • Diabetes, neonatal -- congenital hypothyroidism -- congenital glaucoma -- hepatic fibrosis -- polycystic kidneys: A rare syndrome characterized by the presence of diabetes, hypothyroidism, liver fibrosis, polycystic kidneys and glaucoma in infants.
  • Diabetes-like neuropathy symptoms: Also known as peripheral neuropathy. It is a typical presentation of diabetes but can be a presentation of other diseases too.
  • Diabetes-like pressure ulcer: Pressure ulcer is an area of skin that breaks down when one stays in one position for too long without shifting their weight.
  • Diabetes-like retinal edema: It occurs when fluid and protein collects under the retinal layer of the eye usually due to any trauma , infection or detachment of the retina
  • Diabetic Diarrhea: Diarrhea that occurs in diabetics as a result of the damage done by diabetes to the digestive system. Digestive system damage is caused by intestinal neuropathy (damage to intestinal nerves) or bacterial overgrowth or both.
  • Diabetic Eye Disease: Eye disease caused by diabetes
  • Diabetic Gastroparesis: Gastroparesis is a diabetic complication that occurs from neuropathy of the stomach nerve (called the "vagus nerve"). This causes digestive difficulties as the food starts to move too slowly through the stomach.
  • Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Life-threatening complication of high blood sugars and diabetes.
  • Diabetic Lens Osmosis: Eye lens vision changes due to diabetic sugars; usually reversible.
  • Diabetic Nephropathy: Kidney disease from diabetic blood sugars.
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetic nerve damage affecting toes, feet, and sometimes hands.
  • Diabetic Retinopathy: Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina.
  • Diabetic hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar attack from insulin or diabetes medications
  • Diabetic neuropathy: Nerve damage from diabetes affecting any body part; most commonly feet.
  • Digestive Diseases: Diseases that affect the digestive system
  • Dupont-Sellier-Chochillon syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by an abnormally narrow duodenum and pancreatic dysfunction.
  • Dupont-Sellier-Chocillon Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by lipomatosis of the pancreas and narrowing of the duodenum.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- arthrogryposis -- diabetes mellitus: A rare syndrome characterized by diabetes, short stature and tooth, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Endocrine disorders: Any disorder that affects the endocrine system
  • Endocrine pancreatic cancer: Any disease that affects the endocrine pancreas
  • Endocrine system cancer: Cancer that affects any gland in the endocrine system
  • Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency, Dyserythropoietic Anemia, And Calvarial Hyperostosis: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by anemia, pancreatic dysfunction and abnormal skull calcification.
  • Fitz syndrome: Symptoms caused by an acute pancreatic inflammation.
  • Fraser-Jequier-Chen syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by a cleft epiglottis and larynx, extra fingers and toes and kidney, pancreatic and bone abnormalities. The internal organs are also located on the opposite side of the body to normal (situs inversus totalis).
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Gastrinoma: Rare tumors secreting the digestive hormone gastrin.
  • Gestational diabetes: Diabetes that occurs in pregnant women, usually resolving after birth.
  • Glucagonoma: Rare cancer of the glucagon-producing pancreas cells.
  • Glucagonoma syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a tumor which secretes glucagon and a characteristic spreading rash, diabetes mellitus and various other symptoms.
  • Hemochromatosis: Excess of iron leading to problems with joints, liver, heart and pancreas.
  • Hemochromatosis-related diabetes: A single-gene disease that causes iron accumulation in the tissues of the body. Diabetes is a primary complication if hemochromatosis goes untreated. Hemochromatosis is sometimes referred to as "bronze diabetes."
  • Hereditary pancreatitis: A rare inherited condition involving recurring bouts of pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) often leading to chronic pancreatitis due to scarring of the pancreas.
  • Hyperinsulinemia: High insulin levels in the blood
  • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 1: A disorder where too much insulin causes low blood sugar in infants. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid the brain being damaged by repeated periods of low blood sugar. The various types of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia are distinguished by their genetic origin. HHF1 is due to a mutation in the gene for SUR1 (surfonlyurea receptor 1) on chromosome 11p15.1.
  • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 2: A disorder where too much insulin causes low blood sugar in infants. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid the brain being damaged by repeated periods of low blood sugar. The various types of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia are distinguished by their genetic origin. HHF2 is due to a mutation in the gene for Kir6.2 on chromosome 11p15.1.
  • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 3: A disorder where too much insulin causes low blood sugar in infants. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid the brain being damaged by repeated periods of low blood sugar. The various types of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia are distinguished by their genetic origin. HHF3 is due to a mutation in the gene for glucokinase on chromosome 7p15-p13.
  • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 4: A disorder where too much insulin causes low blood sugar in infants. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid the brain being damaged by repeated periods of low blood sugar. The various types of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia are distinguished by their genetic origin. HHF4 is due to a mutation in the gene for 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase on chromosome 4q22-q26.
  • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 5: A disorder where too much insulin causes low blood sugar in infants. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid the brain being damaged by repeated periods of low blood sugar. The various types of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia are distinguished by their genetic origin. HHF5 is due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 6: A disorder where too much insulin causes low blood sugar in infants. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid the brain being damaged by repeated periods of low blood sugar. The various types of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia are distinguished by their genetic origin. HHF6 is due to a mutation in the GLUD1 gene on chromosome 10q23.3.
  • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 7: A disorder where too much insulin causes low blood sugar in infants. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid the brain being damaged by repeated periods of low blood sugar. The various types of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia are distinguished by their genetic origin. In HHF7 strenuous exercise causes high insulin and low sugar levels.
  • Hyperinsulinism due to glucokinase deficiency: An inherited condition characterized by high insulin levels due to deficiency of glucokinase. The lack of glucokinase prevents the pancreas from detecting low blood sugar so insulin continues to be secreted which keeps the blood sugar level low. Severe symptoms such as seizures and coma can result if sugar levels drop too low.
  • Hyperinsulinism due to glutamodehydrogenase deficiency: An inherited condition characterized by high insulin and ammonia levels in the blood due to an enzyme deficiency (glutamate dehydrogenase). Episodes of low blood sugar can be triggered by fasting for too long or eating a protein meal. Severe symptoms such as seizures and coma can result if sugar levels drop too low.
  • Hyperinsulinism in children, congenital: A rare inherited condition characterized by high insulin levels which cause low blood sugar. Severe symptoms such as seizures and coma can result if sugar levels drop too low.
  • Hyperinsulinism, diffuse: A rare inherited condition where there are abnormal islet cells spread throughout the pancreas. The islet of Langerhans cells produce insulin which regulates the body's sugar level.
  • Hyperinsulinism, focal: A rare inherited condition where only some of the pancreatic islet cells that produce insulin are abnormal. The prognosis for this form is good as surgical removal of the abnormal pancreatic tissue allows the pancreas to retain normal function.
  • Impaired glucose tolerance: Mild glucose metabolism problems not severe enough to be called diabetes.
  • Impaired glucose tolerance- like symptoms as in case of hemochromatosis: The diagnosis of glucose intolerance is based on the circumstance at the time of diagnosis.
  • Insulin Resistance: The resistance of the body to insulin
  • Insulinoma: A rare form of pancreatic cancer that causes excessive secretion of the hormone insulin. A relatively small number of cases are malignant.
  • Ivemark II: A lethal syndrome characterized by lack of spleen function as well as kidney, liver, pancreatic and heart abnormalities. The condition generally results in death within days of birth.
  • Johanson-Blizzard Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder involving a range of abnormalities including a characteristic beak-like small nose, hypothyroidism and deafness.
  • Knee pain: Pain in or around the knee joint
  • Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a genetically-linked, hereditary autoimmune disorder that results in the body mistaking the pancreas as foreign and responding by attacking and destroying the insulin-producing beta islet cells of the pancreas. Simply stated, autoimmune disorders, including LADA, are an "allergy to self."
  • Lipoatrophic diabetes:
  • Lipoatrophy with diabetes, hepatic steatosis, cardiomyopathy, and leukomelanodermic papules: A rare inherited disorder characterized by loss of fat under the skin, diabetes, heart muscle disease, fatty liver
  • MODY diabetes: Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young affects approximately one or two per cent of people who have diabetes, and may often go unrecognised in its early stages. It is a form of diabetes that develops before the patient reaches 25. It also runs in families, and can pass from one generation to the next. MODY does not always require insulin treatment.
  • MODY syndrome: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. The diabetes results due to genetic mutations which leads to dysfunctional insulin-producing pancreatic cells. There are 6 different genetic mutations that can cause this type of diabetes.
  • MODY syndrome, type 1: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 1 is due to a mutation of the HNF4A gene on chromosome 20.
  • MODY syndrome, type 2: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 2 is due to a mutation of the glucokinase gene on chromosome 7. This particular type is quite mild and usually only discovered incidentally or may become evident during pregnancy.
  • MODY syndrome, type III: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 3 is due to a mutation of the hepatic transcriptor factor-1 gene on chromosome 12q24.2. The hyperglycemia in this form of the condition tends to increase with time and hence eventually requires treatment in the form of medication in many patients.
  • MODY syndrome, type IV: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 4 is due to a mutation of the insulin promoter factor-1 gene on chromosome 13q12.1.
  • MODY syndrome, type V: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 5 is due to a mutation of the hepatic transcriptor factor-2 gene on chromosome 17cen-q21.3.
  • MODY syndrome, type VI: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 6 is due to a mutation of the NEUROD1 gene on chromosome 2q32.
  • MODY syndrome, type VII: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 7 is due to a mutation of the KLF11 gene on chromosome 2p25.
  • MODY syndrome, type VIII: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 8 is due to a genetic mutation on chromosome 9q34.3.
  • Malnutrition-related diabetes mellitus: Diabetes mellitus that is caused by a chronic malnutrition state
  • Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness: A rare disorder characterized by deafness associated with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
  • Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness with cardiomyopathy: A rare inherited disorder characterized by deafness, heart muscle disease and diabetes.
  • Metastatic insulinoma: A rare form of pancreatic cancer that causes excessive secretion of the hormone insulin and can spread to other parts of the body (metastasis).
  • Microgastria short stature diabetes: A rare syndrome characterized by a very small stomach, diabetes and a growth hormone deficiency.
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described.
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to, 1: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described. In type 1, the genetic defect is linked to chromosome
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to, 2: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described. In type 2, the genetic defect is linked to chromosome 7q21 and it appears to increase the risk of diabetic kidney and eye disease in particular.
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to, 3: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described. In type 3, the genetic defect is linked to chromosome 17q23 and it appears to increase the risk of diabetic kidney disease in particular.
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to, 4: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described. In type 4, the genetic defect is linked to chromosome 2q14.2 and it appears to increase the risk of diabetic kidney disease in particular.
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to, 5: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described. In type 5, the genetic defect is linked to chromosome 7q21.3 and and it appears to increase the risk of diabetic eye disease in particular.
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to, 6: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described. In type 6, the genetic defect is linked to chromosome 6q25.3 and it appears to increase the risk of diabetic kidney disease in particular.
  • Microvascular Complications of Diabetes, Susceptibility to, 7: Diabetics are prone to developing microvascular complications and experts have now discovered a number of genetic defects which may predispose diabetics to developing these complications. Seven genetic defects have so far been described. In type 7, the genetic defect is linked to chromosome 6p21.3 and it appears to increase the risk of diabetic kidney and eye disease in particular.
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia: A group of conditions that is characterised by the hyperplasia and hyperfunction of two or more glands of the endocrine system
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Myopathy and diabetes mellitus: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle disease and diabetes mellitus. The condition was highly variable with respect to the severity, range and onset of symptoms.
  • Nesidioblastosis of pancreas: A rare genetic disorder where abnormal islets of Langerhans cells in the pancreas produce excess insulin which causes very low blood sugar levels. Untreated low blood sugar can cause permanent brain damage.
  • Non functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: A tumor of the pancreas that does not result in an increased hormone production but can cause symptoms when the tumor becomes big enough to push against other structures. The tumor may be malignant or benign.
  • Pancreas agenesis, dorsal: A very rare disorder where the back portion of the pancreas fails to develop.
  • Pancreatic Acinar Cell Tumors: Pancreatic acinar cell tumors are a rare type of tumor that develops from acinar cells in the pancreas. Normal acinar cells secrete enzymes and hence acinar cells in the tumor will also usually secrete additional enzymes - mostly lipase. This type of tumor usually occurs in old age.
  • Pancreatic Islet Cell Cancer: A malignant carcinoma that is located in the islet cells of the pancreas
  • Pancreatic abscess: A localized pus-filled cavity (abscess) in the pancreas which usually occurs after pancreatitis. Death can occur if the abscess is not drained.
  • Pancreatic adenoma: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Pancreatic beta cell agenesis with neonatal diabetes mellitus: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the pancreas resulting in infant diabetes mellitus. The insulin-producing beta cells are absent from birth.
  • Pancreatic cancer: Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas
  • Pancreatic cancer, adult: Cancer that develops in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas produces digestive juices and certain hormones such as insulin that regulate sugar levels in the body and tumors can in some cases causes excessive hormone secretion.
  • Pancreatic carcinoma, familial: Cancer (malignant) that develops in the pancreas and tends to run in families. The pancreas produces digestive juices and certain hormones such as insulin that regulate sugar levels in the body.
  • Pancreatic insufficiency: Impaired pancreatic functioning. The pancreas does not produce sufficient digestive enzymes to properly digest lipids and proteins. Pancreatic insufficiency may be caused by such things as pancreatic cancer, cystic fibrosis, pancreatic resection and chronic pancreatitis.
  • Pancreatic islet cell tumors (functioning tumor): A tumor that arises from the pancreatic islet cells and produces too many hormones.
  • Pancreatic islet cell tumors (non-functioning tumor): A tumor that arises from the pancreatic islet cells and may involve cells that produce excess pancreatic hormones.
  • Pancreatic lipomatosis and duodenal stenosis:
  • Pancreatitis: Inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Pancreatoblastoma: A very rare pancreatic tumor that occurs almost exclusively in children. The tumor can grow large enough to push against and hence obstruct the passage of material in the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Pearson's anemia: Pearson's anemia is a rare progressive condition characterized by abnormal pancreatic functioning and sideroblastic anemia. Diagnosis usually occurs within the first 7 years of life and death in infancy is common.
  • Pearson's marrow-pancreas syndrome: A rare condition characterized by abnormal functioning of the bone marrow, liver, kidneys and pancreas. Infant death is common.
  • Phosphate diabetes: A condition where the kidney tubules fail to reabsorb phosphate resulting in excess phosphate in the urine.
  • Proximal tubulopathy -- diabetes mellitus -- cerebellar ataxia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by diabetes, movement disorder and kidney abnormality. Death often occurs during childhood.
  • Renal tubulopathy -- diabetes mellitus -- cerebellar ataxia: A very rare condition characterized by rapidly progressive diabetes, kidney disease and cerebellar ataxia. Symptoms develop during the first five years.
  • Renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia -- Dandy Walker cyst: A very rare syndrome involving abnormal development of the kidneys, liver and pancreas as well as a brain cyst called a Dandy-Walker cyst.
  • Senile amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In senile amyloidosis the pancreas, heart and sometimes the brain are affected.
  • Short stature, cranial hyperostosis, hepatomegaly and diabetes: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by enlarged liver, diabetes, short stature and a thickened skull.
  • Shwachman syndrome: A rare disorder where a pancreatic defect impairs digestive enzyme production and malfunction of the bone marrow produces blood abnormalities, particularly blood cells involved with fighting infection. These defects produce a range of symptoms as a result of malabsorption and poor ability to fight infections. Characterized by a lack of digestive enzymes and low immunity due to low leukocyte level.
  • Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome:
  • Situs inversus totalis with cystic dysplasia of kidneys and pancreas: A rare syndrome where the position of the internal organs of the chest and abdomen is transposed. In addition there are kidney and pancreatic abnormalities.
  • Somatostatinoma: A very rare disorder where tumors in glands that produce somatostatin affect the secretion of the hormone. The tumor mainly occurs in the pancreas but can also occur in the intestinal tract.
  • Transient diabetes mellitus:
  • Type 1 diabetes: Severe insulin-treated diabetes typically occurring in young people.
  • Type 1 diabetes related Celiac Disease: Patients with Type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Type 2 diabetes: Most common diabetes in adults, usually progressing slowly, mostly treated without insulin at diagnosis.
  • Yorifuji Okuno syndrome: A condition that is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and heart disease
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: A rare disorder where excessive levels of the hormone gastrin are released into the stomach which increases stomach acidity which results in peptic ulcer development. A hormone secreting pancreatic or duodenal tumor is usually the cause.

 

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