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Treatments for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

Treatments for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

Treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease infection starts with prevention. Prevention measures include seeking regular medical care throughout the lifetime. Regular medical care allows a licensed health care professional to best evaluate the risks of contracting sexually transmitted diseases that causes pelvic inflammatory disease and regularly test for these diseases. These measures greatly increase the chances of diagnosing and curing pelvic inflammatory disease in its earliest stage before serious complications occur.

Other prevention measures include abstaining from sexual activity or having sex only within a mutually monogamous relationship in which neither partner is infected with pelvic inflammatory disease or another sexually transmitted disease. Latex condoms also provide some protection when used properly.

Treatment for mild pelvic inflammatory disease infection includes oral antibiotic medication. At least two antibiotics that treat a range of microorganisms that cause pelvic inflammatory disease are generally prescribed. It is vital to take all medications exactly as directed and finish all antibiotics even if symptoms disappear, unless directed otherwise by a physician. It is also important to abstain from sexual activity until the infection is cured and to diagnose and treat all sexual partners for any possible sexually transmitted diseases, even if they have no symptoms.

In more severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary. Treatment includes intravenous administration of antibiotics through a vein. Laparoscopic surgery may also be needed. In this surgical procedure, the physician inserts a special instrument through a small incision in the abdomen to remove infected tissues. Prompt diagnosis and treatment increases the chances of preserving fertility.

Treatment List for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease may include:

Hidden causes of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease may be incorrectly diagnosed:

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease include:

  • Rocephin
  • Amcel
  • Benaxona
  • Cefaxona
  • Ceftrex
  • Tacex
  • Terbac
  • Triaken
  • Ceftriaxone
  • Cleocin HCL
  • Cheocin Pediatric
  • Cleocin Phosphate
  • Clindagel
  • ClindaMax
  • Clindesse
  • Clindets
  • Evoclin
  • Alti-Clindamycin
  • Apo-Clindamycin
  • Clindoxyl
  • Novo-Clindamycin
  • Clindazyn
  • Cutaclin
  • Dalacin V
  • Galecin
  • Klyndaken
  • Piperacillin and Tazobactam Sodium
  • Zosyn
  • Tazocin

Latest treatments for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

Hospital statistics for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

  • 0.018% (2,271) of hospital consultant episodes were for salpingitis and oophoritis in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 90% of hospital consultant episodes for salpingitis and oophoritis required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 100% of hospital consultant episodes for salpingitis and oophoritis were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 34% of hospital consultant episodes for salpingitis and oophoritis required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 5 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for salpingitis and oophoritis in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

Hospital & Clinic quality ratings »

Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Medical news summaries about treatments for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

The following medical news items are relevant to treatment of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

Discussion of treatments for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

PID: DSTD (Excerpt)

PID can be cured with antibiotics. If women have pelvic pain and other symptoms caused by PID, it is critical that they seek care immediately. Prompt antibiotic treatment can prevent severe damage to pelvic organs. The longer women delay treatment for PID, the more likely they are to be infertile or to have an ectopic pregnancy in the future because of damage to the tubes. However, antibiotic treatment does not reverse any damage that has already occurred to the reproductive organs.

Because of the difficulty in identifying organisms infecting the internal reproductive organs and because more than one organism may be responsible for an episode of PID, PID is usually treated with at least two antibiotics that are effective against a wide range of infectious agents. These antibiotics can be given by mouth or by vein. The symptoms may go away before the infection is cured. Even if symptoms do go away, women should finish taking all of the medicine. This will help prevent the infection from returning. Women on treatment for PID should be re-evaluated by their health care provider two to three days after starting treatment to be sure the antibiotics are working to cure the infection. In addition, women's sex partners should be treated to decrease the risk of re-infection, even if the partners have no symptoms. Many women with PID have sex partners who have no symptoms, although their sex partners may be infected with the organisms that can cause PID.

About one fourth of women with suspected PID must be hospitalized. Hospitalization may be recommended if the woman is severely ill (e.g., high fever) or pregnant; if she cannot take oral medication and needs intravenous antibiotics; if the diagnosis is uncertain; or in some cases, if she is infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus, the virus that causes AIDS). If symptoms continue or if an abscess does not resolve, surgery may be needed. Complications of PID, such as chronic pelvic pain and scarring are difficult to treat but are sometimes improved with surgery. (Source: excerpt from PID: DSTD)

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID (Excerpt)

Because culture of specimens from the upper genital tract are difficult to obtain and because multiple organisms may be responsible for an episode of PID, especially if it is not the first one, the doctor will prescribe at least two antibiotics that are effective against a wide range of infectious agents. The symptoms may go away before the infection is cured. Even if symptoms do go away, patients should finish taking all of the medicine. Patients should be re-evaluated by their physicians two to three days after treatment is begun to be sure the antibiotics are working to cure the infection.

About one-fourth of women with suspected PID must be hospitalized. The doctor may recommend this if the patient is severely ill; if she cannot take oral medication and needs intravenous antibiotics; if she is pregnant or is an adolescent; if the diagnosis is uncertain and may include an abdominal emergency such as appendicitis; or if she is infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus, the virus that causes AIDS).

Many women with PID have sex partners who have no symptoms, although their sex partners may be infected with organisms that can cause PID. Because of the risk of reinfection, however, sex partners should be treated even if they do not have symptoms.

Consequences of PID

Women with recurrent episodes of PID are more likely than women with a single episode to suffer scarring of the tubes that leads to infertility, tubal pregnancy, or chronic pelvic pain. Infertility occurs in approximately 20 percent of women who have had PID.

Most women with tubal infertility, however, never have had symptoms of PID. Organisms such as C. trachomatis can silently invade the fallopian tubes and cause scarring, which blocks the normal passage of eggs into the uterus.

A women who has had PID has a six-to-tenfold increased risk of tubal pregnancy, in which the egg can become fertilized but cannot pass into the uterus to grow. Instead, the egg usually attaches in the fallopian tube, which connects the ovary to the uterus. The fertilized egg cannot grow normally in the fallopian tube. This type of pregnancy is life-threatening to the mother, and almost always fatal to her fetus. It is the leading cause of pregnancy-related death in African-American women.

In addition, untreated PID can cause chronic pelvic pain and scarring in about 20 percent of patients. These conditions are difficult to treat but are sometimes improved with surgery.

Another complication of PID is the risk of repeated attacks of PID. As many as one-third of women who have had PID will have the disease at least one more time. With each episode of reinfection, the risk of infertility is increased.

Prevention

Women can play an active role in protecting themselves from PID by taking the following steps:

  • Signs of discharge with odor or bleeding between cycles could mean infection. Early treatment may prevent the development of PID.
  • If used correctly and consistently, male latex condoms will prevent transmission of gonorrhea and partially protect against chlamydial infection.

Research

Although much has been learned about the biology of the microbes that cause PID and the ways in which they damage the body, there is still much to learn. Scientists supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are studying the effects of antibiotics, hormones, and substances that boost the immune system. These studies may lead to insights about how to prevent infertility or other complications of PID. Topical microbicides and vaccines to prevent gonorrhea and chlamydial infection also are being developed. Clinical trials are in progress to test a suppository containing lactobacilli the normal bacteria found in the vaginas of healthy women. These bacteria colonize the vagina and may be associated with reduced risk of gonorrhea and bacterial vaginosis, both of which can cause PID.

Rapid, inexpensive, easy-to-use diagnostic tests are being developed to detect chlamydial infection and gonorrhea. A recent study conducted by NIAID-funded researchers demonstrated that screening and treating women who unknowingly had chlamydial infection reduced cases of PID by more than 60 percent. Meanwhile, researchers continue to search for better ways to detect PID itself, particularly in women with "silent" or asymptomatic PID.

(Source: excerpt from Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Because culture specimens from the upper genital tract are difficult to obtain and because multiple organisms are usually responsible for an episode of PID, at least two antibiotics are given so that they will be effective against a wide range of infectious agents. The infection may still be present after the symptoms are gone, so it is important to finish taking all of the medicine, even if symptoms go away. Patients should be re-evaluated by their physician 2 to 3 days after treatment is begun to be sure the antibiotics are working to cure the infection. About one-fourth of women with suspected PID must be hospitalized.

Many women with PID have sex partners who have no symptoms. Because of the risk of reinfection, however, sex partners should be treated. Even if they do not have symptoms, they may be infected with organisms that can cause PID. (Source: excerpt from Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: NWHIC)

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