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Diseases » Peptic Ulcer » Glossary
 

Glossary for Peptic Ulcer

  • Abdominal Pain: A condition which is characterized by the sensation of pain that is located in the abdomen
  • Abdominal conditions: Medical conditions affecting the abdominal region.
  • Abdominal discomfort: The sensation of discomfort located in the abdomen
  • Abdominal pain: A condition which is characterized by the sensation of pain that is located in the abdomen
  • Acute Nonulcer dyspepsia: Sudden acute indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Alendronate -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats and rabbits indicate that the use of Alendronate during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Analgesic syndrome: The use of large quantities of pain-killer drugs can sometimes cause serious kidney damage as well as various other problems.
  • Anemia: Reduced ability of blood to carry oxygen from various possible causes.
  • Angina Pectoris: Variant of Angina Pectoris, where episodic chest pain occurs without exertion or provocation, due to a transient spasm of a coronary artery; more common in women
  • Annular pancreas: An abnormality where a ring of pancreatic tissue forms around the duodenum and can block the flow of food through the digestive system. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of constriction. Partial obstruction may not be detected until adulthood.
  • Behcet's Disease: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Belching: The release of gas from the digestive tract through the mouth.
  • Biliary disorder: Any condition affecting the bile ducts
  • Bismuth subsalicylate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bismuth subsalicylate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Chest pain: Pain in the chest area.
  • Chronic Nonulcer dyspepsia: Chronic indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Chronic digestive diseases: Any disorder causing ongoing chronic digestive complaints.
  • Clarithromycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clarithromycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Cyclosporin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cyclosporin (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diclofenac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diclofenac (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Digestive Diseases: Diseases that affect the digestive system
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Dolobid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dolobid (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Duodenal ulcer: A peptic ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). The word "peptic" refers to pepsin, a stomach enzyme that breaks down proteins. If a peptic ulcer is located in the stomach it is called a gastric ulcer.
  • Epigastric pain: Pain located in the upper and middle region of the abdomen
  • Esophageal ulcer: An ulcer erosion of the mucous membrane located in the esophagus
  • Esophagus diseases: Diseases affecting the esophagus
  • Etodolac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Etodolac (used mainly for arthritis) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Flurbiprofen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flurbiprofen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Food intolerances: Any inability to tolerate particular foods.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Gallstones: Stone-like deposits in the gall bladder.
  • Gastric Ulcer: A gastric ulcer is a break in the normal tissue that lines the stomach.
  • Gastrinoma: Rare tumors secreting the digestive hormone gastrin.
  • Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining
  • Gastrocutaneous syndrome: A arare inherited disorder characterized by peptic ulcers, hiatus hernia, eye abnormalities and skin pigmentation.
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Repeated reflux of stomach acid into the throat.
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding: Internal bleeding in the digestive tract
  • Heartburn: Pain from stomach acid coming back up the esophagus
  • Helicobacter pylori bacteria: A bacteria that can infect the gastrointestinal system
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hyperparathyroidism, familial, primary: A rare genetic disorder where excessive activity of the parathyroid gland causes increased blood calcium levels which can cause various problems.
  • Hyperparathyroidism, primary: A rare genetic disorder where excessive activity of the parathyroid gland causes increased blood calcium levels which can cause various problems.
  • Indigestion: Various eating symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Inflammatory bowel disease: Inflammatory bowel disease refers to digestive symptoms resulting from chronic bowel inflammation. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are two of the main subtypes of the disease. Scientists have discovered an array of genetic mutations which can result in an increased susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. Not all people with the genetic anomaly will develop the condition but it can increase the risk especially if other environmental factors are also present. The severity of the disease that develops is variable.
  • Intestinal obstruction: Blockage in the intestines of the digestive tract.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome: Spasms in the colon wall
  • Ketorolac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ketorolac during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lansoprazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lansoprazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Leukemia, mast-cell: A very aggressive form of leukemia - a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia. The cancer can in rare cases develop from chronic myeloid leukemia or systemic mastocytosis but generally develops on its own.
  • Lodine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lodine (used mainly for arthritis) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mastocytosis: A disorder where excessive amounts of mast cells proliferate in organs such as the skin, liver, bone, spleen and gastrointestinal tract. Mast cells occur in connective tissue and defend the body against disease by releasing histamine to stimulate the immune system.
  • Meal symptoms: Symptoms related to meals.
  • Mefenamic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mefenamic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Melena: Black, tarry stools with an offensive odour caused by an upper gastrointestinal bleed.
  • Mucus membrane conditions: Medical conditions affecting any of the mucus membranes.
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Ménétrier's disease: Rare chronic disease with excessive growth of skin folds in the stomach.
  • Nabumetone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nabumetone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Naproxen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Naproxen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nonulcer dyspepsia: Persistent indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Pain: A feeling of suffering, agony, distress caused by the stimulation of pain fibres in the nervous system
  • Pancreatic adenoma: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Pancreatic cancer: Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas
  • Pancreatitis: Inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Peritonitis: Inflammation of the lining of the abdominal cavity
  • Phenylbutazone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenylbutazone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Piroxicam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Piroxicam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Polycythemia: Excess red blood cells in the blood
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Zalcitabine: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Zalcitabine has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Zalcitabine has been used as an anti-HIV agent although its use for this purpose has been largely discontinued.
  • Prednisolone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Prednisolone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Shock: Severe condition from reduced blood circulation
  • Smoking: The smoking of cigarettes
  • Stomach Conditions: Any condition that affects a persons stomach
  • Stomach cancer: Stomach or gastric cancer can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs
  • Stress: Emotional stress (sometimes refers to physical stress)
  • Sulindac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sulindac during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Tenoxicam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tenoxicam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ulcer: A local defect in the mucosa
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Voltaren -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Voltaren (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: A rare disorder where excessive levels of the hormone gastrin are released into the stomach which increases stomach acidity which results in peptic ulcer development. A hormone secreting pancreatic or duodenal tumor is usually the cause.

 

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