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Types of Pollen allergy

Pollen allergy: Types list

The list of types of Pollen allergy mentioned in various sources includes:

Types discussion:

Among North American plants, weeds are the most prolific producers of allergenic pollen. Ragweed is the major culprit, but others of importance are sagebrush, redroot pigweed, lamb's quarters, Russian thistle (tumbleweed), and English plantain.

Grasses and trees, too, are important sources of allergenic pollens. Although more than 1,000 species of grass grow in North America, only a few produce highly allergenic pollen. These include timothy grass, Kentucky bluegrass, Johnson grass, Bermuda grass, redtop grass, orchard grass, and sweet vernal grass. Trees that produce allergenic pollen include oak, ash, elm, hickory, pecan, box elder, and mountain cedar.

It is common to hear people say that they are allergic to colorful or scented flowers like roses. In fact, only florists, gardeners, and others who have prolonged, close contact with flowers are likely to become sensitized to pollen from these plants. Most people have little contact with the large, heavy, waxy pollen grains of many flowering plants because this type of pollen is not carried by wind but by insects such as butterflies and bees. (Source: excerpt from Something in the Air Airborne Allergens: NIAID)

Pollen allergy: Rare Types

Rare types of medical conditions and diseases in related medical categories:

Pollen allergy: Related Disease Topics

More general medical disease topics related to Pollen allergy include:

Research More About Pollen allergy

 

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