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Symptoms of Post-traumatic stress disorder

Symptoms of Post-traumatic stress disorder

The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Post-traumatic stress disorder includes the 22 symptoms listed below:

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Post-traumatic stress disorder: Symptom Checkers

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Post-traumatic stress disorder: Symptom Assessment Questionnaires

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Post-traumatic stress disorder: Complications

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Do I have Post-traumatic stress disorder?

Post-traumatic stress disorder: Medical Mistakes

Post-traumatic stress disorder: Undiagnosed Conditions

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Home Diagnostic Testing

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Wrongly Diagnosed with Post-traumatic stress disorder?

The list of other diseases or medical conditions that may be on the differential diagnosis list of alternative diagnoses for Post-traumatic stress disorder includes:

Post-traumatic stress disorder: Research Doctors & Specialists

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Other Possible Causes of these Symptoms

Click on any of the symptoms below to see a full list of other causes including diseases, medical conditions, toxins, drug interactions, or drug side effect causes of that symptom.

Article Excerpts About Symptoms of Post-traumatic stress disorder:

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Whatever the source of the problem, some people with PTSD repeatedly relive the trauma in the form of nightmares and disturbing recollections during the day. They may also experience sleep problems, depression, feeling detached or numb, or being easily startled. They may lose interest in things they used to enjoy and have trouble feeling affectionate. They may feel irritable, more aggressive than before, or even violent. Seeing things that remind them of the incident may be very distressing, which could lead them to avoid certain places or situations that bring back those memories. Anniversaries of the event are often very difficult. (Source: excerpt from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NWHIC)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Symptoms may be mild or severe -- people may become easily irritated or have violent outbursts. In severe cases, they may have trouble working or socializing. In general, the symptoms seem to be worse if the event that triggered them was initiated by a person -- such as a rape, as opposed to a flood. (Source: excerpt from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NWHIC)

Stress: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Many people with PTSD repeatedly re-experience the ordeal in the form of flashback episodes, memories, nightmares, or frightening thoughts, especially when they are exposed to events or objects that remind them of the trauma.  Anniversaries of the event can also trigger symptoms. People with PTSD also experience emotional numbness and sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety, and irritability or outbursts of anger. Feelings of intense guilt (called survivor guilt) are also common, particularly if others did not survive the traumatic event. (Source: excerpt from Stress: NWHIC)

Anxiety Disorders: NIMH (Excerpt)

The disturbing thoughts or images are called obsessions, and the rituals that are performed to try to prevent or get rid of them are called compulsions. There is no pleasure in carrying out the rituals you are drawn to, only temporary relief from the anxiety that grows when you don't perform them. (Source: excerpt from Anxiety Disorders: NIMH)

Anxiety Disorders: NIMH (Excerpt)

"I was raped when I was 25 years old. For a long time, I spoke about the rape as though it was something that happened to someone else. I was very aware that it had happened to me, but there was just no feeling.

"Then I started having flashbacks. They kind of came over me like a splash of water. I would be terrified. Suddenly I was reliving the rape. Every instant was startling. I wasn't aware of anything around me, I was in a bubble, just kind of floating. And it was scary. Having a flashback can wring you out.

"The rape happened the week before Thanksgiving, and I can't believe the anxiety and fear I feel every year around the anniversary date. It's as though I've seen a werewolf. I can't relax, can't sleep, don't want to be with anyone. I wonder whether I'll ever be free of this terrible problem." (Source: excerpt from Anxiety Disorders: NIMH)

Anxiety Disorders: NIMH (Excerpt)

Ordinary events can serve as reminders of the trauma and trigger flashbacks or intrusive images. A person having a flashback, which can come in the form of images, sounds, smells, or feelings, may lose touch with reality and believe that the traumatic event is happening all over again. (Source: excerpt from Anxiety Disorders: NIMH)

Facts about Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

Many people with PTSD repeatedly re-experience the ordeal in the form of flashback episodes, memories, nightmares, or frightening thoughts, especially when they are exposed to events or objects reminiscent of the trauma. Anniversaries of the event can also trigger symptoms. People with PTSD also experience emotional numbness and sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety, and irritability or outbursts of anger. Feelings of intense guilt are also common. Most people with PTSD try to avoid any reminders or thoughts of the ordeal. PTSD is diagnosed when symptoms last more than 1 month. (Source: excerpt from Facts about Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NIMH)

Facts about Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

Headaches, gastrointestinal complaints, immune system problems, dizziness, chest pain, or discomfort in other parts of the body are common. Often, doctors treat the symptoms without being aware that they stem from PTSD. NIMH encourages primary care providers to ask patients about experiences with violence, recent losses, and traumatic events, especially if symptoms keep recurring. When PTSD is diagnosed, referral to a mental health professional who has had experience treating people with the disorder is recommended. (Source: excerpt from Facts about Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NIMH)

Post-traumatic stress disorder: Onset and Incubation

Incubation period for Post-traumatic stress disorder: less than 3 months

Incubation period for Post-traumatic stress disorder: Symptoms typically begin within 3 months of a traumatic event, although occasionally they do not begin until years later. Once PTSD occurs, the severity and duration of the illness varies. Some people recover within 6 months, while others suffer much longer. (Source: excerpt from Facts about Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: NIMH)

Medical articles and books on symptoms:

These general reference articles may be of interest in relation to medical signs and symptoms of disease in general:

About signs and symptoms of Post-traumatic stress disorder:

The symptom information on this page attempts to provide a list of some possible signs and symptoms of Post-traumatic stress disorder. This signs and symptoms information for Post-traumatic stress disorder has been gathered from various sources, may not be fully accurate, and may not be the full list of Post-traumatic stress disorder signs or Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. Furthermore, signs and symptoms of Post-traumatic stress disorder may vary on an individual basis for each patient. Only your doctor can provide adequate diagnosis of any signs or symptoms and whether they are indeed Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms.

 

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