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Diseases » Rheumatic conditions » Glossary
 

Glossary for Rheumatic conditions

  • Aase Smith syndrome: A rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as cleft palate, joint contractures and hypoplastic anemia.
  • Aase Syndrome: A genetic condition which results in anaemia and some skeletal and joint deformities
  • Aase-Smith I syndrome: A very rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as joint contractures, anemia, hydrocephalus and cleft palate.
  • Absent patella: A rare genetic malformation where the kneecap is absent or reduced.
  • Absent patellae -- scrotal hypoplasia -- renal anomalies -- facial dysmorphism -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by absent kneecaps, underdeveloped scrotum, kidney anomalies, unusual facial appearance and mental retardation.
  • Ackerman Dermatitis Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of skin and joint symptoms. It is characterized by arthritis preceded by a skin rash (interstitial granulomatous dermatitis) which can vary in appearance from person to person. The condition tends to go through periods of flares and remission.
  • Acroosteolysis dominant type: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by breakdown of bone especially in the ends of the fingers and toes.
  • Acute gout: An acute condition which is caused by a disorder of purine or pyrimidine metabolism resulting in inflammatory arthritis
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adult onset Still's disease: A form of Still's disease that has a later onset and involves arthralgia or arthritis and a characteristic rash that often appears during periods of temperature increase.
  • Alopecia-contractures-dwarfism-mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by mental retardation, short stature, lack of hair and contractures.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Amyoplasia: A rare condition characterized by congenital joint stiffness.
  • Amyoplasia congenital disruptive sequence: A rare genetic disorder characterized by congenital contractures of two or more different joints.
  • Amyotonia congenita: A term used to describe conditions involving poor muscle tone that occurs from birth.
  • Aniridia -- absent patella: A rare genetic condition characterized by an abnormal or missing kneecap as well as the absence of the iris of the eye.
  • Ankle Arthritis: Inflammation of the ankle joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Ankle Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the ankle joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Ankle clonus: A rhythmical contraction of the calf muscles following a of sudden dorsiflexion of the leg being semiflexed.
  • Ankle conditions: Conditions that affect the ankle
  • Ankle defects short stature: A rare disorder characterized mainly by ankle defects and short stature
  • Ankle injuries: Injury to the ankle
  • Ankle sprain: Damage to the ankle ligaments.
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: Inflammation of spinal joints similar to rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Ankylosing spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints. The spine becomes progressively painful and stiff and the spine joints may eventually fuse and cause disability. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Inflammation can affect other joints and tissues.
  • Ankylosis: Fusion of bones in a joint
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Antithyroid arthritis syndrome: Arthritis caused by using antithyroid drugs to treat hyperthyroidism.
  • Aortic dilatation- joint hypermobility- arterial tortuosity: A rare syndrome characterized by the dilation of the aortic root, hyperextensible joints and varicose veins
  • Arterial tortuosity syndrome: A rare disorder which affects the connective tissue that makes up blood vessels resulting in various arterial abnormalities. Connective tissue abnormalities also affect the skin and joints.
  • Arthralgia -- purpura -- weakness syndrome: A rare autoimmune disorder characterized mainly by weakness, joint pain, reddish or purplish skin discolorations and a blood abnormality where cryoglobulins in the blood precipitate at low temperatures.
  • Arthralgia similar to that in rheumatoid arthritis: Pain in the joints similar to that of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Arthritis: General name for any type of joint inflammation, but often means age-related osteoarthritis.
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthritis pain: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement.
  • Arthritis, Gouty: Joint pain and inflammation (arthritis) caused by gout (buildup of urate crystals). The big toe is most commonly affected but other joints may also be affected e.g. foot, ankle, elbow, wrist, knee and fingers. Usually only one joint is affected at a time. The condition is most often seen in older men.
  • Arthritis-related enthesitis: Inflammation of the entheses due to arthritis. The enthuses is the site at which the tendon or ligament attaches to the bone.
  • Arthrogryposis: A rare congenital disorder characterized by reduced mobility of joints due to the build up of fibrous tissue in the joint.
  • Arthrogryposis -- epileptic seizures -- migrational brain disorder: A rare disorder characterized by congenital joint contractures, epileptic seizures and brain development abnormalities. It can be caused by fetal exposure to alcohol or chemical products.
  • Arthrogryposis -- hyperkeratosis, lethal form:
  • Arthrogryposis -- ophthalmoplegia -- retinopathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the hands and feet as well as eye problems.
  • Arthrogryposis -- renal dysfunction -- cholestasis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, kidney dysfunction and liver problems.
  • Arthrogryposis -- spinal muscular atrophy: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Joint contractures are also present at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis Distal: A form of arthrygryposis (congenital contractures) which tends to affect mainly the distal parts of limbs (hands and feet). The degree of limb involvement is variable.
  • Arthrogryposis IUGR thoracic dystrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital joint contractures, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and ribcage abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita neurogenic type: A rare non-progressive syndrome characterized by congenital contractures that originates from a nerve problem (spinal motor neuron depletion).
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, distal type 1: A form of arthrygryposis (congenital contractures) which tends to affect mainly the distal parts of limbs (hands and feet). The degree of limb involvement is variable.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, distal, X-linked: A rare condition characterized by the presence of contractures at birth as well as various other anomalies. The condition is X-linked.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex with deafness, inguinal hernias, and early death: A rare syndrome characterized multiple joint contractures throughout the body, deafness, inguinal hernias and death usually within months of birth.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2A: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that involves additional symptoms such as facial and spinal anomalies.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis-like disorder: A rare disorder characterized by joint contractures of the knees and ankles resulting in wasting or overgrowth of nearby muscles.
  • Arthrogryposis-like hand anomaly -- sensorineural deafness: A rare disorder characterized by hand contractures and deafness.
  • Arthropathy, Neurogenic: Joint destruction caused by damage to the nervous system which prevents the patient feeling sensations in the joint. Due to the nerve damage, pain and damage to the joint often goes unnoticed as the joint deteriorates even further. The knee and ankle are the most common joints affected. The condition is usually caused by an underlying diseases which affects the nerves e.g. diabetic neuropathy, syringomyelia, spinal cord injury and pernicious anemia.
  • Arthropathy, progressive pseudorheumatoid, of childhood: A form of progressive rheumatoid arthritis that affects children.
  • Arthrosis: A joint
  • Aural atresia -- multiple congenital anomalies -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by a number of malformations as well as mental retardation.
  • Avascular necrosis: Bone death from lack of circulation.
  • Avascular necrosis of femoral head, familial form: A familial hip joint disorder where bone growth abnormalities caused by an interrupted blood supply to the head of the femoral bone results in it's degeneration and deformity. When the body creates a new blood supply, new healthy bone can be formed.
  • Banki syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal curvature of fingers, thin middle sections of long bones, fusion of certain wrist bones (lunate and cuneiform bones) and other hand abnormalities.
  • Baraitser burn fixen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, a skin disorder and an expressionless face.
  • Bartonellosis: An infectious disease caused by Bartonella bacilliforms and transmitted by sandflies. It causes fever, anemia and a skin rash.
  • Beals syndrome: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by joint contractures, arachnodactyly and a crumpled appearing ear.
  • Behcet's Disease: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bone conditions: Conditions that affect the bones
  • Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome: An illness that sometimes occurs in people with gastrointestinal diseases. It is believed to be caused by a build up of bacteria in a pouch in the bowel which triggers the immune system into action.
  • Boylan-Dew-Greco syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by insufficient myelination of peripheral nerves and contractures at birth. The myelin sheath is a protective coating around nerves.
  • Brachydactylous dwarfism, Mseleni type: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by progressive joint disease, short stature and short fingers and toes. The joint disease affects mainly the hips, knees, ankles and spine. The condition can eventually lead to disability and hip and/or knee replacements in serious cases.
  • Brachydactyly -- elbow, wrist dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized by elbow and wrist abnormalities and short end bones of fingers.
  • Brachydactyly -- scoliosis -- carpal fusion: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short fingers and toes, scoliosis (curved spine) and fused hand bones.
  • Brodie knee: Chronic inflammation of the knee joint.
  • Bruck syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by weak, brittle bones and abnormal knee, ankle and foot joints (congenital contractures) at birth. There are two different subtypes of the disorder, each with a different genetic defect origin.
  • Bruck syndrome 1: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by weak, brittle bones and abnormal knee, ankle and foot joints (congenital contractures) at birth.
  • Bruck syndrome, 2: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by limited joint extension (congenital contractures), weak fragile bones and webbed skin at elbows and knees.
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei: Gram negative, aerobic, motile rod shaped bacterium.
  • Bursitis: Inflammation of one or more bursae (small sacs) of synovial fluid in the body.
  • C Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a triangular-shaped head, facial anomalies, joint contractures and loose skin.
  • C-like syndrome: A rare disorder involving poor fetal growth, limb and facial defects and severe developmental delay.
  • CAMFAK syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, small head, failure to thrive and spinal curvature.
  • Camptobrachydactyly: A rare hand and foot abnormality where the fingers and toes are unusually short and the first part of the fingers or toes are held in a fixed contracted position.
  • Camptodactyly -- joint contractures and facial skeletal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint contractures, drooping eyelids, spinal curvature and permanently bent fingers (camptodactyly).
  • Camurat-Engelmann disease, type 2: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities including waddling gait, muscle weakness, knee and hip contractures, delayed puberty and leg pain.
  • Camurati Engelmann disease, type 2: A rare disorder (described in two patients) which has similar symptoms to the genetic condition called Camurati Engelmann disease but the genetic defect responsible for type 1 is not present in type 2. Type 2 has additional bone abnormalities which were noted on radiographs. Patients tend to suffer flare-ups of their condition which is accompanied by severe pain which may leave the patient incapacitated. Flare-ups can be triggered or made worse by stress, exhaustion, exercise, growth spurts, standing too long, walking too long, infection, illness, injury, surgery, cold weather and sudden changes in air pressure.
  • Carnevale-Canun-Mendoza syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by loss of bone tissue in the wrists and ankles as well as kidney problems.
  • Carpal Fusion: A medical term for the abnormal fusion of two or more carpal bones to make a single bone. The carpal bones are the bones that make up the wrist bones.
  • Carpal Synostosis: A medical term for the abnormal fusion of two or more carpal bones to make a single bone. The carpal bones are the bones that make up the wrist bones.
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Hand or wrist problems; often from repetitive motion.
  • Carpal deformity -- micrognathia -- microstomia: A very rare syndrome characterized by wrist bone defects, a small jaw and a small mouth.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome pain: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), or median neuropathy at the wrist, is a medical condition in which the median nerve is compressed at the wrist, leading to paresthesias, numbness and muscle weakness in the hand.
  • Carpotarsal osteochondromatosis: A rare disorder characterized by a painless swelling in the ankles and wrists which restricts their range of motion. The swelling is caused by abnormal growths on the wrist and ankle bones. The number of joints involved is variable.
  • Cartilage-hair hypoplasia-like syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by thin hair shafts, short stature, short limbs and other skeletal abnormalities. The condition is identical to the skeletal abnormality component of cartilage-hair hypoplasia syndrome.
  • Cartilaginous -- arthritic -- ophthalmic -- deafness syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of eye, joint and cartilage disease as well as deafness.
  • Castellani syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by fever, arthritis and enlarged kidney and liver. The fever may fluctuate or come and go. It is most often seen in middle aged males.
  • Cervenka's syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by joint and facial abnormalities as well as nearsightedness and degenerative eye problems.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 1: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 2: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis due to apatite crystal deposition: A rare inherited disorder involving calcium pyrophosphate deposits in cartilage, joint fluid and tissues around joints.
  • Chondrocalcinosis familial articular: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondromalacia: Degeneration or irritation of joint cartilage that usually affects the knees. It is believed to be caused most often by overuse of the joint.
  • Christian's syndrome 1: A rare recessively inherited syndrome characterized by premature skull fusion, cleft palate, permanently flexed fingers and various other anomalies.
  • Chronic Joint pain: It is inflammation and infection of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement..
  • Collins-Dennis-Clarke-Pope Syndrome: A very rare condition characterized by congenital hip dislocation, flattened facial appearance and congenital heart defects.
  • Collins-Pope syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by a dislocated hip, increased finger flexibility and facial anomalies.
  • Congenital SMA with arthrogryposis: Type of SMA (genetic motor neuron disease) appearing from birth
  • Congenital articular rigidity: A rare disorder where one or more joints are fixed which affects the ability to move limbs. The joint may be completely fixed or may have some movement.
  • Congenital contractures: A muscle condition present from birth where the muscles are abnormally contracted or short. One or more muscles may be involved and the degree of involvement of the individual muscle may vary.
  • Congenital dislocation of the patella: Dislocation of the kneecap at birth.
  • Congenital hip dislocation: Dislocation of the hip in newborns
  • Connective tissue dysplasia, Spellacy type: A very rare syndrome caused by an inherited collagen disorder and characterized by skin abnormalities, skeletal and eye anomalies and joint problems.
  • Contact dermatitis -like behind-knee rash: Contact dermatitis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Contractures -- ectodermal dysplasia -- cleft lip palate: A very rare syndrome characterized by impaired joint mobility at birth, skin problems, cleft lip or palate and growth and psychomotor retardation.
  • Contractures hyperkeratosis lethal: A rare fatal congenital syndrome where numerous abnormalities arise from reduced fetal movement due to excessively tight skin.
  • Contractures, congenital, torticollis and malignant hyperthermia: A very rare syndrome characterized by contractures, torticollis and a hyperthermic reaction to general anesthetics.
  • Cranio osteoarthropathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by large fontanelles, joint problems and finger clubbing.
  • Craniofacial dysostosis -- arthrogryposis -- progeroid appearence: A very rare syndrome characterized usually caused by fetal exposure to the cytomegalovirus and resulting in features such as short stature, mental retardation, joint movement problems and facial anomalies.
  • Craniosynostosis arthrogryposis cleft palate: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of craniosynostosis (premature fusion of skull bones), cleft palate and arthrogryposis.
  • Craniosynostosis cleft lip palate arthrogryposis: A rare condition characterized mainly by the association of premature fusion of skull bones (craniosynostosis), cleft lip and/or palate and arthrogryposis.
  • Craniosynostosis contractures cleft: A rare condition characterized by the association of premature fusion of skull bones (craniosynostosis), contractures and oral clefting.
  • Crawfurd syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by an absent or small spleen, abnormal kidney development and cysts in the liver, kidneys and pancreas.
  • Cushing's symphalangism: A rare syndrome characterized by deafness and the fusion of joints in the middle of fingers and toes as well as fusion of hand and foot bones.
  • Cutis laxa, recessive type 2: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by loose skin and delayed development.
  • Daish-Hardman-Lamont syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by loose joints, tall stature and buildup of fluid inside the skull.
  • Davenport-Donlan syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, white hair, contractures and papillomas.
  • Decreased ankle and knee reflexes: deep tendon reflexes are tonic contraction of the muscles in response to a stretching force, due to stimulation of muscle proprioceptors. Also called myotatic reflex, these may decrease in certain conditions
  • Degos II: A rare condition characterized by the presence at birth of fixed red thickened plaques on skin over joints.
  • Dendrolimiasis: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Desbuquois dysplasia-like syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by various anomalies similar to Desbuquois syndrome but there is no mental retardation, hand abnormalities or facial anomalies involved.
  • Dialysis-related amyloidosis: Amyloidosis (protein deposits) from kidney dialysis treatment.
  • Diastrophic dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature as well as skeletal, spine and ear abnormalities.
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: A form of degenerative arthritis characterized by calcification on the sides of the spine vertebrae as well as inflammation and calcification of tendons where they attach to bone which often results in bone spurs.
  • Digital arthropathy-brachydactyly, familial: A rare familial disorder characterized by progressive joint disease causing shortening of the end two bones of the fingers and toes. The hands tend to be more affected than the feet.
  • Dislocated elbow: Dislocation of the elbow joint
  • Dislocated jaw: Improper separation of the jaw bones
  • Dislocation: Bone dislocated from a joint
  • Distal arthrogryposis syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by congenital contractures and other physical defects.
  • Distal arthrogryposis, Moore-Weaver type: A rare disorder characterized mainly by clenched fists, permanent flexion of toes and fingers and head and facial abnormalities.
  • Dwarfism -- stiff joint -- ocular abnormalities: A very rare form of dwarfism characterized by short stature as well as stiff joints and eye abnormalities.
  • Dwarfism -- syndesmodysplasic: A very rare form of dwarfism involving extremely short stature and progressive joint stiffness.
  • Ear, patella, short stature syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder abnormalities of the inner and outer ear structures, missing kneecap and short stature as well as other physical and developmental abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- arthrogryposis -- diabetes mellitus: A rare syndrome characterized by diabetes, short stature and tooth, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Edwards-Gale Syndrome: A rare hand and foot abnormality where the fingers and toes are unusually short and the first part of the fingers or toes are held in a fixed contracted position.
  • Ehlers Danlos syndrome type 4, autosomal dominant: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by delicate skin, fragile blood vessels, distinctive facial features and minimal joint problems - previously known as EDS type 4.
  • Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Dysfibronectinemic type: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A group of inherited connective tissue disorders primarily involving the joints and skin. There are 11 disorders in the group.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type I: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible joints, hyperextensible skin and poor wound healing.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by tenascin-X deficiency: A rare genetic disorder which is similar to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and involves a deficiency of tenascin-X which affects connective tissue. The main symptoms are loose joints, partially dislocated joints and fragile, hyperextensible skin.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type 3: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type 4: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by small joint hypermobility, easy bruising and characteristic facial appearance - a vascular or ecchymotic form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, hyperextensible skin and poor wound healing - a milder form of Type 1 with hypermobility limited to hands and feet.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by small joint hypermobility, easy bruising and characteristic facial appearance - a vascular or ecchymotic form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IX: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder involving a defective copper metabolism and characterized by mildly hyperextensible skin, lax joints, bladder problems and chronic diarrhea.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type V: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility, moderate joint hypermobility and moderate vascular fragility.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, scoliosis and fragile sclera of the eye - Ehlers Danlos type with predominant ocular abnormalities.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, hyperextensible skin and joint dislocations.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type X: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with Platelet Dysfunction from Fibronectin Abnormality: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with periventricular heterotopia: The association of a brain malformation (periventricular nodular heterotopia) with a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, 6B: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, scoliosis and fragile sclera of the eye - Ehlers Danlos type with predominant ocular abnormalities but lysyl-hydroxylase activity is normal1.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Beasley Cohen type: A rare condition where mental retardation, deafness and cataracts are associated with a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, VIIB: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible and fragile skin and hypermobile joints which leads to dislocations, osteoarthritis and fractures. Type 7B is milder than type 7A and is caused by a defect on the COL1A2 gene.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, X-linked: A rare developmental brain abnormality. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome Xq28.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, arthrochalasic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible and fragile skin and hypermobile joints which leads to dislocations, osteoarthritis and fractures - previously known as EDS types 7A and 7B.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cardiac valvular form: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility - a combination of ED types I and II.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, dermatosparaxis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility hypermobile joints and fragile skin which loses its elasticity - previously known as EDS type 7C.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, dermatospraxis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility hypermobile joints and fragile skin which loses its elasticity - previously known as EDS type 7C.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobile type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and smooth hyperextensible skin as well as joint pain and discolations.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, hyperextensible skin and - previously known as EDS type 3.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliosis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder caused by deficiency of the lysyl hydroxylase enzyme and is characterized by progressive scoliosis and muscle weakness and fragile sclera - previously known as EDS type 6.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, progeroid form: A connective tissue disorder caused by an enzyme (xylosylprotein 4-beta-galactosyl transferase) deficiency.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, tenascin-X deficiency: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by delicate skin, fragile blood vessels, distinctive facial features and minimal joint problems - previously known as EDS type 4.
  • Ehlers-Danlos, syndrome, periodontitis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Elbow Arthritis: Inflammation of the elbow joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Elbow Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the elbow joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Elbow conditions: Conditions that affect the elbow
  • Elbow injury: An injury that affects the elbow
  • Elbow sprain: Damage to ligaments in the elbow.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy:
  • Eng Strom syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by short stature and episodes of locked finger joints.
  • Enthesopathy: A disease process occurring at locations where tendons and ligaments attach to bone.
  • Eosinophilic synovitis: Inflammation of the lining of joints due to the presence of excessive eosinophils. Eosinophils can build up in parts of the body as a response to a variety of conditions such as allergy, parasitic infections and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Epicondylitis: Elbow injury from repeated movements.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. There are 6 different subtypes of the disease, with each caused by a mutation in a different gene.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 1: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. It is caused by a defect in the gene for COMP which is a cartilage protein.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 2: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. It is caused by a defect in the COL9A2 gene.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 3: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. The knees and ankles are usually the most affected joints. Mild weakness of muscles in the upper arms and legs was also sometimes present. It is believed to be caused by a defect in the COL9A3 gene.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 4: An inherited bone and cartilage disorder which is usually mild enough to go undiagnosed.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 5: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. The hips and knees were the main joints involved. It is caused by defects in the gene for matrilin-3 (MATN3).
  • Facet syndrome: An irritation, sprain or strain involving the vertebral joints of the spine. The exact symptoms may vary depending on the part of the spine involved. The condition most often results osteoarthritis, degenerative disc disease or injury.
  • Facial dysmorphism -- intellectual deficit -- short stature -- hearing loss: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by retarded growth, mental retardation, bone abnormalities and distinctive facial features.
  • Facial dysmorphism -- shawl scrotum -- joint laxity syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by loose joints, facial anomalies and a shawl scrotum.
  • Facies unusual arthrogryposis advanced skeletal malformations: A very rare fatal malformation characterized by an unusual facial appearance, arthrogryposis, advanced bone age of the hips and abnormal X-rays of the skeleton.
  • Faciocardiorenal syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a variety of abnormalities such as kidney anomaly, mental retardation, unusual facial features, heart problems and joint problems. Infant death or stillbirth may occur in some cases.
  • Familial Articular Chondrocalcinosis: An hereditary condition affecting the joints with the formation of calcium pyrophosphate
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial Mediterranean fever: A rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent fever and inflammation. The inflammation usually involves the stomach, lungs or joints.
  • Familial hematuria, autosomal dominant -- retinal arteriolar tortuosity -- contractures: A rare inherited disorder characterized by blood in the urine, contractures and retinal anomalies.
  • Familial patella aplasia-hypoplasia: A rare inherited malformation where the kneecap is absent or underdeveloped.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Felty Syndrome: A rare complication of long-term rheumatoid arthritis which involves an enlarged spleen and blood abnormalities.
  • Fibromyalgia: A difficult to diagnose condition affecting the muscles and/or joints
  • Fibronectin-Deficient EDS: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Finger Arthritis: Inflammation of the finger joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Finger osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the finger joints as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Forestier's disease: A rare disorder involving by bony growths that can occur various parts of the skeleton.
  • Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal development of the skeleton and muscles.
  • Frints -- De Smet -- Fabry -- Fryns syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a variation of Larsen syndrome where the physical manifestations are asymmetrical. This is believed to be a mosaic form of the genetic condition where the genetic anomaly is present in only some of the body's cells leading to asymmetric manifestations.
  • Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, skeletal abnormalities, hearing problems and wasting of arm and leg muscles.
  • Froster-Iskenius-Waterson syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by multiple joint contractures at birth, hyperthermia and twisting of neck muscles.
  • Frozen Shoulder: Frozen shoulder, or adhesive capsulitis, is a condition that causes restriction of motion in the shoulder joint.
  • GEMSS syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by stiff joints, short stature, glaucoma and a dislocated eye lens.
  • Geleophysic dwarfism: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a happy facial expression, short stature and limb abnormalities.
  • Glaucoma ectopia microspherophakia stiff joints short stature: A rare, dominantly inherited syndrome characterized mainly by stiff joints, short stature, glaucoma and a dislocated eye lens.
  • Glycogen Storage Disease Type I: An inherited metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase prevents glycogen being turned into glucose leading to a buildup of glycogen in the liver and kidneys. Most problems tend to develop during adulthood.
  • Golfer's elbow: Elbow and forearm disorder from repeated motions
  • Gout: Painful joints, most commonly the big toe.
  • Gram's syndrome: A postmenopausal syndrome involving high blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis of the knee and the development of multiple lipomas.
  • Granulomatous arthritis of childhood: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Guizar-Vasquez-Sanchez-Manzano syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by loose joints, chest deformity and unusual facial appearance.
  • Hairy elbows: A rare condition where the elbows become progressively hairy until about 5 years of age and then slowly disappears. Short stature appears to be associated in the some of the few cases reported.
  • Hairy elbows syndrome: A familial anomaly involving excess hair growth in the elbow area.
  • Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by early tooth loss, relaxed joints, small stature and bone abnormalities.
  • Hallux limitus: The early stages of toe stiffness due to degenerative arthritis of the base of the big toe. As the condition progresses and the toe becomes totally immobile and the condition is then called hallux rigidus.
  • Hecht syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the inability to open the mouth due to short muscles as well as hand movement abnormalities also due to shortened muscles.
  • Hemochromatosis: Excess of iron leading to problems with joints, liver, heart and pancreas.
  • Hemophilic arthropathy: Joint destruction associated with hemophilia. The knees, ankles, elbows, hip and shoulders are the most common joints involved. Symptoms are progressive and often surgical intervention is required to prevent total loss of joint function.
  • Hereditary inclusion body myopathy -- joint contractures -- ophthalmoplegia: A very rare, dominantly inherited genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures at birth and ophthalmoplegia. Muscle function problems usually don't start until the 4th or 5th decade of life.
  • Herrmann Opitz arthrogryposis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by contractures, skeletal abnormalities and short stature.
  • Hip Arthritis: Inflammation of the hip joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Hip Replacement: The replacement of a hip with an synthetic joint
  • Hip conditions: Any condition that affects the hip
  • Hip dislocation:
  • Hip dysplasia: A dislocation of the hip at birth or a hip joint that dislocates easily.
  • Hip dysplasia -- enchondromata -- ecchondromata: A very rare condition characterized by pelvic anomalies and multiple bone tumors.
  • Hip dysplasia, Beukes type: A very rare inherited disease characterized by premature degeneration of the hip joints.
  • Hip luxation: Hip dislocation - the ball of the hip joint comes out of the socket.
  • Hip osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the hip joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Hip subluxation: Partial dislocation of the hip - the ball of the hip joint is only partially in the socket.
  • Hoon-Hall syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by dislocated joints and various other skeletal abnormalities.
  • Humeroradial synostosis syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by fusion of the humerus (upper arm) and radial (lower arm) bones as well as other anomalies.
  • Hunter-Carpenter-Macdonald syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by various abnormalities including small head, facial anomalies, mental retardation and hair, skin and nail anomalies. Fetal exposure to alcohol is believed to be a factor in the syndrome.
  • Hyalinosis, infantile systemic: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal deposits of hyaline throughout various body tissues. Manifestations include progressive joint contractures, skin abnormalities and pain.
  • Hydrocephaly tall stature joint laxity: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by the association of excessive fluid in the skull (hydrocephaly), tall stature and loose joints. Various other anomalies may also be present.
  • Hydrocephaly tall stature joint laxity and kyphoscoliosis: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by the association of excessive fluid in the skull (hydrocephaly), tall stature, loose joints and kyphoscoliosis. Various other anomalies may also be present.
  • Hyperextensible joints: Hyperextensible joints are joints that can extend farther in a larger range of motion than average.
  • Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis: A rare condition characterized by the presence of recurring urticarial vasculitis, arthralgia or arthritis and hypocomplementemia. Hypocomplementemia involves a reduction or absence of blood complement which is a part of the body's immune system which destroying invading bacteria or other pathogens.
  • Hypodontia and Dupuytren contracture: A rare syndrome characterized by missing teeth and Dupuytren contracture which is a hand condition where fingers bend in towards the hand and are unable to be fully straightened.
  • Hypomyelination neuropathy -- arthrogryposis: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by insufficient myelination of peripheral nerves and contractures at birth. The myelin sheath is a protective coating around nerves.
  • I cell disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the harmful accumulation of chemicals (glycoproteins and glycoplipids) due to the deficiency of an enzyme (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-I-phosphotransferase).
  • Iida-Kannari syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by joint contractures, scoliosis, cleft palate, abnormal ears and premature fusion of skull bones.
  • Illum syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by a distinctive "whistling face" and contractures in multiple joints.
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Infectious arthritis: A rare condition where arthritis occurs as a result of joint infection by a bacteria, virus or fungus. Symptoms vary according to the infection type.
  • Ischiogluteal Bursitis: Ischiogluteal bursitis refers to damage and inflammation to the bursa (small fluid filled sac) between the hamstring tendon and the pelvic bone. The main symptoms is pain and it can occur from excessive force, repetitive actions or prolonged pressure during activities such as sitting, running, kicking, climbing and jumping.
  • Jaffe-Lichtenstein-Sutro syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by pain and limited movement in one or more large joints such as the knee.
  • Jaffer-Beighton syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by loose joints, slipped vertebrae and long, thin fingers.
  • Jansen type metaphyseal chondrodysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by extremely short stature, unusual face and skeletal and joint abnormalities.
  • Johnston Aarons Schelley syndrome: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by contractures and thickened skin.
  • Joint clicking: A clicking sound that occurs during movement of a joint. Virtually any joint in the body may be affected. It is quite common and in most cases it is normal and poses no problems and in fact most people can deliberately produce a clicking sound in various joints such as the neck, hips, fingers and toes. People with loose joints tend to have a higher incidence of clicking joints. Injury to the joint and old age may also increase the likelihood of clicking joints. If pain and inflammation are associated with the clicking joint then it is a good idea to seek medical advice as it could be a result of such things as damage to the the joint cartilage or ligaments.
  • Joint injury: An injury to any joint in the body. The larger limb joints tend to be the most utilized and are hence more prone to injuries. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and location of injury and often the primary symptom is pain. A joint injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint injury -- ankle: An injury to the ankle which is the joint between the foot and lower leg. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. An ankle injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint injury -- elbow: An injury to the elbow which is the joint between the upper and lower arm. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. An elbow injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint injury -- hip: An injury to the knee which is the joint at the uppermost part of the leg. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. A hip injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint injury -- knee: An injury to the knee which is the joint between the upper and lower leg. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. A knee injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint injury -- wrist: An injury to the wrist which is the joint between the hand and lower leg. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. A wrist injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint laxity, familial: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by loose joints. Joint dislocations tend to occur mainly in the shoulders, hips and kneecap.
  • Joint pain: Pain affecting the joints
  • Joint swelling: One or more swollen joints
  • Jorgenson-Lenz syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by joint problems, mental retardation and various eye and other anomalies.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Chronic arthritis affecting children and teens
  • Juvenile gout: Gout that occurs in children as a result of kidney disease caused by a genetic defect.
  • Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis: A rare inherited disease involving tumor-like deposits of a substance called hyaline in body tissues such as skin, gums, joints and bones. Hyalin is a collagen-like substance made by cells in the connective tissue.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, unclassified: A chronic inflammatory joint condition affecting children. This particular subtype is defined as unclassified as it doesn't fit into any of the other classifications.
  • Kantaputra-Gorlin syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by fusion of bones in the wrists and ankles as well as other bone development abnormalities in the limbs.
  • Kashin-Bek disease: A disease involving progressive joint degeneration which affects the spine and hands and feet. The condition becomes progressively worse and eventually leads to disability. The condition is most often seen in children who live in the northern parts of China, Siberia and Korea. A possible cause is believed to be eating cereals contaminated with a fungus called Sporotrichella.
  • Kienbock disease: A condition where interruption of the blood flow to the lunate bone (often due to wrist inflammation or injury) in the wrist damages it and impairs wrist movement.
  • Knee arthritis: Inflammation of the knee joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Knee conditions: Any condition that affects the knee
  • Knee injury: Any injury that occurs to the knee
  • Knee osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the knee joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Knee sprain: Damage to ligaments in the knee.
  • Knee tendinitis: Inflammation of the tendons of the knee joint.
  • Kniest dysplasia: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by dwarfism, enlarged joints and facial deformities.
  • Knock knees: Knees that touch
  • Koussef nichols syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems, a high body temperature and various other physical abnormalities.
  • Laband Syndrome:
  • Laplane-Fontaine-Lagardere syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by very short stature and progressive stiffness of joints including the spine and hips.
  • Larsen syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple joint dislocation, a flat face and short fingernails.
  • Larsen syndrome, dominant type: A congenital, genetic disorder characterized by many abnormalities including joint dislocations, bone abnormalities and an unusual dish-shaped face. The dominant form tends to have less severe dwarfism and more severe flattening of the face and is less likely to include webbed fingers, cleft palate and genital anomalies than the recessive form.
  • Larsen syndrome, recessive type: A congenital, genetic disorder characterized by many abnormalities including joint dislocations, bone abnormalities and an unusual face.
  • Larsen-like osseous dysplasia -- dwarfism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by bone abnormalities, joint dislocations, unusual facial appearance and dwarfism.
  • Larsen-like syndrome, lethal form: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by joint dislocations and breathing problems due to respiratory system abnormalities. The condition is a manifestation of abnormal collagen formation.
  • Larsen-like syndrome, lethal type: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by joint dislocations and breathing problems due to respiratory system abnormalities.
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes disease: Femur/hip bone disease mostly in children
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome: A hip joint disorder where bone growth abnormalities caused by an interrupted blood supply to the head of the femoral bone results in it's degeneration and deformity. When the body creates a new blood supply, new healthy bone can be formed.
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease: A lethal genetic disorder involving multiple contractures and facial abnormalities.
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (LAAHD): A lethal disorder characterized by arthrogryposis and loss of anterior horn motor neurons which results in a lack of fetal movement.
  • Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS): A rare inherited lethal disorder characterized by multiple congenital contractures. There are two main types caused by different genetic defects. Type 2 differs from type 1 in that it includes additional head, face and eye symptoms and hydrops, joint webbing and fractures were usually absent.
  • Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1: A rare inherited lethal disorder characterized by multiple congenital contractures. Type 1 occurs as a result of a genetic defect on chromosome 9q34.
  • Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 2: A rare inherited lethal disorder characterized by multiple congenital contractures. Type 2 occurs as a result of a genetic defect on chromosome 12q13. Type 2 differs from type 1 in that it includes additional head, face and eye symptoms and hydrops, joint webbing and fractures were usually absent.
  • Leukoencephalopathy, arthritis, colitis and hypogammaglobulinemia: A rare syndrome characterized by brain disease, arthritis, colitis and immune system problems.
  • Leukoencephalopathy, arthritis, colitis, and hypogammaglobulinema: A rare condition characterized by the association of arthritis, colitis, low blood gammaglobulin levels and brain anomalies.
  • Levy-Yeboa Syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by abnormalities of various bodys systems. Symptoms include low muscle tone, stiff joints, deafness, skin blisters (mainly on hands and feet) and a blank facial expression.
  • Lindstrom syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature and seizures.
  • Lockwood-Feingold syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by arthritis, skeletal abnormalities and a lack of subcutaneous fat.
  • Lupus: Autoimmune disease with numerous effects on various organs and linings.
  • MASS syndrome: A genetic syndrome that is similar the Marfan syndrome but does not involve lens dislocation. It is a connective tissue disorder that involves the skeleton, skin, aorta and mitral valve.
  • Mac Duffie's syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by immune system problems where immune system particles are deposited on amall blood vessel walls
  • Macleod-Fraser syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by long thin fingers and contractures involving the knees, elbows, fingers and sometimes other joints.
  • Marden-Walker Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by blepharophimosis, joint contractures and fixed facial expression.
  • Marden-Walker-like syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by long, thin fingers, contractures from birth and narrow eye slits.
  • Marfanoid hypermobility: An inherited connective tissue disorder with certain characteristics of Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is characterized by hyperextensible skin and loose joints and Marfan syndrome is characterized by symptoms such as tall, slender build, ear anomalies and hand contractures.
  • Massa-Casaer-Ceulemans syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal brain development (lissencephaly - smooth brain) and multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Matsoukas syndrome: An extremely rare condition characterized by mental retardation, eye problems, facial anomalies and joint problems.
  • Matsoukas-Liarikos-Giannika syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, short stature and eye and joint abnormalities.
  • McMurray's sign: A test for the examination of the meniscus of the knee
  • Megarbane syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by short stature, loose joints, hernias, facial abnormalities and severe psychomotor retardation.
  • Melioidosis: Bacterial infection from soil or water.
  • Meningoencephalocele -- arthrogryposis -- hypoplastic thumb: A rare disorder characterized by the association of joint contractures, meningoencephalocele and underdeveloped thumb.
  • Meniscus injury: Knee damage often from trauma or injury
  • Mental Retardation, Joint Hypermobility With or without Metabolic Abnormalities: A rare syndrome observed in a small number of patients and characterized by the association of mental retardation, loose joints. Metabolic abnormalities occur in only some patients.
  • Mental retardation -- contractural arachnodactyly: A rare disorder characterized mainly by the association of mental retardation with long thin fingers which were permanently flexed.
  • Mental retardation -- hip luxation -- G6PD variant: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, partially dislocated hips and an enzyme defect (G6PD).
  • Mental retardation, X-linked -- epilepsy -- progressive joint contractures -- typical face: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, epilepsy, unusual facial appearance and slowly-progressive joint contractures. The disorder is inherited in a X-linked manner which means that only males display the full range of symptoms whereas female carriers may have mild or no symptoms.
  • Metatropic dwarfism: A rare genetic disorder characterized by extremely small stature, short limbs and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Meyenburg-Altherr-Uehlinger syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by recurring inflammation of cartilage which results in deterioration of the cartilage. Any part of the body with cartilage may be affected - ears, nose bridge, larynx, trachea, aortic heart valve and around joints. Symptoms are determined by the part of the body that is affected. Breathing problems and even death can occur if the cartilage in the breathing airways or the aortic valve are affected.
  • Micromelic dysplasia -- dislocation of radius: A rare disorder characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, dislocated forearm and facial anomalies.
  • Miles-Carpenter X-linked mental retardation syndrome: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by mental retardation, contractures at birth and low fingertip arches.
  • Minicore myopathy, antenatal onset, with arthrogryposis: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The antenatal form with arthrogryposis is distinguished by the presence of contractures at birth due to reduced fetal movement as well as various physical anomalies. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Multicentric osteolysis -- nodulosis -- arthropathy: A rare syndrome characterized by joint disease, loss of bone mineral density and nodulosis.
  • Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: A rare condition characterized by the proliferation of histiocytes (immune cells) which causes destructive arthritis and skin nodules.
  • Multiple Skeletal abnormalities with Anterior Segment Anomalies of the Eye and Early Lethality: A rare condition characterized by various skeletal and eye abnormalities and early death. The parents of the children reported with the condition are believed to be related.
  • Multiple congenital contractures: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the abnormal permanent contraction of more than one muscle that occurs from birth. The muscle contraction affects the movement of the affected body part.
  • Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature and limb, joint and hip abnormalities which become evident from two to 10 years.
  • Multiple joint dislocations -- metaphyseal dysplasia: A rare disorder characterized by multiple joint dislocations and abnormal bone development as well as various other anomalies.
  • Multiple pterygium syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by webbing of various parts of the body, contractures, short stature, fusion of neck vertebrae and facial anomalies.
  • Multiple pterygium syndrome lethal type: A rare syndrome characterized by skin, muscle and skeletal anomalies and fetal death.
  • Multiple pterygium syndrome, autosomal recessive: A very rare disorder characterized by webbing of various parts of the body, contractures, short stature, fusion of neck vertebrae and facial anomalies.
  • Multiple synostosis syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple bone fusions involving the face, limbs and middle ear.
  • Musculoskeletal conditions: Medical conditions affecting the musculoskeletal system of bones, muscles and related structures.
  • Myhre Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by retarded growth, mental retardation, bone abnormalities and distinctive facial features.
  • NOMID syndrome: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Nail-Patella Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by small or absent kneecap and ridged and/or absent nails as well as other abnormalities
  • Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome: A rare disorder involving muscle degeneration, loss of skin fat and impaired immune functioning.
  • Neck Arthritis: Degenerative arthritic changes in the neck causing pain and loss of function; may be due to age-related degenerative change (osteoarthritis) or due to autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis)
  • Neck conditions: Any condition that affects the neck
  • Negative rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Neuropathy, congenital, with arthrogryposis multiplex: A very rare condition characterized by peripheral neuropathy from birth and multiple contractures. The condition is generally not progressive.
  • Nevo syndrome: A genetic disorder characterized by excessive fetal growth, loose joints, kyphosis and impaired speech and motor development.
  • Night blindness -- skeletal anomalies -- unusual facies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by night blindness, a distinctive face and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Nodulosis-arthropathy-osteolysis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by joint disease, loss of bone mineral density and nodulosis.
  • Oculo cerebro acral syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, brain, ear and limb abnormalities.
  • Oculodentodigital syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by small eyes, underdeveloped tooth enamel and permanent flexion of one or more finger joints.
  • Oculomelic amyoplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by limb contractures (tightening of muscles which limits movement) from birth and eye abnormalities.
  • Olecranon bursitis: Inflammation of the fluid-filled sac at the pointy end of the elbow. The inflammation can result from trauma to the elbow, infection or chronic injury which can result from frequently resting on the elbows.
  • Oligodontia, keratitis, skin ulceration and arthroosteolysis: A rare condition characterized by a variety of abnormalities including missing teeth, recurring skin ulceration, eye problems and nail symptoms.
  • Ortolani's sign: Indicates a hip that is dislocated but reducible
  • Osteoarthritis: Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterised by mechanical disrturbances due to degradation of joints. It is the most common form of arthritis, and the leading cause of chronic disability.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 1: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21-q33 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 2: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2p24-p23 and tends to primarily affect the hand joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 3: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q21.3-q22 and tends to primarily affect the knee and hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 4: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.3.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 5: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q11.2 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 6: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p24.3 and tends to primarily affect the knee joints.
  • Osteoarthritis, Hip: A common degenerative hip joint disorder that tends to affect older people. The main symptom is pain.
  • Osteoarthropathy of fingers, familial: A rare disorder where a disrupted blood supply to the finger bones which results in bone pain and destruction.
  • Osteochondritis Dissecans: A rare condition caused by an interruption of the blood supply to section of bone in a joint which can result in a piece of bone breaking off and causing pain. The knee is most often affected but it can occur in ankles and elbows.
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta -- congenital joint contractures: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by weak, brittle bones and abnormal knee, ankle and foot joints (congenital contractures) at birth. There are two different subtypes of the disorder, each with a different genetic defect origin: Bruck Syndrome 1 and Bruck Syndrome 2.
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta Type I: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by fragile bones, blue sclerae and hyperextensible joints.
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta, type 1A: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by fragile bones and hyperextensible joints - a type of osteogenesis imperfecta I where the teeth are opalescent and blue sclerae may be absent.
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta, type 3: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by progressive limb deformity and normal sclerae.
  • Osteoporosis -- macrocephaly -- blindness -- joint hyperlaxity: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, osteoporosis, blindness and a large head.
  • Overgrowth radial ray defect arthrogryposis: A rare condition characterized mainly by the association of arthrogryposis, excessive growth and arm and hand defects.
  • Pain conditions: Diseases characterized by pain and pain-like symptoms.
  • Palindromic rheumatism: A rare disorder involving periodic inflammation in and around joints. Eventually, rheumatoid arthritis may develop if the condition persists.
  • Parastremmatic dwarfism: A rare disorder characterized by severe dwarfism, kyphoscoliosis, contractures of the large joints and twisted and bowed limb bones.
  • Patella aplasia, coxa vara, tarsal synostosis: A rare genetic condition characterized by a failure of part or all of the kneecap to develop (patella aplasia), inward curvature of the hip (coxa vara) and fusion of bones in the foot (tarsal synostosis).
  • Patella hypoplasia -- mental retardation: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by the association of knee problems and mental retardation.
  • Patterson pseudoleprechaunism syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by excessive pigmentation, looks skin, unusual face, several mental retardation and bone abnormalities.
  • Pauciarticular chronic arthritis: A rare condition characterized by chronic arthritis that occurs in several joints.
  • Pediatric granulomatous arthritis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Pelvic dysplasia arthrogryposis of lower limbs: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by pelvic anomalies and joint contractures involving the legs.
  • Pfeiffer-Palm-Teller syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by facial peculiarities, defective tooth enamel and progressive joint stiffness.
  • Phocomelia -- contractures -- absent thumb: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by absent thumbs, contractures and missing arm and leg bones.
  • Plica Syndrome: Knee inflammation usually triggered by overuse or injury.
  • Plum syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, brain and bone abnormalities.
  • Podder-Tolmie syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by arthrogryposis, underdeveloped thumbs and meningoencephalocele.
  • Pointer syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, permanently flexed fingers, facial anomalies and feeding problems.
  • Polyarthritis: Pain and inflammation of more than one joint.
  • Polyarthritis, rheumatic factor-negative: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Polyarthritis, systemic: A chronic inflammatory disease (usually autoimmune) that causes inflammation in multiple parts of the body and causes arthritis in five or more joints.
  • Polychondritis: A serious, progressive, episodic condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage in the body. The duration and severity of the episodes can vary.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Positive rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Powell-Chandra-Saal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by webbed joints and heart, vertebral, ear and radial defects.
  • Progressive neurodegeneration -- joint laxity -- cataract: A rare syndrome caused by an enzyme deficiency (Delta-1-pyrroline 5-carboxylate synthetase).
  • Pseudoachondroplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone growth and development abnormalities.
  • Pseudodiastrophic dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, contractures and joint dislocations.
  • Pseudogout: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate crystals
  • Pseudomonas pseudomallei: A form of pseudomonas
  • Psoriasis: Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition where the defective immune system causes skin cells to grow rapidly. It affects a significant number of people. Arthritis, which can be severe, is associated with the psoriasis in up to a third of cases. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it - roughly 10% of those susceptible will actually develop the condition. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriasis arthropathica: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the skin (psoriasis) and joints (arthritis). Psoriatic arthritis is said to be a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and therefore occurs more commonly in patients with tissue type HLA-B27 Syndrome in which psoriasis is associated with arthritis, often involving inflammation in terminal interphalangeal joints. A rheumatoid factor is not usually present in the sera of affected individuals.
  • Psoriasis-like knee rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the knee may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Psoriatic Arthritis: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the skin (psoriasis) and joints (arthritis). Psoriatic arthritis is said to be a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and therefore occurs more commonly in patients with tissue type HLA-B27.
  • Psoriatic Arthritis, susceptibility to: An inflammatory condition where the defective immune system causes joint inflammation as well as skin cells to grow rapidly causing psoriasis. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriatic arthritis, juvenile form: A type of arthritis associated with psoriasis in children. Psoriasis and arthritis are both inflammatory conditions with one affecting the skin and the other affecting the joints. The arthritis tends to precede the psoriasis.
  • Pterygium syndrome multiple dominant type: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, finger webbing, difficulty fully opening mouth and scoliosis.
  • Pterygium syndrome, antecubital: A very rare malformation characterized by a web of tissue that develops at the elbow and prevents the arm from extending fully.
  • Puretic syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by skin tumors and enlarged gums as well as osteopenia and joint contractures. The condition is caused by the accumulation of hyaline in the skin and other tissues.
  • Pyogenic arthritis -- pyoderma gangrenosum -- acne: A very rare autoinflammatory disorder involving the joints and skin. Sufferers develop arthritis, skin lesions and severe acne during adolescence. Usually only one joint is affected during episodes and various joints can be affected - especially the elbows, knees and ankles.
  • Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne: A very rare autoinflammatory disorder involving the joints and skin. Sufferers develop arthritis, skin lesions and severe acne during adolescence. Usually only one joint is affected during episodes and various joints can be affected - especially the elbows, knees and ankles.
  • Rapadilino syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized primarily by a cleft palate which has a high arch and missing or underdeveloped kneecaps as well as other anomalies.
  • Ray-Peterson-Scott syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by pelvic anomalies and joint contractures involving the legs.
  • Reactive arthritis: The inflammation of a joint
  • Reiterís syndrome: A form of reactive arthritis characterized by arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis and skin lesions.
  • Relapsing Polychondritis: A chronic disease that affects multiple joints resulting in inflammation and degeneration
  • Rheumatic fever: An inflammatory disorder that can occur as a complication of untreated streptococcal bacterial infection such as strep throat or scarlet fever. The condition may affect the brain, skin, heart and joints.
  • Rheumatism: Rheumatism is a colloquial term used to describe a range of conditions which are considered to be rheumatalogical disorders. These may include conditions affecting the heart, lung, bones, joint, kidney and skin.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis Associated with Thymus Hyperplasia: An enlarged thymus gland may be associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The thymus gland is located beneath the breastbone and above the windpipe and heart. It is made up of lymphatic tissue and is believed to be responsible for supporting the development of the immune system from the fetal stage through to puberty. After puberty, the thymus gland tends to shrink.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Autoimmune form of arthritis usually in teens or young adults.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia: Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory form of arthritis and is an autoimmune disease.
  • Rheumatoid vasculitis: A rare disorder where sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis with joint inflammation develop inflammation of small and medium sized blood vessels. It tends to mostly affect the blood vessels in the skin. The symptoms are determined by which part of the body is affected.
  • Rhizomelic pseudopolyarthritis: A rare condition which tends to cause muscle pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulder and hip area.
  • Richieri Costa Guion Almeida Cohen syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by premature fusion of skull bones, facial anomalies and various other abnormalities.
  • Rieger anomaly -- partial lipodystrophy: A very rare disorder characterized by short stature, low birth weight and loss of skin fat. SHORT is an acronym for short stature, hyperextensible joints and/or hernia, ocular depression, Reiger anomaly and teething delay. Additional symptoms are also variably present.
  • SAPHO syndrome: A rare disorder involving skin (acne, pustulosis), bone (hyperostosis, osteitis) and joint problems.
  • SHORT Syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by short stature, low birth weight and loss of skin fat. SHORT is an acronym for short stature, hyperextensible joints and/or hernia, ocular depression, Reiger anomaly and teething delay.
  • Schnitzler syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of chronic urticaria as well as a blood abnormality called macroglobulinemia.
  • Schroder syndrome: An inherited familial disorder involving multiple joint dislocations and malformed ears.
  • Schwartz-Jampel Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, blepharophimosis and joint limitation.
  • Sciatica as seen in rheumatoid arthritis: Neuralgia along the course of the sciatic nerve. It can also occur in chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Scleroderma: A rare, progressive connective tissue disorder involving thickening and hardening of the skin and connective tissue. There are a number of forms of scleroderma with some forms being systemic (involving internal organs).
  • Seckle syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, microcephaly and a prominent nose.
  • Septic arthritis like stiff back: Pathology in the back which leads to restriction of movement of the back.
  • Seronegative Arthritis: Classification given to the group of joint conditions with similar features to rheumatoid arthritis, but affecting different joints and lacking the specific autoantibodies used to identify rheumatoid arthritis
  • Seronegative spondyloarthropathy: Spondyloarthropathy that is negative to rheumatoid facotr
  • Short limbs subluxed knees cleft palate: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short limbs, partially dislocated knees and a cleft palate.
  • Short stature -- contractures -- hypotonia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by reduced muscle tone, short stature and contractures.
  • Short tarsus -- absence of lower eyelashes: A very rare syndrome characterized by a lack of lower eyelashes and short eyelids.
  • Shoulder Fracture: Fracture of the shoulder joint
  • Shoulder Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the shoulder joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Shoulder arthritis: Inflammation of the shoulder joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Shoulder bursitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bursa of the shoulder
  • Shoulder conditions: Any condition that affects the shoulder
  • Shoulder dislocation: Dislocation of the shoulder joint.
  • Shoulder injury: Any injury to the shoulder
  • Shoulder separation: Separation of collarbone (clavicle) and the shoulder blade (scapula).
  • Singh-Williams-McAlister, syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the resorption of certain bones (ankles, knees and wrists). Swelling an pain also occur in the affected bones.
  • Sjogren's Syndrome: Autoimmune disease damaging the eye tear ducts and other glands.
  • Small, unstable nodules as seen in osteoarthritis: In case of osteoarthritis the smaller joints, such as at the fingers, hard bony enlargements, called Heberden's nodes (on the distal interphalangeal joints) and/or Bouchard's nodes (on the proximal interphalangeal joints), may form, and though they are not necessarily painful, they do limit the movement of the fingers significantly.
  • Spherophakia brachymorphia syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, and craniofacial, eye, tooth and limb abnormalities.
  • Spinal Arthritis: Inflammation of the spine joints. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Spine osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the spine as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints.
  • Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, fusion of toe and finger bones and failure of spinal segmentation.
  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity: A rare skeletal disorder where the spine and long bones grow and develop abnormally. Loose joints and severe curvature of the spine is also present. The condition is severe and death in the first couple of decades is common.
  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with multiple dislocations: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormal bone growth and multiple joint dislocations.
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda progressive arthropathy: A rare genetic disorder where abnormal bone development primarily involves the spine and epiphyses (end of long bones where growth occurs). Progressive arthropathy (joint disease) also affects most joints.
  • Spondylohypoplasia arthrogryposis popliteal pterygium: A very rare inherited syndrome characterized by webbing at the back of the knees, spinal defects and various other skeletal abnormalities.
  • Spondylohypoplasia, arthrogryposis and popliteal pterygium: A very rare inherited syndrome characterized by webbing at the back of the knees, spinal defects and various other skeletal abnormalities.
  • Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with dentinogenesis imperfecta: A rare skeletal disorder involving abnormal bone development. The condition is characterized by abnormal growth of long bones, loose joints and tooth enamel abnormalities. The shortness in the arms and legs occurs mainly in the middle bones such as the forearm and lower leg bones.
  • Spondylosis: Spinal degeneration of the discs or spinal joints
  • Sprain: Ligament injury near a joint; compare strain
  • Stickler Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities.
  • Stickler Syndrome, type I: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12q13.11-q13.2
  • Stickler Syndrome, type II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 1p21
  • Stickler Syndrome, type III: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and ear abnormalities. Type 3 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 6q21.3. Type 3 doesn't involve any of the eye problems that occur in type 1 and 2.
  • Stickler's syndrome: A condition which is characterized by a hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy
  • Still's Disease, Adult-Onset: A form of arthritic inflammation characterized by fever, rash and joint pain that occurs in adults. The cause is unknown.
  • Subacromial bursitis: Inflammation of a pouch of synovial fluid which is located in the shoulder. It is most often caused by some sort of trauma or overuse of the shoulder. It is difficult to distinguish between subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff injury.
  • Supernumeracy Carpal Bones: A medical term which refers to the presence of extra bones around the carpals which are the bones in the wrist. The anomaly usually causes no symptoms but is sometimes an indicator for certain malformation syndromes.
  • Symphalangism distal: A finger deformity where one or more end joints of fingers or toes are fused. The index finger is the most common digit involved.
  • Symphalangism, distal, with microdontia, dental pulp stones, and narrowed zygomatic arch: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by small teeth, underdeveloped wrist bones and fusion of the joints in the ends of the fingers.
  • Synostoses, tarsal, carpal, and digital: A rare disorder involving the fusion of various joint bones in the hands and feet.
  • Synovial cancer: Cancer (malignant) that develops in synovial tissue in joints. Synovial tissue can be found in the lining of cavities in joints, tendons and bursae.
  • Synovial osteochondromatosis: A rare joint disorder where some of the tissue that lines the joint is replaced by bone-like tissue or cartilage. Usually only one joint is affected and it tends to be the knee, elbow or hip
  • Synovial sarcoma: A slow-growing malignant cancer that occurs mainly in the deeper soft tissue of the limbs (especially around the knee) but can also affect the head and neck area as well as other parts of the body. The cancer is a soft tissue cancer and can arise from fat, muscle, fibrous and blood vessel tissue. The exact symptoms depend on the location and size of the tumor.
  • Synovitis: Inflammation of the lining of joints.
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies, familial: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by joint inflammation, inflammation of the uvea (layer between sclera and retina) and cranial neuropathy (damage to cranial nerves).
  • Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Onset of JRA with fevers and systemic symptoms
  • TMJ Syndrome: Disorder of the jaw joint
  • Talo-patello-scaphoid osteolysis, synovitis, and short fourth metacarpals: A rare condition characterized mainly by the loss of bone in the knee, ankle and wrist joints.
  • Talonavicular coalition: An uncommon congenital anomaly where the bones of the talonavicular joint are fused together. Often the condition is detected incidentally and is often asymptomatic.
  • Tarsal Fusion: A medical term for the abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal bones to make a single bone. The tarsal bones are the bones that make up the hindfoot.
  • Tarsal Synostosis: A medical term for the abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal bones to make a single bone. The tarsal bones are the bones that make up the hindfoot.
  • Tarsal carpal coalition syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by fused ankle and wrist bones.
  • Tarsal tunnel: Entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve as it continues into the bottom of the foot.

 

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