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Diseases » Skin Cancer » Glossary
 

Glossary for Skin Cancer

  • Acanthoma: A rare type of skin tumor that may be benign or malignant. The symptoms are determined by the location, size and aggressiveness of the tumor.
  • Acral lentiginous melanoma: Acral lentigous melanoma is the most common variant of skin cancer seen in dark-skinned people. This form of melanoma appears on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet, or on nails. Lesions are usually brown, black, or multicolored with irregular borders, and flat or nodular.
  • Acrospiroma: A tumor that develops in the ends of sweat glands in the skin. They are usually benign.
  • Actinic keratosis: Scaling of the skin condition usually from sunlight
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • African Kaposi's sarcoma: Endemic Kaposi sarcoma (KS) occurs in people living in Equatorial Africa and is sometimes called African KS. An aggressive form of African Kaposi's sarcoma can spread quickly to the bones. Another form found in African children does not affect the skin. Instead, it spreads through the lymph nodes and vital organs, and can quickly become fatal.
  • Ancell's syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the development of multiple little tumors on various parts of the body that grow hair. The tumors originate mainly from the sweat and scent producing glands. The growths occur mainly on the scalp and neck. Tumors close together may merge and ulcerate or become infected. The tumors usually start after the first decade and continue to grow slowly in size and number. In rare severe cases, the cylindromas may be the size of fists.
  • Angioma: Clump of blood or lymph vessels usually in the skin
  • Angiomatoid melanoma: Rare type of melanoma with same bizarre morphology and an unusual, comparatively benign course, after a primary melanoma.
  • Angiosarcoma of the scalp: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the scalp. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Angiotropic melanoma: Angiotropism is the presence of tumor cells closely apposed to the abluminal surfaces of blood and lymphatic vessels without intravasation. Angiotropism in melanoma could be a marker for extravascular migratory metastasis, the migration of tumor cells along the external surfaces of vessels.
  • Animal-type melanoma: Pigment synthesizing melanoma is a rare histopathological variant of melanoma so termed because of prominent melanin production and its similarity to a variant of melanoma seen in grey horses.
  • Antimony poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to antimony.
  • Atypical mole syndrome: A condition characterized by the development of numerous moles on the skin which may become cancerous and hence need careful monitoring.
  • Balloon cell metastatic melanoma: Balloon cell melanoma, a variant of malignant melanoma, has been reported on rare occasions in animals and is uncommon in man. Such tumours have variable numbers of large, round to polygonal cells with abundant, clear, often vacuolated cytoplasm containing fine melanin granules and variable amounts of lipid.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 1 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 2: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 2 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 1q42.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 3: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 3 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 5p15.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 4: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 4 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 12q13.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 5: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 5 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 9p21.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 6: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 6 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 7q32.
  • Basal cell carcinoma: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer.
  • Basal cell carcinoma, infundibulocystic: A variant form of skin cancer.
  • Basal cell carcinoma, multiple: A slow growing type of skin cancer that occurs in multiples. The cancer tends to remain localized but occasionally spreads to nearby tissues. The cancer may flat, slightly raised or nodular. The lesion may vary in color - white, pink, brown, flesh-colored, pearly or waxy.
  • Basal cell carcinomas with milia and coarse, sparse hair: A rare disorder characterized mainly by skin cancer, milia and coarse, sparse hair. The milia tend to disappear without treatment by adolescence.
  • Basisquamous basal cell carcinoma: A form of skin cancer which arises from two types of skin cells (squamous and basal cells). The cancer tends to grow faster than other basal cell carcinomas which grow slowly over a period of months or years. This cancer also has the potential to metastasize. Basisquamous basal cell carcinomas generally occur on the parts of the skin that tend to have the most sun exposure e.g. face, shoulders, back, neck and scalp.
  • Bazex-Dupre-Christol syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by decreased hair growth, basal cell cancers and destruction of skin follicles which tends to affect the extremities, elbows and knees.
  • Bednar's tumor: A rare aggressive skin tumor that develops in the skin. The tumor consists of melanin-producing cells which increases the skins pigmentation in the affected area. Metastasis is rare but it often regrows after being surgically removed. It occurs mostly on the trunk, shoulders and chest.
  • Bedsores: Skin ulcers from prolonged pressure
  • Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: A rare inherited disorder that affects the skin and results in an increased risk of certain skin tumors called fibrofolliculomas which are benign.
  • Bowen Disease:
  • Bowen's disease: Intraepiderman form of squamous cell skin cancer cause by sun damage to skin.
  • CDK4 linked melanoma: A mutation in the CDK4 gene can cause an increased susceptibility to melanomas.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Carney syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spotty pigmentation on the skin and the development of multiple benign tumors (myxoma) that can occur just about anywhere in the body but mainly in the skin, breast and heart and endocrine glands such as the thyroid and pituitary gland. The symptoms are highly variable depending on the location, size and number of tumors. Endocrine gland tumors can affect hormone production and hence result in a range of symptoms.
  • Chondroid melanoma: Heterologous differentiation is exceedingly rare in melanoma. Chondroid change in the absence of osteogenic differentiation is extremely rare in malignant melanoma. Melanoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of primary cutaneous neoplasms exhibiting cartilaginous differentiation.
  • Classic Kaposi's sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Cutaneous desmoplastic melanoma: Cutaneous desmoplastic melanoma is a rare variant of a spindle cell melanoma.
  • Cutaneous lymphoma: Cutaneous lymphoma is a term used to describe a group of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by localization of neoplastic T lymphocytes to the skin.
  • Cutaneous metastatic melanoma: Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer and accounts for about three-quarters of all skin cancer deaths.
  • De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by sunlight sensitivity, skin atrophy and pigmentation and skin tumors as well neurologic involvement.
  • Dermal melanoma: The term "primary dermal melanoma" has been used to describe a solitary melanoma lesion confined to the dermal and/or subcutaneous tissue in primary unknown melanoma cases. There are no significant histopathological differences between primary dermal melanoma and cutaneous metastasis of melanoma. The most important distinction to be made is with metastatic melanoma, because the prognoses for stage IV melanoma and primary dermal melanoma are vastly different.
  • Dermatofibroma: A benign skin growth that usually occurs on the legs but may affect the arms or trunk. The growth is usually discolored and contains hard, scar-like tissue. A minor injury such as an insect bite or a thorn can result in a dermatofibroma. The color of the nodule is variable (brown, pink, skin-colored, yellow, purplish).
  • Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: A rare form of slow growing tumor that develops deep in the skin. Metastatis is rare but it often regrows after being surgically removed. It occurs mostly on the trunk, shoulders and chest.
  • Desmoplastic neurotrophic melanoma: Desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma (DNM) is a rare variant of a spindle cell melanoma.
  • Discoid eczema: Discoid eczema is a common form of skin inflammation and irritation characterized by its round or oval shape. The size of the lesions may vary from a few millimetres to centimetres across. The cause is unknown but minor injuries such as insect bites may be triggers. The lesions tend to occur most often on the limbs.
  • Eccrine acrospiroma: A rare type of benign sweat gland tumor. The tumor usually occurs as a single skin nodule. The tumor can occur anywhere on the body but is most common in the head, neck, arms and legs.
  • Elephant man in context of NF: A rare disorder where a limb becomes enlarged due to neurofibromatosis of the skin and the tissue under it. Neurofibromatosis is a disorder involving the development of benign nerve and skin tumors. When large areas of nerves are affected in one limb then the limb becomes enlarged.
  • Epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma: The most common type of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) in the United States is epidemic or AIDS-related KS. This type of KS develops in people who are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Familial cylindromatosis: A rare familial condition characterized by the development of multiple little tumors on various parts of the body that grow hair. The tumors originate mainly from the sweat and scent producing glands. The growths occur mainly on the head and neck. Tumors close together may merge and ulcerate or become infected. The tumors usually start after the first decade and continue to grow slowly in size and number. In rare severe cases, the cylindromas may be the size of fists.
  • Familial multiple trichodiscomas: A familial condition involving the development of multiple benign tumors in the hair discs. Dome-shaped, skin-colored papules form on various parts of the body including the head, neck, chest, arms and back.
  • Follicular hamartoma -- alopecia -- cystic fibrosis: A rare syndrome characterized by small benign growths that develop in hair follicles, alopecia and cystic fibrosis.
  • Follicular malignant melanoma: Follicular malignant melanoma can be regarded as a rare and unique presentation of melanoma. It is characterized by a deep-seated follicular structure in which atypical melanocytes extend downward along the follicular epithelium and permeate parts of the follicle as well as the adjacent dermis.
  • Giant cell malignant melanoma: Malignant melanoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. Malignant melanoma of the oral mucosa is a rare tumor. The clinical image can vary, so that diagnostic errors are possible. The case of a primary malignant melanoma camouflaging a giant cell granuloma is presented. The importance of biopsy and histological diagnosis is underlined.
  • Glomus vagale tumors: A rare, usually benign tumor that tends to occur mainly in the skin and soft tissues of lower parts of limbs and under the nails but may also rarely occur in other parts of the body including organs. Symptoms depend on the location, size and malignancy of the tumor.
  • Guizar-Vasquez-Luengas syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by corneal dermoids and short stature.
  • Hemangioma: A condition which is characterized by a benign tumour cause by newly formed blood vessels
  • Hereditary keratoacanthoma: A relatively common benign form of skin tumor which is inherited. The tend to occur on the head but can occur on other parts of the body. The condition often resolves on its own after a number of years but usually leaves a pitted scar. Treatment can speed up the process and the final aesthetic result.
  • Hutchinson's Melanotic Freckle: A slow-growing form of malignant melanoma which is the abnormal proliferation of pigment cells called melanocytes. It tends to occur on sun-exposed skin of the face, scalp or neck. The melanoma can remain non-invasive for many years.
  • Ichthyosiform Erythroderma, Corneal Involvement and Deafness Syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by keratitis, skin lesions and sensorineural deafness. The deafness and skin redness are usually present at birth and the corneas of the eye are gradually destroyed by keratitis which can result in loss of vision.
  • Kaposi's Sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Keratitis Ichthyosis Deafness Syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by keratitis, skin lesions and sensorineural deafness. The deafness and skin redness are usually present at birth and the corneas of the eye are gradually destroyed by keratitis which can result in loss of vision.
  • Keratoacanthoma: A benign form of skin tumor that tends to resolve itself with time. Usually the skin lesion grows for about six weeks, remains stable for a variable length of time and then regresses slowly.
  • Keratoacanthoma, familial: A rare inherited condition characterized by sebaceous gland tumors on the skin and internal malignancies usually involving the digestive tract.
  • Keratosis: Thickening of the skin
  • Leiomyoma: Benign tumour of smooth muscle.
  • Leiomyoma, hereditary multiple, of skin: An inherited disorder involving the development of multiple skin tumors which originate from smooth muscle fibers.
  • Leiomyomatosis familial: A rare syndrome characterized by the development of a number of benign skin tumors that develops from smooth muscle tissue. In familial cases, the condition occurs in several members of a family. Tumors may also occur in other parts of the body.
  • Lentigo maligna: Lentigo maligna is a melanoma in situ that consists of malignant cells but does not show invasive growth..
  • Lentigo maligna melanoma: A slow-growing form of malignant melanoma which is the abnormal proliferation of pigment cells called melanocytes. It tends to occur on sun-exposed skin of the face, scalp or neck. The melanoma can remain non-invasive for many years.
  • Lewandowsky-Lutz dysplasia: A very rare skin disease involving a genetic susceptibility to the human papillomaviru. Scaly macules (flat pigmented skin lesion) and skin bumps develop on the skin, especially on the back of the hands. The condition carries an increased risk of skin cancer, especially in sun-exposed parts of the body such as the back of the hands. The warty growths can become very extensive and surgery may be needed to remove them.
  • Lichen planus: Skin rash
  • Linear porokeratosis: The linear development of multiple pigmented skin bumps. The skin bumps merge into each. They can occur along an arm or leg or on the side of the trunk, head or neck. The linear distribution tends to follow along the path of a sensory nerve.
  • Lipoblast-like malignant melanoma: Two distinctive types of signet ring cells may be observed in this variant: (1) the usual type, composed of polygonal cells with accumulation of vimentin filaments in the cytoplasm, which displace the nucleus to the periphery of the cell and also confer a semilunar shape, and (2) a rarer variant, composed of cells with intracytoplasmic vacuoles and scalloped eccentric nuclei. In such situations, the neoplastic cells may resemble monovacuolated lipoblasts. Lipoblast-like cells are very unusual features of metastatic MMs and may be observed in metastatic deposits of signet ring and in balloon cell melanomas.
  • Lutz-Lewandowsky: A very rare skin disease where scaly macules (flat pigmented skin lesion) and skin bumps develop on the skin, especially on the back of the hands.
  • Lutz-Lewandowsky epidermodysplasia verruciformis: A very rare skin disease where scaly macules (flat pigmented skin lesion) and skin bumps develop on the skin, especially on the back of the hands. Patients tend to be prone to skin cancers.
  • Melanoma: Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It is the leading cause of death from skin disease. It involves cells called melanocytes, which produce a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is responsible for skin and hair color.
  • Melanoma -- astrocytoma syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of a melanoma with a type of brain tumor called an astrocytoma. The exact symptoms may vary depending on the exact location of the brain tumor.
  • Melanoma, familial: Melanoma that occurs in a familial pattern. Melanoma is a cancer of pigment-producing cells and can occur in a number of parts of the body such as the skin and eyes.
  • Merkel cell cancer: A rapidly growing, aggressive form of skin cancer that occur on or just under the skin.
  • Metastatic skin cancer: Cutaneous metastases from carcinoma are relatively uncommon in clinical practice, but they are very important to recognize. Cutaneous metastasis may herald the diagnosis of internal malignancy.
  • Mole: Darkened growths on the skin; everyone has a few.
  • Mole symptoms: Skin moles or growths on the skin.
  • Monster cell malignant melanoma: Cells with significantly enlarged nuclei have been described in basal cell carcinomas, dermatofibromas, and pleomorphic fibromas, to name a few. These cells are typically visible using low power microscopy and have been termed "pleomorphic" or "monster cells." They have not been previously described in cutaneous melanomas. We sought to determine the prevalence of monster cells in otherwise conventional biopsies of primary cutaneous melanomas and its association with other histopathologic features of this malignancy.
  • Morphoeic basal cell carcinoma: A common form of skin cancer which has a waxy, scar-like appearance and grows slowly over a period of months or years. The cancer originates from the innermost cells (basal cells) of the top skin layer. These cancers generally occur on the parts of the skin that tend to have the most sun exposure - particularly the middle of the face.
  • Multiple fibrofolliculoma familial: A rare familial genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous benign hair follicle tumors.
  • Mycosis fungoides: Mycosis fungoides is a rare form of T-cell lymphoma of the skin. The disease is typically slowly progressive and chronic.
  • Myxoid melanoma: Myxoid melanoma is a rare variant of malignant melanoma. The diagnostic problems are obviously increased when it presents as amelanotic metastasis in a lymph node. In the present case, myxoid metastasis occurred with the partial spontaneous disappearance of the primary nonmyxoid malignant melanoma.
  • Neurofibroma: A benign tumor that originates from nerve cells. The tumors usually arise from nerves in the skin or just under the skin.
  • Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1): Neurofibromatosis Type 1 is a genetic disorder often leading to the development of nerve tumors. The condition is also characterized by skin pigmentation abnormalities.
  • Neurofibromatosis syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by areas of increased and decreased skin pigmentation and the development of many non-cancerous nerve and skin tumors some of which may eventually become malignant.
  • Neurofibromatosis syndrome Type II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by areas of increased and decreased skin pigmentation, acoustic neuromas and the development of many noncancerous nerve and skin tumors some of which may eventually become malignant - it is a more severe form of type I neurofibromatosis.
  • Neurofibromatosis type 3A: A rare genetic disorder characterized by areas of increased and decreased skin pigmentation and the development of many non-cancerous nerve and skin tumors some of which may eventually become malignant. The skin tumors tend to develop characteristically on the palms of the hands.
  • Neurofibromatosis type 3B: A rare genetic disorder characterized by areas of increased and decreased skin pigmentation and the development of many non-cancerous nerve and intestinal tumors some of which may eventually become malignant.
  • Neurofibromatosis type 6: A rare, dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by the presence of at least 6 café-au-lait spots without the presence of neurofibromas or Lisch nodules typically present in neurofibromatosis.
  • Neurofibromatosis, type 4, of Riccardi: A rare genetic disorder characterized by areas of increased and decreased skin pigmentation and the development of many non-cancerous nerve and skin tumors some of which may eventually become malignant.
  • Neurofibromatosis-1: Genetic disorder often leading to tumors on nerves.
  • Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by basal cell carcinomas, broade face and rib abnormalities.
  • Nevoid melanoma: Naevoid melanoma is a rare form of nodular melanoma that may mimic benign melanocytic lesions. The lesions are called 'naevoid' because the cytological and architectural features resemble features of benign intradermal or compound melanocytic naevi. Nevoid melanoma is a rare variant of melanoma characterized by deceptive morphologic features reminiscent of a benign melanocytic nevus.
  • Nodular basal cell carcinoma: A common form of skin cancer which is nodular in appearance and grows slowly over a period of months or years. The cancer originates from the innermost cells (basal cells) of the top skin layer. These cancers generally occur on the parts of the skin that tend to have the most sun exposure, especially the face.
  • Nodular melanoma: Nodular melanoma is the most aggressive form of melanoma. It grows in vertical direction from the outset and grows very fast (months). Nodular melanoma has no known precursor. It is a small black, or if amelanotic, pink nodule that simply enlarges. The lesions tend to bleed.
  • Noduloulcerative basal cell carcinoma: A common form of skin cancer which is nodular in appearance and grows slowly over a period of months or years. The cancer originates from the innermost cells (basal cells) of the top skin layer. These cancers generally occur on the parts of the skin that tend to have the most sun exposure, especially the face.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Skin cancer: Occupational exposure to mineral oils can increase the risk of developing skin cancer.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Animal dips: People whose employment involves animal dips may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to arsenic. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Briquette making: People employed as briquette makers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Chimney Sweeps: People employed as chimney sweeps may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Coal Gas Manufacture: People employed as coal gas manufacturers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Coke Oven Workers: People employed as coke oven workers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Construction Workers: People employed as construction workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Farmers: People employed as farmers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Fisherfolk: People employed as fisherfolk may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Germicidal Lamps: People exposed to germicidal lamps during their employment may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to industrial UV. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Insecticide applicators: People employed as insecticide applicators in the agricultural industry may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to arsenic. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Lathe Operators: People employed as tool setters may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to oils. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Mule Spinners: People employed as mule spinners in the cotton industry may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to oils. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Open-Cut mines: People employed as workers in open-cut mines may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Reactor Workers: People employed as radiologists may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ionizing radiation. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Rubber Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the rubber manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Tar Distillers: People employed as tar distillers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- TileWorkers: People employed as tile workers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Timber Proofers: People employed as timber proofers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Tool Setters: People employed as tool setters may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to oils. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- UV Curing Processes: People employed in the UV curing process may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to industrial UV. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Welders: People employed as welders may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to industrial UV. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Osteogenic melanoma: Osteogenic melanoma is a rare variant of malignant melanoma. All tumors arose from acral lentiginous melanomas.
  • Palmoplantar keratoderma -- XX sex reversal -- predisposition to squamous cell carcinoma: A rare syndrome characterized by thickened skin on palms and soles, sex reversal (the male has two X chromosomes instead of an X and a Y) and a tendency for developing skin cancers.
  • Pigmented basal cell carcinoma: A common form of skin cancer which can vary in colour and appearance and grows slowly over a period of months or years. The cancer originates from the innermost cells (basal cells) of the top skin layer. These cancers generally occur on the parts of the skin that tend to have the most sun exposure e.g. face, shoulders, back, neck and scalp.
  • Pilomatrixoma: A slow-growing, benign skin tumor which appears as a hard lump under the skin. The tend to occur mainly in the head and neck area.
  • Primary granulocytic sarcoma: A malignant tumor derived from immature white blood cells called myeloblasts. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most commonly found in bone, soft tissue, lymph nodes and skin. Symptoms will vary according to the location of the tumor.
  • Primary malignant melanoma: Primary malignant melanomas of the GI tract are very rare and occur in the anorectum and esophagus. Criteria for primary melanoma include lack of concurrent or previous removal of a melanoma or atypical melanocytic lesion from the skin, lack of other organ involvement, and in situ change in the overlying or adjacent gastrointestinal epithelium. This latter feature, recognized histologically by the presence of atypical melanocytic cells in the basal layer of the epithelium and extending in a "pagetoid" fashion into the more superficial epithelium, may be reported in 40%-100% of primary GI melanomas.
  • Primary malignant melanoma of the cervix: A form of cervical cancer where the tumor consists of pigment containing cells.
  • Proliferating trichilemmal cyst: A rare form of ulcerating, benign tumor that generally occurs on the back of the head in older women and arises from a hair follicle. Rarely, the growth can occur on other parts of the body.
  • Psoriasis: Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition where the defective immune system causes skin cells to grow rapidly. It affects a significant number of people. Arthritis, which can be severe, is associated with the psoriasis in up to a third of cases. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it - roughly 10% of those susceptible will actually develop the condition. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Puretic syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by skin tumors and enlarged gums as well as osteopenia and joint contractures. The condition is caused by the accumulation of hyaline in the skin and other tissues.
  • Relapsing Polychondritis: A chronic disease that affects multiple joints resulting in inflammation and degeneration
  • Rhabdoid melanoma: Malignant melanoma is known to display tremendous histologic diversity. One rare variant is the rhabdoid phenotype, so called because of the appearance of cells resembling rhabdomyoblasts seen in malignant rhabdoid tumors of the kidney.
  • Rodent ulcer: Facial ulcer not actually related to rodents
  • Rombo syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by hair anomalies and skin problems.
  • Sarcoma of the skin: Skin sarcomas develop from soft tissues like skin tissues.
  • Sclerotylosis: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a skin disorder (atrophic skin fibrosis and keratoderma of the palms and soles), underdeveloped nails and bowel cancer.
  • Sebaceous gland carcinoma: This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin.
  • Seborrheic keratosis: Thickening of the skin condition usually from age
  • Secondary melanoma: Advanced melanoma means the cancer has spread from where it started to another part of the body. It is also called stage 4 melanoma. Cancer that has spread to another part of the body is called secondary cancer or metastases.
  • Segmental neurofibromatosis: A rare genetic disorder involving the development of benign nerve and skin tumors. The tumors are confined to a defined segment of the body such as on one side of the upper back.
  • Senior health conditions: Medical conditions affecting seniors, male or female.
  • Senter syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by ichthyosiform erythroderma and sensorineural deafness.
  • Signet ring cell melanoma: Two distinctive types of signet ring cells may be observed in this variant: (1) the usual type, composed of polygonal cells with accumulation of vimentin filaments in the cytoplasm, which displace the nucleus to the periphery of the cell and also confer a semilunar shape, and (2) a rarer variant, composed of cells with intracytoplasmic vacuoles and scalloped eccentric nuclei. In such situations, the neoplastic cells may resemble monovacuolated lipoblasts. Lipoblast-like cells are very unusual features of metastatic MMs and may be observed in metastatic deposits of signet ring and in balloon cell melanomas.
  • Skin adnexal tumor: Adnexal skin tumors are rare neoplasms that develop from hair follicles, sebaceous glands and sweat glands. In the majority of cases these tumors are benign, although metastases have been reported in rare occasion.
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin infection: A condition which is characterized by an infection which occurs on the skin
  • Small cell melanoma: Rare melanomas appearing in adolescence and children on scalp having characteristics that of a merkel cell melanoma and naevoid melanoma over sun damaged skin in elderly individuals.
  • Spindle cell carcinoma: Carcinoma which is usually of the squamous cell type, marked by fusiform development of rapidly proliferating cells.
  • Spitzoid melanoma: A Spitz melanoma is a type of skin tumour. They can also be called Spitz tumours, melanocytomas of Spitz, benign juvenile naevus and epithelioid cell naevus. They appear as smooth, round, dull pinkish swellings that grow to a size of about a centimetre over a period of 6 to 12 months. They then often turn darker to a tan or brown colour.Spitz melanomas are completely benign (non cancerous).
  • Squamous Cell Skin Cancer: Aggressive skin cancer arising due to sun exposure; lesions are locally invasive to surrounding tissues and may metastasise
  • Squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous: A type of skin cancer that occurs mostly on sun-exposed areas of skin but can occur elsewhere on the skin as well as mucous membranes.
  • Sun spots: Wart-like lumps from sun exposure
  • Superficial basal cell carcinoma: A common form of skin cancer which appears as irregular scaly plaques and grows slowly over a period of months or years. The cancer originates from the innermost cells (basal cells) of the top skin layer. These cancers generally occur on the parts of the skin that tend to have the most sun exposure e.g. face, shoulders, back, neck and scalp.
  • Superficial spreading melanoma: Superficial spreading melanoma is usually characterized as the most common form of cutaneous melanoma in Caucasians.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Syringocystadenoma papilliferum: A benign tumor that usually occurs on the face, neck or scalp. Malignancy and metastasis occurs very rarely. The tumor appears as a plaque, single bump or a row of bumps.
  • T-cell lymphoma of the skin: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a term that describes a group of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by localization of neoplastic T lymphocytes to the skin.
  • Treatment-related Kaposi's sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Ulcer: A local defect in the mucosa
  • Warts: Lumpy growths under the skin
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum: A rare pigmentary disease that is caused by an enzyme deficiency
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 1: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation - type 1 has the lowest level of repair and the most neurological complications.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 2: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type B is often associated with signs of Cockayne syndrome.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 3: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Neurological symptoms are rarely experienced in type 3.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 5: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type E is a very rare form of the condition and involves mild skin symptoms with no neurological symptoms.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 6: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. The skin and neurological symptoms in Type 6 tend to be mild.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 7: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type G usually involves severe neurological symptoms.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, variant type: A rare pigmentary disease that is caused by an enzyme deficiency

 

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