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Diseases » Skin conditions » Glossary
 

Glossary for Skin conditions

  • ABCD syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by albinism, deafness, a black lock of hair and intestinal abnormalities.
  • ADULT syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by nail abnormalities, abnormal teeth development, tear duct obstruction, pigmentation anomalies and hand and foot abnormalities.
  • Abdominal chemodectomas with cutaneous angiolipomas: A rare genetic condition involving the growth of a tumor-like mass of lymphatic tissue in the abdomen.
  • Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome: A rare disorder involving a number of mainly physical abnormalities.
  • Ablinism I syndrome: A recessively inherited form of albinism involving the complete lack of skin, hair and eye pigments.
  • Ablinism II syndrome: A recessively inherited form of albinism involving a reduction in skin, hair and eye pigments.
  • Acanthokeratodermia: An uncommon skin condition involving excessive growth of the horny part of the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Patients also suffer thickening of the nails.
  • Acanthoma: A rare type of skin tumor that may be benign or malignant. The symptoms are determined by the location, size and aggressiveness of the tumor.
  • Acanthosis nigricans: It is a brown to black, poorly defined, velvety hyperpigmentation of the skin usually present in the posterior and lateral folds of the neck, the axilla, groin, umbilicus and other areas.
  • Acanthosis nigricans muscle cramps acral enlargement: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle cramps, dark velvety patches of skin and large hands and feet.
  • Acanthosis nigricans, malignant: The development of skin lesions which signify the presence of malignancies - especially tumors of the gut. Patches of dry, rough bumpy skin become discolored and thickened. Mucosal tissue (inside the mouth and lips) is also often involved.
  • Achenbach syndrome: A rare condition where a blood blister the size of a coin develops spontaneously on the palm of the hand. Sharp pain and redness accompany the blood blister. In some cases the blood blister can develop after strain or temperature change.
  • Ackerman Dermatitis Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of skin and joint symptoms. It is characterized by arthritis preceded by a skin rash (interstitial granulomatous dermatitis) which can vary in appearance from person to person. The condition tends to go through periods of flares and remission.
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the face and skin.
  • Acne Keloid: Overgrowth of scar tissue caused by acne.
  • Acne Vulgaris: Another term for the common skin disorder called acne. Acne may occur just about anywhere on the body but is most common on the face, neck and back. The condition may be mild with just a few small spots or severe where large painful cysts develop. Acne generally results from dead skin blocking skin pores which results in infection.
  • Acneiform Eruptions: Skin lesions caused by or resembling acne. It may be caused by such things as infections and drug reactions.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acquired ichthyosis: Thick, scaly skin that is not inherited but is associated with certain disorders such as vitamin A deficiency, hypothyroidism and certain cancers.
  • Acral lentiginous melanoma: Acral lentigous melanoma is the most common variant of skin cancer seen in dark-skinned people. This form of melanoma appears on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet, or on nails. Lesions are usually brown, black, or multicolored with irregular borders, and flat or nodular.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrodermatitis: A skin condition that occurs mainly in children and is most often present on the limbs. It involves a bumpy skin rash with fever and malaise sometimes also occurring. The disorder itself is harmless by may be signify viral infections such as hepatitis B and Epstein-Barr.
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A rare inherited malabsorption disorder where the body is unable to absorb zinc in adequate quantities.
  • Acrodermatitis, persistent: A rare chronic skin condition characterized by the eruption of pustules that usually occur on the ends of fingers
  • Acrogeria (Gottron Type): An extremely rare, mild form of progeria.
  • Acrokeratoelastoidosis of Costa: A rare condition characterized by yellowish or flesh-colored papules or plaques which have a flat top.
  • Acrokeratosis verruciformis of Hopf: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by skin-colored wart-like lumps on the backs of the hands and feet as well as the forearms and legs.
  • Acromegaloid changes, cutis verticis gyrata and corneal leukoma: A rare disorder characterized by acromegaly (enlarged extremeties) , furrowed skin on scalp and face and corneal leukomas.
  • Acromegaloid, Cutis Verticis Gyrata, Corneal Leukoma Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of acromegaly, cutis verticis gyrate and corneal leukoma.
  • Acropustulosis: Acropustulosis is a recurrent, self-limited, pruritic, vesiculopustular eruption of the palms and soles
  • Acrospiroma: A tumor that develops in the ends of sweat glands in the skin. They are usually benign.
  • Actinic cheilitis: Degeneration of the lip due to sun damage. The condition is considered precancerous.
  • Actinic keratosis: Scaling of the skin condition usually from sunlight
  • Actinic prurigo: An inherited tendency to develop an itchy, bumpy rash on exposure to the sun. Generally only the face and lips are affected. Symptoms tend to occur seasonally.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme which results in a build-up of porphyrins or its precursors in the body. Using certain drugs or eating certain foods can trigger the symptoms of the condition.
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • Adult Acne: An eruption of 'common' acne occurring in a non-adolescent, usually women in their twenties and thirties
  • Adult onset angioedema: Tissue swelling that develops during adulthood. The condition may be caused by a variety of disorders such as certain cancers or allergy.
  • African Kaposi's sarcoma: Endemic Kaposi sarcoma (KS) occurs in people living in Equatorial Africa and is sometimes called African KS. An aggressive form of African Kaposi's sarcoma can spread quickly to the bones. Another form found in African children does not affect the skin. Instead, it spreads through the lymph nodes and vital organs, and can quickly become fatal.
  • African tick typhus: An infectious disease caused by a rikettsial bacteria and transmitted by ticks.
  • Agammaglobulinemia -- microcephaly -- craniosynostosis -- severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Agammaglobulinemia, microcephaly, and severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Akesson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excessive skin folds and furrows on the scalp, mental retardation the failure of the thyroid to develop.
  • Albinism: A rare inherited condition characterized by a lack of pigmentation in the hair, skin and/or eyes.
  • Albinism deafness syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of deafness with partial albinism involving patches of absent pigmentation in the skin and hair. The disorder is inherited in a X-linked manner.
  • Albinism immunodeficiency: A medical condition characterized by the association of immune system problems and albinism.
  • Albinism, minimal pigment type: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a total lack of pigmentation at birth. However, during the first decade of life, some pigmentation does develop in the eyes. The disorder is believed to be a part of a disorder called oculocutaneous albinism type 1B.
  • Albinism-deafness of Tietz: Tietz syndrome is a relatively rare condition characterized by deafness and albinism. It should not be confused with the similarly named Tietz's syndrome which involves inflammation of chest cartilage.
  • Alibert disease 3: An inflammatory skin disorder which involves the hair follicles in the beard area. Infection can be spread through contaminated brushes, combs and shaving tools.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: An allergic contact dermatitis is where the body's immune system causes a skin reaction in response to direct contact with an allergen. Symptoms usually only affect the skin directly in contact with the allergen but in severe cases, symptoms may spread around the contact site or even become widespread across the body.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Alopecia Areata: A condition involving one or more bald patches on the head. These patches may merge and lead to complete baldness.
  • Alopecia congenita keratosis palmoplantaris: An extremely rare condition characterized by thickening of skin on the palms and soles and lack of hair.
  • Alopecia universalis -- onychodystrophy -- vitiligo: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of total hair loss, vitiligo and abnormal nails.
  • Altamira syndrome: A disease that occurs in Altamira (Brazil) and is caused by the black fly bite (Simulium). The pathological agent has not yet been determined.
  • Alves Castelo dos Santos syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by hair, eye, skin and spinal abnormalities.
  • Amelo-cerebro-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving degeneration of the central nervous system, seizures and abnormal tooth development.
  • Amelo-onycho-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare disorder characterized primarily by tooth and nail abnormalities and reduced sweating ability.
  • Amyloidosis IX: A rare disorder where a substance called amyloid is deposited in the skin resulting in itchy, discolored bumps or nodules in the skin. No other body organs are involved.
  • Amyloidosis, Cutaneous bullous: A rare disorder where a substance called amyloid is deposited mainly around the joints which results in blistering.
  • Amyloidosis, familial cutaneous: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. The familial cutaneous form is characterized by brown skin pigmentation as well as systemic symptoms such as failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastrointestinal problems and pneumonia.
  • Amyopathic dermatomyositis: A rare disorder involving a skin rash that normally occurs with inflammation of skeletal muscles (dermatomyositis) but there is no muscle involvement. It is important to monitor patients in case muscle involvement develops.
  • Ancell's syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the development of multiple little tumors on various parts of the body that grow hair. The tumors originate mainly from the sweat and scent producing glands. The growths occur mainly on the scalp and neck. Tumors close together may merge and ulcerate or become infected. The tumors usually start after the first decade and continue to grow slowly in size and number. In rare severe cases, the cylindromas may be the size of fists.
  • Andogsky's syndrome: A condition characterized by chronic eczema-like skin lesions which develop during childhood and cataracts which develop in early adulthood. The main areas affected by the skin lesions are the neck, elbows and knees.
  • Anetoderma, perifollicular: The development of discolored spots on the inside thighs of older women. The condition generally causes no problems. It is believed to be the result of minor destruction of elastic tissue around hair follicles. Causes include endocrine anomalies, certain drugs or bacterial infections that produce enzymes that destroy elastic tissue.
  • Angiectasis pregnancy: A rare condition that occurs during the final trimester of pregnancy and involves the development of small painful areas of raised blood vessel clusters that occur on the back of the legs.
  • Angiokeratoma: A harmless, discolored, raised skin lesion involving damaged blood capillaries. The lesion ranges in color from red to blue and the skin involved is usually thickened.
  • Angioma hereditary neurocutaneous: A rare genetic condition characterized angiomas involving both the skin and nervous system.
  • Angioma serpiginosum: A rare, harmless skin disorder involving linear or snake-like patches of red skin spots caused by small blood vessels near the skin's surface. The spots may occur on any part of the body but are most common on the legs and buttocks. The disorder usually appears during childhood and tends to stabilize once puberty is reached. There is no inflammation, bleeding or changes in skin pigmentation associated with the condition.
  • Angiomatoid melanoma: Rare type of melanoma with same bizarre morphology and an unusual, comparatively benign course, after a primary melanoma.
  • Angiomatosis, diffuse corticomeningeal, of Divry and Van Bogaert: A rare condition characterized by diffuse sclerosis and clusters of capillaries in parts of the brain as well as a marbled appearance to the skin.
  • Angioneurotic Edema: Recurring periods of noninflammatory swelling involving the skin, intestinal organs, brain and mucous membranes. In severe cases, respiratory swelling can result in compromised breathing.
  • Angiotropic melanoma: Angiotropism is the presence of tumor cells closely apposed to the abluminal surfaces of blood and lymphatic vessels without intravasation. Angiotropism in melanoma could be a marker for extravascular migratory metastasis, the migration of tumor cells along the external surfaces of vessels.
  • Anhidrosis: A condition which is characterized by an absence of the ability to sweat
  • Animal-type melanoma: Pigment synthesizing melanoma is a rare histopathological variant of melanoma so termed because of prominent melanin production and its similarity to a variant of melanoma seen in grey horses.
  • Annular pustular psoriasis: Pustular psoriasis is a form of psoriasis characterized by pustules rather the skin bumps. There are various subtypes of the disorder: generalized, annular, palmoplantar or juvenile. Annular pustular psoriasis tends to have a ring-like appearance where the outer margin is red with lighter skin inside.
  • Anonychia with flexural pigmentation: A rare disorder characterized by missing nails and areas of increased and decreased pigmentation in the groin and armpits.
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Aplasia Cutis Congenita: The genetic absence of an area of skin at birth. Mostly occurs on the scalp but can occur on other parts of the body. The missing patch may be covered by a thin membrane or may be raw.
  • Aplasia cutis congenita -- epibulbar dermoids: A very rare syndrome characterized by increased skin pigmentation, a localized absence of skin (aplasia cutis congenital) and epibulbar dermoids (a benign eye tumor).
  • Aplasia cutis congenita dominant: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized by the congenital absence of skin layers on parts of the skull.
  • Aplasia cutis congenita of limbs recessive: A very rare syndrome characterized by a localized absence of skin on the limbs. The extent of the malformation is variable and but it often heals with scarring.
  • Aplasia cutis congenital -- intestinal lymphangiectasia: A rare disorder characterized by a skin defect and dilated intestinal lymph vessels.
  • Aplasia cutis myopia: A very rare syndrome characterized by a skin defect (localized absence of skin at birth) and nearsightedness and other eye anomalies.
  • Aquagenous Urticaria: An allergy to water. The condition is extremely rare with sufferers developing hives within 15 minutes of contact with water. Patients may even react to their own sweat and tears on their skin. A special foam may be rubbed regularly into the skin to previde a barrier to water contact and thus allow the person to do things like showering.
  • Argyria: Grey/black staining of the skin due to overexposure of silver salts - usually occupational exposure or medication
  • Armpit Boil: A boil that occurs in the armpit. A boil is an infected hair follicle located on the skin. The lesions if full of pus and can be quite painful.
  • Arterial dissection -- lentiginosis: A rare inherited condition characterized by arterial dissection and numerous skin macules. An arterial dissection is a blood vessel anomaly where blood leaks into the blood vessel wall through a tear in the inner lining of the blood vessel.
  • Arterial dissections with lentiginosis: A rare familial syndrome characterized by the association of aortic dissection and multiple lentigines (brown skin spots). The aorta can rupture in some cases and result in sudden death.
  • Arterial tortuosity syndrome: A rare disorder which affects the connective tissue that makes up blood vessels resulting in various arterial abnormalities. Connective tissue abnormalities also affect the skin and joints.
  • Arthralgia -- purpura -- weakness syndrome: A rare autoimmune disorder characterized mainly by weakness, joint pain, reddish or purplish skin discolorations and a blood abnormality where cryoglobulins in the blood precipitate at low temperatures.
  • Arthrogryposis -- hyperkeratosis, lethal form:
  • Asteatotic dermatitis: An itchy eczema-like skin condition involving areas of superficial cracking and mild peeling of the skin. Older people who bathe excessive in hot soapy water and live in houses with a high temperature and low humidity are the most prone to this condition. Usually the limbs are affected but the trunk may also be involved.
  • Asteatotic eczema: Asteatotic eczema is a chronic skin condition that tends to occur in old age. It usually develops on the lower legs but can occur on other parts of the body as well. Symptoms tend to be worse in dry winter weather.
  • Athlete's foot: Fungal skin condition typically of feet or toes.
  • Atopic dermatitis: Skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation, and pruritis. Often hereditary and associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 1: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q21. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 2: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 3: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 4: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17q25.3. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 5: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q12-q14. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 6: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis related allergy refers to allergies that: Atopic dermatitis related allergy refers to allergies that are related to atopic dermatitis. These allergies are allergic rhinitis (hay fever) and asthma. Atopic dermatitis is a skin condition caused by an allergic reaction - it is often called eczema. A significant number of patients who have atopic dermatitis go on to develop asthma or hay fever.
  • Atrichia with papular lesions: A rare syndrome characterized by the loss of hair soon after birth and the eventual development of a popular rash that covers all areas of skin.
  • Atrophoderma of Pierini and Pasini: A progressive skin disease characterized by violet or brown skin lesions of varying sizes.
  • Atrophoderma vermiculata: A rare disorder involving destruction of skin tissue that primarily affects the face and causes characteristic skin lesions.
  • Atypical mole: Unusual looking moles which may have the potential to become cancerous.
  • Atypical mole syndrome: A condition characterized by the development of numerous moles on the skin which may become cancerous and hence need careful monitoring.
  • Autoimmune Urticaria: An itchy rash caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: A skin rash that appears to be a result of the body's immune reaction to progesterone. As progesterone production is linked to menstrual cycles, the rash occurs usually in the week before menstruation until a few days after menstruation starts.
  • Autosensitization dermatitis: A skin reaction involving the development of a variety of skin lesions in response to infections (virus, bacteria, fungus, parasite), inflammatory skin conditions or other triggers. The skin reaction may vary considerable in appearance from itchy red skin to the development of blisters and may involve variable portions of the body.
  • Baboon syndrome: A allergic skin condition which results in redness of the buttocks, upper inner thighs and armpits. The condition can occur as a hypersensitivity reaction to ampicillin, nickel and mercury.
  • Baerensprung disease: Circular itchy patches that occur on the thighs as a result of fungal infection.
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Baldness: Lack of hair where it usually grows. Usually on the head.
  • Balloon cell metastatic melanoma: Balloon cell melanoma, a variant of malignant melanoma, has been reported on rare occasions in animals and is uncommon in man. Such tumours have variable numbers of large, round to polygonal cells with abundant, clear, often vacuolated cytoplasm containing fine melanin granules and variable amounts of lipid.
  • Baraitser burn fixen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, a skin disorder and an expressionless face.
  • Barber's rash: Skin infection in facial hair areas
  • Barber-Say syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by excessive hair growth, skin anomaly, large mouth and outward turned eyelids (ectropion).
  • Bartonellosis due to Bartonella quintana infection: A disease caused by infection with Bartonella quintana which are transmitted by the body louse. It causes trench fever but may also result in septicemia and endocarditis in patients with a weakened immune system.
  • Bartsocas Papa syndrome: A rare condition characterized by webbing of skin as well as various other physical and mental abnormalities.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 1 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 2: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 2 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 1q42.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 3: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 3 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 5p15.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 4: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 4 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 12q13.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 5: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 5 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 9p21.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 6: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 6 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 7q32.
  • Basal cell carcinoma: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer.
  • Basal cell carcinoma, infundibulocystic: A variant form of skin cancer.
  • Basal cell carcinoma, multiple: A slow growing type of skin cancer that occurs in multiples. The cancer tends to remain localized but occasionally spreads to nearby tissues. The cancer may flat, slightly raised or nodular. The lesion may vary in color - white, pink, brown, flesh-colored, pearly or waxy.
  • Basal cell carcinomas with milia and coarse, sparse hair: A rare disorder characterized mainly by skin cancer, milia and coarse, sparse hair. The milia tend to disappear without treatment by adolescence.
  • Basal cell nevus anodontia abnormal bone mineralization: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of basal cell nevus, absence of all teeth on one side of the mouth and abnormal bone mineralization.
  • Basan syndrome: A rare condition characterized by skin, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Basaran-Yilmaz syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by reduced body hair, thickened skin on various parts of the body and the presence of white nails at birth.
  • Basisquamous basal cell carcinoma: A form of skin cancer which arises from two types of skin cells (squamous and basal cells). The cancer tends to grow faster than other basal cell carcinomas which grow slowly over a period of months or years. This cancer also has the potential to metastasize. Basisquamous basal cell carcinomas generally occur on the parts of the skin that tend to have the most sun exposure e.g. face, shoulders, back, neck and scalp.
  • Battle's sign: Bruising behind the ears indicating a base of skull fracture.
  • Bazex-Dupre-Christol syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by decreased hair growth, basal cell cancers and destruction of skin follicles which tends to affect the extremities, elbows and knees.
  • Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome: A rare genetic disorder involving skin and skull abnormalities due to the premature fusion of skull bones.
  • Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrate syndrome:
  • Becker nevus syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by a pigmented hairy skin patch associated with skin, muscle or bone defects on the same side of the body as the skin lesion.
  • Becker's nevus: A rare skin disorder where an irregular pigmented patch on the skin slowly grows and becomes thick and hairy.
  • Bednar's tumor: A rare aggressive skin tumor that develops in the skin. The tumor consists of melanin-producing cells which increases the skins pigmentation in the affected area. Metastasis is rare but it often regrows after being surgically removed. It occurs mostly on the trunk, shoulders and chest.
  • Bedsores: Skin ulcers from prolonged pressure
  • Behcet's Disease: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bennion-Patterson Syndrome: A condition characterized by thickening of the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet as well as an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal cancer which increases with age.
  • Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: A rare inherited disorder that affects the skin and results in an increased risk of certain skin tumors called fibrofolliculomas which are benign.
  • Birthmark: Skin marking appearing from birth
  • Blastomycosis: A fungal infection caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis and resulting in lung, skin, bone and genitourinary involvement.
  • Blegvad-Haxthausen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by skin wasting, zonular cataract, blue eyes and osteogenesis imperfecta.
  • Bloom Syndrome: A rare genetic inherited genetic disorder which mainly affects Ashkenazic Jewish people and is characterized by short stature, malar hypoplasia, and a telangiectatic erythema of the face.
  • Blue baby: Any baby born with blueness
  • Blue nevus type: These are melanomas, that all "atypical blue nevi" are either a nevus or a melanoma, and that the trio of curious designations that serve as title of this work are mere evasions transparently from a diagnosis, straightforwardly, of 1 of only 3 possibilities, to wit, "blue nevus," melanoma, or melanoma in association with a "blue nevus." Benign, dermal melanocytic tumor characterized by an ill-defined, deep dermal proliferation of elongated and/or dendritic dermal melanocytes.
  • Blue veins: Veins that are blue in colour
  • Blueberry muffin syndrome: A manifestation of fetal rubella infection. The newborn has purplish or bluish skin lesions or bumps as well as thrombocytopenia. The skin usually clears within 6 weeks.
  • Bluefarb-Stewart syndrome: A rare disorder where blood vessel defects in a limb causes skin lesions. It most often occurs in one leg. The blood vessel defects involves abnormal connections between arteries and veins.
  • Body skin hyperlaxity due to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiency: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder caused by a deficiency of a blood coagulation factor.
  • Boeck scabies: Severe scabies caused by the infestation of huge numbers of mites (in the millions in some cases) under the skin. The scabies tend to live for up to four days as opposed to the normal one day and the condition can be quite contagious.
  • Boil: Infected puseous hair follicle on the skin
  • Book syndrome: A rare condition observed in a number of generations within one family. It was characterized by excessive sweating
  • Borrone-Di Rocco-Crovato syndrome: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal defects. Only several reported cases of the condition.
  • Boudhina-Yedes-Khiari syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by short stature, small head, mental deficiency, seizures, hearing loss and skin lesions.
  • Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome: An illness that sometimes occurs in people with gastrointestinal diseases. It is believed to be caused by a build up of bacteria in a pouch in the bowel which triggers the immune system into action.
  • Bowen Disease:
  • Bowen's disease: Intraepiderman form of squamous cell skin cancer cause by sun damage to skin.
  • Bowenoid Papulosis: Benign reddish-brown papules occurring primary in the genetalia believed to be viral in origin.
  • Brachioradial pruritus: A condition characterized by itching, burning and other sensations of the skin on one or both arms. The skin has no visible evidence of the skin unless the patient causes damage to the skin due to scratching or rubbing. The condition results from nerve damage. It is believed that in some cases the condition arises from nerve damage due to excessive sun exposure. Thus the outer parts of the arm (which tend to receive more sun) tend to be more affected than the inner parts of the arm. In other people, damage to the nerves in the neck from such things as compression or a spinal tumor may also result in the condition.
  • Brachymetapody, anodontia, hypotrichosis, albinoidism: A rare syndrome characterized by short foot bones, total absence of teeth, reduced amount of hair and lack of skin pigmentation.
  • Branchio-Oculo-Facial Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by branchial defects, lacrimal duct obstruction and pseudocleft of upper lip.
  • Breast Milk Jaundice: Jaundice in an infant caused by the presence of a particular substance in the mother's breast milk which leads to high bilirubin levels in the infant. The condition tends to run in families. The jaundice tends to persist up to six weeks after birth.
  • Broad beta disease: An inherited condition involving a defect in the transport of lipids which causes the development of lipid deposits (xanthomas) under the skin in certain parts of the body.
  • Bronze baby syndrome: A term used to describe the abnormal skin color (grey-brown or bronze) in infants undergoing phototherapy to treat jaundice.
  • Brooke-Fordyce trichoepitheliomas: A rare condition characterized by the development of multiple little tumors on the nasolabial area. Tumors close together may merge and ulcerate or become infected. The tumors usually start after the first decade and continue to grow slowly in size and number.
  • Bruck syndrome, 2: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by limited joint extension (congenital contractures), weak fragile bones and webbed skin at elbows and knees.
  • Brugsch's syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by small hands and feet as well as thickened skin on the hands, feet, scalp and face.
  • Bruising: Bleeding under skin leading to discoloration.
  • Brunzell syndrome: A rare recessively inherited syndrome characterized by a lack of skin fat (Seip syndrome), cystic angiomatosis of the long bones which can lead to fractures.
  • Brushfield-Wyatt syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental deficiency, weakness on one side of the body and large port-wine stains that cover about a third of the skin's total surface. This condition may be a variant of another condition called Sturge-Weber syndrome.
  • Bullis fever syndrome: A disease transmitted through tick bites (Ambylomma americanum). Symptoms include fever, rash and headache. The disease was first observed in soldiers training at Camp Bullis in America.
  • Bullous Pemphigoid: A chronic skin disorder characterized blistering of the skin which usually occurs on the joints, abdomen, armpit and groin areas.
  • Bullous dystrophy, macular type: A rare condition characterized by loss of scalp hair, increased skin pigmentation, small head, mental retardation, short stature and blisters. The blisters do not form necessarily on skin that has suffered trauma but occurs spontaneously.
  • Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus: A blistering disease that can develop in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The process is mediated by autoantibodies.
  • Burnett-Schwartz-Berberian syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by an inflammatory facial skin disorder and various congenital anomalies.
  • Burns: Injury from burns and scalds.
  • Buruli ulcer: Infection by a bacterium called Mycobacterium ulcerans. The infection is most common in tropical and subtropical climates. The method of transmission is uncertain but the bacteria can enter the skin if it is broken (e.g. a cut) or it may possibly be transmitted by certain African aquatic insects or mosquitoes. The ulcers may become deep enough to affect the bone and can thus result in disability or deformity.
  • Buschke Ollendorff syndrome: A rare condition involving elastin abnormalities and characterized by a mottled bone appearance and yellowish skin papules
  • Buttock Boil: A boil that occurs on the buttock. A boil is an infected hair follicle located on the skin. The lesions if full of pus and can be quite painful.
  • C Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a triangular-shaped head, facial anomalies, joint contractures and loose skin.
  • CHILD syndrome ichthyosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by unilateral hypomelia, underdeveloped skin and heart defects.
  • CREST syndrome: Group of symptoms usually related to systemic sclerosis
  • Cafe au lait spots, multiple: Multiple café-au-lait spots are normally associated with a condition called neurofibromatosis but some patients have no manifestations of neurofibromatosis other than the café-au-lait spots.
  • Calcinosis cutis: Deposit of calcium in the skin tissues. The deposits can result from skin that has suffered damage, inflammation, cancer or necrosis. It can also occur when there is abnormal calcium and phosphate metabolism within the body such as occurs when there are high blood calcium and/or phosphate levels. In other cases, it occurs for no apparent reason. One or more lesions may be present and the size and severity can vary considerably depending on the underlying cause. Some cases are benign and pose no problem.
  • Calciphylaxis: A rare fatal condition characterized by calcification of skin blood vessels and destruction of skin tissue. The condition is often associated with end-stage kidney disease.
  • Callosities, hereditary painful: A rare skin inherited condition characterized by the development of painful calluses over pressure points in the hands and feet. Occasionally blisters filled with a foul-smelling liquid form around the calluses.
  • Callus: Thickening of skin on hands or feet.
  • Camptodactyly-ichthyosis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by permanently bent fingers giving them a windmill-vane appearance as well as dry, scaly skin.
  • Cancers, Skin, General: Skin cancer is the abnormal growth of skin cells. Most skin cancers occur in sun-exposed areas of skin but can occur on skin on any part of the body. The severity of skin cancers can vary considerably depending on the particular type of skin cancer involved - melanomas are the most severe form of skin cancer.
  • Candidiasis: Fungal infection of moist areas such as mouth or vagina
  • Candidiasis familial chronic mucocutaneous, autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited condition characterized by poor immunity to fungal infections - particularly those caused by Candida albicans. Persistent fungal infections tend to affect the nails, skin or mucous membranes. The degree of severity is variable with some cases leading to fugal infection of the brain which is usually fatal.
  • Candidiasis familial chronic mucocutaneous, autosomal dominant, with thyroid disease: A dominantly inherited condition characterized by poor immunity to fungal infections (particularly those caused by Candida albicans) as will as thyroid disease. Persistent fungal infections tend to affect the nails, skin or mucous membranes. The degree of severity is variable with some cases leading to fugal infection of the brain which is usually fatal.
  • Candidiasis familial chronic mucocutaneous, autosomal recessive: A recessively inherited condition characterized by poor immunity to fungal infections - particularly those caused by Candida albicans. Persistent fungal infections tend to affect the nails, skin or mucous membranes. The degree of severity is variable with some cases leading to fugal infection of the brain which is usually fatal.
  • Carbon Baby Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by progressive increase in pigmentation of mucosal lining and skin.
  • Carbuncle: Group of multiple boils
  • Cardiofaciocutaneous Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart defects skin anomalies and frontal bossing.
  • Cardiomyopathy, dilated, with Woolly hair and keratoderma: A rare syndrome characterized by heart muscle disease involving dilation of the heart ventricles, woolly hair and thickened skin on the palms and soles.
  • Cardiomyopathy, hypogonadism, collagenoma syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized primarily by skin nodules. The skin nodules may be associated with organ system involvement resulting in a variety of other symptoms.
  • Carney syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spotty pigmentation on the skin and the development of multiple benign tumors (myxoma) that can occur just about anywhere in the body but mainly in the skin, breast and heart and endocrine glands such as the thyroid and pituitary gland. The symptoms are highly variable depending on the location, size and number of tumors. Endocrine gland tumors can affect hormone production and hence result in a range of symptoms.
  • Carotenemia: Excessive beta-carotene in the blood causing orange skin
  • Cataract and congenital ichthyosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the presence of cataracts and a dry, scaly skin condition (ichthyosis) at birth or soon after.
  • Cataract, alopecia, sclerodactyly: A rare disorder characterized by cataracts, lack of hair and skin changes in the hands and feet.
  • Cellulitis: Inflammation of skin or subcutaneous tissues.
  • Cercarial dermatitis: A short-lived rash that occurs as an allergic reaction to larval (cercariae) infection of the skin. These particular parasites use birds and animals as their first hosts. Larval eggs are excreted in the faeces and when they land in water, they hatch into larvae which then infect certain aquatic snails. The infected snails release another form of the larvae called cercariae which then search for a bird, mammal host. When they enter the skin of a human they die as humans are unsuitable hosts but the skin can produce an allergic reaction.
  • Cerebellar ataxia -- intellectual deficit -- optic atrophy -- skin abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, mental retardation, optic atrophy and skin abnormalities.
  • Cerebelloparenchymal autosomal recessive disorder 3: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by albinism, incoordination, low muscle tone and eye problems.
  • Cerebelloparenchymal disorder 3: A rare disorder characterized by mental deficiency and delayed development of speech and motor skills. The condition is nonprogressive and is caused by degeneration of a part of the brain called the cerebellum.
  • Cerebral dysgenesis, neuropathy, ichthyosis, and palmoplantar keratoderma syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal brain development, neurological problems, scaly skin and thickened skin on the palms and soles.
  • Channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain: A rare inherited anomaly where a person has no pain sensation - the patient is unable to feel physical pain. Patients can be prone to severe injuries as they are unable to detect if they've been injured or have a broken bone.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 aplasia cutis congenital: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This form of the condition is inherited recessively and involves only mild muscle symptoms as well as a scalp defect.
  • Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder characterized by reduced pigmentation, recurrent infection and neurological disorders.
  • Chediak-Higashi like syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism only.
  • Chemical burn: A chemical burn is a burn caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the chemical, the part of the body affected and the duration of the exposure to the chemical. Rapid first aid following exposure can limit the damage caused by the chemical. Chemical burns can occur when certain chemicals are accidentally swallowed, spilt on the skin, splashed in the eyes or even breathed in the case of chemical gases.
  • Chemical burn -- skin: Burns to the skin caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures.
  • Chemical-related eczema: Chemical-related eczema is a form of eczema that results from exposure to a chemical. Eczema is a type of skin inflammation or irritation that manifests as a skin rash. The amount of skin involved may vary considerable from a single small patch to widespread large areas of the body. The eczema may result from irritation due to the chemical or from an allergic response to the chemical.
  • Chickenpox: Common viral infection.
  • Chickenpox -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the development of Chickenpox during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chilblain: Skin inflammation usually in cold weather
  • Chitayat Meunier Hodgkinson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by face and finger abnormalities
  • Chloasma: Red facial marks in women related to hormones
  • Chlorpropamide-alcohol flushing: An inherited trait where consuming alcohol and chlorpropamide together can cause flushing. Chlorpropamide is a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. The flushing usually occurs within 5 minutes of the ingestion and tends to last about 15 minutes. The flushing is generally associated with low blood sugar and is thus more common in diabetics. Thus many diabetics who are being treated with the drug chlorpropamide tend to abstain from alcohol.
  • Cholestatic jaundice -renal tubular insufficiency: A very rare syndrome characterized by liver and kidney problems.
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata with steroid sulfatase deficiency: A genetic skeletal and skin disorder involving a deficiency of steroid sulfatase. The skin condition is characterized by large brownish scales which can occur almost anywhere on the skin and can be disfiguring. The face, scalp, palms and soles are usually not involved. The skeletal disorder involves abnormal bone calcification near the joints also results in shortened limbs.
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata, non rhizomelic type: A group of inherited disorder affecting the skeleton, skin, eyes and mental function. The disorders are characterized mainly by stippled epiphyses (abnormal calcification near joints) during infancy. The non-rhizomelic forms tend to be milder, with minimal or no upper limb shortening. The Joints in the ends of the arms and legs tend to be more affected. Some of the specific disorders in this group are Conradi-Hunermann disease, Happle's chondrodysplasia and brachytelephalagnic chondrodysplasia punctata. The range of symptoms and severity may vary between disorders.
  • Chondrodystrophia calcificans congenita: A rare genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, short limbs, large skin pores, sparse hair and other abnormalities.
  • Chondroid melanoma: Heterologous differentiation is exceedingly rare in melanoma. Chondroid change in the absence of osteogenic differentiation is extremely rare in malignant melanoma. Melanoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of primary cutaneous neoplasms exhibiting cartilaginous differentiation.
  • Chromomycosis: A chronic fungal infection that occurs in tropical areas. The skin lesions tend to persist for long periods of time and may become cancerous in some cases.
  • Chronic Discoid lupus: Discoid lupus Erythematosus, being a chronic condition, is common among all age groups. Discoid lupus erythematosus is a chronic skin condition characterized by inflammation and scarring type skin lesions which occur on the face, ears, scalp and at times on other body areas.
  • Chronic urticaria: Chronic vascular reaction of the upper demis marked by appearance of wheals and severe itching.
  • Circumscribed cutaneous aplasia of the vertex: A rare birth malformation where a patch of skin on the scalp is missing.
  • Clark nevus: A term used for atypical moles. These types of moles have a high likelihood of becoming cancerous.
  • Classic Kaposi's sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Clayton-Smith Donnai syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by scaly skin and facial and finger anomalies.
  • Cleft upper lip, median -- cutaneous polyps: A rare birth disorder characterized mainly by a cleft in the upper lip, central nervous system tumors and skin polyps.
  • Clouston syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by skin, hair, nail and eye abnormalities.
  • Cockayne syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a senile-like appearance, hearing and vision impairment and sun sensitive skin.
  • Cockayne syndrome type 1: A rare inherited condition characterized by short stature, light sensitivity and a prematurely aged appearance. Type 1 is an early-onset form and involves progressive symptoms that usually start after 1 year of age.
  • Cockayne syndrome type 2: A rare inherited condition characterized by severely impaired neurological development. Type 2 is a congenital form of the disorder and symptoms are apparent from birth.
  • Cockayne syndrome type 3: A rare inherited condition characterized by short stature, light sensitivity and a prematurely aged appearance. Type 3 is a late onset form of the disorder and symptoms occur in late childhood and tend to be mild.
  • Cohen-Hayden syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, eye defect and various growth abnormalities of the bone, skin and head.
  • Cold contact urticaria: A chronic condition where the skin develops hives and becomes very red and itchy after exposure to cold.
  • Cold sores: Skin cores on the skin, face, or lips.
  • Cold urticaria: Itchy red skin swellings with develop upon exposure to cold.
  • Cold-induced sweating syndrome 2: A rare disorder characterized mainly by the inability to sweat in hot weather and excessive sweating on exposure to cold weather.
  • Collagenoma, cutaneous familial: A rare inherited condition characterized primarily by skin nodules.
  • Comel-Netherton Syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by abnormally formed hair shafts and a skin condition involving scaling and redness of the skin. Patients are also predisposed to developing allergic conditions such as asthma and eczema and food allergies. The severity of the condition can vary with some infants having a poor prognosis due to severe allergies, infections and skin problems whereas others have milder symptoms and fewer allergic manifestations.
  • Condyloma: A type of wart transmitted through direct sexual contact and is caused by the human papilloma virus.
  • Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform erythroderma and Limbs Defects: A rare genetic disorder characterized by unilateral hypomelia, underdeveloped skin and heart defects.
  • Congenital Lipomatous Overgrowth, Vascular Malformations and Epidermal Nevi: A rare syndrome characterized by overgrowth of fatty tissue, blood vessel malformations and skin birth marks. The condition is a progressive one and there have been less than 20 reported cases.
  • Congenital Lipomatous Overgrowth, Vascular Malformations, Epidermal Nevi, and Skeletal/Spinal abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by overgrowth of fatty tissue, blood vessel malformations, birth marks and skeletal and spinal abnormalities. The condition is a progressive one and there have been less than 20 reported cases.
  • Congenital brain dysgenesis due to glutamine synthetase deficiency: A rare genetic metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the glutamine synthase enzyme. This results in a lack of glutamine in the serum, urine and brain and spinal fluid. The condition results in severe brain malformations and infant death within weeks of birth.
  • Congenital hypotrichosis milia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by reduced hair from birth and the development of numerous milia which tend to disappear by adolescence. The milia occur on the face, chest, armpits and genital area.
  • Congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma: A rare inherited skin disease characterized by chronic redness and the development of thick scaly skin on palms and soles.
  • Congenital ichthyosis, microcephalus, quadriplegia: A rare birth disorder characterized by scaly skin, small head and paralysis of legs and arms.
  • Congenital nonhemolytic jaundice: A rare disorder where the liver is unable to remove bilirubin from the body which results in jaundice. Chronically high bilirubin levels can lead to neurological toxicity which manifests as progressive neurological symptoms.
  • Congenital partial lipodystrophy: A rare congenital disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue mainly in the trunk and limbs.
  • Congenital psoriasis: Psoriasis is a genetically determined inflammatory and proliferatve disease, characterized by sharply, well defined plaques covered by silvery scales that appear mainly on the extensor prominence and scalp.
  • Congenital syphilis: Syphilis inherited from mother during pregnancy.
  • Connective tissue dysplasia, Spellacy type: A very rare syndrome caused by an inherited collagen disorder and characterized by skin abnormalities, skeletal and eye anomalies and joint problems.
  • Conradi-Huenermann Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, short limbs, large skin pores, sparse hair and other abnormalities.
  • Conradi-Hunermann syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, short limbs, large skin pores, sparse hair and other abnormalities.
  • Contact dermatitis: Skin reaction to an irritant
  • Contact dermatitis -like behind-knee rash: Contact dermatitis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Contact dermatitis like chest rash: Contact dermatitis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Contagious Ecthyma: A viral skin infection that occurs mainly in sheep and goats but can be transmitted to humans through contact. The virus causes painful skin nodules that occur mainly on the hand.
  • Contractures -- ectodermal dysplasia -- cleft lip palate: A very rare syndrome characterized by impaired joint mobility at birth, skin problems, cleft lip or palate and growth and psychomotor retardation.
  • Contractures hyperkeratosis lethal: A rare fatal congenital syndrome where numerous abnormalities arise from reduced fetal movement due to excessively tight skin.
  • Corneal dystrophy -- ichthyosis -- microcephaly -- mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized by vision loss, scaly skin, small head and mental retardation.
  • Corneal dystrophy -- pigmentary anomaly -- malabsorption: A very rare syndrome characterized by eye problems, pigmented skin spots and malabsorption due to chronic diarrhea.
  • Corneodermatoosseous syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by thick, scaly skin on the palms and soles, corneal changes and dental problems.
  • Corns: Conical hardened skin on the toes
  • Corpus callosum agenesis -- polysyndactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by skin and gastrointestinal defects, extra digits and skull and facial anomalies.
  • Cortical hyperostosis-syndactyly: A rare genetic disorder characterized by webbed fingers and thickening and overgrowth of bones.
  • Costello syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by papillomas which may become malignant.
  • Cote-Katsantoni syndrome: A rare condition characterized by osteosclerosis, atrial septal defect, malabsorption, neutropenia, ectodermal dysplasia, growth retardation and mental retardation.
  • Cowpox: A skin disease caused by the cowpox virus. The virus tends to occur in cows but can be transmitted to humans. Exposure usually occurs when hand-milking infected cows.
  • Cradle Cap: Common scalp condition in babies
  • Craniodigital syndrome -- mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized by webbed fingers and toes, mental retardation and skull and facial anomalies.
  • Cranioectodermal dysplasia: A rare condition involving various congenital deformities such as short stature, long head, widely spaced eyes and teeth abnormalities.
  • Craniolenticulosutural dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by skeletal defects and an unusual facial appearance consisting mainly of a prominent forehead, wide-set eyes, broad nose and a prominent forehead with a birthmark.
  • Craniosynostosis exostoses nevus epibulbar dermoid: A rare syndrome characterized by the premature fusion of skull bones, excessive bone growth (hyperostosis), epibulbar dermoids (benign eye tumor) and a skin disorder (linear verrucous epidermal nevus). Patients with this condition need to avoid using aminoglycosides as they can have a negative impact on hearing.
  • Craniosynostosis, anal anomalies, and porokeratosis: A very rare disorder characterized primarily by the premature fusion of skull bones (coronal sutures), anal anomalies and a skin disorder called porokeratosis.
  • Creeping disease: A skin disease caused by a parasite which tunnels its way through the skin leaving a visible red, itchy, linear eruption on the skin where it has been. The hookworm parasite can't use humans to complete its life cycle but continues to travel through the skin until it dies. Transmission usually occurs through skin contact with warm, moist soil contaminated by the feces of an infected animal.
  • Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the premature jointing of the skull bones as well as acanthosis nigricans which is a skin condition.
  • Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis: A rare inherited disorder involving a skin birthmark as well as a blood vessel malformation in the spinal cord (angioma). The severity of the spinal involvement is variable with neurological problems occurring as a result of compression of the spinal cord or bleeding. Other cases may be undiagnosed as the cause no symptoms.
  • Cutaneous Anthrax: A skin infection caused by the spores of the anthrax bacteria called Bacillus anthracis. The infection occurs when the spores enter broken skin and result in a small red bump which blisters. The blister ruptures and forms a dark scab over dead tissue.
  • Cutaneous Candidiasis: A condition which is characterized by a candida infection which occurs on the cutaneous surface
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: A malignancy of the T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The cancer is characterized by the excessive proliferation of T-cells which are a type of white blood cell. The degree of skin involvement is variable.
  • Cutaneous desmoplastic melanoma: Cutaneous desmoplastic melanoma is a rare variant of a spindle cell melanoma.
  • Cutaneous diphtheria: Skin infection from Diphtheria
  • Cutaneous larva migrans: A condition due to prolonged migration of nematode larvae in the skin
  • Cutaneous leishmaniasis: A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species which is transmitted through the bite of an infected sandfly. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis. Cutaneous leishmaniasis tends to be limited to skin lesions that can take weeks or years to heal, often leaving a scar.
  • Cutaneous lymphoma: Cutaneous lymphoma is a term used to describe a group of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by localization of neoplastic T lymphocytes to the skin.
  • Cutaneous mastocytosis: Skin mastocytosis
  • Cutaneous metastatic melanoma: Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer and accounts for about three-quarters of all skin cancer deaths.
  • Cutaneous mucormycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the order Mucorales which is normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses. Cutaneous mucormycosis is very rare and involves infection of the skin.
  • Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and damage of the blood vessel walls that also affects the skin. The condition may occur on its own or as a result of an underlying condition.
  • Cutaneous photosensitivity colitis, lethal: A very rare syndrome where extreme sun sensitivity of the skin is associated with difficult to treat diarrhea. Death often occurs during infancy.
  • Cutaneous vascularitis: Inflammation of blood vessels in the skin which can have any of a variety of causes such as infections or drugs.
  • Cutaneous zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses. Cutaneous zygomycosis involves infection of the skin.
  • Cutis Laxa with Bone Dystrophy: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa with Growth and Developmental Delay: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa with or without Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa, Autosomal Dominant: A rare dominantly inherited condition characterized mainly by loose skin.
  • Cutis Laxa, Autosomal Recessive, Type IIA: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa, Autosomal Recessive, Type IIB: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and a prematurely aged appearance. Many of the reported cases involved parents who were related.
  • Cutis Laxa, Debre Type: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Marmorata Telangiectatica Congenita: A rare birth disorder where dilated blood vessels on the skin's surface caused discolored patches of skin that has a marbled appearance.
  • Cutis laxa: A connective tissue disorder which may be acquired or present at birth. It is characterized by slack or loose skin which may be thicker and darker than normal.
  • Cutis laxa -- osteoporosis: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by loose skin and osteoporosis. The bones are so weak they fracture easily during infancy and can result in bone deformity.
  • Cutis laxa congenital: A rare connective tissue disorder where an infant is born with loose, elastic skin.
  • Cutis laxa, dominant type: A dominantly inherited form of cutis laxa which is characterized by loose, inelastic skin. The skin changes may begin at any age.
  • Cutis laxa, recessive: A recessively inherited form of cutis laxa which is characterized by loose, inelastic skin and is often associated with other serious internal disorders.
  • Cutis laxa, recessive type 1: A severe, recessively inherited form of cutis laxa which is characterized by loose, inelastic skin and emphysema early in life.
  • Cutis laxa, recessive type 2: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by loose skin and delayed development.
  • Cutis verticis gyrata: A rare condition characterized by skin folds and furrows on the scalp and face. It is often associated with various other conditions and abnormalities.
  • Cutis verticis gyrata -- mental deficit: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation and excessive skin folds and furrows on the scalp.
  • Cutis verticis gyrata mental deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures and eye and movement problems.
  • DOC 12 (Neutral Lipid Storage Type): A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Dandruff: White flaking and dryness of the scalp.
  • Dandy-Walker -- facial hemangioma: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a brain malformation (Dandy-Walker) and a hemangioma on the face (mass of dilated blood vessels).
  • Darier Disease: A slowly progressing inherited skin disorder characterized by small brownish warty bumps and nail abnormalities. The skin disorder because the skin cells are not held together properly.
  • Davenport-Donlan syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, white hair, contractures and papillomas.
  • De Barsy Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by loose, inelastic skin, involuntary limb movements, cloudy corneas and other abnormalities.
  • De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by sunlight sensitivity, skin atrophy and pigmentation and skin tumors as well neurologic involvement.
  • Deafness, vitiligo, achalasia: A rare disorder characterized by deafness, achalasia (difficulty swallowing) and patches of reduced pigmentation in the skin (vitiligo).
  • Deal-Barratt-Dillon syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by scaly skin, jaundice, diarrhea and Fanconi syndrome (bone marrow fails to make sufficient new blood cells).
  • Decreased pigmentation: A decrease in the melanocytic composition of the skin.
  • Decreased skin turgor: an abnormality in the skin's ability to change shape and return to normal
  • Degos Disease: A rare disorder where lesions caused by blood vessel inflammation and blockage form on the skin and eventually in the internal organs, especially in the small intestine.
  • Degos II: A rare condition characterized by the presence at birth of fixed red thickened plaques on skin over joints.
  • Delleman-Oorthuys syndrome: A rare birth disorder characterized by eye cavity cysts, brain anomalies, facial skin tags and various other skin lesions.
  • Demodicidosis: A parasitic infection caused by the Demodex mite (Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis) which normally live harmlessly in hair follicles especially on the facial area. The mite can cause symptoms in immunocompromised people.
  • Dendrolimiasis: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Dercum syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the development of painful, localized fatty skin swellings.
  • Dermal melanoma: The term "primary dermal melanoma" has been used to describe a solitary melanoma lesion confined to the dermal and/or subcutaneous tissue in primary unknown melanoma cases. There are no significant histopathological differences between primary dermal melanoma and cutaneous metastasis of melanoma. The most important distinction to be made is with metastatic melanoma, because the prognoses for stage IV melanoma and primary dermal melanoma are vastly different.
  • Dermatitis: General name for any type of skin inflammation.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis: Blistering skin rash of elbows, knees, and buttocks.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy: Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy refers to the body's immune system response to gluten. IgA antibodies drive the allergic response to gluten exposure and manifests as a distinctive skin rash. The rash usually affects the knees, elbows, back, scalp and buttocks and can come and go sporadically.
  • Dermato-cardio-skeletal syndrome Borrone type: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Dermatocardioskeletal syndrome, Boronne type: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by thick skin, thick gums, acne, short fingers and a heart defect.
  • Dermatofibroma: A benign skin growth that usually occurs on the legs but may affect the arms or trunk. The growth is usually discolored and contains hard, scar-like tissue. A minor injury such as an insect bite or a thorn can result in a dermatofibroma. The color of the nodule is variable (brown, pink, skin-colored, yellow, purplish).
  • Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: A rare form of slow growing tumor that develops deep in the skin. Metastatis is rare but it often regrows after being surgically removed. It occurs mostly on the trunk, shoulders and chest.
  • Dermatoleukodystrophy: A very rare progressive brain disease associated with thick wrinkled skin. Only two reported cases with both dying within three years of birth.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Dermatoosteolysis, Kirghizian type: A rare condition characterized by a variety of abnormalities including missing teeth, recurring skin ulceration, eye problems and nail symptoms.
  • Dermatopathia pigmentosa reticularis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by increased skin pigmentation, thickened skin on palms and soles and reduced sweating.
  • Dermatophilosis: A form of bacterial skin infection caused by Dermatophilus congolensis. Infection usually occurs in animals such as cattle and sheep but can cause skin lesions in humans.
  • Dermatostomatitis, Stevens Johnson type: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Dermo-odontodysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by tooth, skin, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Dermoid cyst: Benign cystic tumor often containing skin, hair, and other tissue
  • Desmoplastic neurotrophic melanoma: Desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma (DNM) is a rare variant of a spindle cell melanoma.
  • Devergie syndrome: A chronic skin disorder involving the development of raised spots on the skin that grow and merge into each other to produce large red scaling plaques.
  • Diabetes-like pressure ulcer: Pressure ulcer is an area of skin that breaks down when one stays in one position for too long without shifting their weight.
  • Diaper rash: Red rash in diaper area of infants
  • Diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma -- acrocyanosis: A rare disorder characterized mainly by thickening of the skin on the palms and soles as well as a bluish discoloration of the hands and feet.
  • Diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma, Bothnian type: Thickened skin on palms and soles.
  • Diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma, Norrbotten dominant type: A rare disorder characterized by thickening of the skin on the palms and soles which is associated with frequent fungal infections.
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Discoid Lupus: Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a form of lupus erythematosus marked by chronic skin eruptions. It is a chronic skin condition of sores with inflammation and scarring favoring the face, ears, and scalp and at times on other body areas.
  • Discoid eczema: Discoid eczema is a common form of skin inflammation and irritation characterized by its round or oval shape. The size of the lesions may vary from a few millimetres to centimetres across. The cause is unknown but minor injuries such as insect bites may be triggers. The lesions tend to occur most often on the limbs.
  • Discoid lupus erythematosus: Form of lupus affecting the skin.
  • Disorder of Cornification 12 (Neutral Lipid Storage Type): A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Disorder of Cornification 8, Curth-Macklin Type: A rare inherited skin disorder involving variable degrees of scaling, thickening and hardening of the skin which can occur anywhere on the body. Mild cases can involve on the palms and soles whereas severe cases may involve the whole body.
  • Dominant ichthyosis vulgaris: An inherited disorder characterized by scaling of skin.
  • Dowling-Degos disease: A rare condition characterized by progressive enlargement of pigmented areas that occur on areas of creased or folded skin such as armpits, groin, breasts and limbs.
  • Drug-Induced Pemphigus: Pemphigus is an autoimmune skin blistering disease which affects mainly the skin - mucous membranes are rarely affected. Drug-induced pemphigus is an autoimmune response to a drug.
  • Dry skin: Dryness of the skin.
  • Dubowitz Syndrome: A rare genetic and developmental disorder characterized by infantile eczema, small stature, microcephaly and peculiar facial features.
  • Duhring disease: A rare chronic skin disorder involving rashes of small skin bumps and blisters that are extremely itchy.
  • Duhring-Brocq disease: A very itchy skin rash consisting of red bumps and blisters which is often associated with intestinal sensitivity to gluten that is consumed.
  • Dykes-Markes-Harper syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by dry, scaly skin, enlarged liver and spleen and a incoordination.
  • Dyschromatosis Universalis Hereditaria 1: Dyschromatosis universalis is an inherited skin condition characterized by the progressive development of mottled skin made up of small areas of increased and decreased skin pigmentation. The trunk is the main area of skin affected but the limbs and sometimes the face may also be involved. Subtype 1 is the result of a defect on chromosome 6q24.2-q25.2.
  • Dyschromatosis Universalis Hereditaria 2: Dyschromatosis universalis is a skin condition characterized by the progressive development of mottled skin made up of small areas of increased and decreased skin pigmentation. The trunk is the main area of skin affected but the limbs and sometimes the face may also be involved. Subtype 2 is the result of a defect on chromosome 12q21-q23.
  • Dyschromatosis symmetrica hereditaria 1: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by patches of abnormal skin pigmentation affecting the face and back of hands and top of feet.
  • Dyshidrotic dermatitis: A skin disorder (eczema) that affects the soles of the feet, the palms of the hands and the sides of the fingers. There is no known cause but contributing factors include stress, hot or cold weather, pre-existing atopic condition, metal implants, smoking, and aspirin and oral contraceptive use.
  • Dyskeratosis Congenita: A rare genetic disorder characterized by sking pigmentation abnormalities, nail dystrophy and mucous membrane changes.
  • Dyskeratosis congenita of Zinsser-Cole-Engman: An inherited condition characterized by recurring painful mouth ulcers, skin pigmentation and nail abnormalities.
  • Dysmorphism -- cleft palate -- loose skin: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by facial abnormalities, an opening in the roof of the mouth and loose skin.
  • Dysplastic nevi: Intraepidermal melanocytic dysplasia which is often a precursor to malignant melanoma
  • Dysplastic nevus syndrome: A skin condition characterized by numerous atypical nevi and moles which may develop into melanomas. The nevi and moles vary in size, shape and color and tend to develop during adolescence or young adulthood.
  • Dystrophic calcinosis cutis: Deposit of calcium in the skin tissues resulting from some type of damage to the skin e.g. trauma, inflammation, cancer, necrosis. One or more lesions may be present and the size and severity can vary.
  • Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A rare inherited skin blistering condition which can vary in severity depending on how it is inherited. Recessively inherited are more severe than dominantly inherited cases and can cause the loss of patches of skin and scarring which can impair limb function.
  • ECP syndrome: A rare malformation syndrome characterized by a cleft palate and missing fingers.
  • EEC syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by absence of fingers and toes, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip or cleft palate.
  • Ear Psoriasis: Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition characterized by scaling and inflammation of the skin which can occur on virtually any part of the body. Ear psoriasis refers to psoriasis that develops on the ears. It can be the result of psoriasis spreading from the scalp and may occasionally be triggered by wearing eye glasses.
  • Eccrine acrospiroma: A rare type of benign sweat gland tumor. The tumor usually occurs as a single skin nodule. The tumor can occur anywhere on the body but is most common in the head, neck, arms and legs.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia: A group of rare inherited conditions which affect the ectodermal skin layer which includes the skin, hair, teeth and nails.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- absent dermatoglyphs: A rare condition characterized by skin, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- arthrogryposis -- diabetes mellitus: A rare syndrome characterized by diabetes, short stature and tooth, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- blindness: A rare syndrome characterized mainly be mental retardation, vision loss, short stature and teeth and hair abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- ectrodactyly -- macular dystrophy: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skin, hair, nail and eye abnormalities as well as missing fingers.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- hypohidrotic -- hypothyroidism -- ciliary dyskinesia: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia (A), nail problems (N), eye problems (O - ophthalmic), thyroid dysfunction (T), reduced sweating (H - hypohidrosis), freckles (E-ephelides), intestinal disease (E - enteropathy) and respiratory tract infections (R).
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- mental retardation -- CNS malformation: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, central nervous system disorders and skin, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- mental retardation -- central nervous system malformation: A rare syndrome characterized by severe mental retardation, hypothyroidism, abnormal brain development and hair, teeth and nail abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia anhidrotic: A rare inherited condition involving skin, hair, teeth and nail abnormalities. The condition is characterized by the absence of sweat and sebaceous glands, underdeveloped hair and teeth, characteristic face and other physical deformities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia mental retardation syndactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, webbed fingers and hair, nail and teeth abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia trichoodontoonychial type: A rare syndrome characterized by nail, tooth and hair abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia with natal teeth, Turnpenny type: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by missing teeth, sparse hair and dark velvety skin patches called acanthosis nigricans. The skin patches usually disappears during the second decade and may reoccur during pregnancy.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, Berlin type: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the absence of many or all teeth, a lack of hair, mental retardation and skin abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, Margarita type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, webbed digits, cleft lip, cleft palate, sparse hair, reduced sweating and teeth abnormalities. Progressive loss of scalp hair usually results in baldness by adulthood.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, anhidrotic with T-cell immunodeficiency, autosomal dominant: An inherited disorder characterized by dry, rough skin, sparse scalp hair, cone-shaped teeth and an immune system disorder.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, hypohidrotic, autosomal dominant: A very rare inherited disorder that affects the development of skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands during the fetal stage.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, hypohidrotic, autosomal recessive: A rare genetic multisystem disorder characterized by hair, teeth, nail and skin abnormalities and absence of certain sweat glands.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, hypohidrotic, with immune deficiency: A rare genetic disorder characterized inability to sweat, immune system problems and hair and teeth abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, sensorineural hearing loss, and distinctive facial features: A rare disorder characterized by hearing impairment, facial and hair anomalies.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia/ skin fragility syndrome: An extremely rare syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters and peels, abnormal nails and thickened skin on palms and soles. Skin blistering and peeling starts at birth.
  • Ectodermic dysplasia -- anhidrotic -- cleft lip:
  • Ectrodactyly -- Ectodermal Dysplasia -- Cleft Lip/Palate Syndrome, Type 1: EEC (Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate) is a rare inherited condition characterized by split hand and foot deformities of variable severity, cleft lip or palate and teeth and hair anomalies. There are two main types of EEC which differ in the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11. The severity and type of symptoms and deformities is highly variable.
  • Ectrodactyly -- Ectodermal Dysplasia -- Cleft Lip/Palate Syndrome, Type 3: EEC (Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate) is a rare inherited condition characterized by split hand and foot deformities of variable severity, cleft lip or palate and teeth and hair anomalies. There are two main types of EEC which differ in the origin of the genetic defect. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3q27. The severity and type of symptoms and deformities is highly variable.
  • Ectrodactyly and Ectodermal Dysplasia without Cleft Lip/Palate: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by the EEC syndrome without and oral clefting. The EED syndrome involves a hand deformity (ectrodactyly) and abnormalities of the hair, eyes and skin. The severity of the deformities is variable.
  • Eczema: Eczema is a chronic skin condition characterized by skin inflammation and irritation. The severity of extent of the condition is highly variable. It may be caused by allergies, irritants or other factors such as stress.
  • Eczema vaccinatum: A rare condition where a person who has eczema and is exposed to vaccinia through vaccination. The condition can occur even if the inoculation doesn't occur directly onto eczematous skin. The virus can also be transferred to an eczema sufferer from a recently vaccinated person. Severe untreated cases can result in death.
  • Ehlers Danlos syndrome type 4, autosomal dominant: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by delicate skin, fragile blood vessels, distinctive facial features and minimal joint problems - previously known as EDS type 4.
  • Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Dysfibronectinemic type: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A group of inherited connective tissue disorders primarily involving the joints and skin. There are 11 disorders in the group.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type I: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible joints, hyperextensible skin and poor wound healing.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by tenascin-X deficiency: A rare genetic disorder which is similar to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and involves a deficiency of tenascin-X which affects connective tissue. The main symptoms are loose joints, partially dislocated joints and fragile, hyperextensible skin.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type 3: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type 4: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by small joint hypermobility, easy bruising and characteristic facial appearance - a vascular or ecchymotic form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, hyperextensible skin and poor wound healing - a milder form of Type 1 with hypermobility limited to hands and feet.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by small joint hypermobility, easy bruising and characteristic facial appearance - a vascular or ecchymotic form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IX: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder involving a defective copper metabolism and characterized by mildly hyperextensible skin, lax joints, bladder problems and chronic diarrhea.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type V: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility, moderate joint hypermobility and moderate vascular fragility.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, scoliosis and fragile sclera of the eye - Ehlers Danlos type with predominant ocular abnormalities.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, hyperextensible skin and joint dislocations.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type X: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with Platelet Dysfunction from Fibronectin Abnormality: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with periventricular heterotopia: The association of a brain malformation (periventricular nodular heterotopia) with a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, 6B: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, scoliosis and fragile sclera of the eye - Ehlers Danlos type with predominant ocular abnormalities but lysyl-hydroxylase activity is normal1.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Beasley Cohen type: A rare condition where mental retardation, deafness and cataracts are associated with a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, VIIB: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible and fragile skin and hypermobile joints which leads to dislocations, osteoarthritis and fractures. Type 7B is milder than type 7A and is caused by a defect on the COL1A2 gene.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, X-linked: A rare developmental brain abnormality. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome Xq28.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, arthrochalasic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible and fragile skin and hypermobile joints which leads to dislocations, osteoarthritis and fractures - previously known as EDS types 7A and 7B.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cardiac valvular form: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility - a combination of ED types I and II.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, dermatosparaxis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility hypermobile joints and fragile skin which loses its elasticity - previously known as EDS type 7C.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, dermatospraxis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility hypermobile joints and fragile skin which loses its elasticity - previously known as EDS type 7C.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobile type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and smooth hyperextensible skin as well as joint pain and discolations.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, hyperextensible skin and - previously known as EDS type 3.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliosis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder caused by deficiency of the lysyl hydroxylase enzyme and is characterized by progressive scoliosis and muscle weakness and fragile sclera - previously known as EDS type 6.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, progeroid form: A connective tissue disorder caused by an enzyme (xylosylprotein 4-beta-galactosyl transferase) deficiency.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, progeroid form 2: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, fragile skin, mental retardation and short stature.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, tenascin-X deficiency: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by delicate skin, fragile blood vessels, distinctive facial features and minimal joint problems - previously known as EDS type 4.
  • Ehlers-Danlos, syndrome, periodontitis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Elastoma Intrapapillare Perforans Verruciformis: A rare skin condition characterized by the development of small, usually red, bumps on the skin. Abnormal skin fibre tissue forms from the inner skin layer to the outer skin layer which in turn causes the top skin layer to respond to it as if it were a foreign particle i.e. inflammation. The skin bumps that develop are small and often form a circular, linear or snake-like pattern. The back of the neck is the most commonly affected part of the body with the arms, face and legs affected to a lesser degree. Rarely, the trunk may be affected. It may occur for no apparent reason (idiopathic), as a response to certain drugs such as Penicillamine (drug-induced) or it may be associated with inherited conditions such as Ehlers Danlos syndrome, Marfan Syndrome and Down Syndrome.
  • Elattoproteus syndrome: A rare disorder involving a lack of growth of various parts of the body such as the skin and the fatty layer under the skin.
  • Electrical burns: Burns caused when an electric current pass through the body or part of it. The symptoms and severity of the burn depends on the strength of the electrical current, the duration of the exposure and the part of the body involved. Prompt treatment in more severe cases can improve the prognosis.
  • Elephant man in context of NF: A rare disorder where a limb becomes enlarged due to neurofibromatosis of the skin and the tissue under it. Neurofibromatosis is a disorder involving the development of benign nerve and skin tumors. When large areas of nerves are affected in one limb then the limb becomes enlarged.
  • Elephantiasis: Lymphatic obstruction which causes severe swelling in the legs and groin area. It is usually caused by infection with a parasitic worm which is transmitted by mosquito bites.
  • Elliott-Ludman-Teebi syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by excessive skin folds on the limbs and back, psychomotore retardation, hernia and various other abnormalities.
  • Encephalo cranio cutaneous lipomatosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by craniofacial lipomas, cerebral atrophy and patches of alopecia.
  • Environmental allergen related eczema: Environmental allergen related eczema is a form of eczema that results from exposure to an environmental allergen such as moulds, pollens or dust mite. Environmental allergens are more likely to cause allergic conditions such as hay fever and asthma but can cause eczema in some cases or exacerbate pre-existing cases. Eczema is a type of skin inflammation or irritation that manifests as a skin rash. The amount of skin involved may vary considerable from a single small patch to widespread across large areas of the body.
  • Eosinophilic fasciitis: A rare disorder where the skin on the limbs become painfully inflamed and looses it's elasticity.
  • Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis: A rare skin disorder characterized by the recurring development of characteristic skin papules and pustules.
  • Epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma: The most common type of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) in the United States is epidemic or AIDS-related KS. This type of KS develops in people who are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
  • Epidermal nevus -- vitamin D resistant rickets: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the presence of birth marks on the skin, bone abnormalities and mental retardation.
  • Epidermalolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermoid carcinoma: A non-small-cell type of lung cancer. The cancer develops from cells that line the inside of the lungs.
  • Epidermolysa bullosa simplex and limb girdle muscular dystrophy: A rare syndrome involving fragile skin that blisters easily as well as muscle weakness and wasting in the head and limbs. The severity of the blistering and muscle weakness is variable with some sufferers dying during infancy.
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica, Autosomal Dominant: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes even with minor skin trauma. The blistered areas become scarred. The condition is caused by a defect in the collagen gene. The skin sensitivity may improve with age.
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica, Pretibial: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes even with minor skin trauma. The skin condition also involves itching which usually doesn't respond to conventional therapies. The blistered areas become scarred. The condition is caused by a defect in the collagen gene. The skin sensitivity may improve with age.
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Pruriginosa: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of skin blistering and scarring mainly on the shins. The condition is caused by a defect in the collagen gene. The skin sensitivity may improve with age.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa: A group of rare inherited skin diseases characterized by fragile skin which forms blisters with even minor injuries. The blisters can be painful and can occur anywhere on the skin and even inside the digestive tract.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: An acquired autoimmune skin condition characterized by blisters which cause scarring on the skin of joints and sometimes the skull.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, Bart type: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes as well as areas of missing skin at birth. Nail abnormalities are also present.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, dominant type: A relatively mild form of the skin disease characterized by fragile, blistered skin.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa herpetiformis, Dowling-Meara: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder where blisters occur anywhere on the skin but particularly on the palms, soles, trunk, neck and around mouth. The blisters heal without scarring.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa intraepidermic: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by separation of the layers within the skin which results in fragile, blistered skin. The blisters usually heal without scarring and the skin that is most often placed under trauma (feet and hands) is the most affected.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa inversa dystrophica: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily. The corneas, vulval and anal areas are involved as well as the trunk, neck, thighs and legs.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with mottled pigmentation: A variant of a skin blistering disease which also involved a skin pigmentation anomaly.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Cockayne-Touraine type: A form of skin disease where fragile skin blisters if it suffers some sort of physical trauma. The blisters do not cause scarring and are exacerbated by warm weather.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Koebner type: A rare genetic skin blistering disorder where fragile skin blisters upon minor trauma. The blistering is widespread and can cause severe scarring which can affect growth.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Ogna type: An inherited skin blistering condition characterized by blisters on palms and soles.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia: A rare inherited blistering skin disorder which also involves a defect where the digestive system is closed off in the pyloric area. Death generally occurs even if the defect is corrected.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, acquired:
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, dermolytic: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily due to defective skin collagen. The mucosal lining of the mouth and even intestines may be effected in severe cases.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, generalized atrophic benign: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily and often results in scars after healing. The condition is generally quite mild compared to other skin disorders involving fragile blistering skin.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, junctional: A rare inherited skin disease which is characterized by fragile skin which readily forms skin blisters and can result in fatal complications.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, junctional, Herlitz-Pearson: A rare blistering skin disease which can often result in infant death
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, junctional, with pyloric atrophy: A rare inherited skin disease which is characterized by fragile skin which readily forms skin blisters as well as obstruction of the passage from the stomach to the intestine (pylorus). Death usually occurs within weeks of birth.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, late-onset, localized junctional, with mental retardation: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, hair and nail disorders, absence of teeth and areas fragile skin that blisters easily.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, lethal acantholytic: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by extremely fragile skin and mucous membranes which blisters and peels. The majority of the skin blisters and peels within a week of birth. Severe fluid loss and death follows soon after.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, pretibial: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily due to defective skin collagen. The skin on the front of the shins is usually the main area affected in this form.
  • Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by blistering, redness, scaling and ultimately thickening of the skin that occurs from birth. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Epidermolytic epidermolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma Vorner type: A rare skin disorder characterized by thickening of the skin on the palms and soles as well as degeneration of some layers of the skin tissue.

 

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