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Diseases » Skin rash » Glossary
 

Glossary for Skin rash

  • Accutane -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Accutane during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Acebutolol Hydrochloride -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that using Acebutolol Hydrochloride during pregnancy produces no harmful effects on the developing fetus. Acebutolol Hydrochloride is a beta blocker medication used to treat high blood pressure and abnormal heart rhythm. Other reports indicate that use in pregnant women also produces no harmful effects on the fetus.
  • Acetazolamide -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on mice, rats and rabbits indicate that the use of Acetazolamide during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Acetohexamide -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on mice indicate that the use of Acetohexamide during pregnancy may cause death during the embryonic stage.
  • Acitretin- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Acitretin during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. Acitretin should not be taken by women who are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Ackerman Dermatitis Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of skin and joint symptoms. It is characterized by arthritis preceded by a skin rash (interstitial granulomatous dermatitis) which can vary in appearance from person to person. The condition tends to go through periods of flares and remission.
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the face and skin.
  • Acrodermatitis: A skin condition that occurs mainly in children and is most often present on the limbs. It involves a bumpy skin rash with fever and malaise sometimes also occurring. The disorder itself is harmless by may be signify viral infections such as hepatitis B and Epstein-Barr.
  • Acrodynia: Symptoms caused by chronic mercury poisoning in infants in children.
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • African Sleeping sickness: Fly-borne African parasitic disease.
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: An allergic contact dermatitis is where the body's immune system causes a skin reaction in response to direct contact with an allergen. Symptoms usually only affect the skin directly in contact with the allergen but in severe cases, symptoms may spread around the contact site or even become widespread across the body.
  • Alprazolam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alprazolam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amiloride -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiloride during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Aminophyllin -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that the use of Aminophyllin during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Amobarbital -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amobarbital during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amyopathic dermatomyositis: A rare disorder involving a skin rash that normally occurs with inflammation of skeletal muscles (dermatomyositis) but there is no muscle involvement. It is important to monitor patients in case muscle involvement develops.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- plasma cell type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The plasma-cell type tends to involve systemic symptoms such as fever and weight loss due to the destruction of red blood cells.
  • Angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia lymphadenopathy: A rare immune system disorder which is similar to lymphoma. The condition is progressive but the course varies with some patients surviving a long time without treatment and others surviving only a short period of time.
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Antihypertensive drug allergy: Taking antihypertensive drugs (blood pressure-lowering drugs) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Asian Dendorlimus pini caterpillar poisoning: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain a poisonous caterpillar called Dendorlimus pini. Contact with the cocoon can also cause symptoms. These caterpillars can be found in Asia, north Africa and eastern Europe.
  • Atenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atenolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Atlantic Poison oak poisoning: Atlantic Poison oak is a tall shrub which has a distinctive leaf shape. It is often found growing in the wild. The leaves have small clumps of hairs on the underside. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Atopic dermatitis: Skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation, and pruritis. Often hereditary and associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Azithromycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Azithromycin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Baby bottle nipples induced allergies: Baby bottle nipples induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in Baby bottle nipples . Symptoms usually involve the mouth.
  • Bartonella: A class of bacteria that can infect humans at a range of different sites. The most well known is Cat Scratch Disease, caused by B.henselae.
  • Bartonellosis: An infectious disease caused by Bartonella bacilliforms and transmitted by sandflies. It causes fever, anemia and a skin rash.
  • Bartonellosis due to Bartonella quintana infection: A disease caused by infection with Bartonella quintana which are transmitted by the body louse. It causes trench fever but may also result in septicemia and endocarditis in patients with a weakened immune system.
  • Beclomethasone Dipropionate -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that the use of Beclomethasone Dipropionate during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Bejel: An infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum which is similar to the organism that causes syphilis but is not sexually transmitted.
  • Benazepril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benazepril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Benazepril Hydrochloride -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that the use of Benazepril Hydrochloride during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Benztropine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benztropine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Benztropine Mesylate -- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Benztropine Mesylate during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Betaxolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Betaxolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Biaxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Biaxin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Biotinidase deficiency, late onset: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes. The severity of symptoms may vary depending on the degree of deficiency. Severe cases can result in metabolic acidosis which can lead to death if treatment isn't given.
  • Birth control pill poisoning: Birth control pill contain hormones such as estrogen and progestin and excessive ingestion of the pills can result in relatively minor symptoms - usually there are no serious problems associated with the ingested of many birth control pills at one time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Bisoprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bisoprolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Borreliosis: An infectious bacterial disorder that is transmitted by ticks and causes skin rashes joint swelling and other symptoms similar to the flu.
  • Bortonneuse fever: A mild infectious disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia Conorrii. The disease is transmitted by a dog tick (Riphicephalus sanguineus) and is most common in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Incubation usually takes about one week.
  • Brevibloc -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Brevibloc (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bronchioalveolar Carcinoma: Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is a rare type of lung cancer, it is a sub-type of lung adenocarcinoma
  • Browntail moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Bubble bath allergy: An immune-mediated reaction to exposure to bubble bath solutions. Bubble bath allergy tends to be more common in children and symptoms can vary in nature and severity.
  • Bumetanide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bumetanide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Busulfan -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Busulfan during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Calciphylaxis: A rare fatal condition characterized by calcification of skin blood vessels and destruction of skin tissue. The condition is often associated with end-stage kidney disease.
  • Captopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Captopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carbimazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbimazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cefaclor -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cefaclor (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ceftazidime -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ceftazidime (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celexa -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Celexa (an antidepressant) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Cellulitis: Inflammation of skin or subcutaneous tissues.
  • Cephalexin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cephalexin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ceptaz -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ceptaz (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chemical allergy: A chemical allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients depending on the type and duration of the exposure and individual response.
  • Chemical burn: A chemical burn is a burn caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the chemical, the part of the body affected and the duration of the exposure to the chemical. Rapid first aid following exposure can limit the damage caused by the chemical. Chemical burns can occur when certain chemicals are accidentally swallowed, spilt on the skin, splashed in the eyes or even breathed in the case of chemical gases.
  • Chemical burn -- skin: Burns to the skin caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetophenone: Acetophenone is a chemical used mainly as a fragrance, food flavoring agent and as a solvent for plastics and resins. It is also found naturally in small quantities in foods such as bananas, apples and beef. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylic acid: Acrylic acid is a chemical used mainly in the production of resins and acrylic acids which are usually used in adhesives and coatings. It is also used in water treatment and in the production of plastics and detergents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzo (a) Pyrene: Benzo (a) Pyrene is a chemical emitted in vehicle exhaust and during burning of wood and coal. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Deoderant: Deoderants contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Depilatories: Depilatories are used to remove hair from parts of the body. They contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical-related eczema: Chemical-related eczema is a form of eczema that results from exposure to a chemical. Eczema is a type of skin inflammation or irritation that manifests as a skin rash. The amount of skin involved may vary considerable from a single small patch to widespread large areas of the body. The eczema may result from irritation due to the chemical or from an allergic response to the chemical.
  • Child health conditions: Any medical conditions typically afflicting children.
  • Chlordiazepoxide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlordiazepoxide (a sedative or hypnotic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chlorpropamide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpropamide (an antidiabetic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cholestyramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cholestyramine (cholesterol-lowering drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chrome contact allergy: Chrome contact allergy usually refers to an allergic response to chromium salts which are found in a wide range of products such as leather, paint and cement. Sensitization usually occurs in a workplace settings.
  • Chronic vitamin A toxicity: Chronic excessive ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms.
  • Clarithromycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clarithromycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clobazam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clobazam (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clorazepate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clorazepate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Condoms and diaphragms induced allergies: Condoms and diaphragms induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in condoms and diaphragms.
  • Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Fetal infection with toxoplasmosis.
  • Contact dermatitis: Skin reaction to an irritant
  • Cromolyn Sodium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cromolyn Sodium (an asthma preventer) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Croton poisoning: The croton is a shrub which bears white flowers and leaves with white, red or yellow coloration through them. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause skin irritation.
  • Cutaneous Candidiasis: A condition which is characterized by a candida infection which occurs on the cutaneous surface
  • Cyclosporin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cyclosporin (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cytarabine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cytarabine (a chemotherapy drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Deafness peripheral -- neuropathy -- arterial disease: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by artery disease, deafness and peripheral neuropathy.
  • Declomycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Declomycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Demeclocycline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Demeclocycline (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dermatitis: General name for any type of skin inflammation.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis: Blistering skin rash of elbows, knees, and buttocks.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy: Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy refers to the body's immune system response to gluten. IgA antibodies drive the allergic response to gluten exposure and manifests as a distinctive skin rash. The rash usually affects the knees, elbows, back, scalp and buttocks and can come and go sporadically.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Diclofenac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diclofenac (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dienestrol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dienestrol (a synthetic form of Viagra) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diethylstilbestrol: A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen
  • Diflucan -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diflucan (an antifungal drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dilantin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Dilantin (anti-seizure medication) during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dilor -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dilor (a bronchodilator) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diltiazem -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diltiazem during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dimenhydrinate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dimenhydrinate (an anti-nausea drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diphenoxylate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diphenoxylate (an antidiarrhea drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diseases contagious contagious mother-to-fetus: Diseases contagious from mother to a fetus during pregnancy
  • Diseases contagious during childbirth: Diseases that are contagious during childbirth
  • Diuril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diuril ( a diuretic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dolobid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dolobid (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Domperidone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Domperidone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Dramamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dramamine (an anti-nausea drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Dyphylline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dyphylline (a bronchodilator) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dysbarism: A condition that occurs when there is a change in the surrounding pressure such as when scuba diving or moving to places of different altitudes. Dysbarism can occur when pressure increases or decreases and includes conditions such as decompression sickness, barotraumas, nitrogen narcosis, high pressure nervous system and atrial gas embolism.
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Echinacea -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Echinacea during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Eczema: Eczema is a chronic skin condition characterized by skin inflammation and irritation. The severity of extent of the condition is highly variable. It may be caused by allergies, irritants or other factors such as stress.
  • Egg Hypersensitivity: An allergic reaction to eggs that is caused by a hypersensitive immune system.
  • Elastosis perforans serpiginosa: A rare skin condition characterized by the development of small, usually red, bumps on the skin. Abnormal skin fibre tissue forms from the inner skin layer to the outer skin layer which in turn causes the top skin layer to respond to it as if it were a foreign particle i.e. inflammation. The skin bumps that develop are small and often form a circular, linear or snake-like pattern. The back of the neck is the most commonly affected part of the body with the arms, face and legs affected to a lesser degree. Rarely, the trunk may be affected. It may occur for no apparent reason (idiopathic), as a response to certain drugs such as Penicillamine (drug-induced) or it may be associated with inherited conditions such as Ehlers Danlos syndrome, Marfan Syndrome and Down Syndrome.
  • Enalapril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Enalapril (an ACE inhibitor) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Environmental allergen related eczema: Environmental allergen related eczema is a form of eczema that results from exposure to an environmental allergen such as moulds, pollens or dust mite. Environmental allergens are more likely to cause allergic conditions such as hay fever and asthma but can cause eczema in some cases or exacerbate pre-existing cases. Eczema is a type of skin inflammation or irritation that manifests as a skin rash. The amount of skin involved may vary considerable from a single small patch to widespread across large areas of the body.
  • Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome: A rare condition that occurs in some people who take the antidepressant L-tryptophan.
  • Epoetin alfa -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Epoetin alfa (used to treat some forms of anemia) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Epogen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Epogen (used to treat some forms of anemia) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Erucism: Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar spines. The reaction can be cause by contact with the spines or hairs of the caterpillar. Even airborne caterpillar hair can cause symptoms as can spines or hair on dead caterpillars.
  • Erysipelas: A severe streptococcal bacterial infection where infection spreads from the skin to tissue underneath. The face and extremities are the usual sites affected.
  • Erythema dyschromicum perstans:
  • Erythrasma: A condition where there is a bacterial skin infection that is located in the armpits or the groin
  • Erythrodermic eczema: Erythrodermic eczema is a severe condition that results from worsening eczema.
  • Esmolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Esmolol (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ethosuximide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethosuximide (antiseizure medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride mix allergy: A Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride which is often found in medicinal preparations such as skin creams and nose drops. It also has various industrial uses. Exposure is usually through skin contact and hence results mainly in skin symptoms. Exposure can occur in an occupational setting especially where the chemical is used in industrial applications.
  • Ethylmalonic aciduria: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by neurological and vascular symptoms caused by an excessive buildup of ethylmalonic aciduria.
  • Fabry's Disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Felodipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Felodipine (an antihypertensive drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Fire coral larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of fire coral can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The condition most often occurs in places such as Japan and Eastern Russia.
  • Flavivirus Infections: Infection with a virus from the Flaviviridae family of viruses. Infections by these pathogens include Dengue fever, Rocio encephalitis, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis. Transmission usually occurs through the bite of a mosquito.
  • Fluconazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Fluconazole (an antifungal drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Flucytosine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flucytosine (an antifungal drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Fluorouracil -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Fluorouracil (a chemotherapy drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- MSG: An intolerance to MSG is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to a food additive called MSG which is used in a number of foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- amines: An intolerance to amines is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to amines which are found naturally in foods such as bananas, pineapples, vegetables, red wine, citrus fruit and many other foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the substance. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- citric acid intolerance: An intolerance to citric acid is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to citric acid or foods containing citric acid. Citric acid can be found naturally in foods but is also frequently used as an additive to various foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of citric acid required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- food additives: An intolerance to food additives is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to food additives. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- salicylate: An intolerance to salicylates is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to salicylates which is an ingredient in aspirin but is also found naturally in various fruit, vegetables, herbs and spices. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the salicylate. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulfite: An intolerance to sulfites is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulfites which is often used as a preservative in a variety of foods and medications including meats, salads and dried fruits. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the sulfite. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Fortaz -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Fortaz (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Fresh Mangrove caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Fresh Mangrove caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Frisium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Frisium (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Gemfibrozil -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Gemfibrozil during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Giant silkworm poisoning: A pale, yellow-green caterpillar with red legs which has poisonous green spines on parts of its back. It is commonly found in North America.
  • Graft versus host disease -- chronic: A condition that occurs as a complication of bone marrow transfusion or leukocyte transfusion. The introduced transfusion material produces immune cells against the host's body. The chronic form of the condition usually results in symptoms 3 months or more after the transfusion.
  • Granuloma annulare: A harmless skin disease characterized by raised, bumpy, ring-shaped skin lesions.
  • Granulomatous arthritis of childhood: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Gypsy moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Gypsy moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • HIV related skin conditions: Skin conditions which occur in case of HIV due to decreased body immunity.
  • Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease: Common contagious viral infant or child condition
  • Hand-Foot-Mouth Syndrome: An infectious viral disease caused by the coxsackievirus A. The disease is characterized by the development of blisters in the mouth and on hands and feet. The disease is spread by contact with body fluids from an infected person and the incubation period is 3 - 7 days. The infection is most common in children under the age of ten but can occur in teenagers and sometimes in adults.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Polygonum multiflorum: The root from the Polygonum multiflorum can be used as a herbal agent to treat constipation, insomnia and vertigo. The herbal agent contains anthraquinones which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Peppermint Oil: Peppermint Oil can be used as an antispasmodic (to treat nausea, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome) and as an antibacterial. The herbal agent contains various chemicals (menthol, menthone, methyl acetate) which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Sabah vegetable: Sabah vegetable can be used as a herbal agent to treat obesity and prevent vision problems. The herbal agent contains a chemical (papvarine alkaloids) which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Heroin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Heroin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Hickory tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Hickory tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Homologous wasting disease: A term used to describe the disease state resulting from a graft versus host reaction. Graft versus host reaction occurs when the immune system of a transplant patient attacks the transplanted tissue but in homologous wasting disease the immune cells in the transplanted tissue actually attacks the host tissues. The condition occurs most often after a bone marrow transplant.
  • House dust allergy: House dust allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to allergens dound in household dust such as pet dander, mold and dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Human carcinogen -- Myleran: Myleran is deemed to be carcinogenic to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Myleran exposure is associated mainly with an increased risk of developing leukemia.
  • Hydrochlorothiazide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Hydrochlorothiazide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Hydroid poisoning: Hydroids are a type of jellyfish commonly found in the warmer oceans of the world.
  • Hydroxychloroquine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Hydroxychloroquine (an antimalarial drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Hypersensitive: Excessive sensitivity to sensations or stimuli
  • Hypersensitivity reaction: Hypersensitivity reaction, also called an allergic reaction, is a condition in which the body is sensitive to a particular substance (allergen) and reacts with certain symptoms after exposure to the allergen.
  • Hypersensitivity to drugs: increased sensitivity to a particular drug
  • IgE mediated gastrointestinal food allergy: An adverse reaction by the body's immune system to food that is driven by IgE. IgE antibodies specific to food molecules bind with the circulating food allergen and cause the release of immune response molecules such as cytokines. Symptoms usually occur soon after exposure to the allergen and usually cause skin symptoms. Severe cases may result in anaphylaxis. It is associated with allergic conditions such as pollen-food allergy and other oral allergies and immediate gastrointestinal hypersensitivity.
  • Impetigo: Contagious skin rash from bacteria
  • Ipratropium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ipratropium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Irritant contact eczema: Irritant contact eczema is a form of eczema that occurs when an irritating substance comes into direct contact with the skin. Eczema is a type of skin inflammation or irritation that manifests as a skin rash. This form of eczema often occurs in occupational settings.
  • Isoniazid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Isoniazid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Isothiazolinone allergy: An Isothiazolinone mix allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Isothiazolinone mix which is used mainly as a preservative in products such as cosmetics, toiletries and laundry products. Exposure is usually through skin contact and hence results in skin symptoms.
  • Isotretinoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Isotretinoin (an acne treatment drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Itraconazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Itraconazole (an antifungal drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Japanese poinsettia poisoning: The Japanese poinsettia is a shrubby plant with thick, succulent, green stems. The flowers form on the ends of the branches and are red. The plant is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin contact with the sap can also cause skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Juvenile dermatomyositis: A very rare autoimmune disorder where the body's own immune system attacks blood vessels and causes them to become inflamed. The condition is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic pinkish-purple rash.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer that occurs in children and involves the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Kaposi's Sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Keflex -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Keflex (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Klaricid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Klaricid (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Klonopin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Klonopin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Latex allergies: When a person has an allergic reaction to latex
  • Latex catheters induced allergies: Latex catheters induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in catheters. Symptoms may vary depending on the location of the catheter.
  • Ledermycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ledermycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lepidopterism: A systemic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Leukemia, T-Cell: A form of blood cancer characterized by the proliferation of cancerous T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The exact symptoms and progression vary depending on the subtype involved.
  • Librium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Librium (a sedative or hypnotic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lisinopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lisinopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Local anaesthetic allergy: Using Local anaesthetic can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Loperamide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Loperamide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lorazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lorazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lufyllin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lufyllin (a bronchodilator) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lymphadenopathy, angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia: A progressive immune system disorder that usually affects people over the age of 50 and is characterized by chills, sweating, weight loss, skin rashes.
  • Lymphangitis: Inflammation of the lymphatic channels caused by an infectious agent.
  • Lymphomatoid papulosis: A chronic skin disease characterized by recurring patches of skin bumps and nodules that occur mainly on the trunk, arms and legs. Scarring may occur in some cases. The skin rash heals but reoccurs intermittently over many years.
  • Marine turtle poisoning: Marine turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Green Sea Turtle: Green Sea turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Hawksbill Turtle: Hawksbill turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Leatherback Turtle: Leatherback turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Loggerhead Turtle: Loggerhead turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Soft-shelled Turtle: Soft-shelled turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Medroxyprogesterone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Medroxyprogesterone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mefenamic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mefenamic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Meningococcal infection: A rare infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Neisseria meningitides.
  • Meperidine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Meperidine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Meprobamate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Meprobamate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mercaptobenzothiazole allergy: A Mercaptobenzothiazole allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Mercaptobenzothiazole which is used mainly in the manufacturing process of rubber. Exposure routes can include skin contact or inhalation.
  • Mercury poisoning -- Folk Remedies: Various folk remedies and medicines contain inorganic mercury and mercury salts. They can lead to mercury poisoning and severe cases can result in death. Children tend to be more sensitive to the effects of mercury poisoning than adults. Even low levels of exposure can cause neurological symptoms in infants and young children. Fetal exposure to mercury can also result in symptoms.
  • Mercury poisoning -- consumption of contaminated fish: Eating fish contaminated with mercury can lead to mercury poisoning in humans. The severity and range of symptoms experienced can vary greatly depending on the level and duration of exposure. Severe poisoning can lead to death. Pregnant women who eat mercury contaminated fish may give birth to infants who suffer symptoms such as ataxia, tremors, seizures, mental retardation and cerebral palsy. An epidemic was reported where hundreds of Japanese villagers suffered mercury poisoning after eating fish contaminated by a nearby factory. Nearly half of the victims eventually died and children born during that period suffered a variety of neurological problems.
  • Mesalazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mesalazine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Mesquite stinger caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite stinger caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Metformin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Metformin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Methyclothiazide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methyclothiazide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Methylmalonicaciduria with homocystinuria, cobalamin F: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (cbl F) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylphenidate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methylphenidate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Metolazone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Metolazone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Metoprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Metoprolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Miconazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Miconazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mild allergy:
  • Millian erythema: Symptoms that occur following a course of drug injections with drugs such as arsphenamine.
  • Mold allergy: A mold allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a mold. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Morgellons Disease: A rare disorder involving a variety of skin symptoms such as unusual sensations, skin lesions and the presence of fiber-like particles in or on the skin. There is still dissension over whether this is an actual disorder or whether it is a psychotic disorder or a skin disorder. Further research is being planned.
  • Morphine allergy: Taking morphine (a painkiller) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Motilium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Motilium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mucha-Habermann Disease: A condition which is characterized by rashes and small lesions of the skin
  • Multi-centric Castleman's Disease: A rare disorder characterized by a generalized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which forms a tumor-like growth. This form of Castleman's disease is progressive and can be serious.
  • Multiple carboxylase deficiency, propionic acidemia: A disorder of fat metabolism where the body is unable to convert fat to energy due to the lack of a number of enzymes (carboxylases). Sufferers need to eat regularly to prevent symptoms. Symptoms are determined by the size and exact location of the tumor.
  • Naproxen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Naproxen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Neonatal lupus: Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) is a rare disorder caused by the transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies. The most common clinical manifestations are cardiac, dermatologic, and hepatic. Some infants may also have hematologic abnormalities.
  • Nitrofurantoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nitrofurantoin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Amylcinnamic alcohol: An amylcinnamic alcohol allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called amylcinnamic alcohol which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Anisyl alcohol: An Anisyl alcohol allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called Anisyl alcohol which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Benzyl alcohol: A benzyl alcohol allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called benzyl alcohol which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Benzyl salicylate: A benzyl salicylate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called benzyl salicylate which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Cinnamic alcohol: A cinnamic alcohol allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called cinnamic alcohol which is found in perfumes or fragrances. Cinnamic alcohol has a hyacinth odor and is often used as a fragrance in perfumes, cosmetics, detergents, chewing gums, oral hygiene products and drinks such a cola and bitters. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Cinnamic aldehyde: A cinnamic aldehyde allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called cinnamic aldehyde which is found in perfumes or fragrances. Cinnamic aldehyde has a hyacinth odor and is often used as a fragrance in perfumes, cosmetics, detergents, chewing gums, oral hygiene products and drinks such a cola and bitters. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Cockroach: A cockroach allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cockroaches, in particular their saliva, outer shell, eggs and feces. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Coumarin: A coumarin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called coumarin which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Eugenol: A eugenol allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called eugenol which is found in perfumes or fragrances. Eugenol has a spicy clove odor, is derived from cloves and cinnamon and is often used in perfumes, cosmetics, hair products, oral cleansing products and various creams and lotions. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Geraniol: A geraniol allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called geraniol which is found in perfumes or fragrances. Geraniol has a sweet floral, rose smell and is commonly used in perfumes, cosmetics and skin care products. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Hydroxycitronellal: A Hydroxycitronellal allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called Hydroxycitronellal which is found in perfumes or fragrances. Hydroxycitronellal has a sweet, floral odor and is often used in perfumes, soaps, cosmetics, aftershaves, eye creams, insecticides and antiseptics. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Isoeugenol: A isoeugenol allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called isoeugenol which is found in perfumes or fragrances. Isoeugenol is derived from nutmeg and ylang ylang oil. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Musk ambrette: A musk ambrette allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called musk ambrette which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Oak moss absolute: A oak moss absolute allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called oak moss absolute which is found in perfumes or fragrances. Oak moss absolute has an earthy, woody scent and is often used as a fragrance in men's products. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Sandalwood oil: A sandalwood oil allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called sandalwood oil which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Wood tar: A wood tar allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical called wood tar which is found in perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- chlorine: A chlorine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chlroine. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Alternaria: An Alternaria fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Alternaria. Alternaria is a common outdoor mold and can cause severe asthmatic symptoms as well as other allergy symptoms. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Aspergillus spp: An Aspergillus spp fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Aspergillus spp. Aspergillus is a common indoor and outdoor mold. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Aureobasidium (Pullularia): A Aureobasidium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Aureobasidium. Aureobasidium is a common outdoor mold often found on paper, lumber and painted objects. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Candida albicans: A Candida albicans fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Candida albicans. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Cladosporium: A Cladosporium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Cladosporium. Cladosporium is one of the most common outdoor airborne molds. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Epicoccum: An Epicoccum fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Epicoccum. Epicoccum tends to be found in grassland and agricultural areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Fusarium: A Fusarium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Fusarium. Fusarium is often found on rotting plants. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Helminthosporium: A Helminthosporium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Helminthosporium. Helminthosporium is a fungus found more often in warmer climates. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Mucor: A Mucor fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Mucor. Mucor is a relatively uncommon fungus but can be found on decaying vegetation and damp indoor areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Penicillium: A Penicillium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Penicillium. Penicillium is a common indoor mold and allergy to this fungus is unrelated to a penicillin allergy. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Phoma: A Phoma fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Phoma. Phoma is an outdoor mold which is predominant during wet periods. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Rhizopus: A Rhizopus fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Rhizopus. Rhizopus is relatively uncommon but can be found on decaying vegetation and damp indoor areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, smut: A smut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called smut. Smut is common in agricultural areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- perfume: A perfume allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to perfumes or fragrances. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, during pregnancy: A cancer that originates in the lymphatic system and occurs during pregnancy. The greatest problem is the fact that the cancer is usually quite aggressive and delays in delivery often results in delayed treatment and a poor prognosis.
  • Norfloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Norfloxacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Novacaine drug allergy: Taking Novacaine (local anesthetic often used in dentistry) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Novo-Clopate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Novo-Clopate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nummular dermatitis: A skin disorder characterized by the development of round or oval skin lesions which itch and burn. In the initial stages, small red spots or blisters form and the grow and joint together to form a patch. The lesion eventually looks similar to a ringworm infection with a clear centre and a distinct border. The causes of some cases includes mercury fillings and allergy to rubber, nickel, formaldehyde or neomycin.
  • Oedema: Fluid retention in tissues
  • Oleander caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Oleander caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Oxcarbazepine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Oxcarbazepine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Oxprenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Oxprenolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • P-Phenylenediamine allergy: A p-Phenylenediamine allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to p-Phenylenediamine which is used mainly as a dye in hair colorants. Exposure usually occurs through skin contact and hence results in skin symptoms. In the case of hair colorants, skin reactions may be localized but can occasionally spread to other parts of the body. Very rare cases can result in anaphylaxis.
  • Pain: A feeling of suffering, agony, distress caused by the stimulation of pain fibres in the nervous system
  • Pale tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Pale tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Paming moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Paming moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Para-amino benzoic acid overuse: High doses of para-amino benzoic acid (member of the vitamin B family) cause symptoms.
  • Pediatric granulomatous arthritis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Peganone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Peganone (an anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Penicillamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Penicillamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Penicillin allergy: Taking penicillin (a type of antibiotic) can cause an allergic response in some people. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs. Penicillin allergy is one of the more common types of drug allergies.
  • Pfiesteria piscicida poisoning: Pfiesteria piscicida is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Pfiesteria poisoning: Pfiesteria is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Pfiesteria shumwayae poisoning: Pfiesteria shumwayae is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Phenindione -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenindione during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Phentermine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phentermine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Photoallergic eruption: A skin condition that develops in response to sun exposure on skin to which chemicals such as sunscreen, cosmetics, ointment or fragrance has been applied. The ingestion of certain drugs can also trigger the condition. The reaction may be delayed so that a skin rash on exposure to the sun may not show up for several days. The skin reaction may spread to areas of skin not exposed to the sun.
  • Pindolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Pindolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pineapple sap poisoning: The pineapple plant is cultivated for it's juicy, sweet, tropical fruit. The sap from the leaves can cause skin irritation and some people also suffer symptoms if their skin is exposed to pineapple juice.
  • Pityriasis Rosea: Skin inflammation
  • Pizotifen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Pizotifen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Plendil -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Plendil (an antihypertensive drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Poison sumac poisoning: Poison sumac is a large shrub or tree which has large leaves with reddish stems and a white fruit. It is usually found growing in the wild. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Popcorn tree poisoning: Popcorn tree is a deciduous tree which bears elongated clusters of yellowish fruit and seed capsules containing large whitish seeds. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The sap from the plant and the unripe fruit contain chemicals which can cause gastrointestinal symptom if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Portugese Man-of-War larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of the Portugese Man-of-War can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The condition most often occurs in the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Dacarbazine: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Dacarbazine has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Dacarbazine is used as a chemotherapy drug.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Griseofulvin: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Griseofulvin (an antifungal drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Medroxyprogesterone acetate: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Medroxyprogesterone acetate has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Oxazepam: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Oxazepam (a pharmaceutical drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenobarbital: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenobarbital (a pharmaceutical drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenytoin: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenytoin (an anticonvulsant medication) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Zalcitabine: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Zalcitabine has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Zalcitabine has been used as an anti-HIV agent although its use for this purpose has been largely discontinued.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Zidovudine: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Zidovudine (an anti-HIV drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Primidone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Primidone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Primrose poisoning: Primrose is a herbaceous plant which has hairy leaves and stems. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. Skin contact with the hairy leaves or stems can result in an allergic skin reaction in susceptible people.
  • Probable human carcinogen -- Azacitidine: Azacitidine is a drug deemed to be a probable carcinogen to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Probenecid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Probenecid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Procarbazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Procarbazine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Processionary tree caterpillar poisoning: A dark, grey-black caterpillar which can cause varying symptoms on contact with its hairs or spines.
  • Procrit -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Procrit (used to treat some forms of anemia) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pruritus: The sensation of itch
  • Psoriasis: Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition where the defective immune system causes skin cells to grow rapidly. It affects a significant number of people. Arthritis, which can be severe, is associated with the psoriasis in up to a third of cases. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it - roughly 10% of those susceptible will actually develop the condition. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psychiatric disorders associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Psychiatric disorders are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Refractory Celiac Disease: Refractory Celiac Disease is celiac disease that fails to respond to treatment which involves a gluten-free diet. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition is quite uncommon and often the resulting poor absorption of nutrients from the intestines leads to a poor prognosis.
  • Retinopathy -- aplastic anemia -- neurological abnormalities: A very rare syndrome characterized by retinal disease, aplastic anemia and neurological problems.
  • Rheumatic fever: An inflammatory disorder that can occur as a complication of untreated streptococcal bacterial infection such as strep throat or scarlet fever. The condition may affect the brain, skin, heart and joints.
  • Rickettsial disease: A disease caused by infection with rickettsial bacteria which are transmitted by arthropods such as ticks, mites and lice. Different rickettsial bacteria can cause different types of infections such as typhus, spotted fever and trench fever. Symptoms can vary somewhat between the different types.
  • River Blindness: Skin and eye infection caused by the helminth (worm) 'Onchocerca volvulus', transmitted via fly bites and usually seen only in parts of Africa, the Middle East and South America
  • Rocephin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Rocephin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Rosacea-like conditions: Medical conditions highly related to or similar to rosacea.
  • Roseola infantum: Contagious infant conditions
  • Ross River virus: Mosquito-borne virus in parts of Australia and other countries
  • Saddleback caterpillar poisoning: The Saddleback caterpillar is green with saddle-shaped markings on its back. It has four protrusions at its front and back which has stinging hairs. It is found mainly in the United states feeds on deciduous trees such as oak, cherry, chestnut and plum. Contact with the poisonous spines can result in various symptoms.
  • Satin moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Satin moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Scabies: Mite infection of the skin common in institutions.
  • Schistosomiasis: Parasitic fluke infection in developing countries
  • Schistosomiasis japonica: A trematode which causes schistosomiasis japonica
  • Schistosomiasis mansoni: A trematode which causes schistosomiasis mansoni
  • Scrub typhus: Type of typhus usually caught from ticks
  • Sea anemone larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of certain sea anemone (Edwardsiella lineata) can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally.
  • Sea bather's eruption: A rash that can develop sometimes when swimming in the ocean. The rash forms on the skin covered by the bathing suit and is caused by an allergic response to stinging cells from the larvae of certain sea anemones and thimble jellyfish which become trapped under the bathers. Stings are most likely to occur in summer. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The condition most often occurs in Thailand, Brazil, the Bahamas and the Philippines.
  • Sea nettle sting: The Sea Nettle is a poisonous jellyfish found in coastal parts of the Atlantic and Gulf areas - especially eastern US. The jellyfish usually only causes a relatively minor skin rash but prolonged exposure can result in muscle cramps and breathing problems. The severity of the sting depends on the level of exposure.
  • Sea thimble larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of the sea thimble can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally.
  • Serum sickness: Type of allergic reaction to certain medications or serums
  • Severe combined immunodeficiency, T- B+ due to JAK3 deficiency: A recessively inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a lack of circulating T and Natural Killer Cells and a normal level of B cells. The disorder is caused by a defect on the JAK3 gene. Infants may display symptoms such as pancytopenia, skin rash and abnormal liver function due to a graft-versus-host reaction to the mother's T cells via the placenta. If the condition is not treated, death occurs.
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Simvastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Simvastatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Skin Diseases, Viral: Any condition affecting the skin and caused by a virus. There is a range of viruses that can affect the skin in a number of ways Epstein-Barr, Fifth disease, viral warts, shingles, measles and herpes.
  • Skin allergies: A reaction to the exposure of the skin to an allergen
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin inflammation: General name for any type of skin inflammation.
  • Skin rash: A reaction to the exposure of the skin to an allergen
  • Skin swelling: The occurrence of swelling that is located on the skin
  • Smallpox: Dangerous virus now almost eliminated worldwide by vaccination.
  • Sneddon-Wilkinson disease: A rare chronic condition involving the development of blisters and pustules, usually on the trunk, armpits and flexural areas. It is often associated with conditions such as thyroid problems, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. The condition tends to flare up for a few weeks and the clear up for months or years before recurring.
  • Soap allergy: An immune-mediated reaction to exposure to soap. Soap allergy tends to be more common in children and symptoms can vary in nature and severity.
  • Sotalol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sotalol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Spice allergy:
  • Spiny elm caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Spiny Elm caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Spirurida Infections: Infection with a nematode (worm) from the spirurida order. Nematodes from this order include Loa eyeworm, wuchereria and mansonella. The symptoms are determined by which species is involved. Some cases can result in severe complication if the nematode invades and organ or compresses vital nerves or blood vessels.
  • Spleen Cancer: Malignancy of white blood cells with tumour deposits in the spleen.
  • Spleen neoplasm: A tumor that originates in the spleen.
  • Spots: The occurrence of spots
  • Stethoscope induced allergies: Stethoscope induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the rubber in stethoscopes. Symptoms usually involve skin redness or rash where it has come into contact with the stethoscope.
  • Stinging Bark caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Bark caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Nettle caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Nettle caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Rose caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Rose caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stress-related eczema: Stress-related eczema is chronic skin inflammation and irritation which is triggered by stress. The severity and extent of the skin involved is variable. Stress may trigger a flare up or may exacerbate existing eczema.
  • Sucralfate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sucralfate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Sulfa antibiotics allergy: Taking sulfa antibiotics can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Sulindac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sulindac during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Sunscreen allergy: An immune-mediated reaction to exposure to sunscreen. Sunscreen allergy tends to be more common in children and symptoms can vary in nature and severity.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 1: Susceptibility to celiac disease 1 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6p21.3) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 10: Susceptibility to celiac disease 10 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q25-q26) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 11: Susceptibility to celiac disease 11 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q28) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 12: Susceptibility to celiac disease 12 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6q25) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 13: Susceptibility to celiac disease 13 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 12q24) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 2: Susceptibility to celiac disease 2 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 5q31-q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 3: Susceptibility to celiac disease 3 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 4: Susceptibility to celiac disease 4 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 19p13.1) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 5: Susceptibility to celiac disease 5 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 15q11-q13) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 6: Susceptibility to celiac disease 6 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 4q27) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 7: Susceptibility to celiac disease 7 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 1q133) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 8: Susceptibility to celiac disease 8 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q11-q12) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 9: Susceptibility to celiac disease 9 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3p21) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Syncope, familial neurocardiogenic: A familial condition where a person suffers an increased tendency to faint due to a sudden drop in blood pressure.
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Tacrolimus -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tacrolimus during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Temperature-related eczema: Temperature-related eczema is chronic skin inflammation and irritation which is triggered by changes in temperature, excessive heat, excessive cold or humidity extremes. The severity and extent of the skin involved is variable. Excessive temperatures may trigger a flare up or may exacerbate existing eczema.
  • Tenoxicam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tenoxicam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Terfenadine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Terfenadine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Thalidomide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Thalidomide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Timolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Timolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Tobramycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tobramycin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Tolbutamide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tolbutamide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome: Severe immune reaction causing shock
  • Toxocariasis: A parasitic roundworm (Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati) infection that normally occurs in cats and dogs but can be transmitted to humans by ingesting the larvae or eggs. The infection may be asymptomatic or severe and symptoms depend on where the larvae travel to when they migrate through the body.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Tranxene -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tranxene during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Tretinoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tretinoin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • True Jellyfish larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of true jellyfish (such as Linuche unguiculata) can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The jellyfish most often occur in the colder oceans of the world.
  • Trypanosomiasis:
  • Tuberous sclerosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by harmartomatous skin nodules, seizures, phakomata and bone lesions.
  • Turner syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Females with Turner syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Type 1 diabetes related Celiac Disease: Patients with Type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Typhus: A general name for various arthropod-borne rickettsial infections
  • Ultram overdose: Ultram is a drug used to treat or prevent pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Urticaria, Physical: An itchy rash (hives) caused by a hypersensitive reaction to physical stimuli such as cold, pressure, water and sunlight.
  • Valium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Valium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Valproic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Valproic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Vasotec -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Vasotec (an ACE inhibitor) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Vinblastine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Vinblastine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Vincristine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Vincristine during pregnancy and even the during the year leading up to the pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Virus associated hemophagocytic syndrome: A fulminant condition characterised by viral infection causing multiple organ infiltrates of haemophagocytic histiocytes.
  • Vitiligo: Skin pigment changes, usually harmless but sometimes embarrassing.
  • Voltaren -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Voltaren (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • West African Trypanosomiasis: West African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • West Nile fever: Mosquito-borne infectious virus.
  • White marked tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the White marked tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • William's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with William's syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder that affects only males and is characterized by recurring infections, eczema and reduced level of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia).
  • Wound drains and tubes induced allergies: Wound drains and tubes induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in wound drains and tubes which are often used during surgery. Symptoms may vary depending on the location of the wound drains and tubes.
  • Yersiniosis: A condition which is characterized by infectious diarrhea, enteritis, ileitis and occasionally septicaemia
  • Zarontin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Zarontin (antiseizure medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Zinc deficiency: When there is a deficiency of zinc in an individuals body

 

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