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Diseases » Systemic disorders » Glossary
 

Glossary for Systemic disorders

  • A ?-protein amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. This particular form involves deposits of ?-proteins in the nerves resulting in Alzheimer's disease or around brain blood vessels which can cause strokes or brain bleeds.
  • AIDS wasting syndrome: Loss of body mass (especially the muscles) associated with AIDS.
  • Accidental death: The death of a person occurring accidentally
  • Acidosis: Excess acidic toxins or waste products in the blood
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Addisonian crisis: Severe adrenal gland complication from Addison's disease.
  • Aggressive systemic mastocytosis: The excessive proliferation of mast cells. Mast cells control the skin's response to minor injury and release a chemical called histamine which causes the skin to redden. In the aggressive form, mast cells accumulate in the liver, spleen and lymphatic system.
  • Aging: The medical conditions from getting older.
  • Alkalosis: Blood alkalinity levels too high (opposite of acidosis)
  • All Disease Categories: All major disease categories
  • Amyloidosis: A rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. There are numerous forms of the condition: primary amyloidosis, secondary amyloidosis, hemodialysis-associated amyloidosis and familial amyloidosis.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Amyloidosis, inflammatory: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. Secondary amyloidosis is caused by a chronic infection of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, tuberculosis and osteomyelitis. The main organs affected in secondary amyloidosis are usually the kidneys, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The peripheral and autonomic nerves and the heart are rarely affected.
  • Anaphylaxis: A rare, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood
  • Anoxia: Lack of oxygen to the body's tissues.
  • Atherosclerosis: Atherosclerosis is a syndrome affecting arterial blood vessels. It is a chronic inflammatory response in the walls of arteries, in large part due to the accumulation of macrophage white blood cells and promoted by low density (especially small particle) lipoproteins (plasma proteins that carry cholesterol and triglycerides) without adequate removal of fats and cholesterol from the macrophages by functional high density lipoproteins (HDL). It is commonly referred to as a hardening or furring of the arteries. It is caused by the formation of multiple plaques within the arteries.
  • Autoimmune Atherosclerosis: The formation of atherosclerosis through an autoimmune process
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Bacteremia: A condition where there is the presence of bacteria in the blood
  • Balo disease: A rare neurological disorder where the protective sheath around brain nerve fibres are progressively destroyed. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the affected brain area.
  • Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus: A blistering disease that can develop in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The process is mediated by autoantibodies.
  • Chronic Illness: Any form of continuing chronic illness.
  • Cushing syndrome, familial: A hormonal disorder caused by high levels of the cortisol hormone due to the abnormal development of the adrenal gland.
  • Cushing's syndrome: A rare syndrome where excessive secretion of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex leads to a variety of symptoms. Hormone-secreting adrenal or pituitary tumors are often the cause of the excessive corticosteroid secretion.
  • Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension: Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by a condition caused Cushing's syndrome where the adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of cortisol.
  • Dehydration: Loss of fluids in the body
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Diabetes Insipidus: Rare pituitary disorder often affecting the kidneys.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 17: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 17 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q25.
  • Dialysis-related amyloidosis: Amyloidosis (protein deposits) from kidney dialysis treatment.
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Excessive diaphoresis: It is the state of perspiring profusely.When diaphoresis is pathologic,the underlying cause should be treated.
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Fever: Elevation of the body temperature above the normal 37 degrees celsius
  • Glaucoma associated with systemic abnormalities: Elevation of the intraocular pressure maybe secondary to systemic conditions as listed below.
  • Hangover: Condition following excessive alcohol consumption.
  • Hemochromatosis: Excess of iron leading to problems with joints, liver, heart and pancreas.
  • Hereditary amyloidosis: An inherited form of amyloidosis which is characterized by a build up of the protein amyloid in tissues and organs. This form of amyloidosis tends to affect mainly the nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the amyloid deposits.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency syndrome, systemic: An inherited deficiency of carnitine in tissues other than the muscles resulting primarily in muscle weakness.
  • High Cholesterol: High levels of blood cholesterol, triglycerides, or other lipids.
  • Hyalinosis, infantile systemic: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal deposits of hyaline throughout various body tissues. Manifestations include progressive joint contractures, skin abnormalities and pain.
  • Hypertension: High blood pressure
  • Immunoglobulinic amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the abnormal deposit of amyloid in various parts of the body, especially organs such as the kidneys, heart, liver, gastrointestinal tract and peripheral nerves. It occurs when plasma cells in the bone marrow produce too much of a protein portion of an antibody called the light chain. The exact symptoms are determined by the extent of the organ involvement.
  • Insulin Resistance: The resistance of the body to insulin
  • Leukocytoclastic angiitis -- systemic: Inflammation of small blood vessels. Usually the small blood vessels in the skin are involved but sometimes small blood vessels in other organs such as joints, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract may be involved. Symptoms become more serious once there is systemic (organ) involvement and death may result in some severe cases.
  • Lupus: Autoimmune disease with numerous effects on various organs and linings.
  • Marburg multiple sclerosis: Malignant Multiple Sclerosis, is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Thankfully very rare, this highly aggressive form is defined by its swift and relentless decline to significant disability or even death, often within a few weeks or months after the onset of the initial attack. It is characterized by widespread and progressive cerebral white matter destruction or by severe pathological involvement of clinically strategic regions such as brainstem, resulting in bulbar paralysis.
  • Maternal death: The death of a mother
  • Metabolic Acidosis: Metabolic acidosis is a process which if unchecked leads to acidemia (i.e. blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of H+ by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3-) in the kidney.
  • Metabolic Syndrome: A common body syndrome with the "deadly quartet" of major conditions: obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and high lipids.
  • Metabolic disorders: Disorders that affect the metabolic system in human
  • Metabolic syndrome (syndrome X): Metabolic syndrome is a combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
  • Mitochondrial diseases: Any of a group of mitochondrial disorders affecting cell metabolism and especially muscles.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 1: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 2: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 3: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.2.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 4: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis: A rare disease that is tends to occur in premature infants and involves inflammation and destruction of gastrointestinal tissue. It usually occurs within weeks of birth - often after the start of milk feeding. The condition can be extremely serious and even fatal.
  • Optic-spinal form of multiple sclerosis: The optic-spinal form of multiple sclerosis (OSMS), characterized by recurrent involvement of optic nerve and spinal cord with rare brain magnetic resonance imaging lesions.
  • Osteoarthritis: Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterised by mechanical disrturbances due to degradation of joints. It is the most common form of arthritis, and the leading cause of chronic disability.
  • Paralysis: The loss of motor function due to dysfunction of the spinal cord
  • Physical conditions: Any condition that physically affects an individual
  • Pituitary conditions: Any condition that affects the pituitary
  • Polyarthritis, systemic: A chronic inflammatory disease (usually autoimmune) that causes inflammation in multiple parts of the body and causes arthritis in five or more joints.
  • Portuguese type amyloidosis: An inherited form of systemic amyloidosis which involves deposits of a substance called amyloid throughout various parts of the body.
  • Primary amyloidosis: Protein deposits with no underly cause.
  • Primary progressive multiple sclerosis: Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PPMS) is most commonly found in men.
  • Relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis: During this form of the disease, patients tend to experience an attack or series of attacks (exacerbations) followed by complete or partial remission
  • Renal failure-like electrolyte imbalances: impairment in the level of electrolytes in the body
  • Rheumatic fever: An inflammatory disorder that can occur as a complication of untreated streptococcal bacterial infection such as strep throat or scarlet fever. The condition may affect the brain, skin, heart and joints.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Autoimmune form of arthritis usually in teens or young adults.
  • Scleroderma, systemic: A rare autoimmune connective tissue disease where the body attacks parts of the body and causes scarring and thickness of the tissue. In the systemic form, the skin and organs are involved.
  • Secondary chronic progressive multiple sclerosis: Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (spms) begins with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. The relapsing remitting (rrms) stage of the disease may persist for many years before the onset of secondary progressive ms.
  • Shock, Cardiogenic: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Cardiogenic shock is caused by impaired heart function which means that blood is unable to be pumped effectively around the body.
  • Shock, Distributive: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Distributive shock occurs when the blood vessels are dilated with affects blood volume and blood pressure within the vessels. Septic, neurogenic and anaphylactic shock are various forms of distributive shock.
  • Shock, Endocrine: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Endocrine shock is caused by a disturbance in the endocrine (hormone producing) system. Some examples include severe cases of hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and severe adrenal insufficiency.
  • Shock, Hypovolaemic: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Hypovolaemic shock is caused by a rapid fluid loss which reduces the blood volume.
  • Shock, Neurogenic: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Neurogenic shock is caused problems with the nervous system.
  • Shock, Obstructive: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Obstructive shock is caused by obstruction the blood flow. Causes include cardiac tamponade, pulmonary embolism and narrowing of the aortic artery.
  • Shock, Septic: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Septic shock is caused by infection which affects large parts of the body. This form of shock results in death in about half of the cases.
  • Shock, Traumatic: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Traumatic shock is caused by a serious injury or trauma to the body which affects the blood volume through one or more factors such as severe bleeding, heart damage and lung damage.
  • Shock, anaphylactic: Shock is a life-threatening condition involving insufficient blood flow to the body tissues. Anaphylactic shock is a severe allergic response.
  • Spontaneous periodic hypothermia: A rare disorder characterized by recurring periods of hypothermia that occur for no obvious reason.
  • Sweating: Sweating more than normal
  • Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: A rare disease where episodes of leaking blood capillaries results in a rapid drop in blood pressure which can be life-threatening. Episodes usually last for a few days. The range and severity of symptoms experienced may range somewhat amongst patients.
  • Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Onset of JRA with fevers and systemic symptoms
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Hemolytic Anemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and hemolytic anemia - the anemia often occurs months or even years before symptoms of SLE develop. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q14.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Nephritis, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and nephritis. More than half of SLE patients will develop nephritis. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q22.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Vitiligo, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and vitiligo. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17p13.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q41.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 10: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7q32.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 11: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q32.2-q32.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 12: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8p23.1.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 13: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p23.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 2: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 3: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4p16-p15.2.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 4: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 5: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q32.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 6: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16p11.2.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 7: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p12.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 8: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q13.1.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 9: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q32.
  • Systemic candidiasis: A candida infection that spreads throughout the body. If it invades major organs such as the brain and heart, death may result. It is rare in healthy individuals and tends to occur in immunocompromised individuals. The disorder is difficult to diagnose as it can invade almost any organ of the body and hence the symptoms are hugely variable.
  • Systemic lupus erythematoses: It is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease that can affect any part of the body. As occurs in other autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks the body's cells and tissue, resulting in inflammation and tissue damage
  • Systemic mastocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an accumulation of mast cells in the tissues of the body
  • Systemic monochloroacetate poisoning: Monochloracetate acid is a dangerous chemical which can cause systemic poisoning even if only skin exposure occurs. Exposure to the chemical can be life-threatening with serious symptoms starting within hours of the exposure.
  • Tuberous sclerosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by harmartomatous skin nodules, seizures, phakomata and bone lesions.
  • Volume depletion: When an individual does not have enough fluid volume in there circulation
  • Wasting Syndrome: AIDS related wasting syndrome is the involuntary loss of more than 10% of the body weight plus more than 30 days of either diarrhoea or weakness and fever. It is linked to disease progression and death.
  • Water Intoxication: Excessive water intake can lead to water intoxication and ultimately death.
  • Weight gain: An increase in weight for any reason.
  • Weight loss: Loss of body weight.
  • Wilson's Disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.

 

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