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Symptoms » Anemia » Glossary
 

Glossary for Anemia

Medical terms related to Anemia or mentioned in this section include:

  • 4-Alpha-hydroxyphenylpyruvate hydroxylase deficiency: A very rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of a particular enzyme results in the urinary excretion of a chemical called hawkinsin. Symptoms start once the infant is weaned off breast milk.
  • ACAD8 deficiency: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • ATR16: A rare disorder characterized by alpha thalassemia and mental retardation.
  • Aase-Smith I syndrome: A very rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as joint contractures, anemia, hydrocephalus and cleft palate.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abnormal blood test symptoms: Abnormal results from diagnostic blood tests.
  • Achor-Smith syndrome: A dietary deficiency disorder involving low blood potassium levels which leads to other problems such as diarrhea, anemia, muscle wasting and kidney problems.
  • Acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia: A rare disorder where iron is transported into a developing blood cells but because it is unable to be used, it builds up within the cell and tends to stop it from developing into a fully functioning red blood cell. Thus anemia can occur despite adequate or even high iron levels. Acquired cases can occur on exposure to excess alcohol, lead and drugs or can occur to nutritional problems involving a deficiency of folic acid or copper or an excess of zinc. The condition can also be caused by conditions such as kidney problems, endocrine dysfunction, metabolic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia.
  • Acral dysostosis -- dyserythropoiesis: A rare disorder characterized by hand and foot defects as well as a congenital form of anemia characterized by the production of abnormal red blood cells.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome: The association of a sudden kidney disorder with eye inflammation. Autoimmune processes are believed to be involved.
  • Adenomatous Polyposis of the Colon, autosomal dominant: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and occurs in a familial pattern. Most patients have at least one parent with the condition.
  • Adenosine deaminase, elevated, hemolytic anemia due to: A rare inherited disorder where there is a high level of an enzyme called adenosine deaminase in red blood cells. The high level of this enzyme results in premature destruction of red blood cells which ultimately leads to anemia. The severity of the anemia is determined by the level of excessive enzyme activity.
  • Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anaemia due to: Deficiency of a chemical (adenosine triphosphate) resulting in anemia.
  • Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anemia due to: A rare metabolic disorder where anemia is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme called adenosine triphosphatase.
  • Adenylate Kinase Deficiency: A rare genetic anomaly sometimes associated with hemolytic anemia.
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Aggressive NK-cell leukaemia: An aggressive form of blood cancer involving the rapid proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- Adult benign dominant form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The adult benign form is associated with a normal life expectancy and is often asymptomatic.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- intermediate form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The intermediate form is more severe than the adult form but less severe than the infantile form. Life expectancy is usually normal.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- malignant recessive form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Alcohol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alcohol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Aldolase A deficiency: A rare condition where a deficiency of the enzyme called aldolase A causes muscle problems and anemia.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia trait: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia trait involves defects in two of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is mild anemia which may go unnoticed in many people.
  • Alsing syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by kidney problems, skeletal abnormalities and a hole in the coloboma of the eye.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Anaemia due to pyrimidine 5' nucleotidase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where a deficiency of a particular enzyme (pryimidine 5' nucleotidase) causes hemolytic anemia. The anemia is usually mild.
  • Anaemia, sideroblastic, X-linked -- ataxia: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by mild anemia and early onset neurological motor symptoms. The neurological symptoms tend to be relatively stable or slowly progressive with only occasional dependence on crutches or wheelchairs.
  • Analgesic nephropathy syndrome: Kidney damage caused by excessive use of pain-killing drugs. Aspirin and phenacetin mixtures are the most common causes.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia in children: Anemia in children is a low blood cell count in children.
  • Anemia in pregnancy: Low haemoglobin count in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Anemia, Blackfan Diamond: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare genetic condition where the bone marrow is unable to make sufficient red blood cells which leads low levels of red blood cells. There are eight subtypes of the condition which differ in the location of the genetic defect and the incidence of additional symptoms such as malformations. The severity of symptoms is variable but most cases are serious.
  • Anemia, Hemolytic, Warm Antibody: A rare autoimmune condition where the body's defense system attacks and destroys red blood cells. The onset of the condition is triggered by temperatures 37ºC or higher. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Neonatal: Insufficient red blood cells that can carry oxygen around the body. It is common in premature births or can occur as a result of blood loss before, during or just after the birth.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Sideroblastic: A rare blood disorder where abnormal utilization of iron results in the production of defective red blood cells which have excessive deposits of iron in them.
  • Anemia, sideroblastic spinocerebellar ataxia: A rare inherited condition characterized by anemia at birth as well as spinocerebellar ataxia (impaired ability to control voluntary movements).
  • Anemias, Sideroblastic: Sideroblastic anemias are a group of rare blood disorders where the bone marrow is unable to produce normal red blood cells. The body has enough iron but the red blood cells are unable to utilize it in a normal manner and anemia results. The red blood cells become overloaded with iron and are unable to carry out their normal functions. Some forms of sideroblastic anemia are inherited but most tend to be acquired due to such things as exposure to toxins and certain drugs, leukemia, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and nutritional deficiencies (e.g. copper and pyridoxine deficiency). Inherited forms usually appear in childhood whereas acquired forms usually occur in adulthood.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Angiodysplasia: Abnormality of small blood vessels - especially in the intestinal tract - which can result in bleeding. The size of the lesion involved determines the severity of the condition. Small amounts of bleeding from one lesion often goes unnoticed but multiple large lesions may cause heavy bleeding and result in black tarry stool and anemia.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- plasma cell type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The plasma-cell type tends to involve systemic symptoms such as fever and weight loss due to the destruction of red blood cells.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Anterior pituitary hyperhormonotrophic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the excessive production of various hormones (gonadotrophic, thyrotrophic, lactotrophic and pancreatrophic hormone).
  • Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated disease: A kidney disorder involving varying degrees of kidney impairment. Severe cases lead to kidney failure whereas mild cases have normal kidney function.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Apo A-I deficiency: Low plasma HDL cholesterol that tends to run in families.
  • Apolipoprotein C 2I deficiency: A rare inherited condition where a deficiency of apolipoprotein C-II impairs lipoprotein metabolism and results in a build up of chylomicrons and VLDL.
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Asrar-Facharzt-Haque syndrome: A form of sinus histiocytosis characterized by lymphadenopathy as well as involvement of other tissues such as the sinus cavity, skin, lungs, bone, eyes, kidneys, testes, head and neck area and the central nervous system. Symptoms vary according to the organ involved. The condition usually runs a prolonged course with spontaneous remission occurring in some cases. Rare cases may be fatal.
  • Atransferrinemia: A rare inherited condition characterized by the absence of a compound called transferring which results in a buildup of iron in the body's tissues as well as anemia.
  • Attenuated familial polyposis: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The attenuated form of the condition is distinguished by the development of polyps in old age rather than during the first decades of life.
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause.
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Avitaminosis: A group of diseases caused by the deficiency of one or more vitamins e.g. Beriberi (thiamine deficiency), rickets (Vitamin D deficiency), pellagra (niacin deficiency), pernicious anemia (Vitamin B12), bleeding (vitamin K deficiency) and night blindness (avitaminosis A). Symptoms depend on the type and degree of vitamin deficiency. Lack of various vitamins can affect just about every part of the body including the nervous system.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A slow progressing disease involving cancerous B-cell lymphocytes which take over the healthy cells in the lymph nodes. B-cells help the body to fight infections so when the disease becomes more advanced, the body is less able to fight infection as there are fewer healthy, functioning B-cells.
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Babesiosis: A protozoal infection which is transmitted to human via the bite of certain ticks.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Banti Syndrome: A rare conditions where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Banti's syndrome: A chronic, progressive condition marked by enlargement of the spleen which is associated with anemia, splenomegaly, ascites, jaundice, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Beta Thalassemia trait: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. There are two subtypes of the disorder (alpha and beta) depending on what portion of the hemoglobin is abnormally synthesized. Beta Thalassemia trait involves defects in one of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. Mild anemia is usually the only symptom.
  • Beta thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Beta thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Beta-Glutamylcysteine synthetase deficiency: A rare disorder of amino acid metabolism where deficiency of the enzyme called Beta-Glutamylcysteine synthetase impairs the body's ability to metabolize sulfur-containing amino acids.
  • Bile plug syndrome: A rare condition where thick bile in infants causes blockage of the bile ducts which can result in jaundice, enlarged liver and anemia.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Bint Al Zahab-induced lead poisoning: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used by various ethnic groups (e.g. Indians, Saudi Arabians) to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blethen-Wenick-Hawkins syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, skeletal abnormalities and reduced pituitary gland functioning.
  • Blood loss: loss of blood can occur through any of the body orifices
  • Blood symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood and its blood cells.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Boichis syndrome: A rare syndrome involving nephronophthisis (progressive destruction of kidney tissue) from birth which leads to kidney failure and liver fibrosis.
  • Bokhoor-induced lead poisoning: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bone Marrow Conditions: Medical conditions affecting the bone marrow
  • Bone and cartilage tumors: Any tumors affecting the bones or cartilage, including both cancerous and benign tumors.
  • Bone marrow failure -- neurologic abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of bone marrow failure and neurological abnormalities.
  • Bone symptoms: Symptoms affecting the body's bones
  • Bone-Marrow failure syndromes: A disorder where the bone marrow fails to produce enough new blood cells.
  • Bothriocephalosis: Infection with an intestinal parasite. The parasite is a fish tapeworm called Diphyllobothrium latum. Human infection is caused by eating undercooked contaminated fish.
  • Bowel inflammation: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bowel portion of the gastrointestinal tract
  • Bowel problems: Symptoms affecting the bowel
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Brown Recluse spider poisoning: The Brown Recluse spider is poisonous and is found mainly in southern and central areas of the US.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • CML-Like Syndrome, Familial: A very rare condition characterized by symptom similar to myelocytic leukemia that develop during infancy. The condition can result in death during the first years of life.
  • CMV antenatal infection: A rare condition where a fetus becomes infected with the cytomegalovirus through the mother.
  • Cadmium poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to cadmium.
  • Camurati Engelmann disease, type 2: A rare disorder (described in two patients) which has similar symptoms to the genetic condition called Camurati Engelmann disease but the genetic defect responsible for type 1 is not present in type 2. Type 2 has additional bone abnormalities which were noted on radiographs. Patients tend to suffer flare-ups of their condition which is accompanied by severe pain which may leave the patient incapacitated. Flare-ups can be triggered or made worse by stress, exhaustion, exercise, growth spurts, standing too long, walking too long, infection, illness, injury, surgery, cold weather and sudden changes in air pressure.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- spherocytosis: A rare disorder characterized by the association of spherocytosis with heart muscle disease. Spherocytosis is a red blood cell disorder where the red blood cells have abnormal membranes which gives them a spherical shape and makes them weak resulting in their premature death.
  • Cebagin-induced lead poisoning: Cebagin is a folk remedy used mainly by Middle Eastern people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease -- epilepsy -- occipital calcifications: A rare syndrome characterized by celiac disease and epilepsy with brain calcifications.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder resulting in frequent infections, lack of skin and eye pigmentation, neurological diseases and early death.
  • Chediak-Higashi like syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism only.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: 1,3-Dinitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in explosives. The chemical can be readily absorbed through the skin and cause systemic symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly as an explosive agent and in the production of dyes and photographic chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aluminum: Aluminum is a chemical used mainly for metallurgical purposes and can be found in packaging, electrical parts, vehicles, cooking utensils, construction materials and building components. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzidine: Benzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of azo dyes for such products as leather, paper and textiles. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Captafol: Captafol is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrophenol: Dinitrophenol is a chemical that has various applications: herbicide, pesticide, fungicide, acaricide, manufacture of dyes and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glycol Ether: Glycol Ether is a chemical used mainly in nail polish removers, products to treat leather, anti-icing agents and as an industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isopropyl Alcohol: Isopropyl Alcohol is a chemical used mainly as a rubbing alcohol and also in perfumes, paint thinners, disinfectants, cleaners and fuels. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lewisite: Lewisite is a very poisonous gas which has the potential to be used in chemical warfare due to its deadly effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monosodium Methanarsenate: Monosodium Methanarsenate is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide or pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Naphthalene: Naphthalene is a chemical used mainly as a moth repellant, toilet deodorizer and the manufacture of other chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrotoluene: Nitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications for the production of things such as agricultural chemicals, explosives, rubber chemicals, sulfur dyes and azo dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Para-Dichlorobenzene: Para-Dichlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide, mold and mildew preventer, moth repellent and toilet deodorant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- White Phosphorus: White Phosphorus is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, water treatment, rodenticides and insecticides (for cockroaches). Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Choriocarcinoma, infantile: A rare malignant cancer that originates in the placenta. It is an aggressive cancer which generally results in infant death.
  • Chromosome 22 trisomy mosaic: A rare chromosomal disorder where three copies of chromosome 22 are present in some of the body's cells instead of the normal two. Severity of symptoms is determined by how many cells have the extra chromosomal material.
  • Chromosome 8, monosomy 8q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of the long arm (q) of chromosome 8 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 8, mosaic trisomy: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 8 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Chromosome 8p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chronic Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.3
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 3: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q34.1.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 4: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p25.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 5: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q24.1.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassified: A form of blood disorder characterized by the abnormal proliferation of myeloid precursors in the bone marrow. This category refers to cases of myeloproliferative disease which don't fit into any of the other specific type of myelproliferative diseases.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders: A group of blood cancers where excessive numbers of blood cells are made by overactive or cancerous bone marrow. The number of excess blood cells tends to grow slowly. Examples of such disorders includes chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. The symptoms are determined by which particular blood cancer is involved.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic kidney failure: Gradual failure of the kidneys over a period of time
  • Chronic leukemia: Leukemia in which the cell line is well differentiated, usually B lymphocytes.
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body.
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Chronic pyelonephritis: chronic pyelonephritis is persistent kidney inflammation that can scar the kidneys and may lead to chronic renal failure
  • Chronic renal insufficiency: Chronic lack of function of the renal system. Kidneys.
  • Chuifong tokuwan-induced lead poisoning: Chuifong tokuwan is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian people to arthritis and other pain. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Churg-Strauss Syndrome: A rare allergy related disease involving clumping of excess eosinophils which cause inflammation of smaller arteries and veins (granulomatosis). This has a negative effect on the circulatory system and the lungs resulting in asthma and organ damage.
  • Cirrhosis of liver: diffuse hepatic process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules
  • Classical Hodgkin disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted.
  • Cocaine fetopathy: Cocaine use during pregnancy resulting in various birth defects and other abnormalities.
  • Colchicine poisoning: Ingestion of toxic quantities of colchicines. Colchicine is primarily used as a medicinal theapy for conditions such as gout and familial Mediterranean fever, scleroderma, secondary amyloidosis and pericarditis. The chemical is a natural chemical found in a plant called meadow saffron and ingestion of the plant can also result in poisoning. The plant is found in the northern parts of the world.
  • Cold agglutination syndrome: A rare disorder where abnormal blood proteins called cold agglutinins cause red blood cells to form clumps and die. The process is triggered by exposure to cold temperatures. A small number of cold agglutinins is normal but larger numbers can cause problems such as anemia.
  • Cold antibody hemolytic anemia: A rare autoimmune condition where the body's defense system attacks and destroys red blood cells. The onset of the condition is triggered by temperatures 30°C or lower.
  • Collagen type III glomerulopathy: A rare progressive form of kidney disease characterized by the abnormal deposits of type III collagen in the kidneys. The severity and rate of progression of the condition is variable.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Colon Cancer, Familial: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 1: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 10: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 11: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 2: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8q24.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 3: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 4: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 5: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p14.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 6: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8q23.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 7: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 8: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 9: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16q.
  • Colorectal adenomatous polyposis, dominant: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and occurs in a familial pattern. Most patients have at least one parent with the condition.
  • Colorectal adenomatous polyposis, recessive: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous.
  • Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon (bowel) or rectum.
  • Common Variable Immunodeficiency: An immunodeficiency disorder involving low blood gamma globulin levels which results in an increased susceptibility to infections. The condition may be inherited or can be caused by certain drugs (levamisole, hydantoin and carbamazepine).
  • Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Fetal infection with toxoplasmosis.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1H: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type Ih is caused by a defect on chromosome 11pter-p15.5 and involves the gene for a particular enzyme (dolichyl-P-glucose:Glc-1-Man-9-GlcNAc-2-PP-dolichyl-alpha-3-glucosyltransferase).
  • Congenital short bowel: A rare birth defect where the bowel is abnormally short. A short bowel can impair the body's ability to absorb enough nutrients and hence result in malabsorption.
  • Congenital spherocytic hemolytic anemia: A blood disorder present at birth where the membranes of red blood cells are defective which results in them being spherical rather than doughnut-shaped. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are broken down prematurely by the body which results in anemia. The condition may range from mild to severe.
  • Copper deficiency, familial benign: A rare inherited copper deficiency. Copper has many functions in the body including heart function, cholesterol metabolism, brain development, immune defenses, blood supply, glucose metabolism and normal bone development.
  • Cordyceps-induced lead poisoning: Cordyceps is a folk remedy by Chinese people to treat high blood pressure, bleeding problems and diabetes. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Cutler Syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by multisystem disorders including muscle wasting, ataxia, epilepsy, anemia and kidney disease. The kidney disease is most likely present at birth.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • D-minus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D-HUS) -- familial: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. The familial type is not associated with diarrhea and is inherited. Autosomal recessive cases usually start early in life whereas autosomal dominant cases can occur at any age.
  • D-minus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D-HUS) -- pregnancy related: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. This type is not associated with diarrhea and is triggered by pregnancy.
  • D-plus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS): A rare condition where gastroenteritis involving bloody diarrhea is caused by a bacteria (usually E.Coli) which leads to toxins being present in the blood. These circulating toxins affect red blood cells, kidneys and occasionally even the brain.
  • DIC: DIC s a syndrome triggered by a number of medical conditions including malignancy, infection and liver disease, and results in consumption of clotting factors in the blood.
  • Dana syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the gradual degeneration of the white matter of the spinal cord and pernicious anemia. Various neurological symptoms can result.
  • Danubian endemic familial nephropathy: A form of slow-progressing kidney disease that occurs in a particular geographic area which includes countries such as Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and Romania. The condition can remain asymptomatic for many years until serious kidney damage has occurred.
  • Deafness-tubular acidosis-anaemia: A rare disorder characterized mainly by abnormal progressive calcification of the spinal cord and brain, kidney anomaly, anemia and deafness.
  • Debler anemia: A familial type of anemia that starts during infancy and involves the premature destruction of red blood cells.
  • Decreased folate: Decrease in one of the B vitamins required for red blood cell production
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Deficiency of Member 8 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenace Family: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Deletion 8q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of the long arm (q) of chromosome 8 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Deshi Dewa-induced lead poisoning: Deshi Dewa is a folk remedy by Indian people as a fertility medicine. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Desmoplastic small round cell tumor: A rare aggressive tumor that usually develops in soft tissue and tends to grow to a large size. It usually occurs in the abdomen but may also in other parts of the body such as abdominal organs, brain, testicles, ovaries, spinal cord and skull.
  • Di Guglielmo I -- chronic: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The chronic form has more severe symptoms than the acute form.
  • Diamond-Blackfan anemia: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare genetic condition where the bone marrow is unable to make sufficient red blood cells which leads low levels of red blood cells. There are eight subtypes of the condition which differ in the location of the genetic defect and the incidence of additional symptoms such as malformations. The severity of symptoms is variable but most cases are serious.
  • Dianzani autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: A rare inherited disorder where the body's immune system attack itself, primarily blood components.
  • Diarrhea -- polyendocrinopathy -- infections, X-linked: A rare X-linked disorder characterized by diarrhea and severe, fatal infections during infancy. The body's immune system attacks it's own endocrine glands and various other organs. Females are carriers and can have mild symptoms whereas males suffer the fatal course of the disease.
  • Diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by multiple capillary hemangiomas as well as other abnormalities.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Digestive tract cancer:
  • Dimorphic anemia: Dimorphic refers to anemia that has two different causes acting together e.g. iron deficiency as well as a Vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Diphyllobothriasis: Tapeworm infection from eating undercooked fish.
  • Diphyllobothrium latum infection: A tapeworm infection with a tapeworm species called Diphyllobothrium latum. The infection is called diphyllobothriasis and usually results from eating undercooked contaminated fish. Infections are most common in countries where eating raw fish is common e.g. Japan, North America, Asia and parts of Europe. The severity of symptoms is variable but most infections are asymptomatic. The tapeworm infestation can continue for decades if untreated.
  • Disseminated infection with mycobacterium avium complex: Mycobacterium avium complex is an opportunistic bacterium which tends to occur mainly in patients with advanced AIDS. The infection can spread throughout the body and result in such things as blood infections.
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Diverticular disease and diverticulitis:
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Dressler (D.)syndrome: A rare autoimmune blood disorder where erythrocytes are destroyed suddenly after exposure to cold (usually 15°C or lower).
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Dursun Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of heart anomalies, pulmonary hypertension and leukopenia (reduced number of white blood cells).
  • Dyserythropoietic anemia, congenital: A congenital blood condition where the production of red blood cells is defective. The abnormal red blood cells are often destroyed prematurely within the body which can result in anemia. There are three subtypes of the disorder, each with varying severity of symptoms.
  • Dyserythropoietic anemia, congenital type 1: A very rare genetic blood disorder where abnormal red blood cells are made resulting in anemia. Finger and toe abnormalities are also usually present.
  • Dyserythropoietic anemia, congenital type 2: A very rare genetic blood disorder where abnormal red blood cells are made resulting in anemia.
  • Dyserythropoietic anemia, congenital type 3: An extremely rare blood disorder where abnormal red blood cells are made resulting in anemia.
  • Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding: Uterus bleeding unrelated to periods
  • Dyskeratosis congenita of Zinsser-Cole-Engman: An inherited condition characterized by recurring painful mouth ulcers, skin pigmentation and nail abnormalities.
  • E-coli food poisoning: Type of bacterial food poisoning
  • Electrical burns: Burns caused when an electric current pass through the body or part of it. The symptoms and severity of the burn depends on the strength of the electrical current, the duration of the exposure and the part of the body involved. Prompt treatment in more severe cases can improve the prognosis.
  • Elliptocytosis 1: An inherited blood disorder where a significant number of red blood cells (erythrocytes) are elliptical or oval shaped rather than doughnut shaped. Anemia results when the abnormal red blood cells are destroyed. The severity of the anemia is variable with some cases resulting in fetal death and others being relatively asymptomatic. Type 1 is caused by a defect in the gene on chromosome 1p36.2-p34 for a protein in the red cell membrane.
  • Endometrial hyperplasia: Thickening of the endometrium (lining of the uterus)
  • Enteropathy type T-cell lymphoma: A rare subtype of gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Uncontrolled celiac disease appears to be a risk factor for developing this type of lymphoma.
  • Epidermalolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, dermolytic: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily due to defective skin collagen. The mucosal lining of the mouth and even intestines may be effected in severe cases.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, junctional: A rare inherited skin disease which is characterized by fragile skin which readily forms skin blisters and can result in fatal complications.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, simplex: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermolytic epidermolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epstein-Barr virus: Common virus causing mononucleosis
  • Epstein-Barr virus, chronic: A form of human herpes virus that produces persistent symptoms. Most people become infected with the virus at some stage in their life though they usually have few if any symptoms. However, some people develop severe symptoms as a result of an EBV infection.
  • Erythroblastopenia: A form of anemia involving the absence of red blood cell precursors which results in a low red blood cell count. The blood abnormality may be congenital or acquired through such things as particular viral infections or drug use. Without treatment, symptoms become progressively worse.
  • Erythroderma desquamativa of Leiner: A rare skin disorder characterized by a reddish, thickened skin rash that spreads to various parts of the body and is usually accompanied by diarrhea, failure to thrive, anemia and recurring local and systemic infections.
  • Escamilla-Lisser syndrome: Hypothyroidism in adults where external signs may be few or absent but serious problems can occur internally. Some of the problems includes weakened muscles in the heart, intestines and bladder.
  • Essential thrombocytopenia: A rare blood disorder characterized by an excessively low number of platelets in the blood which often results in hemorrhages.
  • Ewing's sarcoma: Ewing's sarcoma is a malignant round-cell tumor. It is a rare disease in which cancer cells are found in the bone or in soft tissue. The most common areas in which it occurs are the pelvis, the femur, the humerus, and the ribs.
  • Excessive dieting: Excessive limitation of food intake can lead to problems and effects such as dizziness, depression, intestinal problems, edema and impaired growth.
  • Familial Colorectal Cancer: An inherited disorder in which affected individuals have a higher-than-normal chance of developing colorectal cancer and certain other types of cancer, often before the age of 50.
  • Familial Intestinal Polyposis: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous.
  • Familial Mediterranean fever: A rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent fever and inflammation. The inflammation usually involves the stomach, lungs or joints.
  • Familial Multiple Polyposis: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous.
  • Familial adenomatous polyposis, autosomal dominant: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and occurs in a familial pattern. Most patients have at least one parent with the condition.
  • Familial polyposis: Rare genetic disease causing multiple colorectal polyps
  • Familial polyposis -- classical: An inherited condition where polyps develop in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The polyps are initially benign but may become malignant if untreated.
  • Familial polyposis, autosomal recessive: An inherited condition where polyps develop in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The polyps are initially benign but may become malignant if untreated. The autosomal recessive form of this condition is characterized by fewer polyps than in other forms (less than 100) and is due to mutations in a different gene.
  • Familial renal cell carcinoma: A genetic form of kidney cancer that develops in the lining of the tubules in the kidney and tends to run in families.
  • Fanconi-Albertini-Zellweger syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by congenital heart defect, brain abnormalities, unusual face and metabolic acidosis.
  • Farouk-induced lead poisoning: Farouk is a folk remedy by Saudi Arabian people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Fatigue: Excessive tiredness or weakness.
  • Favism: Form of hemolytic anemia that can occur after eating fava beans (broad beans) or walking through a field of the plants. The conditions is inherited.
  • Felty syndrome: A rare complication of long-term rheumatoid arthritis which involves an enlarged spleen and blood abnormalities.
  • Female reproductive toxicity -- Acetaminophen: Taking excessive doses of acetaminophen during pregnancy can result in kidney and liver problems in the baby. Pregnant women should avoid taking more than the recommended amount of the drug.
  • Fluorosis: Excessive fluoride in the body
  • Food Allergy -- milk: A milk allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to milk or food containing milk. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Fowl Paralysis: A viral disease that affects poultry - it is very contagious and is a herpes virus. The virus tends to affect the nerves and cause tumors in internal organs. Poultry may be unable to lay eggs or may even die. Young birds are more susceptible than older birds with death most common between the ages of 8 and 20 weeks. The virus may attack the nervous system and result in paralysis or it may attack the visceral system and cause tumors in the internal organs. Some birds may die without any obvious symptoms.
  • Fowl paralyses: A viral disease that affects poultry - it is very contagious and is a herpes virus. The virus tends to affect the nerves and cause tumors in internal organs. Poultry may be unable to lay eggs or may even die. Young birds are more susceptible than older birds with death most common between the ages of 8 and 20 weeks. The virus may attack the nervous system and result in paralysis or it may attack the visceral system and cause tumors in the internal organs. Some birds may die without any obvious symptoms.
  • Free sialic Acid storage disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of sialic acid in the tissues and excretion of sialic acid in the urine. There are mild and severe forms of the condition - the severe form result in death before birth or within a few years of birth.
  • Fructose-1-phosphate aldolase deficiency, hereditary: An inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of the enzyme fructose-1-phsophate aldolase prevents fructose being metabolized resulting in fructose intolerance.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Gastric erosion: Inflammation of the stomach lining
  • Gastritis: gastritis is inflammation of the gastric mucosa of the stomach
  • Gastritis, familial giant hypertrophic: A rare inherited chronic disorder characterized by overgrowth of the stomach lining resulting in excessive folds.
  • Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Cancer that develops from stroma cells in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The primary locations are the small intestine, esophagus and esophagus with symptoms being determined by the location, stage and size of the tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding: Bleeding in any part of the digestive tract
  • Gastrointestinal neoplasm: A growth or excessive proliferation of cells in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract which includes the esophagus, intestine, pharynx and stomach. The growth may be benign or malignant. The symptoms are determined by the size, location and stage of the tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal tumors: Any tumor of the gastrointestinal (digestive) system, including cancers and benign tumors.
  • Gaucher Disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3.
  • Gaucher disease -- perinatal lethal form: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormally tight skin and Gaucher disease which is a lipid storage disease. This is the most severe form of Gaucher disease.
  • Gaucher disease type 1: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 1 is the visceral, chronic form which usually starts during adulthood.
  • Gaucher disease type 2: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 2 is acute neurological form apparent in infancy.
  • Gaucher disease type 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 3 is a subacute neurological form which often first appears in childhood.
  • Ghasard-induced lead poisoning: Ghasard is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Asian and Indian people as a tonic (usually for indigestion). This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Ghosal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by difficult to treat anemia and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Glenard syndrome: The downward displacement of internal organs.
  • Glomerulonephritis: A condition which affects the kidneys and is characterized by inflammatory changes that occur in the glomeruli
  • Glomerulonephritis -- sparse hair -- telangiectases: A rare syndrome characterized by sparse hair, kidney disease and enlarged skin blood vessels (telangiectasia).
  • Glucagonoma: Rare cancer of the glucagon-producing pancreas cells.
  • Glucagonoma syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a tumor which secretes glucagon and a characteristic spreading rash, diabetes mellitus and various other symptoms.
  • Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare enzyme abnormality involving a deficiency of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase which causes premature destruction of red blood cells. The excessive destruction of red blood cells can be triggered by certain infections or drugs or by eating fava beans.
  • Glucosephosphate isomerase deficiency: A rare inherited condition where a lack of the enzyme glucosephosphate isomerase causes red blood cells to be destroyed prematurely (hemolytic anemia).
  • Glutamate-cysteine ligase deficiency: A very rare condition characterized by an enzyme deficiency which leads primarily to hemolytic anemia which is usually quite mild. Care must be taken to avoid medications which can lead to a hemolytic crisis.
  • Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency: An inborn error of metabolism where insufficient glutathione is produced. Glutathione is an antioxidant which helps destroy unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and helps develop certain cell components. The condition is due to insufficient glutathione synthetase enzyme. The condition may range from mild, resulting in excessive destruction of red blood cells, to severe which includes neurological symptoms.
  • Glutathione synthetase deficiency, intermediate: An inborn error of metabolism where insufficient glutathione is produced. Glutathione is an antioxidant which helps destroy unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and helps develop certain cell components. The condition is due to insufficient glutathione synthetase enzyme. The condition may range from mild, resulting in excessive destruction of red blood cells, to severe which includes neurological symptoms.
  • Glutathione synthetase deficiency, mild: An inborn error of metabolism where insufficient glutathione is produced. Glutathione is an antioxidant which helps destroy unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and helps develop certain cell components. The condition is due to insufficient glutathione synthetase enzyme. The condition may range from mild, resulting in excessive destruction of red blood cells, to severe which includes neurological symptoms.
  • Glutathione synthetase deficiency, severe: An inborn error of metabolism where insufficient glutathione is produced. Glutathione is an antioxidant which helps destroy unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and helps develop certain cell components. The condition is due to insufficient glutathione synthetase enzyme. The condition may range from mild, resulting in excessive destruction of red blood cells, to severe which includes neurological symptoms.
  • Gluten allergy: Gluten allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to gluten or foods containing gluten. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches. Gluten allergy is similar to celiac disease - celiac disease only occurs in people with a genetic defect which predisposes them to the condition whereas gluten can occur in anyone but is more common in people who are also prone to other allergies.
  • Goldstein-Hutt syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by cataracts, excessive eyelash growth and and a blood abnormality (the red blood cells are spherical instead of doughnut shaped which makes them fragile).
  • Goodpasture syndrome: A rare disease involving inflammation of membranes in the lung and kidneys.
  • Goodpasture's syndrome: A condition which is characterized by glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage with circulating antibodies against basement membranes.
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Granulomatous arthritis of childhood: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • Greta-induced lead poisoning: Greta is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Griscelli disease: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism, only.
  • Griscelli syndrome type II: A rare genetic condition characterized by a partial lack of pigmentation in the eye, skin and hair, clumps of pigmentation in hair shafts, immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms.
  • Haemoglobinemia: A blood condition where there is excessive amounts of free hemoglobin in the blood plasma. It may be due to destruction of blood cells within the blood vessels or from other processes which result in hemoglobin separating from the red blood cell.
  • Hai Ge Fen-induced lead poisoning: Hai Ge Fen is clamshell powder used mainly by Chinese people to make traditional Chinese herbal medicines. This product has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Hand-Schuller-Christian Syndrome: A group of blood disorder involving excess production of histiocytes (type of immune cell) throughout the body. Accumulation of histiocytes results in non-cancerous growths which can damage organs and other body tissues such as bones. Symptom vary hugely and depend on location and size of tumor growths.
  • Hashimoto-Pritzker syndrome: A rare harmless skin disorder characterized by the accumulation of histiocytes (infection-fighting cells) in the skin which forms nodules. The condition occurs at birth or soon after and resolves spontaneously within a month.
  • Heavy periods: Excessive menstrual bleeding (called menorrhagia or hypermenorrhea)
  • Heavy-chain diseases: A group of rare condition characterized by the production of the heavy chain portions of immunoglobulin molecules. Subtypes include y-chain disease, µ-chain disease and α-chain disease.
  • Helminthiasis: Infection of the human body with a parasitic worm such as roundworms and pinworms. The worms usually only involve the intestinal tract but sometimes they may invade other organs. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the type of worm and the part of the body infected.
  • Hemangioma thrombocytopenia syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a spreading congenital hemangioma (collection of abnormal blood vessels) usually on the skin as well as blood clotting problems.
  • Hematuria: Hematuria refers to blood in the urine.
  • Hemodialysis: A treatment used to remove toxic elements from the blood
  • Hemoglobin C Thalassemia: A rare genetic blood disorder that can cause mild hemolytic anemia but is asymptomatic in most patients. This condition is also known as Hemoglobin C Disease.
  • Hemoglobin E homozygous: A rare genetic blood anomaly which may cause anemia and occasionally an enlarged spleen.
  • Hemoglobin H: A genetic blood anomaly that causes enlarged liver and spleen and hemolytic anemia.
  • Hemoglobin S/hemoglobin Lepore, Boston: A blood disorder that mainly causes hemolytic anemia with great variability of symptoms.
  • Hemoglobin SC: A genetic blood disorder where the patient inherits a gene for hemoglobin S from one parent and hemoglobin C from another. Severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Hemoglobinemia: A blood condition where there is excessive amounts of free hemoglobin in the blood plasma. It may be due to destruction of blood cells within the blood vessels or from other processes which result in hemoglobin separating from the red blood cell.
  • Hemoglobinopathy: A disease of the blood characterized by abnormal hemoglobin in the blood. The abnormality usually arises from a genetic defect which results in the hemoglobin have an abnormal structure. Sickle-cell disease and thalassemia are examples of hemoglobinopathies. Symptoms may vary from unnoticeable to severe with anemia being the most common symptom.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 1: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q34.3.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 2: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q32.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 3: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q25.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 4: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 5: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.3-p13.2.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 6: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20p11.2.
  • Hemolytic anaemia due to adenylate kinase deficiency: A rare condition characterized by the association of a deficiency of an enzyme called adenylate kinase and hemolytic anemia. There appears to be no conclusive cause-effect relationship between the two characteristics as some patients with virtually no pyruvate kinase activity can have only mild or no anemia whereas others with significant pyruvate kinase activity can have anemia.
  • Hemolytic anaemia, lethal -- genital anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by genital abnormalities and hemolytic anemia which often causes death.
  • Hemolytic anemia: A condition which is characterized by anaemia due to the destruction of red blood cells
  • Hemolytic anemia due to adenylate kinase deficiency: A rare condition characterized by the association of a deficiency of an enzyme called adenylate kinase and hemolytic anemia. There appears to be no conclusive cause-effect relationship between the two characteristics as some patients with virtually no pyruvate kinase activity can have only mild or no anemia whereas others with significant pyruvate kinase activity can have anemia.
  • Hemolytic anemia, lethal -- genital anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by genital abnormalities and hemolytic anemia which often causes death.
  • Hemolytic disease of the newborn: Blood disease in newborns mainly related to Rh incompatibility
  • Hemolytic jaundice: A condition which is characterized by jaundice due to an increased production of bilirubin from degradation of red blood cells
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by acute kidney failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia (reduced blood platelet count). The condition is often caused by upper respiratory infections or infectious diarrhea.
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical, childhood: A rare disorder involving destruction of blood cells and kidney disease. Unlike typical hemolytic uremic syndrome which usually follows a bacterial infection, the atypical form is possibly a genetic disorder. The distinguishing feature of the atypical form is that no diarrhea is involved. The atypical form has a poorer prognosis than the typical form.
  • Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an abnormal appearance of histiocytes in the blood
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 1: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children and can be life-threatening.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 2: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 10q22.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 3: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 17q25.1.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 4: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q24.
  • Hemophagocytic reticulosis: The abnormal proliferation of reticulum cell (histiocytes) which infiltrate various organs and. Macrophages destroy blood cells causing blood abnormalities. Meningoencephalitis frequently occurs when the histiocytes infiltrate the mininges and cerebral tissue. Symptoms start at birth or soon after and become progressively worse without treatment. Medication can control the condition but a hematopoietic stem cell transplant is needed to achieve remission.
  • Hemophilia: Blood disease usually genetic causing failure to clot.
  • Hemorrhage: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Hemorrhagic proctocolitis: Inflammation of the rectum and colon that results in bleeding.
  • Hemorrhagic thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder characterized by increased number of platelets in the blood which often results in an enlarged spleen, bleeding and blood vessel blockages.
  • Hemorrhoids: A condition characterized by the prolapse of an anal cushion that may result in bleeding and pain
  • Henna-induced lead poisoning: Henna is used mainly by Middle Eastern people as a hair and skin dye. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Hepatoma: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver.
  • Hepatorenal tyrosinemia: A rare genetic metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of particular enzymes which prevents the breakdown of tyrosine which then builds up in the liver. Type 1 involves a deficiency of the enzyme fumaril acetoacetate hydrolase.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Pennyroyal Oil: Pennyroyal Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat delayed menstruation and as an insect repellent. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Hereditary Polyposis Coli: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous.
  • Hereditary elliptocytosis: An inherited blood disorder where a significant number of red blood cells (erythrocytes) are elliptical or oval shaped rather than doughnut shaped. The condition is often asymptomatic but anemia can result when the abnormal red blood cells are destroyed.
  • Hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia: A group of genetic blood disorders where red blood cells are prematurely destroyed resulting in anemia if they are not replaced fast enough. The blood cells are destroyed because they have abnormally weak membranes which gives them an irregular shape rather than normal doughnut shape.
  • Hereditary spherocytic hemolytic anemia: An inherited blood disorder where a metabolic defect causes defects in the red blood cells membranes which leads to their characteristic spherical shape (normal cells are doughnut shaped) and premature destruction.
  • Hereditary spherocytosis: A rare genetic condition characterized by a defect of the red blood cell membrane. It is characterized by abnormally-shaped red blood cells which are spherical rather than doughnut-shaped. The abnormal red blood cells are broken down by the spleen sooner than normal which leads to problems such as anemia. There are various subtypes of the disorder which are distinguished by the origin of the underlying genetic defect.
  • High Blood Iron: Where a patient has an elevated iron content of their blood
  • Hirschsprung disease: congenital disorder of the colon in which the ganglionic nerver cells are absent leading to constipation
  • Hirschsprung's disease: A rare condition where abnormalities in the bowel muscles prevent it from contracting normally and pushing the fecal matter through which results in obstruction and dilation of the bowel.
  • Histiocytosis, Non-Langerhans-Cell: A group of disorders involving the excessive proliferation of histiocytes (macrophages) which are not Langerhans cells. Subgroups of this disorder includes hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, sinus histiocytosis, xanthogranuloma and sea-blue histiocyte syndrome. Sometimes only the skin is involved and in other cases there may be systemic involvement which can cause serious problems.
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.
  • Hodgkin's disease, adult: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system in adults. The lymphatic system forms part of the body's immune system. This type of cancer can also occur in children.
  • Hodgkin's disease, childhood: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system in children. The lymphatic system forms part of the body's immune system. This type of cancer can also occur in children.
  • Hodgkin's disease, nodular sclerosis: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted. The nodular sclerosing form is the most common subtype of classical Hodgkin's disease.
  • Homocystinuria due to defect in methylation (cbl g): An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (methionine synthase) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects. It is a form of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Homocystinuria due to defect in methylation cbl e: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (methionine synthase reductase) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects. It is a form of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Hookworm: Worm spread through feces with poor sanitation.
  • Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by retarded growth, a small head, anemia, immunodeficiency and an underdeveloped brain (cerebellum).
  • Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Anaplasma phagocytophilia) which attack granulocytes (a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the deer and American dog tick.
  • Human monocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Ehrlichia chaffeensis) which attack monocytes(a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the Lone Star and American dog tick.
  • Hydrops fetalis syndrome due to Beta-thalassemia: Abnormal accumulation of fluid in the fetus which can be fatal. The condition is caused by a blood abnormality (absence of Beta-globulin genes - Beta-thalassemia).
  • Hyper IgM syndrome 1: Hyper IgM syndrome is a rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome Xq26 and tends to affects males mostly.
  • Hyper IgM syndrome 3: Hyper IgM syndrome is a rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.2.
  • Hyperdibasic aminoaciduria type 2: A rare inborn urea cycle disorder characterized by an enzyme defect in the amino acid transporter gene SLC7A7 (positive amino acid transporter).
  • Hypergammaglobulinemia: An increase in the level of any of a number of gamma globulins. This can result from conditions such as chronic bacterial infections, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, dysproteinemias, liver disease and chronic granulomatous inflammations. The exact symptoms depend on the type of gamma globulins involved and the severity of the condition.
  • Hypersensitivity to drugs: increased sensitivity to a particular drug
  • Hypersplenism: A condition which is characterized by the exaggeration of blood degrading function of the spleen
  • Hypoadrenocorticism -- hypoparathyroidism -- moniliasis: An autoimmune disorder where hormone production by various glands is reduced. The main features of the disorder are Addison disease and/or hypoparathyroidism and/or chronic candidiasis.
  • Hypophosphatasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short limbs, dwarfism and general lack of bone calcification.
  • Hypophosphatemia: Low blood phosphate levels. Causes include malnourishment, chronic alcoholism excessive carbohydrate consumption, malabsorption, phosphaturia, liver failure, respiratory alkalosis and certain genetic disorders.
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • ICF syndrome: A very rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized mainly by a weak immune system and facial anomalies.
  • Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: A rare disorder involving bleeding into the lungs which can eventually cause damage to the lungs.
  • Ileitis: Inflammation of the lower end of the small intestine
  • Infant Cytomegalic virus: A serious CMV viral infection in newborns.
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors: A rare tumor that tends to occur mainly in the soft tissue and internal body organs. The more common specific locations are soft tissue, mediastinum, pancreas, gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts, mouth, skin, breast, nerve, bone and central nervous system. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the tumor.
  • Inherited Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by thrombotic microangiography occurring with renal failure, hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia
  • Internal bleeding: The loss of blood internally from the circulation
  • Intrinsic factor, congenital deficiency of: A very rare disorder where a deficiency of a protein called intrinsic factor prevents vitamin B12 from being absorbed from the stomach. Thus, vitamin B12 deficiency occurs which leads to anemia.
  • Iron deficiency: When there is a deficiency of iron in the body
  • Iron deficiency anemia: Iron-deficiency anemia is a blood condition characterized by low levels of iron in the body which leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells.
  • Isobutyric aciduria: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: An extremely rare genetic condition where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine.
  • Jejunal diverticulosis: Jejunal diverticulosis is considered to be a generally asymptomatic condition in which the diverticula are pulsion mucosal herniations with walls lacking a muscle layer.
  • Jin Bu Huan-induced lead poisoning: Jin Bu Huan is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat pain. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Juvenile nephronophthisis: A rare inherited kidney disorder characterized by formation of cysts inside the kidney, kidney fibrosis and tubular atrophy which leads to progressive kidney failure.
  • Juvenile polyposis of infancy: A genetic inherited risk of developing gastrointestinal tumors. The condition is characterized by gastrointestinal polyps which have a high risk of eventually becoming malignant. The polyps can cause gastrointestinal symptoms even if they aren't malignant.
  • Juvenile polyposis syndrome, infantile form: A genetic inherited risk of developing gastrointestinal tumors. The condition is characterized by gastrointestinal polyps which have a high risk of eventually becoming malignant. The polyps can cause gastrointestinal symptoms even if they aren't malignant.
  • Kandu-induced lead poisoning: Kandu (red powder) is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian and Indian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Kaposi's Sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Kashin-Bek disease: A type of osteoarthritis occurring mostly in children in China, Korea and Siberia and possibly caused by eating wheat infected with a particular fungus.
  • Keratosis palmoplantaris -- adenocarcinoma of the colon: A rare disorder characterized by cancer of the secretory lining of the colon as well as thickening of the skin on the palms and soles. The colon cancer tends to grow slowly.
  • Kernicterus: Kernicterus refers to neurological damage (brain damage) resulting from the passageof bilirubin through the immature blood brain barrier in infants. It can occur in jaundiced infants but not all jaundiced infants will develop kernicterus.
  • Kidney conditions: Any condition affecting the kidney organs.
  • Kidney damage -- 1,2-Dichloromethane: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to a hydrocarbon called 1,2-Dichloromethane. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Acetaminophen: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of analgesic called acetaminophen (Tylenol). Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Aminoglycosides: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Aminosalicylic Acid: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called aminosalicylic acid. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Amphotericin B: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by an antibiotic called amphotericin B. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Amyl Alcohol: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to amyl alcohol. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Anti-cancer drugs: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to anti-cancer drugs such as cyclosporine and cisplatin. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Aristolochic acid: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to aristolochic acid. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Arsenic: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to arsenic. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Aspirin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of analgesic called Aspirin. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Automobile exhaust: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to Automobile exhaust. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Bacitracin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called bacitracin. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Bismuth: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to bismuth. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Cadmium: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to cadmium. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Carbon Tetrachloride: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to Carbon tetrachloride. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Cephaloridine: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called Cephaloridine. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to a hydrocarbon called chloroform. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Chlortetracycline: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called Chlorotetracycline. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Chromium: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to chromium. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Cisplatin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to an anti-cancer drug called Cisplatin. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Contrast agents: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a contrast agent called sodium iodide used in some diagnostic tests. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Copper: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to copper. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Cyclophosphamide: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to an anti-cancer drug called Cyclophosphamide. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Cyclosporin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to an anti-cancer drug called cyclosporine. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Degreasing solvents: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to degreasing solvents. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Dichloroacetylene: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to a hydrocarbon called Dichloroacetylene. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Diethylene glycol: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to a hydrocarbon called Diethylene glycol. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Dioxane: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to a hydrocarbon called Dioxane. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Ethylene Glycol: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to ethylene glycol. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Ethylene glycol ethers: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to Ethylene glycol ethers. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Fuels: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to fuel. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Gasoline: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to gasoline. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Germanium: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to germanium. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Glue solvent vapors: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to glue solvent vapors. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Glues: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to glues. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Gold: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to gold. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Hairdressing solvents: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to hairdressing solvents. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Hairdressing sprays: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to hairdressing sprays. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Heavy metals: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to heavy metals. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Herbicide: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to herbicides. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to a hydrocarbon called Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Hydrocarbons: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to hydrocarbons such as chloroform and styrene. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Ibuprofen: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of analgesic called Ibuprofen. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Lead: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to lead. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Lithium: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to lithium. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Mercury: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to mercury. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Methanol: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to methanol. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Methemoglobin-producing agents: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to methemoglobin-producing agents. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Methicillin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called methicillin. Kidney damage usually occurs as a result of an allergic reaction to the antibiotic. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Neomycin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called Neomycin. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of analgesic called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Oxytetracycline: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called Oxytetracycline. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Paint solvents: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to paint solvents. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Paint thinners: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to paint thinners. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Paints: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to paints. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Paraquat ochratoxin A: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to paraquat ochratoxin A. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Perchloroethylene: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to a hydrocarbon called Perchloroethylene. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Pesticide solvents: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to pesticide solvents. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Pesticides: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to pesticides. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Platinum: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to platinum. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Polymyxin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called polymyxin. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of analgesic called prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Rifampin: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by a type of antibiotic called rifampin. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Kidney problems usually only occur with chronic use of the drug. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Silica: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to silica. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Silicon compounds: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to silicon compounds. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Kidney damage -- Silver: Damage or injury to kidneys caused by exposure to silver. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the kidney toxicity symptoms are listed below. Mild kidney damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in kidney failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the toxicity. Factors such as age, dehydration and underlying kidney problems may also influence a person's risk of developing kidney problems and the severity of the symptoms.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Anemia:

The following list of conditions have 'Anemia' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Anemia or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Anemia:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Anemia' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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