Assessment
Questionnaire

Have a symptom?
See what questions
a doctor would ask.
 
Symptoms » Arrhythmias » Glossary
 

Glossary for Arrhythmias

Medical terms related to Arrhythmias or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abnormal Heart Rhythm: An abnormal way of the heart beating
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Alcohol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alcohol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amitriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amitriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amlodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Anaesthesia: loss of sensations
  • Andersen-Tawil syndrome: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation causes periods of muscle weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities and various physical development abnormalities. It is believed to be caused by problems with the way the body utilizes potassium.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Aortic Valve Insufficiency: A heart valve disorder where the heart valve is unable to close completely which causes a backflow of some of the blood from the aorta. The condition can be caused by such things as systemic lupus erythematosus, endocarditis, high blood pressure, Marfan's syndrome and aortic dissection.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood.
  • Asphyxia neonatorum: Respiratory failure in a newborn.
  • Atenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atenolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Atrial cardiomyopathy with heart block: Atrial heart disease involving a disruption of the electrical signals in the heart and causes heart rhythm problems.
  • Atrial fibrillation: A rhythm disturbance of the heart that results in irregular and chaotic ventricular contractions.
  • Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A muscular dystrophy charaterised by enlargement of muscles
  • Beta-blocker poisoning: Excessive ingestion of Beta-blocker drugs.
  • Betaxolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Betaxolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bisoprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bisoprolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bounding pulse: Is most often classified as a forceful and strong pulse.
  • Bradycardia: Where there is a decreased or slowing of the heartbeat to less than 60 beats perminute
  • Bretylium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bretylium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Brevibloc -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Brevibloc (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bruit: Audible blood flow through a vessel or the heart, indicating abnormal flow.
  • Bruits: Swishing sounds heard over an artery that may also produce a palpable vibration.
  • Caffeine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to caffeine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Calcium channel blocker poisoning: Excessive ingestion of calcium channel blocker drugs.
  • Carbamate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of carbamate insecticide drugs.
  • Carbon Monoxide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbon Monoxide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cardem -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cardem (a beta-blocker medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cardiac malformation: Any malformation or structural defect of the heart or it's structures. Some examples include atrioventricular septal defect, conotruncal malformations, transposition of great vessels and heart valve dysplasia. The symptoms vary in nature and severity depending on the type of malformation.
  • Cardiac valvular dysplasia, X-linked: An inherited (X-linked) form of heart disease involving mitral or aortic valve regurgitation. Females are carriers and hence asymptomatic whereas males displayed symptoms.
  • Cardiomyopathy: A condition characterized by an increase in the size of the heart
  • Cardiomyopathy, Alcoholic: A weakened heart mucle due to excessive alcohol consumption. Symptoms are usually not evident until the heart becomes severely damaged.
  • Cardiovascular symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart and related vascular systems.
  • Cartelol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Cartelol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celipro -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Celipro (a beta-blocker medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celiprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Celiprolol (a beta-blocker medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cervical bruit: Audible blood flow through a cervical vessel, indicating abnormal flow.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fluoridated toothpaste: Fluoridated toothpaste contains fluoride and various other chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. As little as half a tube of children's paste can cause death in a 2 year old child and a whole tube can cause death in a 9 year old child. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chlorpromazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpromazine (a neuroleptic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chromosome 19p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the short arm of chromosome 19 is duplicated resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Climbing Onion poisoning: The Climbing onion is an unusual plant with many small branching, green, leafless stems and small whitish-green flowers. The plant originated in Africa and is often used as an ornamental house or garden plant. The plant contains a chemical (cardiac glycoside) which can cause symptoms if large quantities are consumed. Skin contact with the bulb of the plant can also cause relatively minor skin irritation.
  • Clonidine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of the drug called clonidine.
  • Cocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cordiax -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cordiax (a beta-blocker medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Crotalaria poisoning: Crotalaria is a herb which bears elongated, flower-covered stems and seed pods. The seeds and leaves of the plant contain alkaloids which can cause poisoning symptoms if large amounts are eaten.
  • Cuban lily poisoning: The Cuban lily is very toxic bulbous herb. It has long thin leaves with sprays of white, blue or purple bell-shaped flowers. The plant originated in Africa, Europe and Asia. Skin contact can cause skin irritation and eating parts of the plant can result in death. The toxic chemical in the plant is called cardiac glycoside.
  • Cyclic antidepressant poisoning: Excessive ingestion of cyclic antidepressant drugs.
  • Cyclosporine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Digoxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digoxin (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Digoxin antidepressant poisoning: Excessive ingestion of digoxin antidepressant drugs.
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy: A rare chronic heart muscle condition where one or both heart ventricles are dilated or have impaired contractility.
  • Diltiazem toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Donepezil toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Dothiepin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dothiepin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Drug overdose: A condition characterized by the consumption in excess of a particular drug causing adverse effects
  • Ebstein's anomaly: A heart defect where the tricuspid valve is malformed
  • Eisenmenger Syndrome: Increased lung blood pressure that can result from conditions such as a hole in the wall between the two heart chambers.
  • Endomyocardial fibrosis: Heart disease characterized by progressive fibrosis of the lining of one or both lower heart cavities. This results in constriction of the heart cavity and may involve the heart valves and other structures.
  • Esmolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Esmolol (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Everlasting pea poisoning: The everlasting pea is a vine which bears pink, pea-like flowers and flat seed pods. It's usually found growing in the wild in many parts of the world. The seeds contains various chemicals (amines, phenol, glycoside) which can cause poisoning symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Fabry disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Fabry's Disease: An inherited metabolic disorder where phospholipids are deposited mostly in the blood vessels as well as other tissues and organs. Symptoms include skin lesions, small red spots on the abdomen, thighs and scrotum, fever, peripheral edema, hypertension and renal failure. Also called angiokeratoma corporis diffusion, Anderson's syndrome, Anderson-Fabry disease, Morbus Anderson-Fabry, Ruiter-Pompen syndrome or Sweeley-Klionsky disease.
  • Felodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Foxglove poisoning: The foxglove is a herb which produces fruit in a capsule and colored, tubular flowers. The leaves, flowers and seeds of the plant contain a very toxic chemical called digitalis glycoside which can cause serious symptoms or even death if eaten. Skin irritation can occur if contact with the skin occurs. NOTE: Patients who are taking certain medications (digoxin, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers) are more susceptible to foxglove poisoning.
  • Gallop, atrial: A condition which is characterized by an atrial beat of the heart which is gallop like in nature
  • Gallop, ventricular: A condition which is characterized by a ventricle beat of the heart which is gallop like in nature
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome: An acute condition which is characterized by polyradiculoneuropathy that affects the peripheral nervous system
  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Heart block: is a disease in the electrical system of the heart
  • Heart cancer: A malignancy that is located in the heart
  • Heart conditions: Any condition that affects the heart
  • Heart disease: Any disease that affects that heart but particularly relating to its own blood supply
  • Heart injury: An injury to the heart
  • Heart rhythm symptoms: Problems with the rhythm of the heartbeat (arrhythmias)
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Heat exhaustion: major cause of preventable morbidity worldwide
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Peppermint Oil: Peppermint Oil can be used as an antispasmodic (to treat nausea, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome) and as an antibacterial. The herbal agent contains various chemicals (menthol, menthone, methyl acetate) which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • High T4 syndrome: A disorder involving transient increases in thyroxine levels for no apparent reason.
  • Holt-Oram Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by hand, arm and heart abnormalities. Bone abnormalities usually affect the left arm more than the right and occasionally only one arm and/or hand is affected.
  • Hyperkalaemia: Increased concentration of potassium in the blood.
  • Hypertensive heart disease: Heart disease that is caused by hypertension
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar levels
  • Hypokalaemia: Decreased concentration of potassium in the blood
  • Hypokalemia: Abnormally low levels of potassium in the blood.
  • Hypothermia: Low body temperature
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Iatrogenic pneumothorax: A pneumothorax that is caused by the actions of a physician or surgeon
  • Intracranial bruit: Audible blood flow through a cranial vessel, indicating abnormal flow.
  • Irregular heartbeat: An irregular beat of a persons heart
  • Irregular rhythm: When the heart beats too fast, too slow, or with a skipping (irregular) rhythm, a person is said to have an arrhythmia
  • Isradipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Jaundice: yellowish discoloration of the skin and mucous membrane
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Kentucky coffee tea poisoning: Kentucky coffee tea is a large, deciduous tree which bear small flowers and a flattened seed pod. The sticky, sweet substance surrounding the seeds in the seedpods contains a chemical called alkaloid cytosine which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Leukomalacia: Softening or destruction of the white matter of the brain. Brain tissue that surrounds fluid-filled parts of the brain (ventricles) is destroyed. It tends to occur mainly in premature or newborn babies who have been deprived of oxygen or have poor blood flow to parts of the brain. Intrauterine infections and premature membrane rupture tend to predispose infants to this condition. This type of brain destruction can cause cerebral palsy. Severity of symptoms varies according to the degree of injury to the brain.
  • Lidocaine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Lily-of-the-Valley poisoning: Lily-of-the-Valley is a plant often grown in gardens. The plant contains cardiac glycosides (convallamatian, convallarin) and saponins which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. Large amounts would need to be eaten to cause poisoning symptoms. Cardiovascular symptoms usually occur a few hours after gastrointestinal symptoms. The biggest danger of eating this plant is the effects on the heart which can cause serious problems in patients with underlying heart conditions.
  • Lithium poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lithium.
  • Long QT syndrome type 10: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 10 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (SCN4B gene on chromosome 11q23).
  • Long QT syndrome type 11: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 11 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 7q21-q22).
  • Long QT syndrome type 2: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 3 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 7).
  • Long QT syndrome type 3: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 3 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 3p21).
  • Long QT syndrome type 4: A very rare genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 4 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (gene for Ankyrin B on chromosome 4q25-q27).
  • Long QT syndrome type 5: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 5 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (KCNE1 gene on chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2).
  • Long QT syndrome type 6: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 6 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (KCNE2 gene on chromosome 21q22.1).
  • Long QT syndrome type 9: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 9 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (caveolin 3 gene on chromosome 3p25).
  • Loud Heart Sounds: Heart sounds that are louder than normal.
  • Machupo virus: A virus which is the cause of a form of hemorrhagic fever occurring in Bolivia
  • Magnesium deficiency: A deficiency in the magnesium stores of the body
  • Malignant hyperthermia: A very rare genetic disorder where sufferers suffer episodes of adverse reactions when certain anesthetics or muscle relaxants are administered.
  • Mc Leod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by neuromuscular, blood and central nervous system symptoms. The disease is slowly progressive.
  • Medullary Sponge Kidney: A rare inherited disorder where the tubes in the kidneys that collect urine are wider than normal.
  • Mepindolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mepindolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Metabolic acidosis: metabolic acidosis is a process which if unchecked leads to acidemia (i.e. blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of H+ by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3-) in the kidney
  • Methaemoglobinaemia: The presence of methaemoglin in the a persons blood
  • Metoprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Metoprolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mitral regurgitation: A condition which is characterized by a regurgitation of blood from the left ventricle into the atrium due to a problem with the mitral valve
  • Mitral valve prolapse, familial, autosomal dominant: A form of congenital heart disease where an abnormal heart valve (mitral valve) fails to close properly and allows some blood to leak through. The severity of the symptoms is determined by the degree of the defect.
  • Mitral-valve prolapse: A common heart condition that is often harmless.
  • Mountain Laurel poisoning: The mountain laurel is a large evergreen shrub which bears clusters of small flowers. The plant contains chemicals (andromedotoxin, arbutin) which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered highly toxic if ingested. The level of toxicity varies amongst species but it is unlikely that eating less than three leaves or flowers would cause symptoms.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Mustard tree poisoning: The mustard tree is found in various parts of America and contains nicotine. Ingestion of the plant can cause various symptoms. The leaves of the plant is sometimes smoked for its effects but it can result in death.
  • Myocarditis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the muscles of the heart
  • Myxedema coma: Myxedema coma is a rare, life-threatening condition, occurs late in the progression of hypothyroidism. The condition is seen typically in elderly women and is often precipitated by infection, medication, environmental exposure, or other metabolic-related stresses.
  • Nadolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nadolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis: A rare disease that is tends to occur in premature infants and involves inflammation and destruction of gastrointestinal tissue. It usually occurs within weeks of birth - often after the start of milk feeding. The condition can be extremely serious and even fatal.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Nifedipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Nimodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Nortriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nortriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Oleander poisoning: The oleander is a flowering shrub or small tree which bears clusters of flowers. The plant originated from Eurasia and is often used as an ornamental plant. The plant contains chemicals (cardiac glycosides: nerioside, oleandroside; saponins) which are very toxic if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The toxicity within a species can vary depending on the season. As little as seven leaves have been reported to cause poisoning symptoms. Poisoning can occur from inhaling smoke from burning oleander leaves.
  • Opioid poisoning: Excessive ingestion of opioids drugs.
  • Organophosphate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of organophosphate insecticides. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the exact poison ingested and the quantity.
  • Oxprenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Oxprenolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Palpitations: Abnormality of the heart beat that person can feel
  • Penbutolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Penbutolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pindolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Pindolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Propanolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Propanolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pulse rhythm abnormality: An abnormality which occurs in the rhythm of the heart
  • Pulsus alternans: Regular alternation of weak and strong beats without changes in cycle length
  • Pulsus bisferiens: The occurrence of a pulse which has 2 strong systolic peaks which are then separated by a mid-systolic dip
  • Pulsus paradoxus: An alteration of the blood pressure on inspiration
  • Quinidine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Quinidine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Rapid heart beat: Excessively fast heart beat (fast pulse) called "tachycardia"
  • Respiratory failure: A condition which is due to marked impairment of respiratory function
  • Romano-Ward syndrome: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary.
  • Scleroderma: A rare, progressive connective tissue disorder involving thickening and hardening of the skin and connective tissue. There are a number of forms of scleroderma with some forms being systemic (involving internal organs).
  • Sea wasp poisoning: The sea wasp can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning (Chiropsalmus quadrigatus): The Chiropsalmus quadrigatus jellyfish can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning -- Chironex fleckeri: The Chironex fleckeri jellyfish is one of the deadliest jellyfish in the world. It can deliver a serious sting and can be found mainly in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sedative hypnotic drug poisoning: Excessive ingestion of sedative hypnotic drugs.
  • Sinus arrhythmia: A condition which is characterized by any abnormality in the rate, regularity or sequence of the heart
  • Sinus bradycardia: Sinus bradycardia refers to a cardiac arrhythmia in which the heart is beating unusually slowly (less than 60 beats per minute), which may be normal in some cases or may indicate a disease, disorder, or condition.
  • Sinus node disease: Heart rhythm disorder due to the sinus node in the heart
  • Skull symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skull surrounding the brain.
  • Slow heartbeat: Excessively slow heart beat (slow pulse) called "bradycardia"
  • Smoking: The smoking of cigarettes
  • Soft Heart Sounds: Heart sounds that are softer than normal.
  • Sotalol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sotalol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Stress: Emotional stress (sometimes refers to physical stress)
  • Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm which can result in sudden death in otherwise healthy people. It is caused by a genetic defect which affects the hearts electrical activity. Examples of disorders that can cause lethal heart rhythm abnormalities are Long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, certain drugs, idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sodium channel disease.
  • Sumatriptan -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sumatriptan during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Tachycardia: Heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute.
  • Tacrine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Tetraodon Poisoning: Food poisoning from Tetradons.
  • Thallium poisoning: The poisoning of a person with the element thallium
  • Timolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Timolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Tricuspid valve diseases: Any disease that affects the tricuspid valve
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Uhl anomaly: A rare congenital heart malformation where the myocardial layer (muscle wall of the heart) of the right ventricle is completely or partially absent.
  • Vasovagal attack: Cranial nerve disorder with various effects.
  • Vertebral fracture: Any fracture which occurs to the vertebrae of the back
  • Weight symptoms: Symptoms related to body weight.
  • Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome: Heart arrhythmia causing increased heart rate
  • Yellow fever: A viral infection transmitted by mosquito bites which can damage various organs such as the liver, heart, kidney and digestive tract.
  • Young Simpson syndrome: A condition that is characterised by mainly mental retardation and physical signs of hypothyroidism

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Arrhythmias:

The following list of conditions have 'Arrhythmias' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Arrhythmias or choose View All.

View All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Conditions listing medical complications: Arrhythmias:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Arrhythmias' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use. Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use.

Home | Symptoms | Diseases | Diagnosis | Videos | Tools | Forum | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Advertise