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Symptoms » Bleeding gums » Glossary
 

Glossary for Bleeding gums

Medical terms related to Bleeding gums or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: A reoccurring periodontal disease which results in necrosis and ulceration of the gums. Symptoms may include fever, bone loss, breath odor and enlarge neck and throat lymph nodes. Also called trench mouth, Vincent's angina or Vincent's infection.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Agranulocytosis: Extremely low level of white blood cells (basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils).
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bleeding disorders: Any disorder leading to bleeding or bruising.
  • Bleeding gums in children: Bleeding gums in children occur when there is hemorrhaging, bleeding, or oozing of blood from the gums.
  • Bleeding gums in pregnancy: Bleeding gums in pregnancy refer to easy bleeding from the gums in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Bloody sputum: Blood stained matter ejected from the respiratory system
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Breath symptoms: Breath-related symptoms including breath odor
  • Breathing symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Cavernous hemangioma: A harmless proliferation of blood vessels which form a tumor-like mass of blood filled spaces which can occur anywhere in the body and is present at birth or develops soon after. It occurs in deeper layers of the skin as opposed to the top skin layers and the color may vary according to the depth of the lesion.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Brodifacoum: Brodifacoum is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromadiolone: Bromadiolone is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chlorophacinone rodenticide poisoning: Chlorophacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Congenital aplastic anemia: A genetic disorder where the bone marrow does not produce enough blood cells. Fanconi's anemia is an example of congenital aplastic anemia.
  • Coumachlor rodenticide poisoning: Coumachlor is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumafuryl rodenticide poisoning: Coumafuryl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumatetralyl rodenticide poisoning: Coumatetralyl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Dental caries: Decay of the teeth
  • Dental conditions: Conditions that affect ones dentition
  • Dental pain: Any pain that is caused by ones dentition
  • Dental symptoms: Symptoms affecting teeth or mouth area.
  • Diabetes: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Difenacoum rodenticide poisoning: Difenacoum is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Difethialone rodenticide poisoning: Difethialone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Diphacinone rodenticide poisoning: Diphacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Dry mouth: When the mouth is not as moist as usual.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa: A group of rare inherited skin diseases characterized by fragile skin which forms blisters with even minor injuries. The blisters can be painful and can occur anywhere on the skin and even inside the digestive tract.
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Factor V Quebec: An inherited bleeding disorder reported in Quebec, Canada.
  • Factor V deficiency: An inherited disorder where the deficiency of a blood component affects its ability to clot properly which can lead to bleeding problems. The severity of the disorder can vary from easy bruising to life-threatening hemorrhages.
  • Factor X deficiency: A rare blood clotting disorder which may be inherited or acquired in people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, leprosy and certain cancers. The underlying cause is the deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The condition may cause mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Friuli: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Fruili variant tends to only cause moderate bleeding problems and occurs mainly in an area of Italy called Fruili.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Kanazawa: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Kanazawa variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Ketchikan: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Ketchikan variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Nottingham: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Nottingham variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Padua: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Padau variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- San Antonio: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The San Antonia variant results in 14% of normal Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Santo Domingo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Santo Domingo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Shanghai: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Shangai variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- St. Louis II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The St. Louis II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Stockton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Stockton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Taunton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Taunton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Tokyo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Tokyo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Vorarlberg: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Vorarlberg variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee I: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee I variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- autosomal dominant: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The autosomal dominant variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Finale rodenticide poisoning: Finale is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Flocoumafen rodenticide poisoning: Flocoumafen is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Folgorat rodenticide poisoning: Folgorat is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Gingivitis: Inflammation of the gums
  • Glanzmann Thrombasthenia: A haemorrhagic disorder which causes a prolonged bleeding time
  • Gradual onset of bleeding gums: Gradual onset of bleeding gums is the slow development of bleeding from the gums.
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • Gum abnormalities: are due to conditions causing focal or diffuse swelling of the gums
  • Gum disease: Dental condition affecting the gums.
  • Gum disorder: Any condition which affects the gums
  • Gum pain: The occurrence of pain located in the gums
  • Gum symptoms: Dental symptoms affecting the gums
  • Havoc rodenticide poisoning: Havoc is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hemangioma thrombocytopenia syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a spreading congenital hemangioma (collection of abnormal blood vessels) usually on the skin as well as blood clotting problems.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 1: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children and can be life-threatening.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 2: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 10q22.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 3: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 17q25.1.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 4: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q24.
  • Hemophilia: Blood disease usually genetic causing failure to clot.
  • Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by epistaxes and multiple telangiectases.
  • Herpes: Virus with one subtype causing cold sores and another causing genital herpes.
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura is a condition in which there is excessive bleeding and bruising due to a low number of platelets, blood cells that are important to the clotting process, that has no known cause.
  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Reduced blood platelets causing visible skin blemishes from bleeding or bruising.
  • Immune thrombocytopenia: A rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks blood platelets which affect the blood's ability to clot.
  • Indandione rodenticide poisoning: Indandione is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer that occurs in children and involves the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Klerat rodenticide poisoning: Klerat is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid: A form of blood cancer that causes a proliferation of the precursors or immature red blood cells, platelets and certain white blood cells such as granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Aggressive-Phase: Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The aggressive phase of myeloid leukemia follows the chronic form and is a sign that the condition is progressing more rapidly to a blast crisis which is the final stage of leukemia.
  • Lichen planus: Skin rash
  • Lymphangiomas: A form of angioma caused by lymph vessels
  • Machupo virus: A virus which is the cause of a form of hemorrhagic fever occurring in Bolivia
  • Malabsorption: Dysfunctional absorption
  • Matikus rodenticide poisoning: Matikus is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Megaloblastic Anemia 1: A rare genetic blood disorder where a defect in the vitamin B12 receptor means that it can't be absorbed from food during digestion. As a result of the low vitamin B12 levels, the body produces increased numbers of abnormal enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts).
  • Megaloblastic anemia: Megaloblastic anemia, also called pernicious anemia, is a condition in which there is a low number of red blood cells most often caused by a lack of vitamin B12.
  • Mercury poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to mercury.
  • Mouser rodenticide poisoning: Mouser is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Mouth pain: Pain or burning of the mouth
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Myeloproliferative disease:
  • Owren Parahemophilia: An inherited disorder where the deficiency of a blood component affects its ability to clot properly which can lead to bleeding problems. The severity of the disorder can vary from easy bruising to life-threatening hemorrhages.
  • Pemphigus: A rare group of autoimmune skin disorders where blisters or raw sores develop on the skin and mucous membranes. The bodies immune system destroys proteins the hold skin cells together resulting in blistering. The condition can be life-threatening if untreated.
  • Periodontitis: Dental infection of the gums and/or related bones.
  • Periodontitis as in case of leukemia: Periodonditis is a dental disorder that results from progression of gingivitis, involving inflammation and infection of the ligaments and bones that support the teeth.
  • Periodontitis-like bleeding gums: Bleeding gums are mainly due to inadequate plaque removal from the teeth at the gum line.
  • Pindone rodenticide poisoning: Pindone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Pregnancy: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Quebec platelet disorder: An inherited bleeding disorder reported in Quebec, Canada.
  • Ratak Plus rodenticide poisoning: Ratak Plus is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Rodend rodenticide poisoning: Rodend is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Sabia virus: An arbovirus causing fever, rashes and hemorrhagic bleeding
  • Scurvy: Severe disease from vitamin C deficiency
  • Selective Vitamin B12 malabsorption with Proteinuria: A rare genetic blood disorder where a defect in the vitamin B12 receptor means that it can't be absorbed from food during digestion. As a result of the low vitamin B12 levels, the body produces increased numbers of abnormal enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts).
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Skin color changes: Skin changes such as redness, blueness, or whitening.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Squamous Cell Skin Cancer: Aggressive skin cancer arising due to sun exposure; lesions are locally invasive to surrounding tissues and may metastasise
  • Stress: Emotional stress (sometimes refers to physical stress)
  • Stuart factor deficiency, acquired: A rare blood clotting disorder which causes mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X (Stuart factor). This disorder can be inherited or acquired by people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, certain cancers and leprosy.
  • Sudden onset of bleeding gums: Sudden onset of bleeding gums refers to the rapid development of gums that bleed.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Talon rodenticide poisoning: Talon is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Throat symptoms: Symptoms affecting the throat
  • Thrombasthenia: An inherited blood clotting disorder where abnormal blood platelet function causes results in excessive bleeding.
  • Thrombocytopathy: A blood disorder where abnormal blood platelets affect blood coagulation.
  • Thrombocytopenia: Decreased concentration of platelets in the blood.
  • Tooth abnormalities as seen in diabetes: are acquired and inherited conditions which alter the size, shape and number of teeth.
  • Trench mouth: A reoccurring periodontal disease which results in necrosis and ulceration of the gums. Symptoms may include fever, bone loss, breath odor and enlarge neck and throat lymph nodes. Also called acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, Vincent's angina or Vincent's infection.
  • Vincent's disease: Form of gingivitis causing ulcers
  • Viral diseases: Any disease that is caused by a virus
  • Vitamin deficiency: When there is any deficiency of vitamins in the body
  • Volak rodenticide poisoning: Volak is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Volid rodenticide poisoning: Volid is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Von Willebrand disease: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a deficiency or defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems
  • Von Willebrand disease, platelet type: A condition that is characterised by autosomal inheritance and is a disorder that is charaterised by prolonged bleeding time.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 1: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a deficiency in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Most cases of von Willebrand disease are type 1 which is the mildest form of the condition. Patients rarely have severe bleeding problems but may bleed excessively during surgery, dental work or due to a traumatic injury.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The different subtypes have different methods of treatment so an correct diagnosis is important. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2A: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2B: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable. Type 2B often requires a different medication to the other subtypes.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2M: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. Type 2M is very rare. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2N: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 3: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 3 is the most severe form of von Willebrand Disease.
  • Willebrand disease, acquired: A bleeding disorder characterised by prolonger bleeding time

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Bleeding gums:

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Last revision: Oct 30, 2003
 

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