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Symptoms » Bleeding symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Bleeding symptoms

Medical terms related to Bleeding symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • ADP platelet receptor P2Y12, deficiency of: Deficiency of a compound (P2Y12) involved in the blood clotting process which results in bleeding problems.
  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • ATRUS syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by fusion of the forearm bones near the elbow and a blood disorder.
  • Aantibodies anti-FVIIIc syndrome: A rare, acquired blood condition where the body develops antibodies against a blood clotting factor (FVIII) which results in bleeding problems.
  • Abdomen bleeding: Bleeding due to abdominal wall disorders or due to failure in the body clotting mechanisms.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal muscle strain: Damage to the abdominal muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Abdominal pain that worsens with menses: also known as dysmenorrhea
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abdominal wall bleeding: Bleeding due to abdominal wall disorders or due to failure in the body clotting mechanisms.
  • Abnormal bleeding in children: Abnormal bleeding in children is unexpected or excessive bleeding or hemorrhage in children.
  • Abnormal infrequent menstrual bleeding: also known as oligomenorrhea is the infrequent uterine bleeding episodes with intervals of more than 35 days
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding: The loss of blood from the uterus that varies from that which is considered normal
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding: refers to vaginal bleeding at any time during the menstrual cycle other than normal menstruation
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding in children: Abnormal vaginal bleeding in children is any kind of bleeding or hemorrhage from the vagina in a girl who has not yet reached menses or puberty.
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding in pregnancy: Bleeding from the vagina during pregnancy that occurs after conception but before the onset of labour.
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Absence of pulmonary artery: The absence of a pulmonary artery at birth.
  • Absence of vaginal bleeding: also called amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation in a women of reproductive age group. It maybe be primary or secondary
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Absent menses: amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Accidental Eye Injury: The accidental injury to an eye
  • Accidental injury: An injury that occurs accidentally
  • Achard-Thiers Syndrome: A rare hormonal disorder that occurs in diabetic postmenopausal women where body hair grows in a masculine manner. Hormonal therapy is used to correct the endocrine imbalance.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Acorn poisoning: Acorns contain tannic acid which affects the metabolism of proteins and causing serious symptoms if large amounts are consumed. The amount of tannin in the acorn varies amongst species - higher tannin content results in a more bitter tasting acorn.
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia: A rare blood disorder characterized by a deficiency of blood platelets required for normal blood clotting. Autoimmune processes can be a cause of the acquired form of this condition.
  • Acquired hypoprothrombinemia: A low level of blood prothrombins which is not inherited but occurs as a result of certain medical disorders such as Vitamin K deficiency.
  • Acquired prothrombin complex deficiency: A rare disorder where infants with a deficiency of vitamin K suffer problems with bleeding. It is believed to occur in breast fed infants where the milk from the mother lacks sufficient vitamin K.
  • Acquired prothrombin deficiency: A deficiency of prothrombin (vital for blood clotting) which is acquired through other conditions such as liver disease, anticoagulant drugs or vitamin K deficiency. The severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of deficiency.
  • Acquired pure megakaryocytic aplasia: A rare blood disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia (reduced blood platelets) or reduced megakaryocytes (bone marrow cells that produce blood platelets). The disorder may be caused by immune processes inhibiting the development of megakaryocytes.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Acute Crohns-like rectal bleeding: disorders which can cause acute rectal bleeding( hematochezia) similar to that in case of Crohn's disease
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute biphenotypic leukemia: A rare form of leukemia that has myeloid and lymphoid features.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute elemental mercury inhalation: Inhalation of elemental mercury can lead to breathing and lung symptoms of various degrees of severity depending on the level of exposure.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute gastritis: Acute gastritis is the sudden onset of irritation or inflammation of the stomach.
  • Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis:
  • Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis: Acute inflammation of the pancreas accompanied by the formation of necrotic areas on the surface of the pancreas and in the omentum and, frequently, also accompanied by hemorrhages into the substance of the gland.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myelofibrosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: A reoccurring periodontal disease which results in necrosis and ulceration of the gums. Symptoms may include fever, bone loss, breath odor and enlarge neck and throat lymph nodes. Also called trench mouth, Vincent's angina or Vincent's infection.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute panmyelosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement. The disease often progresses rapidly and results in death.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute prostatitis: An acute condition which affects the prostate which is the result of infammation
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Acute urinary conditions: An acute condition that occurs in the urinary system
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Adams-Oliver Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by scalp, skull and limb abnormalities. The range and severity of the symptoms can vary greatly from mild to severe.
  • Adelaide I dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Aarau type was discovered in Aarau.
  • Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency: A rare genetic disorder where an enzyme (2, 8-dihydroxyadenine) deficiency results in urinary tract stone formation.
  • Adenocarcinoid tumor: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and tends to metastasize. The symptoms are determined by the location of the tumors.
  • Adenocarcinoma: Refers to a variety of malignant epithelial cell tumors of the glands.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: A type of cancer that occurs mainly in the genitourinary tract and the cells that make up the tumor are clear. It is very rare and most cases occur in females whose mothers used a drug called DES (synthetic estrogen) while pregnant.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: A malignant cancer in the form of cysts which may occur in the salivary glands, breast, mucous glands of the respiratory tract and sometimes in vulval vestibular glands. Also called adeoncystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma, cribriform carcinoma or cylindroma.
  • Adenoid cystic carcionoma: Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast is a rare neoplasm. It has a biological course of slow progression and near absence of Iymph node metastasis.
  • Adenoids bleeding: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenomatous Polyposis of the Colon, autosomal dominant: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and occurs in a familial pattern. Most patients have at least one parent with the condition.
  • Adenomyosis: presence of ectopic endometrial tissue in the myometrium
  • Adenosarcoma of the uterus: A tumor that develops from the glands that line the uterus.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adiposis dolorosa: A condition which mainly affects women and causes painful fatty swellings
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital (General): Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is an inherited condition characterized by adrenal insufficiency. It is caused by a deficiency in an enzyme needed to produce certain adrenal hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital, due to 11-Beta-hydroxylase deficiency: A rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia characterized by a deficiency of 11-Beta-hydroxylase which results in excess androgen production and hypertension. The disorder can occur in virilizing, hypertensive and salt-wasting forms and symptoms may range from mild to severe.
  • Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked: A genetic disorder which affects the body tissues that produce hormones. It is characterized by underdeveloped adrenal glands which results adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adult-onset Renal Failure: A progressive kidney disease characterized by the presence of high blood pressure.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Aflatoxicosis: Poisoning from ingestion of aflatoxins.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Aloe poisoning: Aleo vera is often used on the skin to treat such things as burns and dermatitis. The sap from the leaves contain a chemical called anthraquinone glycoside which can cause skin irritation in susceptible people but can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome -- mental retardation -- midface hypoplasia -- elliptocytosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of Alport syndrome, mental retardation, underdeveloped midface and a blood abnormality (elliptocytosis). Alport syndrome is an inherited condition involving progressive kidney damage and hearing loss.
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Alport syndrome with macrothrombocytopenia: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by progressive kidney damage and hearing loss as well as macrothrombocytopenia.
  • Alport syndrome, dominant type: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney problems and hearing loss. The condition is inherited as a dominant trait.
  • Alport syndrome, recessive type: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney problems and hearing loss. The condition is inherited as a recessive trait.
  • Altamira syndrome: A disease that occurs in Altamira (Brazil) and is caused by the black fly bite (Simulium). The pathological agent has not yet been determined.
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Amebiasis: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebic dysentery.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia: A blood disorder involving a deficiency of blood platelets required for normal blood clotting. The disorder may be present at birth (congenital) or acquired (e.g. autoimmune disorders).
  • Amenorrhea: Absence of menstrual periods.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Aminoacidopathies: Any of a group of inborn errors of metabolism which results in the build up in the body of one or more amino acids in the blood and/or urine. The range and severity of symptoms is hugely variable.
  • Amnion rupture sequence: A rare disorder where the amniotic sac is ruptured resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Amniotic fluid syndrome: A rare disorder where large amounts of amniotic fluid suddenly enters the blood stream. The amniotic fluid contains debris which can block blood vessels and dilutes the blood which affects coagulation. This can occur when there is an opening in a blood vessel wall and can occur if the birth involves difficult labor, older women, dead fetus syndrome or large babies. The condition can result in rapid death of the mother.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis VI: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In the Icelandic type, the amyloid deposits affect the brain blood vessels and cause hemorrhages.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Amyloidosis, cerebroarterial, hereditary, Italian type: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In the Italian type, the amyloid deposits affect the brain blood vessels and cause hemorrhages.
  • Amyloidosis, familial cutaneous: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. The familial cutaneous form is characterized by brown skin pigmentation as well as systemic symptoms such as failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastrointestinal problems and pneumonia.
  • Amyloidosis, familial visceral: A rare genetic disorder involving widespread amyloidosis (abnormal buildup of amyloid protein in tissues) which tends the affect the kidneys severely.
  • Anal bleeding: The loss of blood per rectum
  • Anal bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the anus.
  • Anal cancer: A cancerous malignancy that is located anatomically in the anus
  • Anal fissure: A painful ulcer linear to the margin of the anus
  • Anal hematoma: Anal hematoma is a collection of blood that has leaked from blood vessels in the anus.
  • Analgesic nephropathy syndrome: Kidney damage caused by excessive use of pain-killing drugs. Aspirin and phenacetin mixtures are the most common causes.
  • Analgesic syndrome: The use of large quantities of pain-killer drugs can sometimes cause serious kidney damage as well as various other problems.
  • Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Females with male XY genetics but inability to respond to testosterone.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Aneurysm: Swelling or ballooning of part of an artery
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 10: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 10 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8q12.1.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 9: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.1.
  • Angiodysplasia: Abnormality of small blood vessels - especially in the intestinal tract - which can result in bleeding. The size of the lesion involved determines the severity of the condition. Small amounts of bleeding from one lesion often goes unnoticed but multiple large lesions may cause heavy bleeding and result in black tarry stool and anemia.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Angiopathy, hereditary, with nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps: An inherited disorder characterized by kidney disease, aneurysms, blood vessel disease and muscle cramps which can last from seconds to minutes.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Animal bites:
  • Ankle bruise: A haematoma that occurs at the ankle.
  • Ankle fracture: Ankle fracture refers to a broken bone in the ankle.
  • Ankle sprain: Damage to the ankle ligaments.
  • Ankylostomiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a hookworm called Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus. Infection usually occurs when larva enter a break in the skin and then travel throughout the body until the reach the intestines.
  • Anorectal stricture: Narrowing of the anorectal canal.
  • Anorexia: This is known as a lack of or loss of appetite for food
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anorexia nervosa, genetic types: There is mounting evidence that anorexia nervosa may be caused by genetic factors which when combined with psychosocial factors can increase a persons risk of developing the condition.
  • Antepartum Eclampsia: Antepartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Antepartum means that it occurs before delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Anterior epistaxis: Anterior epistaxis is a nosebleed that originates in forward two thirds of the nose.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated disease: A kidney disorder involving varying degrees of kidney impairment. Severe cases lead to kidney failure whereas mild cases have normal kidney function.
  • Anti-plasmin deficiency, congenital: A very rare inherited blood disorder involving a deficiency of antiplasmin which results in excessive bleeding.
  • Anticoagulant poisoning: Excessive ingestion of anticoagulant drugs.
  • Aortic dilatation- joint hypermobility- arterial tortuosity: A rare syndrome characterized by the dilation of the aortic root, hyperextensible joints and varicose veins
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Appendix bleeding: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arm bruise: Injury or trauma to the arm tissue which is often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Arm fracture: Arm fracture is a break in any of the bones in the arm.
  • Arm strain: An arm strain is an injury or damage to a muscle or tendon in the arm.
  • Aromatase deficiency: A congenital deficiency of the enzyme called aromatase which is needed to convert androgens to estrogens.
  • Arteriovenous Malformation: Birth defect of a tangle of veins and arteries.
  • Asahi I dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Asahi I type was discovered in Asahi I.
  • Asbestosis: Lung condition from asbestos exposure
  • Asherman Syndrome: A condition where adhesions form inside the uterus because of uterine surgery or infection. The adhesions may cause menstruation to cease and/or infertility.
  • Asherman's syndrome: Scarring and adhesions that develop in the uterus and can result in menstrual and fertility problems.
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Attenuated congenital adrenal hyperplasia: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Attenuated familial polyposis: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The attenuated form of the condition is distinguished by the development of polyps in old age rather than during the first decades of life.
  • Auricle bleeding: Usually occurs due to trauma to the ear.
  • Autoimmune Hemophilia: Hemophilia caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune enteropathy: A very rare condition that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks the intestinal wall and affect the way it absorbs food.
  • Autoimmune oophoritis: An autoimmune condition where the body's own immune system attacks the ovaries and causes them to become inflamed. It can lead to ovarian function stopping prematurely.
  • Autoimmune orchitis: A inflammation of the testicles caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Automobile accidents injury: An injury caused by the mechanism of a car accident
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Avitaminosis: A group of diseases caused by the deficiency of one or more vitamins e.g. Beriberi (thiamine deficiency), rickets (Vitamin D deficiency), pellagra (niacin deficiency), pernicious anemia (Vitamin B12), bleeding (vitamin K deficiency) and night blindness (avitaminosis A). Symptoms depend on the type and degree of vitamin deficiency. Lack of various vitamins can affect just about every part of the body including the nervous system.
  • BXO: Skin condition of the penis which can effect the glans, prepuce or urethra.
  • Back bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the back.
  • Back sprain: Damage to ligaments in the back.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial septicemia: Sepsis of the bloodstream caused by bacteraemia.
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Baltimore dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Baltimore type was discovered in Baltimore.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Bannayan-Zonana syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal polyposis, pigmentation of penis and benign tumor-like growths.
  • Banti Syndrome: A rare conditions where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Banti's syndrome: A chronic, progressive condition marked by enlargement of the spleen which is associated with anemia, splenomegaly, ascites, jaundice, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a defect in chromosome 11q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 10: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 10 is caused by a defect in chromosome 12q.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 11: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 11 is caused by a defect in chromosome 9q33.1.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 12: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 12 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a defect in chromosome 16q21.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 3 is caused by a defect in chromosome 3p12-q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 4 is caused by a defect in chromosome 15q22.3.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 5: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 5 is caused by a defect in chromosome 2q31.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 6 is caused by a defect in chromosome 20p12.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 7 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 8: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 8 is caused by a defect in chromosome 14q32.11.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 9: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 9 is caused by a defect in chromosome 7p14.
  • Barotrauma: Damage to the lungs, ear or sinuses caused by rapid or extreme changes in air pressure.
  • Barraquer-Simons syndrome: A rare disorder that occurs in children and involves the progressive loss of fat layers under the skin which affects the face first and then spreads to the chest region and limbs.
  • Barrett Esophagus: Pre-malignant syndrome of the lower oesophagus characteries by columnar epithelium with areas of metaplasia.
  • Barrett syndrome: Barrett's syndrome refers to cellular changes in the lower portion of the oesophagus as a result of chronic reflux. The changes in the cells of the esophagus can lead to cancer of the esophagus (adenocarcinoma).
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Basal cell carcinoma, multiple: A slow growing type of skin cancer that occurs in multiples. The cancer tends to remain localized but occasionally spreads to nearby tissues. The cancer may flat, slightly raised or nodular. The lesion may vary in color - white, pink, brown, flesh-colored, pearly or waxy.
  • Battle's sign: ecchymosis over the mastoid process of the temporal bone.
  • Bearn-Kunkel syndrome: A type of autoimmune liver disease characterized by liver damage, very high blood gammaglobulin levels and increased plasma cells.
  • Benign familial hematuria: A rare inherited kidney disorder characterized by periods of blood in the urine. The kidney is still able to function normally.
  • Benign lung Tumor: Benign lung tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplastic lesions originating from pulmonary structures.
  • Benign mucosal pemphigoid: A rare chronic disease involving blistering and scarring of the mucous membranes especially in the mouth and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Benign peptic ulcer: Benign ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach.
  • Bernard-Soulier Syndrome: A congenital bleeding disorder marked by inability of platelets to coagulate or by insufficient platelets. The platelets that are present are often large.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Bethesda I dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Bethesda I type was discovered in Bethesda.
  • Bicep muscle strain: Damage to the bicep muscle in the arm due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 1: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-beta-hydroxy-delta-5-C27-steroid oxidoreductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 3: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect involved a deficiency of 7-alpha-hydroxylase which is an enzyme needed to prevent the accumulation of 27-hydroxycholesterol which is toxic to the liver.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Biliary atresia, intrahepatic, non syndromic form: Congenital obstruction of the passages in the liver that carry bile. The nonsyndromic form is not associated with any other abnormalities.
  • Biliary atresia, intrahepatic, syndromic form: Congenital obstruction of the passages in the liver that carry bile. The syndromic form is associated with other congenital abnormalities such as heart and visceral defects.
  • Biliary cirrhosis: Biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions. The cause of primary biliary cirrhosis is not fully understood.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Birth Injury: An injury to the mother caused by childbirth
  • Birth control pill poisoning: Birth control pill contain hormones such as estrogen and progestin and excessive ingestion of the pills can result in relatively minor symptoms - usually there are no serious problems associated with the ingested of many birth control pills at one time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Bladder cancer: Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder.
  • Bladder conditions: Any condition affecting the bladder
  • Bladder diverticulum: A defect where a part of the bladder lining forms a pouch in the muscle wall of the bladder. The defect may be congenital or acquired through conditions such as infection and urinary tract obstruction. The size of the diverticulum will determine the severity of the disorder with mild cases being asymptomatic.
  • Bladder papilloma: Benign tumor in the bladder
  • Bleeding after sex: Vaginal bleeding after sexual intercourse
  • Bleeding after sex in pregnancy: Bleeding after sex in pregnancy refers to the loss of blood from the genital region whilst pregnant. The blood loss may or may not be accompanied by other symptoms such as pain.
  • Bleeding and coagulation conditions:
  • Bleeding auricles: Bleeding auricles refers to bleeding from the outside areas of the ear.
  • Bleeding disorders: Any disorder leading to bleeding or bruising.
  • Bleeding from ear: Bleeding out of an ear
  • Bleeding from ear in children: Bleeding from ear in children includes any type of bleeding from the outer, middle or outer ear of a child.
  • Bleeding from the mouth: A condition which is characterized by the loss of blood from the mouth
  • Bleeding gums: Bleeding from or around the teeth gums
  • Bleeding gums in children: Bleeding gums in children occur when there is hemorrhaging, bleeding, or oozing of blood from the gums.
  • Bleeding gums in pregnancy: Bleeding gums in pregnancy refer to easy bleeding from the gums in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Bleeding in the brain: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal loss of blood from blood vessels located in the brain
  • Bleeding in the brain in children: Bleeding in the brain in children is a condition in which there is bleeding in a child's brain.
  • Bleeding in the eye: A condition which is characterized by blood loss from the eye
  • Bleeding nipple: Bleeding from the nipple
  • Bleeding oesophageal varices:
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Bleeding tendencies: defect in the haemostasis mechanism
  • Bleeding that occurs after a woman has stopped menstruating: postmenopausal bleeding
  • Bleeding under skin: Bleeding into or under the skin
  • Bleeding under the skin: A condition which is characterized by the loss of blood from blood vessels under ones skin
  • Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by inner canthal folds, lateral displacement of inner canthi and drooping upper eyelid. The severity of symptoms is variable. There are two subtypes of the condition: Type 2 involves eye anomalies as well as female fertility problems whereas type 1 only involves the eye anomalies.
  • Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by inner canthal folds, lateral displacement of inner canthi and drooping upper eyelid. The severity of symptoms is variable. There are two subtypes of the condition: Type 2 involves eye anomalies as well as female fertility problems whereas type 1 only involves the eye anomalies.
  • Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus: A rare genetic disorder characterized by inner canthal folds, lateral displacement of inner canthi and drooping upper eyelid.
  • Blood abnormalities: Any abnormalities in tests conducted on blood
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Blood coagulation disorders, inherited: Inherited blood disorders where the ability to form clots is dysfunctional. The blood needs to be able to clot to prevent excessive bleeding in situations such as when the body suffers some sort of injury. With blood coagulation disorders, the blood's ability to clot may be impaired, resulting in excessive bleeding, or the blood may form clots too readily and result in thrombosis.
  • Blood in stools as in case of inflammatory bowel disease: presence of blood in stools
  • Blood in the anterior chamber: Blood in the anterior chamber refers to an abnormal condition in which there is blood in the anterior portion of the eye.
  • Blood in urine: Hematuria is blood in the urine.
  • Blood in urine in children: Blood in urine in children is a condition in which there is visible blood or microscopic blood in the urine of a child.
  • Blood loss: loss of blood can occur through any of the body orifices
  • Blood loss in pregnancy: Blood loss in pregnancy refers to the loss of blood from the genital region whilst pregnant. This blood is often found on the toilet paper, in the toilet bowl or after sexual intercourse. The blood loss may or may not be accompanied by other symptoms such as pain.
  • Blood streaked diarrhea: Blood streaked diarrhea is loose or watery stool that occurs more frequently than usual and contains streaks of blood.
  • Blood streaked diarrhoea: presence of blood in stools
  • Blood-stained phlegm: Blood-stained phlegm is a condition in which there are streaks of blood in the phlegm that is coughed up out of the lungs.
  • Bloodshot eyes: Red blood-like color of the eyes
  • Bloody diarrhea: Diarrhea with blood in stool
  • Bloody ejaculation: Blood appearing in the ejaculate after male ejaculation
  • Bloody nipple discharge: discharge of blood from the nipple
  • Bloody semen: Blood appearing in ejaculated semen
  • Bloody sputum: Blood stained matter ejected from the respiratory system
  • Bloody stool: Blood appearing in the stool.
  • Bloody vaginal discharge: discharge from the vagina other than normal menstruation
  • Bloody vaginal discharge in pregnancy: Bloody vaginal discharge in pregnancy refers to the loss of blood from the vagina whilst pregnant. This blood is often found on the toilet paper, in the toilet bowl or after sexual intercourse. The blood loss may or may not be accompanied by other symptoms such as pain.
  • Body skin hyperlaxity due to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiency: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder caused by a deficiency of a blood coagulation factor.
  • Boerhaave syndrome: A rare spontaneous rupture of the esophagus which can occur during violent vomiting or retching.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bone-Marrow failure syndromes: A disorder where the bone marrow fails to produce enough new blood cells.
  • Bowel conditions: Medical conditions that affect the bowels
  • Bowel obstruction: A condition which is characterized by the obstruction of the gastrointestinal system
  • Breakthrough bleeding: Breakthrough bleeding includes any type of mild to severe bleeding or hemorrhaging that occurs after initial bleeding has stopped.
  • Breast Duct Papilloma: Benign tumour of the collecting duct of the breast.
  • Breast bleeding: Bleeding from one or both nipples of the breast.
  • Breast bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the back.
  • Breast cancer stages: 0, I, II, III, IV: Cancer stage is based on the size of the tumor, whether the cancer is invasive or non-invasive, whether lymph nodes are involved, and whether the cancer has spread beyond the breast.

    Stage 0- is used to describe non-invasive breast cancers, such as DCIS and LCIS. In stage 0, there is no evidence of cancer cells or non-cancerous abnormal cells breaking out of the part of the breast in which they started, or of getting through to or invading neighboring normal tissue.

    Stage 1- describes invasive breast cancer (cancer cells are breaking through to or invading neighboring normal tissue) in which the tumor measures up to 2 centimeters and no lymph nodes are involved.

    Stage 2- Stage 2 is divided into subcategories known as 2A and 2B.

    Stage 2A- No tumor can be found in the breast, but cancer cells are found in the axillary lymph nodes (the lymph nodes under the arm).

    Stage 2B- the tumor is larger than 2 but no larger than 5 centimeters and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

    Stage 3- Stage III is divided into subcategories known as IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC.

    Stage 3A- no tumor is found in the breast. Cancer is found in axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone.

    Stage 3B- the tumor may be any size and has spread to the chest wall and/or skin of the breast

    Stage 3C- there may be no sign of cancer in the breast or, if there is a tumor, it may be any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast, and the cancer has spread to lymph nodes above or below the collarbone.

    Stage 4- the cancer has spread to other organs of the body -- usually the lungs, liver, bone, or brain.

  • Brenner tumor: A benign ovarian tumor
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bright red blood on toilet paper:
  • Bright's Disease: A condition where the parts of the kidneys that are responsible for filtering become inflamed and results in blood and proteins accidentally leaking into the urine. The condition can occur after certain infections and serious kidney dysfunction can result in severe or chronic complications.
  • Broken finger: Fracture of a finger bone
  • Broken foot: Fracture of one or more foot bones
  • Broken hand: Fracture of one or more bones in the hand
  • Broken jaw: Fracture of the jaw bone (mandible)
  • Broken nose: Fracture of the nose
  • Broken shoulder blade: Fracture of the shoulder blade bone (scapula)
  • Broken toe: Fracture of a bone in a toe
  • Bronchial adenomata syndrome: A type of bronchial tumor that causes various respiratory symptoms.
  • Bronchial bleeding: usually occurs due to direct trauma to the lung and the bronchi.
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Brow bleeding: Bleeding from the brow - usually occurs due to physical injury.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Bruising: Bleeding under skin leading to discoloration.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Buttercup poisoning: The buttercup plant contains a toxic compound called protoanemonin. The plant is most toxic while it is flowering with the sap being poisonous portion of the plant. Poisoning by eating the plant is unlikely due to the fact that skin contact is quite painful.
  • Buttock bleeding: Bleeding coming from the buttocks
  • Buttock bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the buttock.
  • CAMFAK syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, small head, failure to thrive and spinal curvature.
  • CCFDN: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized by cataracts during infancy, unusual facial appearance and neuropathy.
  • CIN: A premalignant condition of the cervix that can progress into cervical cancer.
  • CML-Like Syndrome, Familial: A very rare condition characterized by symptom similar to myelocytic leukemia that develop during infancy. The condition can result in death during the first years of life.
  • COACH syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • Calf bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the calf or calves.
  • Calf muscle strain: Damage to the calf muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Campylobacter jejuni: Rod shaped bacteria causing diarrhea.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Capecitabine poisoning: Capecitabine is used to treat metastatic colorectal and breast cancer . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Carbohydrate deficiency glycoprotein syndrome type II: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect which involves the gene for a particular enzyme (Golgi localized N-acetyl-glucosaminyltransferase II). Type 2 tends to have more severe psychomotor retardation than type 1 but there is no peripheral neuropathy or underdeveloped cerebellum.
  • Carcinoma of the vocal tract: Cancer of the vocal cords in the larynx.
  • Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck: A type of cancer that occurs in the mucosal lining of parts of the head and neck e.g. esophagus, sinuses, nasal cavity, pharynx, mouth and lips. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the cancer.
  • Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A very rare disorder where the blood clotting system becomes dysfunctional and clots too easily due to the abnormal presence of antphospholipid antibodies. It results in blood flow blockages to various body organs. It is possible that the condition has autoimmune origins. The disorder is often triggered by infections, certain drugs (e.g. anticoagulants), minor surgery and hysterectomy.
  • Caterpillar complication poisoning: The spines on certain caterpillars can cause a skin reaction as well as systemic symptoms if ingested. The nature of the symptoms vary depending on the species of caterpillar involved. Some only produce skin reactions whereas others can produce systemic symptoms.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome: Caterpillars from the Lonomia genus have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome -- Lonomia achelous: Lonomia achelous caterpillars are native to Northern Brazil and Venezuela. They have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome -- Lonomia obliqua: Lonomia obliqua caterpillars are native to Southern Brazil and have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caustic or corrosive substance ingestion: Ingestion of a caustic (alkaline) or corrosive (acidic) substance. Many cases occur when children ingest cleaning products found in the home.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Cephalothoracic progressive lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue mainly in the trunk and arms.
  • Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia -- oligophrenia -- congenital ataxia -- coloboma -- hepatic fibrosis: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • Cerebral cavernous malformations: A rare disorder where a group of small abnormal blood vessels in the brain. These blood vessels become enlarged, irregularly shaped and thin walled. They swell when filled with blood and are then often unable to return to their original shape and the thin walls means that they can leak blood and cause bleeding in the brain. Severity of symptoms depends on the number and location of the lesions.
  • Cerebral hemorrhage: Bleeding in the brain
  • Cerebral ventricle neoplasm: A tumor that occurs in the fluid-filled spaces of the brain called the ventricles. Symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the tumor and whether it is cancerous or not.
  • Cervical cancer: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of malignancy on the cervix
  • Cervicitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the cervix
  • Cervix bleeding: Inflammatory conditions which cause cervical bleeding
  • Cervix conditions: Conditions of the cervix (entrance) of the female uterus.
  • Chafing: Skin chafing from friction or rubbing
  • Chancroid: An sexually transmitted disease caused by the Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria and is characterized by painful genital ulceration.
  • Changes in normal menstrual cycle: can cause increase or decrease in the menstrual flow
  • Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder resulting in frequent infections, lack of skin and eye pigmentation, neurological diseases and early death.
  • Chemical adverse reaction -- Cesium: Cesium is a chemical used mainly in the photosterilization of foods such as wheat and potatoes and in the manufacture of photoelectric cells. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount (and concentration) of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical burn -- ingestion: Burns to the mouth and gastrointestinal system caused by swallowing a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the gastrointestinal system are suspected.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Butoxyethanol: 2-Butoxyethanol is a chemical used mainly in dry cleaning, textile dyeing, protective coatings, glass cleaners, solvents, cleaning agents and paint thinners. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine: 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of pigments for various items such as paint, ink, textiles and plastics. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4-Aminodiphenyl: 4-Aminodiphenyl is a chemical used mainly in research and laboratory facilities. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldrin: Aldrin is a chemical once used mainly in insecticides for crops and as a termite preventative. The chemical can readily be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anti-rust products: Anti-rust products contain various chemicals which are toxic if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Arsine: Arsine is a chemical used in the making of semiconductors and in the metal refining industry. It is considered a possible chemical agent in chemical warfare. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Asphalt: Asphalt is the substance used in road surfacing and is also used in electrical adhesive and paints. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Automatic dishwashing detergent: Automatic dishwashing detergents contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the dishwashing detergent cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzidine: Benzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of azo dyes for such products as leather, paper and textiles. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Biphenyl: Biphenyl is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide for fruit packaging and in textile dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Borates: Borate is a chemical used in a wide variety of products - herbicides, paints, insecticides, rodenticides and various personal products such as skin creams, toothpastes and powders. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Brodifacoum: Brodifacoum is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromadiolone: Bromadiolone is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium Sulfate: Calcium Sulfate is a chemical with a wide range of applications from soil conditioners and paint pigment to the manufacture of products such as plaster and tiles. It is also often used as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbon Tetrachloride: Carbon tetrachloride is a chemical used mainly in grain fumigants, insecticides and in the production of fluorocarbons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Caulking products: Caulking products (e.g. silicon, acrylic, neoprene) are used to seal gaps and the chemicals in them can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorine: Chlorine is a chemical used mainly in bleaches, water disinfectants and in pulp mills. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Chlorine is very corrosive and extensive damage to body tissues can result. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Clinitest tablet: Clinitest tablet are used to test sugar levels in urine. The tablets contain various chemicals (copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and eating them can cause serious symptoms. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cloth Dyes: Cloth dyes contain chemicals which are considered not toxic but the ingestion of large amounts cay cause symptoms. Some dyes contain corrosive ingredients which can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. Most household cloth dyes don't contain corrosive chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cologne: Colognes contain chemicals such as ethanol and isopropanol which can cause symptoms if ingested or inhaled in excessive quantities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dieldrin: Dieldrin is a chemical used mainly to prevent termite infestations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. This chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diesel oil: Diesel oil is a commonly used fuel. Ingestion is unlikely due to the foul taste and smell. Accidental or purposeful ingestion can result in internal burns and various other symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethyl Phthalate: Dimethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly as an insect repellant . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethylnitrosamine: Dimethylnitrosamine is a chemical used mainly as a solving in the manufacture of plastics, rubbers, lubricants and rocket fuel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diquat Dibromide: Diquat Dibromide is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Drain Cleaners: Drain cleaners contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the drain cleaners cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Drainpipe Cleaners: Drainpipe Cleaners contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the drainpipe cleaners cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dye remover: Dye removers can contain chemicals which are corrosive and can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. The damage may continue for a few weeks after ingestion so death can occur weeks after the incident. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Emulsion paints: Emulsion paints (latex or water-based) contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endothall: Endothall is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide and rodenticide but it is rarely used today. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol: Ethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in antifreeze, coolants and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. Symptoms tend to occur in three phases: the first 12 hours involves inebriation, seizuresand brain swelling; the second and third day involves deterioration of lung and heart function and the third stage involves kidney damage and possibly failure. Death can occur during any of the stages.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Formaldehyde: Formaldehyde is a chemical used mainly in blues, lacquers, fireproofing, electrical insulation, leather tanning products and embalming. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furniture polish: Furniture polish contains chemicals (hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glycol Ether: Glycol Ether is a chemical used mainly in nail polish removers, products to treat leather, anti-icing agents and as an industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glyphosate: Glyphosate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Bleach: Hair bleach contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair bleach can continue to cause gastrointestinal damage for weeks after ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Dye: Hair dyes contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair dye can continue to cause damage for weeks after ingestion. Some dyes contain lead or mercury which can cause neurological problems even if low level exposure occurs over an extended period of time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydrogen Chloride: Hydrogen Chloride is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of rubber and vinyl chloride . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-8: Jet Fuel-8 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jewelry cleaner: Jewelry cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lacquer: Lacquer contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lead-containing Paint: Lead pain contains lead as well as other harmful chemicals. The lead in the pain is toxic (especially to young children) and ingesting fresh or old paint can cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lighter fluid: Lighter fluid contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metal cleaner: Metal cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metal polish: Metal polish contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methanol: Methanol is a chemical used mainly in fuel, paint removers, solvent, antifreeze and in the production process of many other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mirex: Mirex is a chemical used mainly to control fire ants but also other insecticides such as mealy bugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monosodium Methanarsenate: Monosodium Methanarsenate is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide or pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mould remover: Mould removers contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if swallowed, inhaled or skin and eye exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Naphthalene: Naphthalene is a chemical used mainly as a moth repellant, toilet deodorizer and the manufacture of other chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrates: Nitrates are chemicals used mainly in explosives and ammunitions but are also an ingredient in cold packs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oven Cleaners: Oven cleaners contain toxic chemicals which can cause serious symptoms on exposure. Severe gastrointestinal burns can be caused by ingesting oven cleaner. The burns can lead to perforation which involves a high risk of death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Petroleum Distillates -- Naphtha: Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pool Cleaners: Pool Cleaners contain various chemicals (mainly chlorine) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The chemicals are very damaging to the mucosal linings in the body. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Potassium Permanganate: Potassium Permanganate is a chemical used in various applications: topical antibacterial, photography, laboratory chemical, wood dye, water purification and bleaching processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfuric Acid: Sulfuric Acid is a chemical used mainly in car batteries and in the fur and leather industries. It is a significant component of air pollution and results in the production of "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tar remover: Tar remover contains various chemicals (mainly hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetrachloroethylene: Tetrachloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as a fabric dry cleaner, degreaser, worming treatment for animals and in the manufacture of freons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetryl: Tetryl is a chemical used mainly as a military explosive. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thioglycolic Acid: Thioglycolic Acid is a chemical used mainly in leather processing and in the production of hair straightening solutions, hair removal products, polyvinyl chloride, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and in metal detection reactions. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene Diisocyanate: Toluene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of elastomers and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Turpentine Oil: Turpentine Oil is a chemical used mainly as a solvent, paint thinner and various other applications such as deodorizing fragrances and antiseptics. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vanadium: Vanadium is an element used mainly in steel alloys but is also used in glass coatings, electric fuel cells and other applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Window cleaner: Window cleaner contains various chemicals (usually alcohols and ammonia) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- acetic acid: Acetic acid is a chemical used for medicinal purposes such as superficial ear infections, jellyfish stings and bladder irrigation. Acetic acid is a also a component of vinegar which is used as a cooking ingredient. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chest bleeding: Bleeding that occurs from the chest
  • Chest bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the chest.
  • Chin bleeding: Bleeding from the chin
  • Chin bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the chin.
  • China Tree poisoning: The China tree is a deciduous tree which bears clusters of numerous pinkish-purple flowers. It also produces a yellow-green fruit. The fruit and leaves contain a chemical called tetranortriterpene neurotoxin which can cause poisoning symptoms if consumed in large quanitites.
  • Chlamydia: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Chlamydial infection: Infection from Chlamydia genus.
  • Chlorophacinone rodenticide poisoning: Chlorophacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic 1: A rare inherited condition where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage.
  • Chondrodysplasia, acromesomelic, with genital anomalies: A very rare condition characterized by severe limb malformations and genital anomalies. The reported case involved related parents.
  • Choriocarcinoma: Rare cancer of the placenta
  • Choriocarcinoma, infantile: A rare malignant cancer that originates in the placenta. It is an aggressive cancer which generally results in infant death.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Bleeding symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Bleeding symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Bleeding symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Bleeding symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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