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Symptoms » Blood symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Blood symptoms

Medical terms related to Blood symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18-Hydroxylase deficiency: A rare genetic, metabolic defect where a deficiency of the enzyme 18-Hydroxylase which results in a reduced amount of aldosterone and salt wasting.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase II Deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving an enzyme deficiency which causes symptoms such as degeneration of the nervous system. The other features of the disorder are somewhat variable.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1: A recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by methylglutaconic acid in the urine.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Type 4 is characterized by symptoms which overlap type 1 and 3.
  • 4-Alpha-hydroxyphenylpyruvate hydroxylase deficiency: A very rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of a particular enzyme results in the urinary excretion of a chemical called hawkinsin. Symptoms start once the infant is weaned off breast milk.
  • ACAD8 deficiency: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • ACAD9 deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9). The symptoms are variable and are usually triggered by a viral infection or ingestion of aspirin which can trigger a Reye-like episode which can cause death.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • ASO present: The presence of antistreptolysin antibodies in the blood system
  • ATR16: A rare disorder characterized by alpha thalassemia and mental retardation.
  • Aase-Smith I syndrome: A very rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as joint contractures, anemia, hydrocephalus and cleft palate.
  • Abdominal obesity metabolic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by a group of conditions that are considered major risk factors for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Aberrant subclavian artery abnormality: A rare defect where one the subclavian artery arises from an abnormal location on the aortic arch. The defect may cause compression of organs such as the airway and the voice box.
  • Abetalipoproteinemia: A rare genetic disorder involving fat metabolism. The disorder is also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome. Signs of the disease include acanthocytosis, little or no serum beta-lipoproteins and hypocholesterolemia. In severe cases, steatorrhea, ataxia, nystagmus, motor incoordination and retinitis pigmentosa may also occur.
  • Abnormal blood smear findings in children: Abnormal blood smear findings in children refers to abnormal blood smear test results in children.
  • Abnormal blood test symptoms: Abnormal results from diagnostic blood tests.
  • Absence of gamma: The absence of anything located in the gamma region on electrophoresis
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Acetylcholine receptor antibodies: The presence of antibodies in the blood to acetylcholine receptor
  • Achalasia -- Addisonianism -- Alacrimia syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- addisonianism -- alacrima syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achor-Smith syndrome: A dietary deficiency disorder involving low blood potassium levels which leads to other problems such as diarrhea, anemia, muscle wasting and kidney problems.
  • Acid phosphatase elevation: Acid phosphatase is an enzyme which is stored in the lysosomes. Its elevation maybe to diagnostic of certain diseases in various organs
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidemia, methylmalonic: An inborn error of metabolism where amino acids in the body aren't metabolized properly resulting in high levels of the acid throughout the body.
  • Acidemia, propionic: An inherited genetic disorder where the body is incapable of processing some proteins and fats resulting in the accumulation of certain substances in the body which causes the symptoms of the condition. The condition can be life threatening.
  • Acidosis: The accumulation of hydrogen ions or the depletion of the alkaline reserve in the body.
  • Ackee Fruit Food poisoning: Unripe ackee fruit contains a chemical called hypoglycin A and B which affect the central nervous system and fatty acid oxidation. Eating the unripe fruit can cause symptoms can occur in as little as two hours but is generally 6 to 48 hours. The ackee fruit is found mainly in Jamaica, West Africa, Central America, Sought Florida, southern California and Hawaii.
  • Acquired hypoprothrombinemia: A low level of blood prothrombins which is not inherited but occurs as a result of certain medical disorders such as Vitamin K deficiency.
  • Acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia: A rare disorder where iron is transported into a developing blood cells but because it is unable to be used, it builds up within the cell and tends to stop it from developing into a fully functioning red blood cell. Thus anemia can occur despite adequate or even high iron levels. Acquired cases can occur on exposure to excess alcohol, lead and drugs or can occur to nutritional problems involving a deficiency of folic acid or copper or an excess of zinc. The condition can also be caused by conditions such as kidney problems, endocrine dysfunction, metabolic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia.
  • Acquired total lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue through the body. The disorder is very similar to the congenital form but the liver involvement is more severe.
  • Acral dysostosis -- dyserythropoiesis: A rare disorder characterized by hand and foot defects as well as a congenital form of anemia characterized by the production of abnormal red blood cells.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocyanosis: A condition where the body extremities sweat and turn blue and cold. Exposure to cold, emotional stress and smoking may trigger the condition. Also known as Raynaud's phenomenon or Raynaud's sign.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute subtype tends to progress rapidly and is the most prevalent form of the condition.
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute cholesterol-related symptoms: diseases which can cause an increase in the total cholesterol and hence lead to cholesterol related complications
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute lower respiratory conditions: An acute condition that occurs in the lower respiratory tract
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myelofibrosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute panmyelosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement. The disease often progresses rapidly and results in death.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Acute triglyceride-related symptoms: diseases which can cause an increase in the triglyceride level and hence lead to cholesterol related complications
  • Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome: The association of a sudden kidney disorder with eye inflammation. Autoimmune processes are believed to be involved.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency of: A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (short-chain fatty acids) into energy. Symptoms are exacerbated by fasting or acute illness. The severity of symptoms is variable with some patients remaining virtually asymptomatic their whole life while other suffer symptoms from infancy.
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Adenomatous Polyposis of the Colon, autosomal dominant: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and occurs in a familial pattern. Most patients have at least one parent with the condition.
  • Adenosine deaminase, elevated, hemolytic anemia due to: A rare inherited disorder where there is a high level of an enzyme called adenosine deaminase in red blood cells. The high level of this enzyme results in premature destruction of red blood cells which ultimately leads to anemia. The severity of the anemia is determined by the level of excessive enzyme activity.
  • Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anaemia due to: Deficiency of a chemical (adenosine triphosphate) resulting in anemia.
  • Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anemia due to: A rare metabolic disorder where anemia is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme called adenosine triphosphatase.
  • Adenylate Kinase Deficiency: A rare genetic anomaly sometimes associated with hemolytic anemia.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland hypofunction: Reduced adrenal gland activity due to damage to the adrenal gland or lack of stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal hypofunction: A condition which is characterized by a lack of production of hormones from the adrenal gland.
  • Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked: A genetic disorder which affects the body tissues that produce hormones. It is characterized by underdeveloped adrenal glands which results adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • Adult T-Cell lymphoma: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The lymphoma subtype is aggressive and tends to affect the lymph nodes more than the blood.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: A condition which is characterized by fulminant pulmonary interstitial alveolar oedema.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,1-Dichloroethene: 1,1-Dichloroethene is a chemical used in packaging, food wraps, carpet backing, adhesives and steel pipe coating. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Aggressive NK-cell leukaemia: An aggressive form of blood cancer involving the rapid proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells.
  • Aggressive systemic mastocytosis: The excessive proliferation of mast cells. Mast cells control the skin's response to minor injury and release a chemical called histamine which causes the skin to redden. In the aggressive form, mast cells accumulate in the liver, spleen and lymphatic system.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 1: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 2: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 13q14-q21.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 3: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q13.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 4: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19p13.13.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 5: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Airway obstruction: airway obstruction is a blockage of the upper airway, which can be in the trachea, laryngeal (voice box), or pharyngeal (throat) areas or involve the bronch.
  • Al Gazali Aziz Salem syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart disease, short stature and a webbed neck.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- Adult benign dominant form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The adult benign form is associated with a normal life expectancy and is often asymptomatic.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- intermediate form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The intermediate form is more severe than the adult form but less severe than the infantile form. Life expectancy is usually normal.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- malignant recessive form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Aldolase A deficiency: A rare condition where a deficiency of the enzyme called aldolase A causes muscle problems and anemia.
  • Alkaline phosphatase elevation: Alkaline phospsphatase are a group of enzymes found in all tissues in the body but primarily in the liver, bile ducs, kidney, bone and placenta
  • Alkalosis: A condition that iscaused by the accumulation of base in the body.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by homogentisic aciduria, arthritis and ochronosis. Symptoms include darkening of urine, alkinization due to overproduction of homogentisic acid, arthritis in the large joints and black ochronotic pigmentation of cartilage and collagen tissue. However, many of these symptoms may not occur until middle age. The condition may also be caused by chronic phenol poisoning.
  • Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome: An immune reaction to the ingestion of a drug called allopurinol. It is a potentially fatal disorder.
  • Aloe poisoning: Aleo vera is often used on the skin to treat such things as burns and dermatitis. The sap from the leaves contain a chemical called anthraquinone glycoside which can cause skin irritation in susceptible people but can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia trait: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia trait involves defects in two of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is mild anemia which may go unnoticed in many people.
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Alsing syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by kidney problems, skeletal abnormalities and a hole in the coloboma of the eye.
  • Alstrom disease: A rage genetic disorder involving a group of abnormalities affecting vision, hearing, kidney function and also characterized by obesity and diabetes mellitus.
  • Alstrom syndrome: A rare, hereditary genetic disorder which is progressive. Initial symptoms in infants are usually extreme light sensitivity, wobbling of the eyes and sometimes dilated dilated cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Young children quickly gain weight and become obese and as they get older, multiple organ systems may be affected causing blindness, hearing loss, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, liver disease, urological dysfunction, pulmonary fibrosis and renal failure.
  • Alström Syndrome: A progressive condition which is characterized by deafness, obesity and visual problems in childhood that may lead to diabetes and kidney failure in adulthood
  • Altered vital signs due to dehydration: Altered vital signs due to dehydration refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a lack of sufficient fluid in the body.
  • Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis: Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of diabetic ketoacidosis.
  • Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism: Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of pulmonary embolism.
  • Aluminium toxicity: High body levels of aluminium resulting in symptoms. Usually occurs in patients with renal impairment.
  • Alveolar capillary dysplasia: The abnormal development of the lung blood vessels. The normal barrier across which air and blood can diffuse fails to develop properly. Death usually results within weeks of birth but rare cases can survive for months.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Amelo-cerebro-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving degeneration of the central nervous system, seizures and abnormal tooth development.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amlodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Anaemia due to pyrimidine 5' nucleotidase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where a deficiency of a particular enzyme (pryimidine 5' nucleotidase) causes hemolytic anemia. The anemia is usually mild.
  • Anaemia in pregnancy: Anaemia in pregnancy is a decreased haemoglobin concentration in the blood, often giving rise to weakness, pallor and breathlessness.
  • Anaemia, sideroblastic, X-linked -- ataxia: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by mild anemia and early onset neurological motor symptoms. The neurological symptoms tend to be relatively stable or slowly progressive with only occasional dependence on crutches or wheelchairs.
  • Analgesic nephropathy syndrome: Kidney damage caused by excessive use of pain-killing drugs. Aspirin and phenacetin mixtures are the most common causes.
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Ancylostoma duodenale: An infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale which is a parasitic hookwork whichcan cause serious disease in humans - usually occurs in people who work barefoot in damp soil. The hookworms suck blood from the intestines of the host which can result in anemia if there is a large number of worms.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia due to brucellosis: Anemia due to brucellosis is a low number of red blood cells that is the result of an infection with Brucella bacteria.
  • Anemia in children: Anemia in children is a low blood cell count in children.
  • Anemia in fetus: Anemia in a fetus is an abnormally low number of blood cells in a developing baby during pregnancy that can be caused by a variety of disorders, diseases and conditions.
  • Anemia in newborn: Anemia in a newborn is an abnormally low number of blood cells in a newborn baby that can be caused by a variety of disorders, diseases and conditions.
  • Anemia in pregnancy: Low haemoglobin count in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Anemia, Blackfan Diamond: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare genetic condition where the bone marrow is unable to make sufficient red blood cells which leads low levels of red blood cells. There are eight subtypes of the condition which differ in the location of the genetic defect and the incidence of additional symptoms such as malformations. The severity of symptoms is variable but most cases are serious.
  • Anemia, Hemolytic, Warm Antibody: A rare autoimmune condition where the body's defense system attacks and destroys red blood cells. The onset of the condition is triggered by temperatures 37ºC or higher. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Neonatal: Insufficient red blood cells that can carry oxygen around the body. It is common in premature births or can occur as a result of blood loss before, during or just after the birth.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Sideroblastic: A rare blood disorder where abnormal utilization of iron results in the production of defective red blood cells which have excessive deposits of iron in them.
  • Anemia, sideroblastic spinocerebellar ataxia: A rare inherited condition characterized by anemia at birth as well as spinocerebellar ataxia (impaired ability to control voluntary movements).
  • Anemias, Sideroblastic: Sideroblastic anemias are a group of rare blood disorders where the bone marrow is unable to produce normal red blood cells. The body has enough iron but the red blood cells are unable to utilize it in a normal manner and anemia results. The red blood cells become overloaded with iron and are unable to carry out their normal functions. Some forms of sideroblastic anemia are inherited but most tend to be acquired due to such things as exposure to toxins and certain drugs, leukemia, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and nutritional deficiencies (e.g. copper and pyridoxine deficiency). Inherited forms usually appear in childhood whereas acquired forms usually occur in adulthood.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Angiodysplasia: Abnormality of small blood vessels - especially in the intestinal tract - which can result in bleeding. The size of the lesion involved determines the severity of the condition. Small amounts of bleeding from one lesion often goes unnoticed but multiple large lesions may cause heavy bleeding and result in black tarry stool and anemia.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- plasma cell type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The plasma-cell type tends to involve systemic symptoms such as fever and weight loss due to the destruction of red blood cells.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Ankle blueness: A blue discolouration of the ankle
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Anophthalmia -- short stature -- obesity: A very rare syndrome characterized by absent eyes, short stature and obesity.
  • Anophthalmia with pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare disorder characterized by absent or very small eyes and underdeveloped lung tissue.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood.
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Anterior pituitary hyperhormonotrophic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the excessive production of various hormones (gonadotrophic, thyrotrophic, lactotrophic and pancreatrophic hormone).
  • Anthracosis: An often asymptomatic chronic lung disease caused by inhaling coal tust which then deposits in the lungs. Also called black lung disease, coal worker's pneumoconiosis or miner's pneumoconiosis.
  • Anti DNA antibody: An elevated amount of the anti-DNA antibody in the blood
  • Anti-DNAse B: The presence of anti-DNAse B antibody in the blood system
  • Anti-GAD antibodies: The presence of antibodies in the blood which inhibit the production of GABA
  • Anti-Ri: The presence of antibodies in the blood to purkinje cells
  • Anti-ganglioside antibodies: The presence of anti-ganglioside antibodies in the blood
  • Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated disease: A kidney disorder involving varying degrees of kidney impairment. Severe cases lead to kidney failure whereas mild cases have normal kidney function.
  • Anti-staphylococcal: The presence of anti-staphylococcal antibodies in the blood system
  • Anti-yo: The presence of antibodies in the blood to purkinje cells
  • Antibodies to myelin basic protein: The presence of antibodies to myelin basic protein present in the blood
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Aortic arch interruption: A rare genetic birth defect where a portion of the aortic arch is missing or discontinued which severely impairs the flow of oxygenated blood to the lower body.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Apo A-I deficiency: Low plasma HDL cholesterol that tends to run in families.
  • Apolipoprotein C 2I deficiency: A rare inherited condition where a deficiency of apolipoprotein C-II impairs lipoprotein metabolism and results in a build up of chylomicrons and VLDL.
  • Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess, type 2: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition is caused by a genetic defect which results in an inborn error of metabolism of peripheral cortisol. Type 2 causes similar symptoms to type 1 but the urinary steroid levels are different.
  • Apparent mineralocorticoid excess: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition results from a genetic defect which causes impaired metabolism of cortisol.
  • Apple seed poisoning: Apple seeds contain a toxic chemical called amygdalin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Hospital admission is recommended if more than 50 apple seeds have been consumed.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Arcobacter butzleri infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arginase deficiency: A very rare urea cycle disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme (arginase) needed to convert ammonia to the urea which can then be removed in the urine. The condition leads to excess build-up of ammonia in the body which is toxic to the nervous system.
  • Argininosuccinic aciduria: A rare inherited disorder of the urea cycle characterized by the lack of an enzyme (argininosuccinate lyase) which is needed to remove nitrogen from the body so a lack of the enzyme leads to a build-up of ammonia in the blood.
  • Aristolochic Acid poisoning: Aristolochic acid is derived from a forest herb from the Aristocholochia family. It is often used in herbal preparations such as Aristolochia Fang Ch, Bragantia and Asarum. It is usually used in herbal preparations to promote weight loss. The substance is believed to cause kidney failure and urinary tract cancer.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arm blueness: A blue discolouration of the arm
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis -- renal dysfunction -- cholestasis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, kidney dysfunction and liver problems.
  • Asbestos conditions: Medical conditions caused be exposure to asbestos dust
  • Aseptic abscesses syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the development of deep, sterile lesions containing neutrophils. The lesions don't respond to antibiotics but do respond to corticosteroid therapy. The abscesses usually occur in the abdomen and are often associated with conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and polychondritis. Although the abscesses respond to corticosteroids, more than half of the cases relapse.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Asparatate aminotransferase elevation: elevation of asparatate aminotransferase in the serum is seen in acute liver injury, but it is also present in red blood cells, cardiac and skeletal muscles and is therefore not specific to the liver
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Asphyxia neonatorum: Respiratory failure in a newborn.
  • Asrar-Facharzt-Haque syndrome: A form of sinus histiocytosis characterized by lymphadenopathy as well as involvement of other tissues such as the sinus cavity, skin, lungs, bone, eyes, kidneys, testes, head and neck area and the central nervous system. Symptoms vary according to the organ involved. The condition usually runs a prolonged course with spontaneous remission occurring in some cases. Rare cases may be fatal.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Astrovirus: An RNA virus that may affect the gastrointestinal system
  • Atherosclerosis: A condition which is a form of arteriosclerosis where atheromas are caused by the aggregation of cholesterol and lipids
  • Atransferrinemia: A rare inherited condition characterized by the absence of a compound called transferring which results in a buildup of iron in the body's tissues as well as anemia.
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Attenuated familial polyposis: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The attenuated form of the condition is distinguished by the development of polyps in old age rather than during the first decades of life.
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause.
  • Autoantibodies to voltage gated calcium channels: The presence of autoantibodies to voltage gated calcium channels
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Autoimmune Myocarditis: Inflammation of the heart muscle due to the body's own immune system attacking it.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy: A very rare condition that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks the intestinal wall and affect the way it absorbs food.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy, type 1: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Avitaminosis: A group of diseases caused by the deficiency of one or more vitamins e.g. Beriberi (thiamine deficiency), rickets (Vitamin D deficiency), pellagra (niacin deficiency), pernicious anemia (Vitamin B12), bleeding (vitamin K deficiency) and night blindness (avitaminosis A). Symptoms depend on the type and degree of vitamin deficiency. Lack of various vitamins can affect just about every part of the body including the nervous system.
  • Azalea poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A slow progressing disease involving cancerous B-cell lymphocytes which take over the healthy cells in the lymph nodes. B-cells help the body to fight infections so when the disease becomes more advanced, the body is less able to fight infection as there are fewer healthy, functioning B-cells.
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Babesiosis: A protozoal infection which is transmitted to human via the bite of certain ticks.
  • Bacillus cereus type I food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Bacillus cereus type II food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Back blueness: A blue discolouration on the back
  • Bacteremia: A condition where bacteria is present in the blood.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Baker-Winegrad disease: A very rare syndrome caused by a deficiency of the enzyme fructose-1-6-diphosphatase which impairs the body's ability to break down fructose that is consumed in the diet.
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Banti Syndrome: A rare conditions where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Banti's syndrome: A chronic, progressive condition marked by enlargement of the spleen which is associated with anemia, splenomegaly, ascites, jaundice, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Barakat syndrome: A rare condition characterized by deafness, kidney disease and insufficiency parathyroid hormone production.
  • Bard-Pic syndrome: A complication of advanced pancreatic cancer marked by jaundice and enlarged gallbladder.
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Bartter Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder of kidney metabolism characterized by reduced blood acidity and low potassium levels.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4 also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4A: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4A also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4B: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4B also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Basophilic stippling in blood smear: Basophilic stippling in blood smear is an abnormal finding on a blood smear test that may indicate lead poisoning and other conditions.
  • Basophilic stippling in blood smear in children: Basophilic stippling in blood smear in children is an abnormal finding on a child's blood smear test that may indicate lead poisoning and other conditions.
  • Beau's syndrome: A syndrome characterized by heart insufficiency and inability of the heart ventricles to completely empty of blood.
  • Beemer-Ertbruggen syndrome: A rare lethal syndrome characterized primarily by hydrocephalus, heart malformations, and increased bone density. Only a couple of cases have been reported.
  • Beer-drinker syndrome: Symptoms that can occur when large amounts of beer is consumed with little or no food.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bell mania: A rare life-threatening neuropsychiatric disorder involving delusions, hyperactivity and periods of fever. Death can occur within days or months without treatment.
  • Bence Jones Proteins: The presence of free light chains in the urine
  • Bence jones protein: Bence Jones protein is a type of abnormal protein that may be found in the urine associated with certain conditions and diseases that produce high levels of protein in the urine.
  • Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, loss of body fat, hepatomegaly, enlarged genitals, increased skeletal growth and other abnormalities.
  • Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus, loss of body fat, serious insulin resistance, high blood triglycerides and fatty liver. Type 1 is distinguished from type 2 by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1 is caused by a defect on the AGPAT2 gene on chromosome 9q34.3. Type 1 seems to be less severe with some cases of type 2 resulting in premature death which can occur as early as the first year of life. Type 2 also involves mental retardation which is not seen in type 1.
  • Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus, loss of body fat, serious insulin resistance, high blood triglycerides and fatty liver. Type 2 is distinguished from type 2 by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 2 is caused by a defect on the BSCL2 gene on chromosome 11q13. Type 2 seems to be more severe with some cases resulting in premature death which can occur as early as the first year of life. Type 2 also involves mental retardation which is not seen in type 1.
  • Berylliosis: Beryllium poisoning which causes granulomas and pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Beta Thalassemia trait: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. There are two subtypes of the disorder (alpha and beta) depending on what portion of the hemoglobin is abnormally synthesized. Beta Thalassemia trait involves defects in one of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. Mild anemia is usually the only symptom.
  • Beta ketothiolase deficiency: A rare inherited disease characterized by the bodies inability to metabolise certain amino acids and products of the breakdown of fat. Harmful levels of organic acids build up in the body and cause ketoacidic attacks.
  • Beta thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Beta thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Beta-Glutamylcysteine synthetase deficiency: A rare disorder of amino acid metabolism where deficiency of the enzyme called Beta-Glutamylcysteine synthetase impairs the body's ability to metabolize sulfur-containing amino acids.
  • Beta-gamma bridging: An increase in the number of proteins lying between beta and gamma on electrophoresis
  • Bicarbonate deficit: A condition caused by excessive organic or inorganic acids in the body. The excess may be due to abnormally high acid production such as occurs during fever and starvation or may occur as a result of excessive acid intake, acid retention or loss of bases.
  • Bile plug syndrome: A rare condition where thick bile in infants causes blockage of the bile ducts which can result in jaundice, enlarged liver and anemia.
  • Bindewald-Ulmer-Muller syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a heart defect, and mental and growth retardation.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Bint Al Zahab-induced lead poisoning: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used by various ethnic groups (e.g. Indians, Saudi Arabians) to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Biotinidase deficiency, late onset: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes. The severity of symptoms may vary depending on the degree of deficiency. Severe cases can result in metabolic acidosis which can lead to death if treatment isn't given.
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Birth Injury: An injury to the mother caused by childbirth
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Bleeding tendencies: defect in the haemostasis mechanism
  • Blethen-Wenick-Hawkins syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, skeletal abnormalities and reduced pituitary gland functioning.
  • Blood abnormalities: Any abnormalities in tests conducted on blood
  • Blood clot: A coagulum that is located in the blood stream due to the aggregation of blood factors
  • Blood clot in pregnancy: Blood clot in pregnancy is relatively common and is caused largely by physiological factors related to pregnancy, but can also be caused by pathology unrelated to pregnancy.
  • Blood clots: Multiple coagulums that are located in the blood stream due to the aggregation of blood factors
  • Blood clots in pregnancy: Blood clots in pregnancy are relatively common and are caused largely by physiological factors related to pregnancy, but can also be caused by pathology unrelated to pregnancy.
  • Blood conditions: Conditions that affect the blood
  • Blood count signs: Blood count signs refers to a variety of diagnostic parameters that can be determined on a blood count test.
  • Blood decreased pH: A decrease in the pH acid balance of the blood
  • Blood increased pH: An increase in the pH acid balance of the blood
  • Blood infection:
  • Blood lead concentration: The level of lead concentration in the blood
  • Blood lipid symptoms: Symptoms affecting the lipids such as cholesterol in the blood.
  • Blood lithium concentration: The level of lithium concentration in the blood
  • Blue baby: Any baby born with blueness
  • Blue face in children: Blue face in children, sometimes called facial cyanosis, can occur due to a lack of oxygen in the cells of the face, among other causes.
  • Blue hands: Blue appearance of the hands
  • Blue hands in children: Blue hands in children, sometimes called cyanosis, can occur due to a lack of oxygen in the cells of the hands, extreme cold, and other causes.
  • Blue lips: Blueness or discoloration of the lips
  • Blue lips in children: Blue lips in children, sometimes called cyanosis, occurs due to extreme cold, a lack of oxygen in the cells of the lips, and other causes in children.
  • Blue nails: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of nails that are blue in appearance
  • Blue nails in children: Blue nails in children, sometimes called cyanosis, occurs due to extreme cold, a lack of oxygen in the cells of the skin under the nails, and other causes in children.
  • Blue rubber bleb nevus: A very rare congenital vascular disorder characterized by multiple hemangiomas on the skin and internal organs.
  • Blue skin: Blueness of the skin
  • Blue tongue: A symptom which occurs when the tongue is blue in appearance
  • Blue tongue in children: Blue tongue in children, sometimes called tongue cyanosis, can occur due to a variety of conditions, including a lack of oxygen in the tongue cells.
  • Blueberry muffin syndrome: A manifestation of fetal rubella infection. The newborn has purplish or bluish skin lesions or bumps as well as thrombocytopenia. The skin usually clears within 6 weeks.
  • Bluish black discoloration of the mucous membrane: decreased in the oxygen saturation of the mucous membrane also known as cyanosis
  • Bluish discoloration of both arms: Bluish discoloration of both arms, sometimes called cyanosis, is an abnormally blue tint or coloring of both arms.
  • Bluish discoloration of both hands: Bluish discoloration of both hands, sometimes called cyanosis, refers to a condition in which there is a blue tone or tint of both hands.
  • Bluish discoloration of one arm: Bluish discoloration of one arm, sometimes called cyanosis, occurs when one arm appears bluish.
  • Bluish discoloration of one hand: Bluish discoloration of one hand refers to an abnormal bluish color of one hand, sometimes called cyanosis.
  • Bluish discoloration of the mucous membrane: decreased in the oxygen saturation of the mucous membrane also known as cyanosis
  • Bluish discoloration of the skin: Cyanosis is a bluish discoloration of the skin or mucous membranes caused by lack of oxygen in the blood .
  • Bluish discoloration of the skin similar to that in case of acute severe asthma: decreased in the oxygen saturation, also known as cyanosis
  • Bluish discoloration of the skin similar to that in the case of acute severe asthma: Bluish discoloration of the skin similar to that in the case of acute severe asthma is an abnormal bluish coloration of the skin that is due to a lack of oxygen that is delivered to the body's cells.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Boichis syndrome: A rare syndrome involving nephronophthisis (progressive destruction of kidney tissue) from birth which leads to kidney failure and liver fibrosis.
  • Bokhoor-induced lead poisoning: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bone and cartilage tumors: Any tumors affecting the bones or cartilage, including both cancerous and benign tumors.
  • Bone marrow failure -- neurologic abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of bone marrow failure and neurological abnormalities.
  • Bone symptoms: Symptoms affecting the body's bones
  • Bone-Marrow failure syndromes: A disorder where the bone marrow fails to produce enough new blood cells.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Bothriocephalosis: Infection with an intestinal parasite. The parasite is a fish tapeworm called Diphyllobothrium latum. Human infection is caused by eating undercooked contaminated fish.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brainerd diarrhea: Diarrheal condition of unknown cause.
  • Breast blueness: A blue discolouration on the breast or breasts
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Bronchiolitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bronchioles
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A condition which is characterized by dysplasia of the brochopulmonary vessels
  • Brown Recluse spider poisoning: The Brown Recluse spider is poisonous and is found mainly in southern and central areas of the US.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Brown-Sequard Syndrome: A disorder where spinal cord compression and lesions involve only half of the spinal cord.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Brunzell syndrome: A rare recessively inherited syndrome characterized by a lack of skin fat (Seip syndrome), cystic angiomatosis of the long bones which can lead to fractures.
  • Buerger's disease: Buergers's disease is a recurring inflammation and thrombosis (clotting) of small and medium arteries and veins of the hands and feet
  • Bufotenine poisoning: The skin glands of certain toads (Cane toad and Colorado river toad) contain a poison called bufotoxin.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Bullis fever syndrome: A disease transmitted through tick bites (Ambylomma americanum). Symptoms include fever, rash and headache. The disease was first observed in soldiers training at Camp Bullis in America.
  • Busulfan toxicity syndrome: Symptoms caused by the use of a chemotherapy drug called Busulfan.
  • Buttock blueness: A blue discolouration on the buttocks
  • Bébé Collodion syndrome: A rare birth abnormality where an infant is born covered in a tight, yellow, shiny membrane. The membrane peels off and may reform several times. As the membrane dries it can leave crack which can result in infection, dehydration or inability to control body temperature. The tight skin can also affect breathing and feeding ability or impair blood supply to limbs. In mild cases the underlying skin may be normal. 10% of cases resolve themselves within a few weeks of birth.
  • CDG syndrome type 1B: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1B has a phosphomannose isomerase enzyme defect.
  • CML-Like Syndrome, Familial: A very rare condition characterized by symptom similar to myelocytic leukemia that develop during infancy. The condition can result in death during the first years of life.
  • CMV antenatal infection: A rare condition where a fetus becomes infected with the cytomegalovirus through the mother.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Cadmium poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to cadmium.
  • Calf blueness: A blue discolouration on the calf or calves
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Camurati Engelmann disease, type 2: A rare disorder (described in two patients) which has similar symptoms to the genetic condition called Camurati Engelmann disease but the genetic defect responsible for type 1 is not present in type 2. Type 2 has additional bone abnormalities which were noted on radiographs. Patients tend to suffer flare-ups of their condition which is accompanied by severe pain which may leave the patient incapacitated. Flare-ups can be triggered or made worse by stress, exhaustion, exercise, growth spurts, standing too long, walking too long, infection, illness, injury, surgery, cold weather and sudden changes in air pressure.
  • Carbamate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of carbamate insecticide drugs.
  • Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited urea cycle disorder where the lack of the enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase prevents ammonia from being turned into urea and being excreted in the urine. Excess ammonia builds up in the body which can cause serious complications or even death if left untreated.
  • Carbohydrate deficiency glycoprotein syndrome type II: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect which involves the gene for a particular enzyme (Golgi localized N-acetyl-glucosaminyltransferase II). Type 2 tends to have more severe psychomotor retardation than type 1 but there is no peripheral neuropathy or underdeveloped cerebellum.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Cardiac malformation: Any malformation or structural defect of the heart or it's structures. Some examples include atrioventricular septal defect, conotruncal malformations, transposition of great vessels and heart valve dysplasia. The symptoms vary in nature and severity depending on the type of malformation.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hypotonia -- lactic acidosis: A rare syndrome characterized by heart muscle disease, reduced muscle tone and lactic acidosis from birth.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- spherocytosis: A rare disorder characterized by the association of spherocytosis with heart muscle disease. Spherocytosis is a red blood cell disorder where the red blood cells have abnormal membranes which gives them a spherical shape and makes them weak resulting in their premature death.
  • Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase I Deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy.
  • Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase II Deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, infantile hepatocardiomuscular type: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The infantile form of this disease affects the muscles and the liver and heart.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine transporter deficiency: An inherited deficiency of carnitine caused by the impaired ability of the carnitine transporter protein to carry the carnitine to where it is needed. Instead the carnitine is excreted through the urine. Fasting or illness can trigger a severe attack.
  • Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where long-chain fatty acids can't be metabolized properly because the compound needed to transport it is faulty. Ultimately this prevents certain fats (long-chain acylcarnitine) being converted to energy and results in a build up of the fat which is harmful to body organs and tissues.
  • Caroli Disease: A rare disorder where the bile ducts inside the liver become enlarged resulting in infection, irritation and gallstone formation.
  • Cast syndrome: Obstruction of the third part of the duodenum by an artery following the use of a body plaster cast or a Bradford frame.
  • Cataract and cardiomyopathy: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital cataracts, heart muscle disease, lactic acidosis and skeletal muscle disease. The disorder involves the abnormal storage of lipids and glycogen in the skeletal and heart muscles. The cataracts progress rapidly and require surgery. The severity of the disorder ranges from stillbirth to survival into the fourth decade.
  • Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A very rare disorder where the blood clotting system becomes dysfunctional and clots too easily due to the abnormal presence of antphospholipid antibodies. It results in blood flow blockages to various body organs. It is possible that the condition has autoimmune origins. The disorder is often triggered by infections, certain drugs (e.g. anticoagulants), minor surgery and hysterectomy.
  • Caterpillar complication poisoning: The spines on certain caterpillars can cause a skin reaction as well as systemic symptoms if ingested. The nature of the symptoms vary depending on the species of caterpillar involved. Some only produce skin reactions whereas others can produce systemic symptoms.
  • Cebagin-induced lead poisoning: Cebagin is a folk remedy used mainly by Middle Eastern people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease -- epilepsy -- occipital calcifications: A rare syndrome characterized by celiac disease and epilepsy with brain calcifications.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Central cyanosis: bluish discoloration of the skin and the mucous membrane.
  • Cephalothoracic progressive lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue mainly in the trunk and arms.
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder resulting in frequent infections, lack of skin and eye pigmentation, neurological diseases and early death.
  • Chediak-Higashi like syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism only.
  • Chemical pneumonia: Lung inflammation from inhaled chemicals
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine: 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine is a chemical used mainly in jet fuel and rocket fuel, plant growth agent, photography and various other industrial uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,3-Dichloropropene: 1,3-Dichloropropene is a chemical used in solvents and soil fumigants for nematode control. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: 1,3-Dinitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in explosives. The chemical can be readily absorbed through the skin and cause systemic symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly as an explosive agent and in the production of dyes and photographic chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dinitrotoluene: 2,4-Dinitrotoluene is a chemical used the production of explosives, vehicle air bags and polyurethane polymers. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid: 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid is a chemical mainly used as a herbicide for field crops and turf. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4-Aminopyridine: 4-Aminopyridine is a pesticide used mainly to control bird pests. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene Tetrabromide: Acetylene Tetrabromide is a chemical used mainly in mineral separation and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Adiponitrile: Adiponitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of hexamethylene diamine which in turn is used mainly to produce nylon. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Agrocide: Agrocide is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice as well as other agricultural insect pests. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Agronexit: Agronexit is a chemical insecticide used mainly as an agricultural insecticide. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amitraz: Amitraz is a chemical used mainly as a topical parasitic preventative in livestock and fruit trees. It is also used as an insect repellant and a prevention of mite infestation. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Chloride: Ammonium Chloride is a chemical used as a medical agent for conditions such as metabolic acidosis, in deodorizer cleaners and also used in industry in fertilizers, electroplating, galvanizing, soldering and in deodorizer cleaners. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Nitrate: Ammonium Nitrate is a chemical used mainly in explosives, fireworks and fertilizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aniline: Aniline is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of perfumes, varnishes, resins, dyes, paint removers, herbicides, fungicides, explosives, solvents and photographic chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anisidine (o,p-Isomers): Anisidine (o,p-Isomers)is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antu: Antu is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aparasin: Aparasin Aparasin. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aphtiria: Aphtiria is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ben-Hex: Ben-Hex is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benhexol: Benhexol is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene hexachloride: Benzene hexachloride is a chemical insecticide. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzidine: Benzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of azo dyes for such products as leather, paper and textiles. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bexol: Bexol is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Borates: Borate is a chemical used in a wide variety of products - herbicides, paints, insecticides, rodenticides and various personal products such as skin creams, toothpastes and powders. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Captafol: Captafol is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloralose: Chloralose is a chemical used mainly in poisons for rodents and crows . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorate salts: Chlorate salt is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and in the manufacture of matches and explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloresene: Chloresene is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorfenvinphos: Chlorfenvinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorine Dioxide: Chlorine dioxide is a chemical used mainly in water treatment and disinfectant for various processing operations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzene: Chlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a solvent and in the production of various other chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorpyrifos: Chlorpyrifos is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chromium: Chromium is a chemical used mainly as an alloy in manufactured steel goods, anti-corrosive plating and also has industrial applications . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Coumaphos: Coumaphos is used as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol: Diethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in coolants, manufacture of plastic products and resins as well as other uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether: Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether is a chemical used in a variety of applications: cleaning agents, solvent, manufacture of dyes, rubber, soap and printing products . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrophenol: Dinitrophenol is a chemical that has various applications: herbicide, pesticide, fungicide, acaricide, manufacture of dyes and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endosulfan: Endosulfan is a chemical used mainly as a crop pesticide and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endothall: Endothall is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide and rodenticide but it is rarely used today. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Epichlorohydrin: Epichlorohydrin is a chemical used for a variety of applications - epoxy production, insecticides, solvent and agricultural chemical. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol: Ethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in antifreeze, coolants and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. Symptoms tend to occur in three phases: the first 12 hours involves inebriation, seizuresand brain swelling; the second and third day involves deterioration of lung and heart function and the third stage involves kidney damage and possibly failure. Death can occur during any of the stages.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate: Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of commercial dynamite and blasting gelatin. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Oxide: Ethylene oxide is a chemical used mainly in detergents, plasticizers, fumigants, inks, cosmetics and brake fluid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glufosinate: Glufosinate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glycol Ether: Glycol Ether is a chemical used mainly in nail polish removers, products to treat leather, anti-icing agents and as an industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glyphosate: Glyphosate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- HCH-gamma: HCH-gamma is an insecticide which is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma): Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma) is an insecticide which is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Imazapyr: Imazapyr is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Blood symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Blood symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Blood symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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