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Symptoms » Bone pain » Glossary
 

Glossary for Bone pain

Medical terms related to Bone pain or mentioned in this section include:

  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Adamantinoma: A very aggressive malignant cancer of the jaw. Also called ameloblastoma, adamantoblastoma or epithelioma adamantinum.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- Adult benign dominant form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The adult benign form is associated with a normal life expectancy and is often asymptomatic.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- intermediate form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The intermediate form is more severe than the adult form but less severe than the infantile form. Life expectancy is usually normal.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Aneurysmal bone cysts: A benign tumor-like lump in the bone. Most frequently occurs in the spine and longer bones of the body.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Arthritis: A condition which is characterized by the inflammation of a joint
  • Aseptic osteitis (generic term): A non-infectious inflammation of the bone. Any bone may be affected
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Avascular necrosis: Bone death from lack of circulation.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Biliary cirrhosis: Biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions. The cause of primary biliary cirrhosis is not fully understood.
  • Blast crisis: The final phase of chronic myeloid leukemia which has a high mortality rate. Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The three phases of the condition are the chronic phase, aggressive phase and finally the blast crisis. A blast crisis is occurs when over 30% of the cells in the blood or bone marrow are immature blood cells (blast cells). Patients in the final stage of leukemia are more prone to relapses following treatment.
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bone and cartilage tumors: Any tumors affecting the bones or cartilage, including both cancerous and benign tumors.
  • Bone cancer: Malignancy that occurs in the bone
  • Bone conditions: Conditions that affect the bones
  • Bone dysplasia with medullary fibrosarcoma: A rare inherited bone disorder characterized by aggressive bone tumors and defective bone development. The tumors metastasized readily.
  • Bone loss: A condition which is characterized by the loss of the amount of bone in ones body particular its density
  • Bone pain: Pain affecting the bones
  • Bone symptoms: Symptoms affecting the body's bones
  • Brain -- bone -- fat: A rare inherited disease characterized by bone cysts and progressive presenile dementia.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Breast Cancer: A condition which is characterized by the presence of malignant tissue within breast tissue
  • Breast Duct Papilloma: Benign tumour of the collecting duct of the breast.
  • Breast cancer: A condition which is characterized by the presence of malignant tissue within breast tissue
  • Broberger-Zetterstrom syndrome: A type of chronic bone abscess where a infected bone forms a pus-filled cavity. The abscess may cause no symptoms for many years.
  • Bronchogenic carcinoma: When cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner, the condition is called lung cancer .
  • CRMO, juvenile: A rare chronic inflammatory bone disease that occurs in children. The symptoms go into periods of remission only to return. The most common sites for the inflammation are the shinbone, thighbone and collarbone with usually several sites being affected at once.
  • Calcitriol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Calcitriol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydrogen Fluoride: Hydrogen Fluoride is a chemical used mainly in car cleaning products and in the production of integrated circuits. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cholestasis: A condition where bile formation or flow is reduced.
  • Chondromatosis (benign): Benign cartilage growths that can occur in various parts of the body. Symptoms are determined by the size and exact location of the growth. For example, a spinal chondroma can result in compression of the spinal cord.
  • Chondrosarcoma: Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequent primary malignant tumor of bone, representing approximately 25% of all primary osseous neoplasms. Chondrosarcomas are a group of tumors with highly diverse features and behavior patterns, ranging from slow-growing non-metastasizing lesions to highly aggressive metastasizing sarcomas.
  • Chondrosarcoma (malignant): A form of bone cancer that originates from cartilage tissue. The most common areas affected are the pelvic bones, femur, humerus, arm, spine and ribs
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.3
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 3: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q34.1.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 4: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p25.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 5: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q24.1.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassified: A form of blood disorder characterized by the abnormal proliferation of myeloid precursors in the bone marrow. This category refers to cases of myeloproliferative disease which don't fit into any of the other specific type of myelproliferative diseases.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders: A group of blood cancers where excessive numbers of blood cells are made by overactive or cancerous bone marrow. The number of excess blood cells tends to grow slowly. Examples of such disorders includes chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. The symptoms are determined by which particular blood cancer is involved.
  • Chronic leukemia: Leukemia in which the cell line is well differentiated, usually B lymphocytes.
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body.
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia: A slow-growing cancer of the white blood cells where the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells which eventually invade various parts of the body.
  • Chronic myeloid leukemia: Type of leukemia mostly in adults; rarely in children.
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: A rare chronic inflammatory bone disease that occurs in children. The symptoms go into periods of remission only to return. The most common sites for the inflammation are the shinbone, thighbone and collarbone with usually several sites being affected at once.
  • Chronic vitamin A toxicity: Chronic excessive ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms.
  • Classical Hodgkin disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Cytomegalic Inclusion Body Disease: An infection due to cytomegalovirus and marked by nuclear inclusion bodies in enlarged infected cells
  • Cytosine arabinose syndrome: Symptoms following the use of a chemotherapy drug called cytosine arabinose.
  • Deafness -- lymphoedema -- leukemia: A rare syndrome characterized by deafness, early-onset leukemia and lymphoedema in the lower legs.
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Deposition diseases related fibromyalgia: Deposition diseases related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with deposition diseases. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Deposition diseases involve the abnormal deposit of material in parts of the body such as the joints e.g. gout.
  • Di Guglielmo I -- acute: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Diaphyseal medullary stenosis with malignant fibrous histiocytoma: A rare form of inherited bone cancer which tends to develop malignant changes. The condition has been observed in only a few families worldwide.
  • Diclofenac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diclofenac (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, tenascin-X deficiency: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility.
  • Enchondromatosis (benign): Benign cartilage growths that develop inside bones.
  • Epidermoid carcinoma: A non-small-cell type of lung cancer. The cancer develops from cells that line the inside of the lungs.
  • Epstein Barr virus related fibromyalgia: Epstein Barr virus related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with infection with the Epstein Barr virus. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Erdheim-Chester Disease: A condition which is defined as a non langerhans cell histiocytosis
  • Erdheim-Chester syndrome: A very rare lipid storage disorder involving lipid deposits in various organs and hardening of the ends of long bones which affects the growth of the bone. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Ewing's family of tumors: A rare condition where tumors develop in bone or soft tissue. Usually teenagers are affected.
  • Ewing's sarcoma: Ewing's sarcoma is a malignant round-cell tumor. It is a rare disease in which cancer cells are found in the bone or in soft tissue. The most common areas in which it occurs are the pelvis, the femur, the humerus, and the ribs.
  • Familial Expansile Osteolysis: An hereditary condition characterized by degradation of the bones of the body
  • Fanconi renotubular syndrome: A condition where the kidneys are unable to reabsorb glucose and amino acids and hence they are excreted in the urine. The condition may be inherited or occur as a result of heavy metal toxicity, malignancy and myeloma.
  • Fibromyalgia: A difficult to diagnose condition affecting the muscles and/or joints
  • Fibrous Dysplasia: A rare condition where fibrous tissues develops instead of normal bone tissue. One or more bones may be affected and bones in the legs, head and chest are the usual ones affected.
  • Fibrous dysplasia of bone: A bone development abnormality that can occur in one or more bones. The bone develops tumor-like growths in bones where normal bone is replaced by fibrous tissue. It can occur as a single lesion or in multiples. Malignancy can occur but is rare. Symptoms are determined by the location and extent of the abnormality.
  • Fractures: Breakage of bones
  • Gaucher Disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3.
  • Gaucher disease type 1: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 1 is the visceral, chronic form which usually starts during adulthood.
  • Gaucher disease type 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 3 is a subacute neurological form which often first appears in childhood.
  • Generalised musculoskeletal pain: Generalised aches and pains over the body.
  • Glomerulonephritis: A condition which affects the kidneys and is characterized by inflammatory changes that occur in the glomeruli
  • Haferkamp syndrome: A severe lymphatic malformation syndrome involving multiple hemangiomas and gradual spontaneous bone resorption. It is a severe generalized form of Gorham syndrome which is a lymphatic malformation syndrome involving the bone.
  • Hand-Schuller-Christian Syndrome: A group of blood disorder involving excess production of histiocytes (type of immune cell) throughout the body. Accumulation of histiocytes results in non-cancerous growths which can damage organs and other body tissues such as bones. Symptom vary hugely and depend on location and size of tumor growths.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hemoglobin C Thalassemia: A rare genetic blood disorder that can cause mild hemolytic anemia but is asymptomatic in most patients. This condition is also known as Hemoglobin C Disease.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Reishi mushroom: Reishi mushroom can be used as a herbal agent to improve the immune system and to prevent cancer. The herbal agent can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.
  • Hodgkin's disease, adult: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system in adults. The lymphatic system forms part of the body's immune system. This type of cancer can also occur in children.
  • Hodgkin's disease, childhood: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system in children. The lymphatic system forms part of the body's immune system. This type of cancer can also occur in children.
  • Hodgkin's disease, nodular sclerosis: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted. The nodular sclerosing form is the most common subtype of classical Hodgkin's disease.
  • Hypercalcaemia: Increased concentration of calcium in the blood
  • Hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the development of painful, recurring swellings on the long bones. The swellings are transient.
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hypervitaminoses A and D: The excessive physiological effect of vitamin A or D cause by excessive intake of the vitamins
  • Hypophosphatemia, Familial: An inherited disorder involving low blood phosphate levels due to problems with the transport of phosphate and problems with vitamin D metabolism. Vitamin D and phosphates are not properly absorbed from the kidneys which can lead to bone problems if not treated.
  • Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia: An inherited muscle wasting disorder associated with dementia and bone disease.
  • Infantile recurrent chronic multifocal osteomyolitis: A rare disorder characterized by recurring periods of inflammation. The cause is undetermined and tends to affect mostly children. It is often associated with certain autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and Wegener's granulomatosis.
  • Juvenile Paget disease: A rare genetic bone disorder involving abnormal loss of bone mineralization and remineralization, broadened bone shafts and high levels of alkaline phosphatase in the blood. Some juvenile cases are relatively mild.
  • Juvenile Paget's Disease:
  • Juvenile osteoporosis: Osteoporosis (progressive bone loss) that occurs in children. Osteoporosis in children can be caused by certain medical conditions (e.g. diabetes, malabsorption syndromes, kidney disease, hyperthyroidism), certain medications (e.g. corticosteroids, anticonvulsants), prolonged immobility or sometimes for no detectable reason (idiopathic).
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Large cell carcinoma: Large cell carcinoma is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the lungs. This non-small cell lung cancer that represents 10% to 20% of all tumors that start in the bronchi, which are the main branches of the trachea that lead to the lungs.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells: L1 is characterized by small, uniform cancer cells with a round nucleus and very little cytoplasm. L1 has a better prognosis than L2. L1 is the main form in children (about 85%) but is less common in adults (about 30%).
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L2: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells: L2 is characterized by larger cells, an irregular-shaped nucleus, more cytoplasm and significant variation between cells. L2 has a poorer prognosis than L1. L2 is the main form in adults (about 65%) but is less common in children (about 15%).
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L3: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively aggressive cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells. L3 is quite uncommon but is very similar to Burkitt's lymphoma - in fact, they may be considered the same disease with different manifestations.
  • Leukemia, Monocytic, Acute: A cancer of the blood-forming tissues of the bone marrow involving the proliferation of a type of infection-fighting white blood cell called a monocyte. Acute leukemia involves a more rapid proliferation of cancer cells compared to chronic forms of leukemia.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid: A form of blood cancer that causes a proliferation of the precursors or immature red blood cells, platelets and certain white blood cells such as granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Aggressive-Phase: Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The aggressive phase of myeloid leukemia follows the chronic form and is a sign that the condition is progressing more rapidly to a blast crisis which is the final stage of leukemia.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic: A slow-growing cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Negative: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively aggressive cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. The Philadelphia negative form of the condition is not associated with a genetic mutation. It is distinguished from the positive form by the clinical course which is initially the same but progresses to eventual bone marrow failure without a distinct increase in blast cells. Other differences include poor response to chemotherapy, lower white blood cell counts, greater monocytosis, less basophilia, lower bone marrow myeloid to erythroid ratio and increased likelihood of developing thrombocytopenia. Philadelphia negative patients also tend to be older and median survival rates tend to be poorer.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Positive: A relatively aggressive cancer of the cells that produce white blood cells. The Philadelphia form of myeloid leukemia carries a relatively poor prognosis. It involves an acquired genetic mutation which results in the production tyrosine kinase which causes too many abnormal white blood cells to be produced which results in a shortage of other blood cell types. Treatment is aimed at inhibiting the production of tyrosine kinase.
  • Leukemia, T-Cell: A form of blood cancer characterized by the proliferation of cancerous T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The exact symptoms and progression vary depending on the subtype involved.
  • Leukemia, T-Cell, Acute: A form of blood cancer characterized by the proliferation of cancerous T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The exact symptoms and progression vary depending on the subtype involved. The acute form involves a rapid proliferation of cancerous T-cells and hence a more rapid disease progression and increased severity of symptoms.
  • Leukemia, mast-cell: A very aggressive form of leukemia - a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia. The cancer can in rare cases develop from chronic myeloid leukemia or systemic mastocytosis but generally develops on its own.
  • Lymphocyte depletion Hodgkin's disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted. The lymphocyte depleted form is the least common form of Hodgkin's disease.
  • Lymphocytic leukemia: A condition characterized by the proliferation of lymphoid tissues
  • Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Follicular: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell, immunoblastic: A cancer of the immune system characterized by the presence of immunoblasts. Immunoblasts are T cells which have been transformed due to stimulation by an antigen.
  • MSBD syndrome: A rare form of osteosclerosis caused by a lack of calcium in the bones.
  • Majeed syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by blood abnormality and recurring bone infections.
  • Major depressive disorder related fibromyalgia: Major depressive disorder related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with major depression. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Mastocytosis: A disorder where excessive amounts of mast cells proliferate in organs such as the skin, liver, bone, spleen and gastrointestinal tract. Mast cells occur in connective tissue and defend the body against disease by releasing histamine to stimulate the immune system.
  • Melanoma: Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It is the leading cause of death from skin disease. It involves cells called melanocytes, which produce a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is responsible for skin and hair color.
  • Metastatic bone cancer: Cancer cells that break off from a primary tumor and enter the bloodstream can reach nearly all tissues of the body. Bones are a common place for these cancer cells to settle in and start growing.
  • Metastatic cancer: Any cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
  • Mixed cellularity Hodgkin's disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted. The mixed cellularity type if often associated with infection with HIV or Epstein Barr virus.
  • Mixed sclerosing bone dystrophy: A rare form of osteosclerosis caused by a lack of calcium in the bones.
  • Multiple Hereditary Exostoses: An hereditary condition which is characterized by benign bony growths projecting from a bone surface
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Multiple myeloma: A rare malignant cancer that occurs in the bone marrow. More common in skull, spine, rib cage, pelvis and legs.
  • Muscle cramps: spasmodic, painful, involuntary contraction of muscles.
  • Muscle pain: Aches or pains affecting the muscles
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Myelofibrosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • Myelogenous leukemia: A condition which is characterized proliferation of myeloid tissue and the abnormal increase in granulocytes
  • Myeloma: A primary malignancy of the plasma cells
  • Myeloproliferative disease:
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuroblastoma: neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblstoma.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 2: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p12.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 3: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2p23.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 4: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 5: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q35.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 6: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q21.
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's lymphoma: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, during pregnancy: A cancer that originates in the lymphatic system and occurs during pregnancy. The greatest problem is the fact that the cancer is usually quite aggressive and delays in delivery often results in delayed treatment and a poor prognosis.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Hodgkin's lymphoma: Occupational exposure to wood dust can increase the risk of developing Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Oncogenic hypophosphatemic osteomalacia: A rare condition where a mesenchymal tumor causes low blood phosphate levels. This affects bone mineralization resulting weak, fragile bones and other symptoms.
  • Oncogenic osteomalacia: A rare type of cancer (mesenchymal) that results in osteomalacia or rickets. Osteomalacia and rickets normally occurs as a consequence of a diet deprived of vitamin D. The tumor can occur in bone or soft tissue. The removal of the tumor alleviates the osteomalacia.
  • Orthopedic disorders: Various types of physical disorders and deformity
  • Ostealgia: Ostealgia refers to bone pain.
  • Osteitis: Inflammation of bone.
  • Osteoarthritis: A form of degenerative arthritis due to chronic degeneration
  • Osteochondroses: Various diseases affecting the ends of long bones
  • Osteoid Osteoma: Benign bone tumor usually in long bones
  • Osteomalacia: Softening of bones caused by a vitamin D deficiency.
  • Osteomyelitis: An infection that occurs in bone
  • Osteoporosis: Bone mass loss (osteoporosis) as a symptom
  • Osteoradionecrosis: A complication of radiation therapy where parts of the bone die due to damage to the blood vessels the supply blood to the involved portion of bone. The symptoms will vary depending on the location and extent of the bone death. Symptoms may not be evident for months or even years. The condition most often occurs in the jaw bone.
  • Osteosarcoma: Osteosarcoma is the most common type of malignant bone cancer, accounting for 35% of primary bone malignancies. There is a preference for the metaphyseal region of tubular long bones. 50% of cases occur around the knee.
  • Paget disease juvenile type: A rare genetic bone disorder involving abnormal loss of bone mineralization and remineralization, broadened bone shafts and high levels of alkaline phosphatase in the blood. Some juvenile cases are relatively mild.
  • Paget's disease of bone: A chronic, slowly progressing bone disorder where the bone is destroyed rapidly and replaced by abnormal bone which is dense and fragile.
  • Paget's disease, type 1: A chronic, slowly progressing bone disorder where the bone is destroyed rapidly and replaced by abnormal bone which is dense and fragile. Type 1 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Paget's disease, type 4: A chronic, slowly progressing bone disorder where the bone is destroyed rapidly and replaced by abnormal bone which is dense and fragile. Type 1 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 5q31.
  • Pain: Any type of pain sensation symptoms.
  • Pain Disorder: Somatoform disorder causing pain
  • Panostotic fibrous dysplasia: A rare disorder characterized by an unusual facial appearance, fragile bones, high blood phosphatase levels that low blood phosphate levels.
  • Parathyroid Cancer: A condition that is characterised by malignancy that affects the parathyroid
  • Parathyroid cancer, adult: A rare cancer that can occur in the parathyroid gland in adults. The parathyroid glands regulate body calcium levels so cancer of the gland upsets the body's calcium balance causing muscle, bone and other symptoms.
  • Pathological fracture: The occurrence of a fracture a bone of the body caused by a disease state
  • Periosteal chondrosarcoma: A form of bone cancer that originates from cartilage tissue. Periosteal chondrosarcomas originate from the surface of previously healthy bones. The most common location is the metaphyses (part of the bone between the shaft of the bone and the rounded ends) of long bones.
  • Phosphate diabetes: A condition where the kidney tubules fail to reabsorb phosphate resulting in excess phosphate in the urine.
  • Plasma cell leukemia: A form of leukemia characterized by the proliferation of plasma cells in the peripheral blood system. The prognosis is generally poor for this usually aggressive condition.
  • Polycythemia: increase in the total number of red blood cells in the circulation. It can be primary or secondary
  • Primary Fibromyalgia: Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Primary fibromyalgia is a term given to fibromyalgia that occurs for no apparent reason whereas secondary fibromyalgia has an identifiable cause. The primary form is more common than the secondary form.
  • Primary chondrosarcoma: A form of bone cancer that originates from cartilage tissue. Primary chondrosarcomas originate from the central parts of previously healthy bones. The most common areas affected are the pelvic bones, femur, humerus, arm, spine and ribs.
  • Primary granulocytic sarcoma: A malignant tumor derived from immature white blood cells called myeloblasts. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most commonly found in bone, soft tissue, lymph nodes and skin. Symptoms will vary according to the location of the tumor.
  • Prostate Cancer: Cancer of the prostate.
  • Psychiatric disorders associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Psychiatric disorders are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Refractory Celiac Disease: Refractory Celiac Disease is celiac disease that fails to respond to treatment which involves a gluten-free diet. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition is quite uncommon and often the resulting poor absorption of nutrients from the intestines leads to a poor prognosis.
  • Renal osteodystrophy: Lack of bone mineralization due to kidney disease.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune inflammatory condition which primarily affects the joints
  • Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia: Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory form of arthritis and is an autoimmune disease.
  • Rib symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ribs
  • Ribbing disease: A rare disorder primarily involving abnormal development of bone tissue inside parts of some long bones - particularly in the lower legs.
  • Ribbing syndrome: An inherited syndrome characterized patches of increased bone density in the shafts of one or more long bones. The shin and thigh bone are the most common bones affected. The condition is often asymptomatic.
  • Rickets: A condition that affects the bones due to vitamin D deficiency
  • SLE related fibromyalgia: SLE related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. SLE is an autoimmune disease that can affect virtually any body system e.g. blood vessels and organs.
  • Schnitzler syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of chronic urticaria as well as a blood abnormality called macroglobulinemia.
  • Secondary Biliary Cirrhosis: Secondary biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to a secondary cause which results in blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions.
  • Secondary Bone Cancer: Tumour development in bone as a result of spread from a primary malignant tumour from another body site (usually lung bronchus, breast and prostate)
  • Secondary Fibromyalgia: Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Primary fibromyalgia is a term given to fibromyalgia that occurs for no apparent reason whereas secondary fibromyalgia has an identifiable cause. The primary form is more common than the secondary form.
  • Secondary chondrosarcoma: A form of bone cancer that originates from cartilage tissue. Secondary chondrosarcomas originate from benign bone anomalies such as osteochondroma or enchondroma. The most common location is the hips and shoulders but can occur on any part of the skeleton.
  • Secondary hyperparathyroidism: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of hyperparathyroidism due to a secondary condition affects the thyroid
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Sensory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sensory systems.
  • Sickle Cell Anemia: Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are crescent-shaped rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are unable to function normally and tend to undergo premature destruction which leads to anemia. If the genetic defect which causes the condition is inherited from both parents the condition can be quite severe whereas if it is inherited from only one parent, often there are no symptoms. The abnormally shaped red blood cells can cause problems when they clump together and block blood vessels.
  • Sickle cell crisis: A condition which is characterized by either a hemolytic crisis or vaso-occlusive crisis
  • Skeletal pain: Skeletal pain is discomfort in the bones.
  • Skeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skeletal system such as the bones.
  • Sleep disturbance related fibromyalgia: Sleep disturbance related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with sleep disturbance. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Sphingolipidosis: A group of diseases involving the abnormal metabolism and storage of a substance called sphingolipid. Symptoms will vary depending on the disease. Examples of diseases from this group include gangliosidosis, Gaucher's disease and Niemann-Pick disease.
  • Spleen Cancer: Malignancy of white blood cells with tumour deposits in the spleen.
  • Spleen neoplasm: A tumor that originates in the spleen.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 1: Susceptibility to celiac disease 1 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6p21.3) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 10: Susceptibility to celiac disease 10 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q25-q26) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 11: Susceptibility to celiac disease 11 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q28) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 12: Susceptibility to celiac disease 12 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6q25) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 13: Susceptibility to celiac disease 13 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 12q24) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 2: Susceptibility to celiac disease 2 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 5q31-q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 3: Susceptibility to celiac disease 3 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 4: Susceptibility to celiac disease 4 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 19p13.1) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 5: Susceptibility to celiac disease 5 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 15q11-q13) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 6: Susceptibility to celiac disease 6 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 4q27) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 7: Susceptibility to celiac disease 7 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 1q133) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 8: Susceptibility to celiac disease 8 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q11-q12) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 9: Susceptibility to celiac disease 9 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3p21) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Swelling symptoms: Symptoms causing swelling or enlargement.
  • Swollen bone: Enlarged, swollen, or misshapen bones
  • Systemic mastocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an accumulation of mast cells in the tissues of the body
  • T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Cancer of particular white blood cells called T-cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Temporary increase in bone pain: A temporary increase in ones pain that occurs in the bone
  • Tension myositis related fibromyalgia: Tension myositis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with tension myositis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Tension myositis is a chronic pain syndrome that tends to mainly affect the back, neck, arm and pelvis.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Turner syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Females with Turner syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Type 1 diabetes related Celiac Disease: Patients with Type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Vicodin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Vicodin use is discontinued or reduced. Vicodin is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Vitamin D -- adverse effects: Excessive use of vitamin D supplements can cause symptoms.
  • WT limb blood syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by blood and limb abnormalities.
  • Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia: A rare disorder involving malignancy of the lymph and blood cells.
  • Weber-Christian disease: A form of panniculitis involving fever and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • William's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with William's syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Bone pain:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Bone pain:

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