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Symptoms » Cataracts » Glossary
 

Glossary for Cataracts

Medical terms related to Cataracts or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 2q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • ACTH -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on mice indicate that the use of ACTH during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Absent corpus callosum -- cataract -- immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by immunodeficiency, cleft lip or palate, cataract, reduced pigmentation and brain abnormalities.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Adolescent cataract and infertility syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by cataracts and infertility in male adolescents.
  • Aging: The medical conditions from getting older.
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Amaurosis Congenita of Leber, type 12: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 12 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1q32.3.
  • Amaurosis Congenita of Leber, type 13: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious usually by the age of 4 years. Type 13 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 14q23.3, RDH12 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 6: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 6 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 14q11, RPGRIP1 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 7: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 7 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 19q13.3, CRX gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 8: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 8 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1q31-q32.1, CRB1 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 9: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 9 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1p36, LCA9 gene.
  • Andogsky's syndrome: A condition characterized by chronic eczema-like skin lesions which develop during childhood and cataracts which develop in early adulthood. The main areas affected by the skin lesions are the neck, elbows and knees.
  • Arachnodactyly -- ataxia -- cataract -- aminoaciduria -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by congenital cataracts, ataxia, mental retardation, abnormal amino acid metabolism and long, thin fingers.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Bardet-Biedl Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a defect in chromosome 11q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 10: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 10 is caused by a defect in chromosome 12q.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 11: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 11 is caused by a defect in chromosome 9q33.1.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 12: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 12 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a defect in chromosome 16q21.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 3 is caused by a defect in chromosome 3p12-q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 4 is caused by a defect in chromosome 15q22.3.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 5: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 5 is caused by a defect in chromosome 2q31.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 6 is caused by a defect in chromosome 20p12.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 7 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 8: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 8 is caused by a defect in chromosome 14q32.11.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 9: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 9 is caused by a defect in chromosome 7p14.
  • Bhaskar-Jagannathan syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by long, thin fingers, amino acids in the urine, cataracts (during infancy), incoordination and delayed development.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Blindness: Loss of sight in one or both eyes
  • Blurred vision: Blurriness of vision or images.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • CAMFAK syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, small head, failure to thrive and spinal curvature.
  • CCFDN: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized by cataracts during infancy, unusual facial appearance and neuropathy.
  • Cat Eye Syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving abnormalities of chromosome 22 and characterized by coloboma of the iris, down-slanting palpebral fissures and anal atresia.
  • Cataract -- Hypertrichosis -- Intellectual Deficit: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by excessive body hair (especially on the back, shoulders and sides of the face), cataracts and mental retardation.
  • Cataract -- aberrant oral frenula -- growth delay: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, growth problems and abnormal mouth tissue (frenulum).
  • Cataract -- ataxia -- deafness: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, ataxia and progressive deafness.
  • Cataract and cardiomyopathy: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital cataracts, heart muscle disease, lactic acidosis and skeletal muscle disease. The disorder involves the abnormal storage of lipids and glycogen in the skeletal and heart muscles. The cataracts progress rapidly and require surgery. The severity of the disorder ranges from stillbirth to survival into the fourth decade.
  • Cataract dental syndrome: A very rare inherited condition mainly involving eye abnormalities but also various other physical abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Cataract, Zonular Pulverulent 1: A genetic form of congenital cataract inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Diagnosis usually occurs in the first few years of life. Type 1 refers to the fact that this subtype is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21.1.
  • Cataract, Zonular Pulverulent 3: A genetic form of congenital cataract inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Diagnosis usually occurs in the first few years of life. Type 3 refers to the fact that this subtype is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q11.
  • Cataract, alopecia, sclerodactyly: A rare disorder characterized by cataracts, lack of hair and skin changes in the hands and feet.
  • Cataract, autosomal recessive congenital 2: A rare, recessively inherited, genetic eye disorder involving congenital cataracts (cloudy eye lens).
  • Cataract, autosomal recessive congenital 3: A rare, recessively inherited, genetic eye disorder involving congenital cataracts (cloudy eye lens). Type 3 is distinguished by the origin of the genetic defect which is linked to the cataracts.
  • Cataract, congenital, with microcornea or slight microphthalmia: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by congenital cataracts (cloudy eye lens) and slightly small eyes or small corneas.
  • Cataract, microphthalmia and nystagmus: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by congenital cataracts (cloudy eye lens), small eyes and rapid, involuntary eye movements.
  • Cataract, posterior polar, 1: An inherited form of cataract caused by a defect on chromosome 1pter-p36.1.
  • Cataract, posterior polar, 2: An inherited form of cataract caused by a defect in the CRYAB gene on chromosome 11q.
  • Cataract-glaucoma: A rare syndrome characterized by congenital cataracts in both eyes as well as glaucoma which tends to occur between the ages of 10 and 40.
  • Cataracts in children:
  • Cennamo-Gangemi syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by small eyes, congenital cataracts and hydrocephalus (buildup of fluid in the brain).
  • Cerebellum agenesis -- hydrocephaly: A rare brain disorder which manifests as reduced muscle tone, ataxia, cataracts and mental retardation.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrophenol: Dinitrophenol is a chemical that has various applications: herbicide, pesticide, fungicide, acaricide, manufacture of dyes and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Titanium: Titanium is an element used mainly in alloys. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chondrodysplasia Punctata, Rhizomelic type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by slow growth, mental deficiency, characteristic facial features and skeletal deformities particularly of the limbs, spine and pelvis.
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata: An inherited skeletal abnormality where bone calcifications near joints and other disorders result in growth retardation, short limbs, cataracts and an abnormal nose shape. Also called chondrodystrophia calcificans congenital or congenital stippled epiphyses.
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata, non rhizomelic type: A group of inherited disorder affecting the skeleton, skin, eyes and mental function. The disorders are characterized mainly by stippled epiphyses (abnormal calcification near joints) during infancy. The non-rhizomelic forms tend to be milder, with minimal or no upper limb shortening. The Joints in the ends of the arms and legs tend to be more affected. Some of the specific disorders in this group are Conradi-Hunermann disease, Happle's chondrodysplasia and brachytelephalagnic chondrodysplasia punctata. The range of symptoms and severity may vary between disorders.
  • Chondrodystrophia calcificans congenita: A rare genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, short limbs, large skin pores, sparse hair and other abnormalities.
  • Chondrodystrophia punctata, autosomal dominant: A rare genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, short limbs, large skin pores, sparse hair and other abnormalities.
  • Chorea, remitting with nystagmus and cataracts: A rare inherited disorder characterized by chorea and involuntary horizontal eye movements that start in infancy and improve or disappear by the age of 10. Cataracts were also present.
  • Chromosome 1, 1p36 deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as heart problems, mental retardation, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and short stature. The symptoms are variable depending on the exact location of chromosomal deletion.
  • Chromosome 10, Monosomy 10p:
  • Chromosome 10p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 resulting in variable abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 11, deletion 11p: A syndrome that is caused by the deletion of short arm (p) of chromosome 11. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 12, Isochromosome 12p Mosaic: A very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 15q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 15q, trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 18, Monosomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • Chromosome 18p minus syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the short arm of chromosome18 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 1q21.1 Deletion Syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder caused by the deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 at a specific location (1q21.1). The main symptoms were mental retardation and various physical anomalies. The manifestations in individuals is quite variable.
  • Chromosome 2, monosomy 2q: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 21q, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of the long arm of chromosome 21 is deleted.
  • Chromosome 6p partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 6 resulting in various abnormalities depending on the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Cicatricial pemphigoid: A rare chronic disease involving blistering and scarring of the mucous membranes especially in the mouth and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Classic galactosemia: Rare serious genetic defect in galactose metabolism.
  • Cloudy vision: Cloudiness of the visual field
  • Cockayne syndrome type 1: A rare inherited condition characterized by short stature, light sensitivity and a prematurely aged appearance. Type 1 is an early-onset form and involves progressive symptoms that usually start after 1 year of age.
  • Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Fetal infection with toxoplasmosis.
  • Congenital hypothyroidism: A condition in infancy or early childhood due to an in-utero deficiency of thyroid hormones that can be caused by genetic or environmental factors, such as thyroid dysgenesis or hypothyroidism in infants of mothers treated with thiouracil during pregnancy.
  • Congenital lactase deficiency: A congenital metabolic disorder where a deficiency of an enzyme called lactase impairs the body's ability to digest milk and other products that contain lactose. Symptoms tend to occur soon after consuming such products. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of lactase deficiency.
  • Congenital syphilis: Syphilis inherited from mother during pregnancy.
  • Conradi-Huenermann Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, short limbs, large skin pores, sparse hair and other abnormalities.
  • Conradi-Hunermann syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, short limbs, large skin pores, sparse hair and other abnormalities.
  • Conradi-Hünermann Syndrome: A condition which affects the development of bone and cartilage
  • Corticotropin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Corticotropin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Crome syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by various abnormalities including mental retardation, epilepsy and eye and kidney problems.
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • DOC 12 (Neutral Lipid Storage Type): A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Deafness -- cataracts -- skeletal anomalies: A rare disorder characterized by deafness, cataracts and skeletal abnormalities as well as other anomalies.
  • Deafness progressive cataract autosomal dominant: A rare dominantly inherited disorder characterized by deafness and progressive cataracts. The deafness is caused by degeneration of a part of the inner ear . The hearing loss can start in the 3rd decade of life and cataracts occur before the 5th decade.
  • Del (2) (q21-q24): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in one reported case. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Deletion 11p: A syndrome that is caused by the deletion of short arm (p) of chromosome 11. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Deletion 2q: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Dennis-Fairhurst-Moore syndrome: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by dwarfism, characteristic facial features, small eyes and reduced hair.
  • Desmin related myopathy: A very rare neuromuscular disorder involving the buildup of a certain protein called desmin in various muscles. The severity and rate of progression of the disorder is variable.
  • Developmental Lactase Deficiency: This form of lactase deficiency occurs in premature infants. Lactase enzyme activity usually develops late in pregnancy so a preterm infant will not yet have developed this enzyme function. The greater the degree of prematurity, the greater the reduction in lactase activity.
  • Diabetes: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diseases related to congenital cataract: Congenital cataracts are usually diagnosed at birth. If a cataract goes undetected in an infant, permanent visual loss may ensue.
  • Disorder of Cornification 12 (Neutral Lipid Storage Type): A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Double vision: Seeing two images, overlapping images, shadow images, or ghost images (diplopia)
  • Down Syndrome: A chromosome syndrome causing physical effects and mental retardation.
  • Dwarfism -- stiff joint -- ocular abnormalities: A very rare form of dwarfism characterized by short stature as well as stiff joints and eye abnormalities.
  • Dystrophia myotonica 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, muscle atrophy, cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia: A group of rare inherited conditions which affect the ectodermal skin layer which includes the skin, hair, teeth and nails.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Beasley Cohen type: A rare condition where mental retardation, deafness and cataracts are associated with a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
  • Emanuel syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 11 is translocated with a portion of chromosome 22. The disorder involves a wide range of abnormalities such as kidney, genital and heart abnormalities, mental retardation, small head and failure to thrive.
  • Erythromycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Erythromycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Fabry disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial Lactase Deficiency: A congenital metabolic disorder where normal amounts of lactase are produced but the lactase is defective and unable to digest milk and other products that contain lactose. Symptoms tend to occur soon after consuming such products.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Favre-Goldman syndrome: A type of eye disease inherited in a familial manner.
  • Fechtner syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes.
  • Flynn-Aird syndrome: A rare inherited disorder where neurological degeneration causes symptoms such as dementia, ataxia, eye problems, skin disorders and muscle wasting.
  • Francois dyscephalic syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, microphthalmia, small pinched nose and hypotrichosis.
  • Galactokinase deficiency: A rare condition where an enzyme deficiency (galactokinase) impaires the body's ability to break down galactose consumed in the diet.
  • Galactosemia: Accumulation of galactose in the blood leading to mental retardation and failure to thrive if not corrected.
  • Galactosemia I: A rare inherited disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase) prevents the metabolism of galactose which is a sugar component of milk. Ranges from milk intolerance in mild cases to death in severe untreated cases.
  • Galactosemia III: A rare inherited disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (UDP-Galactose-4-epimerase) prevents the metabolism of galactose which is a sugar component of milk. The condition may vary from mild to severe.
  • Glaucoma: A condition which affects the eye and characterized by an increase in the intraocular pressure
  • Glutaric aciduria 2: A metabolic disorder involving an enzyme deficiency - electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxydoreductase. The severity of symptoms depends on the level of deficiency. The infant onset form is the most severe and often results in death. Severe cases usually develop during childhood or infancy and usually involve metabolic acidosis and its associated symptoms. Milder cases may simply present with muscle weakness initially that develops in adulthood. Some cases may involve additional symptoms such as heart, liver and kidney problems, facial anomalies and genital abnormalities.
  • Gottron's syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by the gradual loss of fatty tissue under the skin which results in a prematurely aged appearance. The hands and feet tend to be the most affected with thin, delicate skin.
  • Granulomatous arthritis of childhood: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Hallermann-Streiff Syndrome: A condition which affects stature, head shape and hair growth
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Herpes, Neonatal -- Mucocutaneous and Ocular Infection: Mucocutaneous herpes infection in neonates is a herpes infection of the mucous membranes within the first six weeks of life. The virus may be transmitted from the mother to the baby while it is still in the uterus or during delivery. The risk of transmitting the virus is highest if genital herpes is contracted during the late stages of the pregnancy. A mother with long standing or recurring herpes infection usually has sufficient antibodies to the virus to prevent the infant becoming infected. Neonatal herpes can also be contracted when an infant comes into contact with an infected person e.g. being kissed by and adult with cold sores. A cesarean birth may be advised for mothers who have active genital lesions.
  • High blood pressure: Excessive blood pressure.
  • Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency: A rare genetic biochemical disorder where a deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthase results in high levels of methionine and homocysteine in the blood and reduced levels of cyteine in the blood. There are two subtypes of the disorder with varying manifestations. One type responds to Vitmain B6 supplementation and the other doesn't. Those who do respond to Vitamin B6 tend to have milder manifestations.
  • Hornova-Dlurosova syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation and amyloid (abnormal protein) deposits in the eyelids and gums.
  • Human carcinogen -Tamoxifen: Tamoxifen is a drug used to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer but is also deemed to be carcinogenic to humans as it increases the risk of developing other cancers. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Tamoxifen exposure is associated mainly with an increased risk of developing uterine cancer.
  • Hyperferritinemia, hereditary with congenital cataracts: A rare disorder characterized by high levels of ferritin in the blood and cataracts that usually occur during infancy.
  • Hypocalcaemia: Decreased concentration of calcium in the blood.
  • Hypomyelination -- congenital cataract: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital cataract with progressive neurological impairment due to progressive demyelination.
  • Hypomyelination and congenital cataract: An inherited disorder characterized by congenital cataract and progressive neurological impairment due to reduced myelination of nerves.
  • Hypoparathyroidism: causesd by lack of PTH
  • Hypoparathyroidism familial isolated: A rare familial condition involving low levels of parathyroid hormone which upsets the body's ability to regulate calcium and phosphate. The severity of symptoms is determined by the how low the parathyroid hormone level is.
  • IBIDS syndrome: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by red, dry, scaly skin (I - ichthyosis), brittle hair (B), impaired physical and mental development (I), decreased fertility (D) and short stature (S). It is the same as PIBIDS syndrome but doesn't involve photosensitivity.
  • Ichythosiform Erythroderma with Leukocyte Vacuolation: A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Impaired vision: Reduced or degraded vision.
  • Inborn amino acid metabolism disorder: A group of inherited disorders where the body is not able to metabolize amino acids consumed in the diet. Amino acids are a part of carbohydrates, fats and proteins and are metabolized in order to provide energy or to make other needed compounds. There are many steps involved in metabolism and the severity can be greatly variable depending on the exact nature of the disorder.
  • Injury: Any damage inflicted in the body
  • Kniest dysplasia: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by dwarfism, enlarged joints and facial deformities.
  • Krause syndrome: A syndrome involving the abnormal development of the eye and cerebral portion of the brain. It most often occurs in premature infants or an infant from a multiple birth. It is believed to possibly result from intercurrent infections in the mother, placental abnormalities and hemorrhages that occur during the second trimester of the pregnancy.
  • Lanzietri syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by head and face abnormalities, dwarfism and absence of an lower leg bone (fibula).
  • Leber Congenital Amaurosis, type 13: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious usually by the age of 4 years. Type 13 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 14q23.3, RDH12 gene.
  • Leber congenital amaurosis, type 10: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 10 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 12, CEP290 gene
  • Leber congenital amaurosis, type 11: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 11 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 7q, IMPDH1 gene
  • Leber congenital amaurosis, type 12: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 12 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1q32.3.
  • Leiomyomatosis of oesophagus, congenital cataract and hematuria: A rare disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, blood in urine and the development of tumors in the esophagus called a leiomyoma. A leiomyoma is a benign tumor that originates from smooth muscle tissue. These tumors may also be present in the female genital tract and possible in other parts of the body.
  • Low-level radiation exposure: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Low-level radiation is usually associated with delayed effects.
  • Lowe Syndrome: An X linked condition characterized by vitamin D deficiency and causing an oculocerebrorenal syndrome
  • Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome: A rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized primarily by eye and bone abnormalities, mental retardation and kidney problems.
  • Marfan syndrome: A genetic connective tissue disorder involving a defect of chromosome 15q21.1 which affects the production of the fibrillin needed to make connective tissue.
  • Marinesco-Sjogren I: A rare condition characterized by cerebellar ataxia, speaking difficulty, mental retardation, short stature and tooth, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome: A group of recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by incoordination due to a brain anomaly.
  • Marshall syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a distinctive face and vision and hearing impairment.
  • Martsolf syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by mental retardation, cataracts, small head and hypogonadism (reduced production of hormones by ovaries or testes).
  • Mental retardation, X-linked, Armfield type: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures, short stature, small hands and small feet. The disorder is X-linked and hence only males exhibit the symptoms. The genetic defect occurs on chromosome Xq28.
  • Mental retardation, X-linked, Seemanova type: A rare X-linked disorder characterized by mental retardation, retarded growth and small genitals. The disorder is inherited in a X-linked manner which means that only males display the full range of symptoms whereas female carriers may have mild or no symptoms.
  • Metabolic disorder: occurs when abnormal chemical reactions occur in the body
  • Mevalonic aciduria: A rare disorder of amino acid metabolism characterized by a defect in the enzyme mevalonate kinase.
  • Micro syndrome: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized by intellectual impairment, small head, various eye problems, small genitals and abnormal brain development.
  • Microcephaly, hiatal hernia and nephrotic syndrome: A rare genetic disorder primarily involving physical and developmental abnormalities as well as kidney disease.
  • Microphthalmis, isolated, with cataract 1: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by congenital cataracts (cloudy eye lens) and small eyes.
  • Microphthalmis, isolated, with cataract 4: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by congenital cataracts (cloudy eye lens) and small eyes. The various types differ in the origin of the genetic defect. Type 4 involves a defect on chromosome 22q11.2-q13.1. Type 1 involves a defect on chromosome 16p13.3 and type 2 involves chromosome 14q23.
  • Monosomy 1p36: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as heart problems, mental retardation, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and short stature. The range and severity of symptoms is variable with some cases being relatively mild.
  • Mucoepithelial dysplasia, Witkop type: A rare inherited disorder primarily involving mucosal lesions throughout the body as well as skin, hair and lung problems.
  • Muscle-eye-brain syndrome: A genetic disease characterized by muscle weakness, congenital brain abnormalities and eye problems as well as other defects.
  • Myopathy, Mitochonrdrial Progressive, with Congenital Cataract, Hearing Loss and Developmental Delay: A rare condition characterized by muscle disease, congenital cataracts, hearing loss and developmental delay.
  • Myotonic Dystrophy: An inherited disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting as well as eye defects, heart abnormalities and other anomalies. The severity of the condition is greatly variable. There are two type of myotonic dystrophy with type 1 being more severe than type 2.
  • Myotonic dystrophy, type 2: An inherited disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting as well as eye defects, heart abnormalities and other anomalies. The severity of the condition is greatly variable. There are two type of myotonic dystrophy with type 1 being more severe than type 2. Type 2 also tends to affect muscle closer to the trunk e.g. upper leg and shoulders.
  • Nance-Horan Syndrome: An inherited congenital condition characterized mainly by cataracts and peg-shaped and extra teeth
  • Nathalie syndrome: A very rare condition described in four children of one family. The condition is characterized by wasting of the spine muscles, abnormal heart electrical activity, cataracts, hypogonadism and hearing impairment.
  • Nephrosis neuronal dysmigration Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder primarily involving physical and developmental abnormalities as well as kidney disease. The type and severity of symptoms that can occur is variable.
  • Neu-Laxova Syndrome: A rare fatal genetic disorder characterized by microcephaly and multiple congenital abnormalities. Death occurs during the fetal or newborn stage.
  • Neurofibromatosis-2: Genetic disorder often leading to tumors on nerves.
  • Nevus comedonicus syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the development of large comedones which can occur in groups or linear arrangements. The skin lesions tend to occur mainly on the face, neck, arms and trunk. If it is associated with other congenital malformations, it is called a syndrome. There are a variety of possible malformations that can occur in the syndromic form e.g. skeletal defects, brain anomalies and eye problems such as cataracts.
  • Norrie Disease: A rare form of blindness that occurs at birth or soon after due to eye defects. The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Norrie syndrome: A rare form of blindness that occurs at birth or soon after due to eye defects. The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Numbness of both elbows: Numbness of both elbows refers to the loss or reduction of sensation in the elbows.
  • Oculocerebral syndrome with hypopigmentation: A rare inherited disorder involving lack of pigmentation and eye and brain defects caused by central nervous system abnormalities.
  • Oculodentoosseous dysplasia recessive: A very rare recessively inherited syndrome characterized mainly by eye, tooth and finger abnormalities. The eye abnormalities tend to be more severe than in the dominant form of the disorder.
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta congenita, microcephaly, and cataracts: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder charactedrized by blue sclerae, cataracts and microcephaly - a lethal form of osteogenesis imperfecta.
  • Osteopetrosis lethal: A severe, lethal form of the brittle bone condition called osteopetrosis.
  • Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by early onset of osteoporosis (during childhood) and loss of vision resulting from retinal detachment due to a retinal pseudoglioma (inflammatory eye condition).
  • PHACE association: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a brain malformation (involving the posterior fossa), large facial hemangioma and eye, heart and artery anomalies.
  • PIBIDS syndrome: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by photosensitivity (P), red, dry, scaly skin (I - ichthyosis), brittle hair (B), impaired physical and mental development (I), decreased fertility (D) and short stature (S). It is the same as IBIDS syndrome but involves photosensitivity.
  • Pallister Killian Mosaic Syndrome: Pallister Killian Mosaic Syndrome is a very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Pallister Mosaic Syndrome Tetrasomy 12p: A very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Pallister-Killian Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder due to tetrasomy of the 12th chromosome
  • Pars Planitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the peripheral retina of the eye
  • Pediatric granulomatous arthritis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Pena-Shokeir syndrome Type 2: A rare progressive congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities as well as eye abnormalities.
  • Peripheral vision loss: Reduced or lost peripheral vision
  • Plasmalogenes synthesis deficiency isolated: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal development of bones due to a particular enzyme deficiency (peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyl transferase).
  • Plasmalogens synthesis deficiency isolated: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal development of bones due to a particular enzyme deficiency (peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyl transferase).
  • Prednisolone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Prednisolone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Premature aging, Okamoto type: A form of premature aging.
  • Progressive External Opthhalmoplegia, Autosomal Dominant, 1: A slow progressive paralysis of the motor nerves of the eye (external eye muscles). The condition is often abbreviated to PEO and is caused by a mitochondrial disease called mitochondrial myopathy which affects the muscles which can include the eye muscles. There are a number of different subtypes, each linked to a different genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q25.
  • Proximal myotonic dystrophy: A very rare genetic muscle disorder which is often associated with cataracts, abnormal heart rhythm and infertility. Muscle weakness tends to occur more in muscles closer to the trunk such as the neck, shoulders, hips and upper legs. Pregnancy can exacerbate or initiate symptoms.
  • Pseudo-torch syndrome: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by a small head, eye disease and brain abnormalities. The symptoms are often very similar to another disorder caused by certain infections during pregnancy.
  • Refsum Disease: A metabolic disorder where a deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase results in a buildup of phytanic acid in the body which causes neurological disorders.
  • Refsum disease with increased pipecolic acidemia: A rare disorder involving all the clinical features of Refsum disease as well as high blood levels of L-pipecolic acid. Refsum disease is a metabolic disorder where a deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase results in a buildup of phytanic acid in the body which causes neurological disorders.
  • Retinis pigmentosa -- deafness -- hypogenitalism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive retinal damage, deafness and genital anomalies.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 10: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 10 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q31.3-q32.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 11: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 11 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 19q13.4.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 12: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 12 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31-q32.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 13: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 13 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17p13.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 14: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 14 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 17: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 17 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q23.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 18: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 18 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q21.2.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 19: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 19 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p21-p13.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 2: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp11.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 20: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 20 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p31.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 22: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 22 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16p12.3-p12.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 23: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 23 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp22.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 24: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 24 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xq26-q27.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 25: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 25 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q12.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 26: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 26 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q31.2-q32.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 28: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 28 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2p15-p11.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 30: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 30 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q25.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 31: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 31 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 32: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 32 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p21.3-p13.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 33: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 33 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11.2.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 34: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 34 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xq28.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 35: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 35 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q22.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 36: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 36 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q22.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 37: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 37 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q23.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 38: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 38 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q14.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 39: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 39 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q41.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 4: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q21-q24.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 40: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 40 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p16.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 41: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 41 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p15.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 42: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 42 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7p15.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 43: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 43 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31.2-q34.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 44: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 44 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q23.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 45: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 45 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16q13.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 46: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 47: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 47 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q37.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 48: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 48 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 49: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 49 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p12-cen.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 6: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp21.3-p21.2.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 7: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 9: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 9 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7p14.2.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa: A hereditary group of diseases that cause progressive loss of retinal function
  • Retinitis pigmentosa 1: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q11-q13.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa 27: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 27 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 14q11.1-q11.2.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa 29: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 29 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q32-q34.
  • Retinopathy pigmentary -- intellectual deficit: A rare syndrome characterized by eye disease and mental retardation.
  • Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, type 1: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal development of bones which causes abnormal calcification of bones near the joints. The genetic defect is located on chromosome 6q22-q24.
  • Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, type 2: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal development of bones due to a particular enzyme deficiency (glyceronephosphate O-Acyl transferase). The bones have abnormal calcification of bones near the joints. The genetic defect is located on chromosome 1q42.
  • Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, type 3: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal development of bones due to a particular enzyme deficiency (alkyldihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase). The bones have abnormal calcification of bones near the joints. The genetic defect is located on chromosome 2q31.
  • River Blindness: Skin and eye infection caused by the helminth (worm) 'Onchocerca volvulus', transmitted via fly bites and usually seen only in parts of Africa, the Middle East and South America
  • Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: A syndrome which is characterized by atrophy, pigmentation and telangiectasia of the skin.
  • Rubella congenital syndrome: The transplacental infection of a fetus with rubella
  • Rubinstein-Taybi like syndrome: A condition characterized by numerous congenital abnormalities including small head, unusual facial features, short stature, broad thumb and big toe and mental retardation.
  • Santavuori Disease:
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Schafer syndrome: A disorder characterized mainly by thickened skin on the palms and soles, white patches in mouth, mental and growth retardation and hair, nail and eye abnormalities.
  • Secondary Lactase Deficiency: This form of lactase deficiency results from some sort of damage to the intestines either due to a disease or surgery. Some possible causes include untreated celiac disease, long-term use of antibiotics, giardiasis, carcinoid syndrome, HIV enteropathy, gastrectomy and intestinal resection. Lactase enzyme activity usually develops late in pregnancy so a preterm infant will not yet have developed this enzyme function. The greater the degree of prematurity, the greater the reduction in lactase activity.
  • Sialidosis type 1: A rare inherited condition where deficiency of an enzyme called neuraminidase results in epilepsy, ataxia and vision problems as well as characteristic cherry red spots in the macula of the eye. Symptoms may be exacerbated by factors such as smoking and menstrual cycles.
  • Siegler-Brewer-Carey syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by cataracts, ear infections, poor absorption by the intestines, respiratory infections and failure to thrive.
  • Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome, type 1 (SGBS1): A rare genetic disorder characterized by accelerated growth, a peculiar face and other defects.
  • Spastic paraplegia 9, autosomal dominant: A rare disorder characterized by muscle wasting and weakness mainly in the legs, short stature, skeletal abnormalities and cataracts.
  • Spinal muscular atrophy -- Dandy-Walker complex -- cataracts: A rare syndrome characterized by muscle weakness in the ends of the limbs, cataracts and a brain anomaly called a Dandy-Walker malformation.
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, congenita: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by prenatal growth deficiency, myopia and short trunk.
  • Storm syndrome: A rare progressive genetic disorder characterized by premature aging and heart disease which results in premature death.
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • TORCH Syndrome: Infection of a fetus by any of a group of infectious agents which have been transmitted from the mother through the placenta. The infections include toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes virus, hepatitis and syphilis. The severity and nature of symptoms is determined by the type of infection.
  • Tapetal-like reflex: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by distinctive appearance of the macula which isn't associated with vision loss.
  • Trichothiodystrophy -- sun sensitivity: A rare condition characterized by short brittle hair
  • Triglyceride storage disease with impaired long-chain fatty acid oxidation: A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities.
  • Type 1 diabetes: Severe insulin-treated diabetes typically occurring in young people.
  • Unusual facies, osteosarcoma and malformation syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by an unusual facial appearance, osteosarcoma, hearing problems and other variable abnormalities.
  • Uveitis: A condition which is the result of inflammation of the uvea
  • Van Bogaert disease: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.
  • Van Bogaert's disease: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.
  • Van Bogaert-Scherer-Epstein Disease: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.
  • Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the development of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Verloes Van Maldergem Marneffe syndrome: A condition that is characterised by dwarfing skeletal dysplasia.
  • Vision changes: Any change in vision or sight.
  • Vision distortion: Distortions or changes to vision
  • Visual problems: Any problems which might occur that affect ones vision
  • Vitreoretinal degeneration: A condition characterised by the degeneration of the vitreous and retina of the eye
  • Vitreoretinochoroidopathy dominant: A form of hereditary fundus dystrophy
  • WAGR Syndrome: A syndrome that is due to the deletion of chromosome 11.
  • Walker-Warburg Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by brain malformations and retinal and muscle abnormalities.
  • Warburg Sjo Fledelius syndrome: A syndrome that is characterised by visual and neurological problems as well as microgenitalia
  • Wellesley Carmen French syndrome: A syndrome characterised visual difficulties and growth retardation
  • Wellesley-Carman-French Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, growth problems and abnormal mouth tissue (frenulum).
  • Werner syndrome: A form of premature aging where sufferers start aging during adolescence or soon after and appear old by the time they reach their 30's or 40's. Milder forms of the condition may also occur.
  • Whitaker syndrome: A condition that usually occurs in childhood caused by an autoimmune polyendocrinopathy
  • Wilkie Taylor Scambler syndrome: A syndrome characterised by cataracts with microphthalmia and septal defect
  • Wilms tumor -- aniridia -- genitourinary anomalies -- mental retardation: A syndrome resulting from deletion of genetic material from chromosome the short arm of chromosome 11 (11p13). The characteristic symptoms are partial or complete absence of iris, genitourinary anomalies, mental retardation and Wilms' tumor. The specific range and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the size and exact location of the genetic material that is missing.
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.
  • Xanthomatosis cerebrotendinous: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 7: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type G usually involves severe neurological symptoms.
  • Zellweger Syndrome: Zellweger spectrum disorders are a group of rare, genetic, multisystem disorders that were once thought to be separate entities. These disorders are now classified as different expressions (variants) of one disease process. Collectively, they form a spectrum or continuum of disease. Zellweger syndrome is the most severe form; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy is the intermediate form; and infantile Refsum disease is the mildest form.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Cataracts:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Cataracts:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Cataracts' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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