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Symptoms » Clotting symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Clotting symptoms

Medical terms related to Clotting symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • ACAD9 deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9). The symptoms are variable and are usually triggered by a viral infection or ingestion of aspirin which can trigger a Reye-like episode which can cause death.
  • AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abnormal blood test symptoms: Abnormal results from diagnostic blood tests.
  • Acidemia, propionic: An inherited genetic disorder where the body is incapable of processing some proteins and fats resulting in the accumulation of certain substances in the body which causes the symptoms of the condition. The condition can be life threatening.
  • Acquired hypoprothrombinemia: A low level of blood prothrombins which is not inherited but occurs as a result of certain medical disorders such as Vitamin K deficiency.
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Aggressive NK-cell leukaemia: An aggressive form of blood cancer involving the rapid proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 1: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 2: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 13q14-q21.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 3: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q13.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 4: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19p13.13.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 5: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Antithrombin Deficiency: Antithrombin deficiency refers the deficiency or impaired activity of a substance that inactivates enzymes involved in blood coagulation. Antithrombin prevents the blood from clotting too readily and if its activity is impaired then the blood becomes more prone to clotting which can result in severe problems. Severity of the condition can vary amongst patients and the symptoms can vary considerably depending on the location of blood clots and size of the blood clot.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Arthrogryposis -- renal dysfunction -- cholestasis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, kidney dysfunction and liver problems.
  • Atherosclerosis: A condition which is a form of arteriosclerosis where atheromas are caused by the aggregation of cholesterol and lipids
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Beemer-Ertbruggen syndrome: A rare lethal syndrome characterized primarily by hydrocephalus, heart malformations, and increased bone density. Only a couple of cases have been reported.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Bleeding tendencies: defect in the haemostasis mechanism
  • Blood clot: A coagulum that is located in the blood stream due to the aggregation of blood factors
  • Blood clot in pregnancy: Blood clot in pregnancy is relatively common and is caused largely by physiological factors related to pregnancy, but can also be caused by pathology unrelated to pregnancy.
  • Blood clots: Multiple coagulums that are located in the blood stream due to the aggregation of blood factors
  • Blood clots in pregnancy: Blood clots in pregnancy are relatively common and are caused largely by physiological factors related to pregnancy, but can also be caused by pathology unrelated to pregnancy.
  • Blood symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood and its blood cells.
  • Blood vessel symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood vessels
  • Blueberry muffin syndrome: A manifestation of fetal rubella infection. The newborn has purplish or bluish skin lesions or bumps as well as thrombocytopenia. The skin usually clears within 6 weeks.
  • Bone marrow failure -- neurologic abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of bone marrow failure and neurological abnormalities.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Brown Recluse spider poisoning: The Brown Recluse spider is poisonous and is found mainly in southern and central areas of the US.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Buerger's disease: Buergers's disease is a recurring inflammation and thrombosis (clotting) of small and medium arteries and veins of the hands and feet
  • Busulfan toxicity syndrome: Symptoms caused by the use of a chemotherapy drug called Busulfan.
  • Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A very rare disorder where the blood clotting system becomes dysfunctional and clots too easily due to the abnormal presence of antphospholipid antibodies. It results in blood flow blockages to various body organs. It is possible that the condition has autoimmune origins. The disorder is often triggered by infections, certain drugs (e.g. anticoagulants), minor surgery and hysterectomy.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chromium: Chromium is a chemical used mainly as an alloy in manufactured steel goods, anti-corrosive plating and also has industrial applications . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Selenium: Selenium is a chemical element used mainly as an industrial catalyst, in glass and ceramic manufacturing, as an animal feed additive, in photography and in the electronics industry. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium: Thallium is an element used for such things as electronic devices, selenium rectifiers, gamma radiation detection apparatus, transmission equipment and infrared radiation detection. It is also used as a catalyst in various manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vinyl Choride: Vinyl Choride is an intermediate chemical used in the manufacturing process of a variety of products: polyvinyl chloride, pipes, wire coverings, vehicle plastics, rubber, paper, furniture and glass. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chromosome 11, Partial Monosomy 11q: A very rare chromosomal disorder involving the absence of a portion of chromosome 11q. The range and severity of symptoms is determined by the size of the portion that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 13, Partial Monosomy 13q: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Chromosome 13q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Chromosome 13q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Chromosome 21q, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of the long arm of chromosome 21 is deleted.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 22 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • Circulation symptoms: Symptoms affecting the circulatory system
  • Clotting symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood's ability to clot
  • Coagulation defects: deal with disruption of the body's ability to control blood clotting
  • Congenital Afibrinogenemia: A rare disorder involving the inability to make fibrinogen which is essential for the process of blood clotting.
  • Congenital cytomegalovirus: Fetal infection with cytomegalovirus.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1/IIX: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type I/IIX refers to cases where the specific abnormality cannot be determined.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1H: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type Ih is caused by a defect on chromosome 11pter-p15.5 and involves the gene for a particular enzyme (dolichyl-P-glucose:Glc-1-Man-9-GlcNAc-2-PP-dolichyl-alpha-3-glucosyltransferase).
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2F: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type IIf is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q25.16q15 and involves a defect on the gene for CMP-sialic acid transporter.
  • Congenital mitral malformation: Malformations of the mitral valve that are present at birth. The mitral valve allows blood to flow between the two chambers on the left side of the heart. Types of mitral malformation are atresia (absent mitral valve), stenosis (narrowed mitral valve) and parachute mitral valve.
  • Congenital mumps: Fetal exposure to the mumps virus during pregnancy. From existing evidence, fetal exposure to mumps rarely proves to be a problem although there have been cases of spontaneous abortion and a heart condition called endocardial fibroelastosis. Infection late in the pregnancy can result in the infant contracting mumps.
  • Conor's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Consumption coagulopathy: Consumption coagulopathy, also called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), is a serious bleeding disorder that can occur as a result of a variety of diseases, disorders and conditions, such as sepsis, certain tumors and severe trauma.
  • Copperhead snake poisoning: The Copperhead snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in parts of North America. The toxicity of the poison varies among species but some species are extremely poisonous and readily result in death if the patient is not treated.
  • Crotalidae snake poisoning: Crotalids are snakes from the Crotalidae family. This group of snakes includes rattlesnakes which are usually found in America. These snakes are easily identified by the "rattle" at the tip of their tails. The toxicity of the venom can vary among species but some can result in death if prompt treatment is not given.
  • Cutler-Bass-Romshe syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by kidney, neurological and thyroid problems.
  • Cyclic neutropenia: A rare blood disorder characterized by recurrent periods of extremely low blood levels of neutrophils which results in frequent infections. The low level usually occurs for about 7 days every 21 days. Levels of other blood components may also be affected.
  • D-minus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D-HUS) -- familial: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. The familial type is not associated with diarrhea and is inherited. Autosomal recessive cases usually start early in life whereas autosomal dominant cases can occur at any age.
  • D-minus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D-HUS) -- pregnancy related: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. This type is not associated with diarrhea and is triggered by pregnancy.
  • D-plus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS): A rare condition where gastroenteritis involving bloody diarrhea is caused by a bacteria (usually E.Coli) which leads to toxins being present in the blood. These circulating toxins affect red blood cells, kidneys and occasionally even the brain.
  • DIC: DIC s a syndrome triggered by a number of medical conditions including malignancy, infection and liver disease, and results in consumption of clotting factors in the blood.
  • DIDMOAD Syndrome, Mitochondrial form: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness which results in mitochondrial defects.
  • Decreased protein C: A protein which is necessaryto prevent theclotting cascade and is autosomal dominant with regards to inheritance
  • Del (2) (p13-p11): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in two reported cases. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Deletion 13q: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness.
  • Diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, mitochondrial form: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness which results in mitochondrial defects.
  • Diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by multiple capillary hemangiomas as well as other abnormalities.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Dysfibrinogenemia, familial: A rare familial disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen. There are various types of this order and they can vary in severity from asymptomatic to causing abnormal bleeding and blood clotting. Examples of subtypes includes Amsterdam, Detroit and Wiesbaden dysfibrinogenemia.
  • Easy bruising: Where one bruises with minimal trauma to the skin
  • Endocarditis, infective: A rare condition where a bacterial infection attacks the inner lining of the heart muscle and valves which is called the endocardium.
  • Epidural hematoma: The occurrence of a haematoma upon or outside the dura mata
  • Epstein's Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the association of kidney disease, deafness and a blood disorder.
  • Epstein-Barr virus, chronic: A form of human herpes virus that produces persistent symptoms. Most people become infected with the virus at some stage in their life though they usually have few if any symptoms. However, some people develop severe symptoms as a result of an EBV infection.
  • Escharonodulaire: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Factor V Leiden mutation: A rare genetic condition where a abnormalities in the factor V protein prevent it from being inactivated by protein C which causes the blood to clot. The normal processes which regulate the blood coagulation process is impaired. The homozygous form of the condition carries a greater risk of blood clotting than the heterozygous form.
  • Fallot syndrome: A congenital heart disorder consisting of four heart defects - hole between the ventricles (ventricular septal defect), obstruction from right ventricles to the lungs (subpulmonary stenosis), overriding aorta and thickened right ventricle muscle.
  • Familial primary cryofibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder where exposure to cold causes various symptoms due to the presence of cryofibrinogen in the blood which precipitates when exposed to cold.
  • Familial renal cell carcinoma: A genetic form of kidney cancer that develops in the lining of the tubules in the kidney and tends to run in families.
  • Fanconi pancytopenia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by upper limb defects and kidney abnormalities.
  • Faye-Petersen-Ward-Carey syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excess fluid in the skull, a blood disorder and bone and bone abnormalities.
  • Fechtner syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes.
  • Fibrinogen deficiency, congenital: A rare congenital disorder characterized by the inability to make fibrinogen which is essential for the process of blood clotting.
  • Gardner-Morrisson-Abbot syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by thrombocytopenia and various other abnormalities present at birth.
  • Gaucher Disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3.
  • Gaucher disease -- perinatal lethal form: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormally tight skin and Gaucher disease which is a lipid storage disease. This is the most severe form of Gaucher disease.
  • Gaucher disease type 1: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 1 is the visceral, chronic form which usually starts during adulthood.
  • Gaucher disease type 2: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 2 is acute neurological form apparent in infancy.
  • Gaucher disease type 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 3 is a subacute neurological form which often first appears in childhood.
  • Ghosal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by difficult to treat anemia and skeletal abnormalities.
  • HIV-1, CRF01_AE: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/E occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1, CRF02_AG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/G involves both And G subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/G occurs mainly in west and central Africas well as Taiwan.
  • HIV-1, CRF04_ cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/B involves both And B subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF_cpx is made up of a combination of subtypes A, G, H, K, and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cyprus and Greece.
  • HIV-1, CRF05_ D/F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF D/F involves both D and F subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF D/F occurs mainly in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF06_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF06_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G, J and K - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Burkina Faso and Mali.
  • HIV-1, CRF07_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF07_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF08_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF08_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF11_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF11_cpx is extremely rare and appears to include a mix of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G and J - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF12_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF B/F has been diagnosed in Uruguay and Argentina.
  • HIV-1, CRF13_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF13_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G, J and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF14_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF14_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Spain.
  • HIV-1, CRF15_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF15_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B.
  • HIV-1, CRF16_ A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF16_ A2D involves a combination of subtypes A2 and D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Kenyand South Korea.
  • HIV-1, CRF17_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF17_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF18_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF18_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, F, G, H, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF19_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF19_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, D and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF20_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF20_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF21_A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF21_A2D involves a combination of subtypes A, D and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF22_01A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF22_01A1 involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF23_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF23_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF24_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF24_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF25_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF25_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon and Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1, CRF26_AU: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF26_AU involves a combination of subtypes And U.
  • HIV-1, CRF27_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF27_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, G, H, J, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF28_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF28_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF29_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF29_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF30_0206: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF30_0206 involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and CRF06 (A, G, J and K).
  • HIV-1, CRF31_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF31_BC involves a combination of subtypes B and C.
  • HIV-1, CRF32_06A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF32_06A1involves a combination of subtypes CRF06 (A, G, J, K) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF33_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF33_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Malaysia.
  • HIV-1, CRF34_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF34_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Thailand.
  • HIV-1, CRF35_AD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF35_AD involves a combination of subtypes And D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Afghanistan.
  • HIV-1, CRF36_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF36_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF37_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF37_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF38_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF38_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF39_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF39_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF40_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF40_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF41_CD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF41_CD involves a combination of subtypes C and D.
  • HIV-1, CRF42_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF42_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F1.
  • HIV-1, CRF43_02G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF43_02G involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and G. This type has been diagnosed in Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype A is most prevalent in West Africa.
  • HIV-1A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A1 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A2 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A3: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A3 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype B is most prevalent in Thailand, Australia, Japan, Europe and America. This subtype tends to be transmitted mainly by homosexual contact and intravenous drug use i.e. infection occurs mainly through blood exposure.
  • HIV-1C: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype C is most prevalent in Nepal, India and Southern and Eastern parts of Africa. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype and is transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype D is most prevalent in the Eastern and Central parts of Africa and tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1E: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype E has to date not occurred on its own but has occurred in combination with subtype A in a subtype called CRF A/E. This subtype occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype F is most prevalent in Eastern Europe, South America and Central Africa.
  • HIV-1F1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F1 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1F2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F2 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype G is most prevalent in Africa and central parts of Europe. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1H: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype H is most prevalent in central parts of Africa.
  • HIV-1J: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype J is most prevalent in central America.
  • HIV-1K: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype K is most prevalent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cameroon.
  • HIV-1M: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1 group M is the most common form of HIV accounting for roughly 90% of cases worldwide.
  • HIV-1N: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group N is very rare and has only been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1O: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group O is very rare and has only been diagnosed in the western parts of Central Africa. This type is more difficult to diagnose and the standard test kits are not sensitive enough to pick up the virus.
  • HIV-2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-2 is very rare and is generally only diagnosed in Africa but a number of cases have been diagnosed in the US. HIV-2 is less easily transmitted than HIV-1 and the time between infection and symptoms tends to be longer in HIV-2.
  • HIV-2A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV-2B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • Hand-Schuller-Christian Syndrome: A group of blood disorder involving excess production of histiocytes (type of immune cell) throughout the body. Accumulation of histiocytes results in non-cancerous growths which can damage organs and other body tissues such as bones. Symptom vary hugely and depend on location and size of tumor growths.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Heavy-chain diseases: A group of rare condition characterized by the production of the heavy chain portions of immunoglobulin molecules. Subtypes include y-chain disease, µ-chain disease and α-chain disease.
  • Hematoma: Local collection of clotted blood
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 1: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q34.3.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 2: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q32.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 3: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q25.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 4: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 5: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.3-p13.2.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 6: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20p11.2.
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical, childhood: A rare disorder involving destruction of blood cells and kidney disease. Unlike typical hemolytic uremic syndrome which usually follows a bacterial infection, the atypical form is possibly a genetic disorder. The distinguishing feature of the atypical form is that no diarrhea is involved. The atypical form has a poorer prognosis than the typical form.
  • Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an abnormal appearance of histiocytes in the blood
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 1: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children and can be life-threatening.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 2: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 10q22.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 3: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 17q25.1.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 4: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q24.
  • Hemophagocytic reticulosis: The abnormal proliferation of reticulum cell (histiocytes) which infiltrate various organs and. Macrophages destroy blood cells causing blood abnormalities. Meningoencephalitis frequently occurs when the histiocytes infiltrate the mininges and cerebral tissue. Symptoms start at birth or soon after and become progressively worse without treatment. Medication can control the condition but a hematopoietic stem cell transplant is needed to achieve remission.
  • Hemophilia: Blood disease usually genetic causing failure to clot.
  • Hemorragic fever with renal syndrome: A group of infectious diseases that involve bleeding, fever and kidney problems. Examples of viruses that can cause such infectious diseases include Hantan virus, Puumala virus and Seoul virus. Examples of diseases caused by viruses in this group includes epidemic nephritis, Hantaan fever and Songo fever. The virus is usually transmitted to human by rodents or biting insects such as mosquitos. The severity and range of symptoms is determined by the particular virus involved.
  • Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: A blood disorder triggered by the use of the drug called heparin which is an anticoagulant. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Kombucha: Kombucha can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, arthritis, aches, high blood pressure and to improve the immune system. Kombucha can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Kombucha: Kombucha can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, arthritis, aches, high blood pressure and to improve the immune system. The ingestion of excessive amounts of Kombucha can result in overdose symptoms.
  • Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by various degrees of albinism, bleeding due to a platelet defect and accumulation of a waxy substance in cells (lysosomal ceroid storage).
  • Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2: A rare disorder characterized by various degrees of albinism, bleeding due to a platelet defect, an accumulation of a waxy substance in cells (lysosomal ceroid storage) and immunodeficiency. HPS type 2 differs from type 1 in that it also involves immunodeficiency due to congenital neutropenia.
  • High Platelets: High platelets in the blood.
  • Hip Replacement: The replacement of a hip with an synthetic joint
  • Homocystinuria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving the amino acid methionine and resulting in a harmful accumulation of homocysteine in the body.
  • Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency: A rare genetic biochemical disorder where a deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthase results in high levels of methionine and homocysteine in the blood and reduced levels of cyteine in the blood. There are two subtypes of the disorder with varying manifestations. One type responds to Vitmain B6 supplementation and the other doesn't. Those who do respond to Vitamin B6 tend to have milder manifestations.
  • Homologous wasting disease: A term used to describe the disease state resulting from a graft versus host reaction. Graft versus host reaction occurs when the immune system of a transplant patient attacks the transplanted tissue but in homologous wasting disease the immune cells in the transplanted tissue actually attacks the host tissues. The condition occurs most often after a bone marrow transplant.
  • Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by retarded growth, a small head, anemia, immunodeficiency and an underdeveloped brain (cerebellum).
  • Hyper IgM syndrome 1: Hyper IgM syndrome is a rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome Xq26 and tends to affects males mostly.
  • Hyper IgM syndrome 3: Hyper IgM syndrome is a rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.2.
  • Hyperdibasic aminoaciduria type 2: A rare inborn urea cycle disorder characterized by an enzyme defect in the amino acid transporter gene SLC7A7 (positive amino acid transporter).
  • Hypergammaglobulinemia: An increase in the level of any of a number of gamma globulins. This can result from conditions such as chronic bacterial infections, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, dysproteinemias, liver disease and chronic granulomatous inflammations. The exact symptoms depend on the type of gamma globulins involved and the severity of the condition.
  • Hypersensitivity to drugs: increased sensitivity to a particular drug
  • Hypersplenism: A condition which is characterized by the exaggeration of blood degrading function of the spleen
  • Immune Dysfunction with T-Cell Inactivation due to Calcium Entry Defect 2: A rare condition where a genetic anomaly affects the movement of calcium through the body and results in immune system problems. Defect 1 is linked to a defect in the STIM1 gene on chromosome 11p15.5 The condition was reported in four siblings.
  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Reduced blood platelets causing visible skin blemishes from bleeding or bruising.
  • Inceased prothrombin time: An increase in the clotting time of plasma in the presence of a tissue extract
  • Increased prothrombin time: An increase in the time taken for blood to clot
  • Increased thrombin clotting time: An increase in the thrombin clotting time.
  • India tick typhus: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Indian tick fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Israeli spotted fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Jacobsen syndrome: A very rare chromosomal disorder involving the absence of a portion of chromosome 11q. The range and severity of symptoms is determined by the size of the portion that is deleted.
  • Junin virus:
  • Juniper tar poisoning: Tar from the Juniper plant is sometimes used to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. Ingestion of the substance can cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Kenya fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Kenya tick typhus: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Kenya tick-bite fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Kidney symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both kidneys.
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Leishmaniasis: A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis.
  • Littoral cell angioma of the spleen: A usually benign type of tumor that develops in the spleen. The name arises from the fact that the tumor develops from the littoral cells which line the blood vessels in the spleen.
  • Liver symptoms: Symptoms affecting the liver
  • Low Platelets: Low platelets in the blood.
  • Lymphoblastic lymphoma: A cancer of the lymph system which usually involves immature T-lymphocytes and sometimes B-lymphocytes. The cancer usually affects the mediastinum (between the lungs), bone marrow, brain and spinal cord.
  • Lymphoma: Any neoplastic disorder that occurs in lymphoid tissue
  • Lymphoproliferative Syndrome, X-Linked, 1: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder where the body's immune systm is unable to respond appropriately to certain viral infections (Epstein Barr virus). The immune system becomes weakened following and EBV infection. As the condition in inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer the full extent of the disease which tends to be eventually fatal in most cases. Female carriers tend not to develop and problems following an EBV infection. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq25.@
  • Lymphoproliferative Syndrome, X-Linked, 2: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder where the body's immune systm is unable to respond appropriately to certain viral infections (Epstein Barr virus). The immune system becomes weakened following and EBV infection. As the condition in inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer the full extent of the disease which tends to be eventually fatal in most cases. Female carriers tend not to develop and problems following an EBV infection. Type 2 is linked to a defect in the XIAP gene on chromosome Xq25.
  • Lymphoproliferative syndrome, EBV-Associated, Autosomal, 1: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder where the body's immune systm is unable to respond appropriately to certain viral infections (Epstein Barr virus). Infection with the virus can lead to chronic immune problems which can ultimately result in death. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q32.
  • Malignant Buotonneuse fever: A serious complication of Buotonneuse fever that tends to occur mainly in patients who are old or have other conditions such as heart disease.
  • Marseilles fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • May-Hegglin Anomaly: A rare inherited blood disorder involving abnormalities in some of the blood components (platelets and certain leukocytes). Some patients develop bleeding problems whereas other remain asymptomatic.
  • May-Hegglin thrombocytopenia: A rare inherited blood disorder involving abnormalities in some of the blood components (platelets and certain leukocytes). Some patients develop bleeding problems whereas other remain asymptomatic.
  • Mayapple poisoning: The Mayapple is a small flowering plant which is often found growing naturally. It bears small single flowers and apple-like fruit which turns yellow when ripe. The unripe fruit and leaves contain a chemical called podophyllin which can cause poisoning if eaten. The plant is considered highly toxic and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten. The leaves, roots and unripe fruit are toxic but the ripe fruit is edible. The plant has been used to treat venereal warts.
  • Mediterranean spotted fever: A condition caused by Rickettsia rickettsia transmitted by the tick
  • Methotrexate toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Microcephaly immunodeficiency lymphoreticuloma: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a small head, reduced immunity and increased risk of cancer. There are a wide range of other abnormalities and symptoms that can occur.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes: A group of syndromes characterized by a disruption in the production of blood cells. Often the bone marrow increases production of various blood cells but because many of them are defective, they are destroyed before the reach the blood stream.
  • Myeloproliferative disease:
  • Myelpathic anemia: Myelopathic anemia is a form of anemia resulting from the development of abnormal tissue in the bone marrow - usually metastatic cancers. It is characterized by abnormal number of immature blood cells in the blood.
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis: A rare disease that is tends to occur in premature infants and involves inflammation and destruction of gastrointestinal tissue. It usually occurs within weeks of birth - often after the start of milk feeding. The condition can be extremely serious and even fatal.
  • Nephrotic syndrome: A condition involving excess loss of protein in the urine, reduced albumin levels in the blood and swelling.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome: A rare disorder where the patients has symptoms of neurofibromatosis (nerve tumors) and Noonan syndrome (short stature, bleeding problems, heart defect, unusual facial features, skeletal anomalies, webbed neck).
  • Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a small head, reduced immunity and increased risk of cancer. There are a wide range of other abnormalities and symptoms that can occur.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, during pregnancy: A cancer that originates in the lymphatic system and occurs during pregnancy. The greatest problem is the fact that the cancer is usually quite aggressive and delays in delivery often results in delayed treatment and a poor prognosis.
  • Non-diarrheal (D-) HUS syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that is not associated with diarrhea which means that it is not a result of bacterial gastroenteritis. This form of hemolytic uremic syndrome may be caused by kidney transplants, certain drugs (cyclosporine, tacrolimus, cytotoxic drugs), pregnancy, malignancy, HIV, non-diarrheal bacterial infections, immunological conditions or it may be inherited or in some cases there is no obvious cause (idiopathic).
  • Noonan Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a webbed neck, chest deformity, undescended testes and pulmonic stenosis.
  • Omsk hemorrhagic fever: A hemorrhagic fever caused by a virus. A serious outbreak occurred in Omsk and hence the name. Transmission occurs through tick bites. The infection has two phases: the first acute phase involves symptoms such as fever, rash and muscle pain and the second phase occurs after a week or two and involves the central nervous system (e.g. delirium, convulsions).
  • Oriental Hornet poisoning: The Oriental hornet can deliver a venomous sting which can result in serious and even life-threatening symptoms. Allergies to the venom are also a possible life-threatening consequence. Multiple stings increase the severity of symptoms.
  • Osteomyelitis: An infection that occurs in bone
  • Osteopetrosis, autosomal recessive 2: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. This form is relatively mild with survival possible for a couple of decades in some cases.
  • Pancytopenia: A term used to describe a lack of all of the different types of blood cells - red and white blood cells and blood platelets. Cancer, infections and toxins are some of the causes of pancytopenia. Symptoms depend on the severity of the deficiency.
  • Paris-Trousseau thrombocytopenia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by bleeding problems, mental retardation, heart malformations and facial abnormalities.
  • Partial thromboplastin time with kaolin: A high partial thromboplastin time with kaolin indicates that there is an abnormality with the clotting cascade
  • Pearson's anemia: Pearson's anemia is a rare progressive condition characterized by abnormal pancreatic functioning and sideroblastic anemia. Diagnosis usually occurs within the first 7 years of life and death in infancy is common.
  • Pediatric AIDS: Pediatric AIDS is an immune system disease in infants or children caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Symptoms in children are similar to those of an adult but their susceptibility to various AIDS-related conditions varies e.g. children are less susceptible to Kaposi sarcoma, taxoplasmosis and cryptococcosis than adults.
  • Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloid leukemia: A form of leukemia.
  • Phocomelia -- thrombocytopenia -- encephalocele -- urogenital malformation: An early congenital condition that is characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The severity and range of abnormalities may vary amongst patients.
  • Platelet clumping: An invitro artefact in some patients.
  • Polycythemia: increase in the total number of red blood cells in the circulation. It can be primary or secondary
  • Polycythemia vera: Polycythemia vera refers to a condition in which there is an abnormal rise n the number of blood cells, especially red blood cells.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Propionic Acidemia: A condition which is characterized by the excess of propionic acid and glycine in the blood resulting in acidaemia
  • Protein S acquired deficiency: A rare disorder involving a deficiency of a blood protein called protein S. Protein S prevents blood from clotting in the veins. A deficiency of protein S can be acquired through liver disease, chemotherapy, lack of vitamin K or through the use of oral anticoagulants or L-asparaginase.
  • Pseudo-torch syndrome: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by a small head, eye disease and brain abnormalities. The symptoms are often very similar to another disorder caused by certain infections during pregnancy.
  • Pyridoxamine 5-prime-phosphate oxidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme called 5-prime-phosphate oxidase. Symptoms start soon after birth and involves seizures and other anomalies.
  • Raised activated partial thromboplastin time: An elevated amount of neutrophil specific autoantibodies in the blood
  • Refractory anaemia with ringed sideroblasts: Refractory anaemia with ringed sideroblasts is a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome
  • Renal Cell Carcinoma 2: A genetic form of kidney cancer.
  • Renal Cell Carcinoma 3: A dominantly inherited form of kidney cancer which is linked to chromosome 5q.
  • Renal Cell Carcinoma 4: A genetic form of kidney cancer.
  • Renal cancer, familial: A genetic form of kidney cancer that tends to run in families.
  • Renal segmental hypoplasia-induced Hypertension: Renal segmental hypoplasia-induced hypertension is high blood pressure resulting from either an abnormally developed kidney (birth defect) or from damage to the kidney resulting from vesicureteral reflux.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Retinopathy -- anaemia- CNS anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by disease of the eye retinas, anemia and central nervous system anomalies.
  • Retinopathy -- anemia -- CNS anomalies:
  • Revesz Debuse syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by disease of the eye retinas, anemia and central nervous system anomalies.
  • Revesz Syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by disease of the eye retinas, anemia and central nervous system anomalies.
  • SARS: Serious respiratory infection
  • Sabia virus: An arbovirus causing fever, rashes and hemorrhagic bleeding
  • Sea-Blue histiocytosis: A rare condition involving the presence of too many histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow. These histiocytes stain a sea-blue color during testing. These abnormal staining histiocytes have been noted in several diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease, lipid metabolism disorders and Norum disease.
  • Sebastian syndrome: A rare blood disorder characterized mainly by the presence of large blood platelets.
  • Skeletal and Cardiac Malformations with thrombocytopenia: A rare, newly described syndrome characterized by skeletal and heart abnormalities as well as a blood disorder.
  • Skeleto cardiac syndrome with thrombocytopenia: A rare, newly described syndrome characterized by skeletal and heart abnormalities as well as a blood disorder.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Sphingolipidosis: A group of diseases involving the abnormal metabolism and storage of a substance called sphingolipid. Symptoms will vary depending on the disease. Examples of diseases from this group include gangliosidosis, Gaucher's disease and Niemann-Pick disease.
  • Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with combined immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by skeletal abnormalities as well as a poor immune system.
  • Stomach cancer: Stomach or gastric cancer can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs
  • Stomach cancer, familial: Cancer of the stomach that tends to run in families.
  • Subdural hematoma: A condition which is characterized by a blood clot beneath the dura mater
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • TAR syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the absence of radial bones of both forearms and thrombocytopenia.
  • The Hemophilias: A group of hereditary hemorrhagic diathesis due to a deficiency of a blood coagulation factor
  • Thrombocythemia: A haematological disorder in which there is excessive proliferation of platelet precursor cells, resulting in increased numbers of platelets in the blood.
  • Thrombocytopenia: Decreased concentration of platelets in the blood.
  • Thrombocytopenia -- Multiple Congenital Anomalies: A rare inherited condition characterized by thrombocytopenia, neurological problems and various malformations.
  • Thrombocytopenia -- chromosome breakage: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by low blood platelets, carcinomas and autoimmunity.
  • Thrombocytosis: An increased number of platelets in the blood.
  • Thrombomodulin anomalies, familial: A defect in a protein involved with anticoagulation which results in an increased risk of developing blood clots which can result in death.
  • Thrombophilia:
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, acquired: A rare blood condition where small blood clots form in blood vessels which reduces the number of blood platelets and results in kidney failure, neurological symptoms and anemia. The condition may be familial or acquired - symptoms tend to recur regularly in the familial form.
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, congenital: A rare blood condition where small blood clots form in blood vessels which reduces the number of blood platelets and results in kidney failure, neurological symptoms and anemia.
  • Thyrocerebral-retinal syndrome: A very rare syndrome observed in a brother and sister and characterized by thyroid, kidney and neurological disease.
  • Transcobalamin 2 deficiency: A rare genetic syndrome involving a lack of transcobalamin 2 which is needed to transport vitamin B12 to various parts of the body.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury: Brain injury from trauma or accident.
  • Trypanosomiasis, east-African: A rare infectious disease caused by a parasite called Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and is transmitted through the bite of an infected Tsetse fly. The infection causes an acute illness with symptoms occurring from days to weeks after infection. Death relatively common, especially in untreated cases.
  • Vasculitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation to blood vessels
  • Velocardiofacial syndrome: A genetic disorder which can present with a wide range of phenotypic manifestations which has lead to a number of different names being assigned to the various presentations e.g. DiGeorge Syndrome and Cayler Anomaly Face Syndrome. There are nearly 200 different symptoms that can occur and the severity of the condition is also highly variable depending on the nature and severity of the symptoms that are present.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis: A tropical disease caused by a protozoan organism and transmitted to humans through sand fly bites. Also called Assam fever, black fever, dumdum fever, ponos or kala-azar.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar): A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis. Visceral leishmaniasis infection involves the spleen, liver and bone marrow and can be fatal if untreated.
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.
  • Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder that affects only males and is characterized by recurring infections, eczema and reduced level of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia).
  • Wolfram Syndrome 2: Wolfram Syndrome is a condition characterized by the association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness. Type 2 is the result of a genetic defect and is similar to type 1 but there is no diabetes insipidus and patients tend to develop gastrointestinal problems.
  • Wolfram Syndrome, Mitochondrial form: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness which results in mitochondrial defects.
  • Yellow fever: A viral infection transmitted by mosquito bites which can damage various organs such as the liver, heart, kidney and digestive tract.
  • Zenker's diverticulum: Zenker's diverticulum, is a diverticulum of the mucosa of the pharynx, just above the cricopharyngeal muscle.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Clotting symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Clotting symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Clotting symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Clotting symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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