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Symptoms » Cyanosis » Glossary
 

Glossary for Cyanosis

Medical terms related to Cyanosis or mentioned in this section include:

  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Aberrant subclavian artery abnormality: A rare defect where one the subclavian artery arises from an abnormal location on the aortic arch. The defect may cause compression of organs such as the airway and the voice box.
  • Abnormal blood test symptoms: Abnormal results from diagnostic blood tests.
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocyanosis: A condition where the body extremities sweat and turn blue and cold. Exposure to cold, emotional stress and smoking may trigger the condition. Also known as Raynaud's phenomenon or Raynaud's sign.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: A condition which is characterized by fulminant pulmonary interstitial alveolar oedema.
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Airway obstruction: airway obstruction is a blockage of the upper airway, which can be in the trachea, laryngeal (voice box), or pharyngeal (throat) areas or involve the bronch.
  • Al Gazali Aziz Salem syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart disease, short stature and a webbed neck.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by homogentisic aciduria, arthritis and ochronosis. Symptoms include darkening of urine, alkinization due to overproduction of homogentisic acid, arthritis in the large joints and black ochronotic pigmentation of cartilage and collagen tissue. However, many of these symptoms may not occur until middle age. The condition may also be caused by chronic phenol poisoning.
  • Alveolar capillary dysplasia: The abnormal development of the lung blood vessels. The normal barrier across which air and blood can diffuse fails to develop properly. Death usually results within weeks of birth but rare cases can survive for months.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Ankle blueness: A blue discolouration of the ankle
  • Anophthalmia with pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare disorder characterized by absent or very small eyes and underdeveloped lung tissue.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood.
  • Anthracosis: An often asymptomatic chronic lung disease caused by inhaling coal tust which then deposits in the lungs. Also called black lung disease, coal worker's pneumoconiosis or miner's pneumoconiosis.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Apple seed poisoning: Apple seeds contain a toxic chemical called amygdalin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Hospital admission is recommended if more than 50 apple seeds have been consumed.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Arm blueness: A blue discolouration of the arm
  • Artery symptoms: Symptoms affecting the arteries (large blood vessels)
  • Asbestos conditions: Medical conditions caused be exposure to asbestos dust
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Asphyxia neonatorum: Respiratory failure in a newborn.
  • Aspiration of foreign body: can be a life threatening condition and requires immediate attention
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Autoimmune Myocarditis: Inflammation of the heart muscle due to the body's own immune system attacking it.
  • Back blueness: A blue discolouration on the back
  • Beau's syndrome: A syndrome characterized by heart insufficiency and inability of the heart ventricles to completely empty of blood.
  • Berylliosis: Beryllium poisoning which causes granulomas and pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Bindewald-Ulmer-Muller syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a heart defect, and mental and growth retardation.
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Blood symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood and its blood cells.
  • Blood vessel symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood vessels
  • Blue baby: Any baby born with blueness
  • Blue hands: Blue appearance of the hands
  • Blue rubber bleb nevus: A very rare congenital vascular disorder characterized by multiple hemangiomas on the skin and internal organs.
  • Blue skin: Blueness of the skin
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Breast blueness: A blue discolouration on the breast or breasts
  • Breathing difficulties: Various types of breathing difficulty (dyspnea).
  • Breathing symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Bronchiolitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bronchioles
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A condition which is characterized by dysplasia of the brochopulmonary vessels
  • Bronchospasm: sudden spasm of the bronchi
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Buttock blueness: A blue discolouration on the buttocks
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Calf blueness: A blue discolouration on the calf or calves
  • Carbamate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of carbamate insecticide drugs.
  • Cardiac malformation: Any malformation or structural defect of the heart or it's structures. Some examples include atrioventricular septal defect, conotruncal malformations, transposition of great vessels and heart valve dysplasia. The symptoms vary in nature and severity depending on the type of malformation.
  • Cast syndrome: Obstruction of the third part of the duodenum by an artery following the use of a body plaster cast or a Bradford frame.
  • Central cyanosis: bluish discoloration of the skin and the mucous membrane.
  • Chemical pneumonia: Lung inflammation from inhaled chemicals
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: 1,3-Dinitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in explosives. The chemical can be readily absorbed through the skin and cause systemic symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly as an explosive agent and in the production of dyes and photographic chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dinitrotoluene: 2,4-Dinitrotoluene is a chemical used the production of explosives, vehicle air bags and polyurethane polymers. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Adiponitrile: Adiponitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of hexamethylene diamine which in turn is used mainly to produce nylon. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Nitrate: Ammonium Nitrate is a chemical used mainly in explosives, fireworks and fertilizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aniline: Aniline is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of perfumes, varnishes, resins, dyes, paint removers, herbicides, fungicides, explosives, solvents and photographic chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anisidine (o,p-Isomers): Anisidine (o,p-Isomers)is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antu: Antu is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorate salts: Chlorate salt is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and in the manufacture of matches and explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzene: Chlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a solvent and in the production of various other chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether: Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether is a chemical used in a variety of applications: cleaning agents, solvent, manufacture of dyes, rubber, soap and printing products . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endosulfan: Endosulfan is a chemical used mainly as a crop pesticide and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Epichlorohydrin: Epichlorohydrin is a chemical used for a variety of applications - epoxy production, insecticides, solvent and agricultural chemical. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol: Ethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in antifreeze, coolants and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. Symptoms tend to occur in three phases: the first 12 hours involves inebriation, seizuresand brain swelling; the second and third day involves deterioration of lung and heart function and the third stage involves kidney damage and possibly failure. Death can occur during any of the stages.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate: Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of commercial dynamite and blasting gelatin. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Oxide: Ethylene oxide is a chemical used mainly in detergents, plasticizers, fumigants, inks, cosmetics and brake fluid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-4: Jet Fuel-4 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mineral-Based Crankcase Oil: Mineral-Based Crankcase Oil is a chemical used mainly as a fuel . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine: N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine is a chemical used mainly in artificial nail solutions. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nickel Carbonyl: Nickel Carbonyl is a chemical used mainly in petroleum and rubber production and in electroplating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrates: Nitrates are chemicals used mainly in explosives and ammunitions but are also an ingredient in cold packs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrites: Nitrite is a chemical used in many applications: manufacture of dyes, fabric manufacture, corrosive inhibitors, photography and cyanide antidote kits. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrobenzene: Nitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in floor polish, shoe dyes, soaps and the production of other chemicals such as cellulose ether and acetaminophen. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroethane: Nitroethane is a chemical used mainly as in industrial solvent, fuel additive, propellant, manufacture of pharmaceutical products and in artificial nail removers . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroglycerin: Nitroglycerin is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of explosives, dynamite, rocket propellant and smokeless powders. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol: Nitrophenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of dyes and pigments and also in fungicides and laboratory chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol Urea: Nitrophenol Urea is a pesticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrotoluene: Nitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications for the production of things such as agricultural chemicals, explosives, rubber chemicals, sulfur dyes and azo dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Paraphenylenediamine: Paraphenylenediamine is a chemical used mainly in photographic developing solutions, hair dye, photocopying and printing ink, black rubber, grease, temporary tattoos and car cosmetics. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Petroleum Distillates -- Naphtha: Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenol: Phenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of fertilizer, explosives, rubber, paint, paint remover, perfumes, asbestos products, wood preservatives, resins, textiles, pharmaceuticals and drugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propane: Propane is a chemical used mainly in fuels and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propylene Glycol Dinitrate: Propylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly as a propellant or occasionally in explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Strychnine: Strychnine is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfur Dioxide: Sulfur Dioxide is a chemical used mainly as a disinfectant, food preservative, fumigant, antioxidant and in the manufacture of some cements. It is also found as an air pollutant associated with smelters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thioglycolic Acid: Thioglycolic Acid is a chemical used mainly in leather processing and in the production of hair straightening solutions, hair removal products, polyvinyl chloride, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and in metal detection reactions. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in adhesives, lacquer, fire retardants and house cleaning solvents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- m-Anisidine: o-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- o-Anisidine: o-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- p-Anisidine: p-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Chest blueness: A blue discolouration on the chest
  • Chin blueness: A blue discolouration on the chin
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Choking: Sensation of blockage or inability to breathe.
  • Cholesterol pneumonia: Lung inflammation caused by cholesterol.
  • Chromosome 22, trisomy: A very rare disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 22 in all the body cells. The condition is usually fatal soon after birth or during the fetal stage.
  • Chromosome 22q11 Deletion Spectrum: A rare chromosomal disorder where a small piece of genetic material is missing from chromosome 22 at the q11 location.
  • Chronic Bronchitis: A condition which is characterized by the chronic inflammation of ones or more of the bronchi
  • Chronic berylliosis: A condition that results from long term exposure to beryllium in the form of dust or fumes. The lungs, skin eyes or blood may be affected.
  • Chronic bronchitis: A condition which is characterized by the chronic inflammation of ones or more of the bronchi
  • Chronic lower respiratory diseases: General term for various chronic respiratory diseases including COPD, emphysema and chronic bronchitis
  • Chronic pneumonitis of infancy: A rare form of interstitial lung disease that occurs in infants. Death is common even if treatment is delivered.
  • Chronic respiratory conditions: Chronic disorders of the respiratory (breathing) systems, such as COPD, emphysema, and others.
  • Circulation symptoms: Symptoms affecting the circulatory system
  • Circulatory disorder: Disease affecting circulation of blood
  • Circulatory system conditions: Medical conditions affecting the heart and the circulatory system.
  • Cirrhosis of liver: diffuse hepatic process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis: An often asymptomatic chronic lung disease caused by inhaling coal tust which then deposits in the lungs. Also called black lung disease, anthracosis or miner's pneumoconiosis.
  • Codeine overdose: Codeine is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Comly syndrome: High blood levels of methemoglobin due to drinking water from wells which have a high nitrate concentration. It is most often seen in babies who have their formula made up using well water. The disorder may also occur in infants who are fed high nitrat food such as eggplant, spinach, beets and green beans. Infants who are less than three months old lack sufficient enzymes to prevent the problem.
  • Congenital arteriovenous shunt: A rare birth defect involving the abnormal passage of blood between arteries and veins. The range and severity of symptoms is determined by the number, size and location of the arteries and veins involved.
  • Congenital cardiovascular malformations: The abnormal development of heart blood vessels. Specific examples of this condition includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome, coarctation and tricuspid atresia.
  • Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: A rare condition where an infant is born with an opening in the diaphragm which allows some of the abdominal organs to move into the chest cavity and cause problems.
  • Congenital heart defects: Heart defects that a baby is born with.
  • Congenital heart disease: Diseases of the heart that one is born with
  • Congenital heart septum defect: A heart defect involving the septum which is present at birth. The defect is a hole in the wall of the heart that separates the right and left chambers and allows blood to flow through the hole. An atrial septal defect is a hole between the two upper heart chambers and a ventricular septal defect is a hole between the two lower heart chambers. Symptoms are determined by the size and exact location of the defect.
  • Congenital mitral malformation: Malformations of the mitral valve that are present at birth. The mitral valve allows blood to flow between the two chambers on the left side of the heart. Types of mitral malformation are atresia (absent mitral valve), stenosis (narrowed mitral valve) and parachute mitral valve.
  • Congenital tracheal stenosis: A rare birth defect where a portion of the trachea is narrowed due to the cartilage rings that make up the trachea forming a complete or almost complete ring.
  • Conotruncal heart malformations: A rare group of heart defect involving the outflow tracts. Examples include truncus arteriosus, transposition of great arteries and tetralogy of Fallot. Obviously the symptoms will be determined by which specific defect is involved.
  • Convulsions, benign familial infantile, 1: An inherited form of seizures that occurs in infancy and early childhood. Symptoms only occur during the seizures. The seizures tend to occur in clusters.
  • Convulsions, benign familial infantile, 3: An inherited form of seizures that occurs in infancy and early childhood. Symptoms only occur during the seizures. The seizures tend to occur in clusters. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q23-q24.3.
  • Convulsions, benign familial infantile, 4: An inherited form of seizures that occurs in infancy and early childhood. Symptoms only occur during the seizures. The seizures tend to occur in clusters. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p36.12-p35.1.
  • Cor Triatriatum: A rare congenital malformation where the heart has three atria instead of the normal two due to the presence of a separating membrane.
  • Cor biloculare: A rare birth defect where the heart has two chambers instead of the normal four. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being asymptomatic during infancy and survival has occurred for several decades in some cases. The defect rarely occurs on its own and is usually associated with various other malformations such as inverted abdominal organ positions.
  • Coral snake poisoning: The Coral snake is a usually brightly colored, poisonous snake found mainly in America and Africa. The toxicity amongst species is variable. They are considered a shy snake and bites are usually the result of deliberate handling. Coral snakes have to bite for long enough to release the toxin through the fangs so envenomation tends to be rarer than for other snakes who can strike and envenomate rapidly. The snake venom contains toxins which mainly affect the nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Coronary arteries -- congenital malformation: Abnormal coronary arteries present at birth. The coronary artery may be misplaced or deformed and the severity of the defect will determine the type and seriousness of symptoms. Some malformations produce no clinical symptoms whereas others are life-threatening without prompt treatment.
  • Croup: A condition characterized by an acute partial obstruction of the upper airway on young children
  • Cutis Marmorata Telangiectatica Congenita: A rare birth disorder where dilated blood vessels on the skin's surface caused discolored patches of skin that has a marbled appearance.
  • Cyanosis: Blueness or purple coloring of skin.
  • Cyanosis in children: Cyanosis in children refers to a bluish color of the skin, lips, and/or nails of a child due to a lack of oxygen in the tissues.
  • Cyanosis in infant: Cyanosis in infant refers to a bluish color of the skin, lips, and/or nails in an infant due to a lack of oxygen in the tissues.
  • Cyanotic skin: bluish discoloration of the skin or mucous membranes caused by lack of oxygen in the blood
  • Dark skin: Darkening of the skin as a symptom
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Decreased oxygen saturation: decreased amount of oxygen that is dissolved or carried in a given medium
  • Deletion 22q11: A rare chromosomal disorder where a small piece of genetic material is missing from chromosome 22 at the q11 location.
  • Demerol overdose: Demerol is a prescription drug used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Diaphragmatic hernia, congenital: A birth defect involving an abnormal opening in the diaphragm which is a structure that assists breathing and keeps the abdominal organs from moving into the chest. The abdominal organs can protrude through this abnormal opening and restrict the growth of chest organs such as the lung and heart. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the size of the defect - some cases aren't diagnosed until adulthood.
  • Diaphragmatic paralysis: Diaphragmatic paralysis occurs when the muscles associated with breathing become do weak to function properly. Breathing becomes difficulty and severe cases can result in death if breathing assistance is not delivered. The condition can result from such things as motor neuron disease, trauma and myopathy.
  • Dilaudid overdose: Dilaudid is a prescription drug used mainly to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Diphosphoglycerate mutase deficiency of erythrocyte: A rare inherited condition where a deficiency of an erythrocyte enzyme diphosphoglycerate mutase in red blood cells impairs the ability of red blood cells to deliver oxygen to body tissues that need it. In response, the body produces more red blood cells to assist oxygen delivery.
  • Double outlet -- right ventricle II: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. In the type II the hole is located in the infracristal area and there is no narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Double outlet -- right ventricle IV: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. In the type VI the hole is located just below the aorta and there is a narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Double outlet right ventricle: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the location of the connecting hole in the heart and the exact location of the two arteries with respect to the heart.
  • Dressler (D.)syndrome: A rare autoimmune blood disorder where erythrocytes are destroyed suddenly after exposure to cold (usually 15°C or lower).
  • Drowning: Accidental loss of life due to water.
  • Drug overdose: A condition characterized by the consumption in excess of a particular drug causing adverse effects
  • Ductus arteriosus, patent reversed flow: A rare birth defect. During the fetal stage, a connecting tube (ductus arteriosus) joins the pulmonary artery and aorta and hence prevents blood from flowing past the fluid filled lungs. After birth, the tube normally closes off so that the blood can be sent to the lungs to be oxygenated. Patent ductus arteriosus is where the connecting tube fails to close and hence the blood can't be oxygenated properly. In the patent reversed flow form of the condition, blood flow is reversed between the pulmonary and aorta opening and results in a reduced pulmonary flow.
  • Duodenal atresia tetralogy of Fallot: A rare birth defect characterized by a heart defect and an intestinal malformation where the duodenum is absent or closed off which prevents digested material passing through.
  • Ear blueness: A blue discolouration on the ear
  • Ebstein's anomaly: A heart defect where the tricuspid valve is malformed
  • Ectopic pregnancy: The occurrence of a pregnancy outside that of the uterus
  • Eisenmenger Syndrome: Increased lung blood pressure that can result from conditions such as a hole in the wall between the two heart chambers.
  • Elbow blueness: A blue discolouration on the elbow
  • Emphysema: Emphysema is a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is defined as an abnormal, permanent enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles accompanied by destruction of their walls and without obvious fibrosis.
  • Emphysema, congenital lobar: A rare respiratory disorder where air can readily enter the lungs but has difficulty escaping. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Epiglotitis: Inflamation of the epiglottis in the throat
  • Erythromelalgia: A rare disorder characterized by periods of burning pain, redness and warmth in the feet and hands.
  • Esophageal Atresia and/or Tracheoesophageal Fistula: A rare condition characterized by an underdeveloped esophagus where the esophagus is not connected to the stomach. An abnormal opening between the trachea and esophagus may or may not also be present. The two abnormalities usually occur together.
  • Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare condition characterized by an abnormal opening between the trachea and esophagus as well as an underdeveloped esophagus where the esophagus is not connected to the stomach.
  • Ethylmalonic aciduria: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by neurological and vascular symptoms caused by an excessive buildup of ethylmalonic aciduria.
  • Eucalyptus Oil poisoning: Eucalyptus oil can be used for medicinal purposes but excessive ingestion can cause problems. Likewise, eating the leaves of the eucalyptus plant (very unlikely) can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Eye blueness: A blue discolouration of the eye
  • Eyelid blueness: A blue discolouration of the eyelid
  • Facial blueness: A blue discolouration on the face
  • Fallot syndrome: A congenital heart disorder consisting of four heart defects - hole between the ventricles (ventricular septal defect), obstruction from right ventricles to the lungs (subpulmonary stenosis), overriding aorta and thickened right ventricle muscle.
  • Familial emphysema: A rare genetic form of emphysema caused by a deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) which results in destruction of the elastin component of the lung structure. The disorder tends to run in families (familial).
  • Familial interstitial fibrosis: A rare familial disorder involving fibrosis and scarring of the lung tissue which causes the lung to become stiff and unable to function normally.
  • Farmer's lung: A condition that affects farmers who are exposed to mouldy hay or crops. The lungs become inflamed due to a hypersensitivity reaction to the exposure.
  • Fibrosing alveolitis: A condition characterized by abnormalities in the fibrous tissues between lung alveoli which results in inflammation.
  • Finger blueness: A blue discolouration on the finger or fingers
  • Fingernail blueness: A blue discolouration of the fingernail
  • Gradual onset of cyanosis: Gradual onset of cyanosis is the slow development of a bluish discoloration of the skin, nails, or lips or mucus membranes due to a lack of oxygen in the tissues.
  • Grand mal epilepsy: A condition characterize by sudden loss of consciousness with tonic-clonic seizures
  • Grand mal seizures: A condition which is characterized by the sudden onset of generalized muscle spasms and loss of consciousness
  • HMG-CoA lyase deficiency: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme impairs the processing of amino acids in food to create energy and causes various symptoms. Stresses on the body such as infection, fasting and heavy exercise can trigger an episode.
  • Hamman-Rich syndrome: A rare acute lung disease where the lung sufferers progressive inflammation and fibrosis which often leads to death.
  • Heart attack: An acute myocardial infarction
  • Heart failure: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently and effectively
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Hemangiomatosis, familial pulmonary capillary: A rare condition involving the excessive proliferation of lung capillaries which results in pulmonary hypertension.
  • Heroin overdose: Heroin is an illegal and highly addictive recreational drug. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Herring poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some herrings contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the herring does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The herrings are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Hydrocodone overdose: Hydrocodone is a prescription drug used mainly to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Hyperekplexia and epilepsy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by progressively severe epilepsy and hyperekplexia. The condition is caused by a defect on chromosome Xq22.1.
  • Hypoxia: This is where there is a reduction of oxygen supply to parts of the body below what is required for adequate perfusion
  • Iatrogenic pneumothorax: A pneumothorax that is caused by the actions of a physician or surgeon
  • Idiopathic diffuse interstitial fibrosis: A rare lung disease involving progressive inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) of deep lung tissue which can cause shortness of breath. In idiopathic forms of the condition, there is no apparent cause.
  • Idiopathic pulmonary hypertension: A rare condition where sclerosis of the pulmonary arteries cause cyanosis, polycythemia and heart failure.
  • Idiopathic subglottic tracheal stenosis: Narrowing of the portion of the trachea below the glottis (voice box) that occurs for no apparent reason.
  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Reduced blood platelets causing visible skin blemishes from bleeding or bruising.
  • Infantile apnea: A disorder where infants stop breathing temporarily.
  • Insect sting allergies: When a person has an allergic reaction at the site of an insect sting
  • Intermittent cyanosis: Intermittent cyanosis is a condition that occurs on and off, in which a person's skin, lips, nails or mucus membranes appear bluish due to a lack of oxygen.
  • Iron poisoning: Excessive ingestion of iron - often occurs when children ingest adult iron tablets.
  • Isaacs syndrome: A rare disorder where muscles suffer from stiffness and cramping, particularly limb muscles.
  • Ischemic heart disease: Heart disease from reduced blood flow to the heart
  • Ivemark Syndrome: A rare progressive disorder characterized by absence or abnormal development of the spleen and malformations of the heart vessels.
  • Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by congenital deafness and a long Q-T interval which is where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge after a heartbeat.
  • Kaposi's Sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Kersting-Hellwig syndrome: A rare disorder involving the development of a skin nodule which is often painful.
  • Knee blueness: A blue discolouration on the knee
  • Kugel-Stoloff syndrome: A rare form of heart disease that occurs in children and involves fibrosis and thickening of the heart muscle which affects it's ability to function. The cause is unknown.
  • Lantana poisoning: Lantana is a small flowering shrub with spiny stems. It bears small clusters of colorful flowers on a stalk and small green fruit which become dark when ripe. The plant contains a chemical called triterpene which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. Death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten as the chemical is quite toxic. The green berries are considered the most toxic part of the plant but the leaves are also poisonous but less likely to be eaten. Skin irritation can also result from skin contact with the plant.
  • Laryngeal cleft: A rare birth defect where there is an abnormal opening between the larynx and esophagus which allows food to get into the airways and even the lungs. The severity of the condition is determined by the size of the opening.
  • Laryngeal oedema:
  • Larynx obstruction: Usually causes difficulty in breathing and speech production.
  • Left heart failure: Failure of the left side of the heart
  • Leg blueness: A blue discolouration on the leg
  • Legionella adelaidensis infection: Legionella adelaidensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella anisa infection: Legionella anisa is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella beliardensis infection: Legionella beliardensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella birminghamensis infection: Legionella birminghamensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bozemanii infection: Legionella bozemanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bruneiensis infection: Legionella bruneiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella brunensis infection: Legionella brunensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella busanensis infection: Legionella busanensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cherrii infection: Legionella cherrii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cincinnatiensis infection: Legionella cincinnatiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonii infection: Legionella donaldsonii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonil infection: Legionella donaldsonil is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drancourtii infection: Legionella drancourtii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drozanskii infection: Legionella drozanskii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella dumofii infection: Legionella dumofii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella erythra infection: Legionella erythra is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fairfieldensis infection: Legionella fairfieldensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fallonii infection: Legionella falloni is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feelei infection: Legionella feelei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feeleii infection: Legionella feeleii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gesstiana infection: Legionella gesstiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gormanii infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gratiana infection: Legionella gratiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gresilensis infection: Legionella gresilensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella hackeliae infection: Legionella hackeliae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella impletisoli infection: Legionella impletisoli is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella isrealensis infection: Legionella isrealensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jamestowniensis infection: Legionella jamestowniensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jordanis infection: Legionella jordanis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lansingensis infection: Legionella lansingensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella londinensis infection: Legionella londinensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella longbeachae infection: Legionella longbeachae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment, especially potting mixes and compost. Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lytica infection: Legionella lytica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachemii infection: Legionella maceachemii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachernii infection: Legionella maceachernii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella micdadei infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella monrovica infection: Legionella monrovica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella moravica infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella nautarum infection: Legionella nautarum is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella oakridgensis infection: Legionella oakridgensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella parisiensis infection: Legionella parisiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quateirensis infection: Legionella quateirensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quinlivanii infection: Legionella quinlivanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rowbothamii infection: Legionella rowbothamii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rubrilucens infection: Legionella rubrilucens is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella sainthelensi infection: Legionella sainthelensi is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella santicrucis infection: Legionella santicrucis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella shakespearei infection: Legionella shakespearei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella spiritensis infection: Legionella spiritensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella steigerwaltii infection: Legionella steigerwaltii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tauriensis infection: Legionella tauriensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tusconensis infection: Legionella tucsonensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsorthii infection: Legionella wadsorthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsworthii infection: Legionella wadsworthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella waltersii infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella worsliensis infection: Legionella worsliensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella yabuuchiae infection: Legionella yabuuchiae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Lethal chondrodysplasia, Moerman type: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal bone development.
  • Levotransposition of the great arteries: A very rare heart defect where the aorta originates from the right heart ventricle and the pulmonary artery from the left ventricle. The aorta is located in front of and to the left of the pulmonary artery. This means that oxygen-poor blood that has returned from the body is pumped into the right side of the heart and then out through the aorta and back to the body. The oxygenated blood from the lungs is sent to the left side of the heart, through the pulmonary artery and back to the lungs. Thus, the body is deprived of oxygenated blood unless. Often there is an associated heart defect such as a hole between the chambers which allows some mixing of the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood but surgery is usually urgently required. Without treatment, half of the patients with this defect will die within months of birth and nearly all will die within a year.
  • Lichen planus: Skin rash
  • Limb transversal defect -- cardiac anomaly: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart anomaly and leg and hand malformations involving missing bones.
  • Lissencephaly: A very rare disorder characterized by abnormal brain formation so that the brain surface appears smooth rather than convoluted.
  • Lortab overdose: Lortab is a prescription drug used to treat. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Lung cancer: Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. Most lung tumors are malignant.
  • Lung conditions: Various conditions affecting the lungs or related airways.
  • Lung symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both lungs.
  • Lymphangiomatosis, pulmonary: A rare disorder characterized by the presence of numerous small lung cysts at birth which severely affects breathing and blood pressure and generally results in infant death.
  • Marie-Bamberg syndrome: A rare condition characterized by clubbing of fingers and toes, excessive sweating and development of fibrous tissue around the ends of bones. The condition is a form of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy that occurs secondary to other conditions such as cardiopulmonary disease and certain cancers.
  • Meadows syndrome: A rare condition that affects pregnant women during the last trimester or within two months after birth. It is characterized by breathing difficult, chest pain, congestive heart failure, heart rhythm abnormalities, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal symptoms and embolisms.
  • Meconium aspiration syndrome: A condition that occurs when an infant suffers respiratory distress following birth due to the presence of meconium in the amniotic fluid.
  • Melioidosis: Bacterial infection from soil or water.
  • Mendelson syndrome: Symptoms caused by breathing in gastric juices stomach contents during general anesthesia. Severe cases can lead to shock and death but this is rare. The condition is believed to be caused by the absence of laryngeal reflexes. It is most often seen in pregnant women.
  • Methadone overdose: Methadone is a prescription drug mainly used as a painkiller and to treat heroin addiction. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Methaemoglobinaemia: The presence of methaemoglin in the a persons blood
  • Methaemoglobinemia: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of methemoglobin in the blood
  • Methahemoglobinemia: Excess methahemoglobin in the blood
  • Methemoglobinemia, beta-globin type: An inherited blood disorder where oxygen transport by the blood is impaired by the presence of defective hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is the part of the red blood cell that carries the oxygen.
  • Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type 1: A form of dwarfism associated with brain and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Microphthalmia syndromic, type 9: A rare inherited disorder characterized by small or absent eyes and lung, heart and diaphragmatic abnormalities. The disorder is caused by a defect on the STRA6 gene.
  • Mitral atresia: A rare defect where the mitral valve is closed off. The mitral valve connects the two chambers on the left side of the heart (atrium and ventricle). The blood is therefore unable to flow between the two heart chambers.
  • Morphine overdose: Morphine is a highly addictive drug used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Mountain sickness: Symptoms caused by rapid ascent to a higher altitude as a result of a reduction in available oxygen. May occur in mountain climbers or those traveling in unpressurized planes. Symptoms may include dizziness, nausea, weakness, fatigue, insomnia, headache, irritability, breathlessness and euphoria. The elderly or those suffering from pulmonary or cardiac disorders may suffer pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or prostration. Also called acute altitude sickness.
  • Mucus membrane symptoms: Symptoms affecting the mucus membranes.
  • Mycosis fungoides: Mycosis fungoides is a rare form of T-cell lymphoma of the skin. The disease is typically slowly progressive and chronic.
  • Mycosis fungoides, familial: A rare form of lymphatic cancer (T-cell lymphoma) that primarily affects the skin and tends to occur with higher than normal frequency within a family. The skin is affected first, then the lymph nodes become inflamed and usually cancerous. The cancer can then spread to organs such as the liver, lungs and bone marrow. Survival depends on how early treatment starts. Patients diagnosed in the early stages can survive more than 12 years whereas once the cancer has spread to other organs, death usually occurs within three years.
  • Necrotizing fasciitis: A severe, progressive skin infection which causes progressive destruction of skin and underlying tissue. It is caused by certain bacteria and has a high mortality rate.
  • Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Lung disease mostly in premature newborns; see also adult RDS.
  • Neonatal sepsis: Bacterial blood infection in an infant under 3 months of age.
  • Neuromyotonia: A condition which is characterized by myotonia caused by electrical activity of the peripheral nerve
  • Nipple Blueness: Blue discoloration of the nipple
  • Noncardiogenic pulmonary oedema: Noncardiogenic pulmonary oedema refers to fluid on the lungs causes by a change in permeability of lung tissue from a direct or indirect insult in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Nose Blueness: Blue discolouration of the nose.
  • Nosocomial pneumonia: A form of pneumonia which is contracted in a hospital
  • Organophosphate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of organophosphate insecticides. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the exact poison ingested and the quantity.
  • Osler-Vaquez disease: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased red blood cell count.
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta: Weak bones ("brittle bone disease") and loose joints
  • Paleness: Whitening or pallor of the skin
  • Partial atrioventricular canal: A type of congenital heart defect involving and abnormal opening between the heart chambers and defective valves that control blood flow in the heart. The partial form of the condition involves only the two upper heart chambers. Symptoms are determined by the severity of the defect. Often symptoms do not become apparent until later in life.
  • Patent foramen ovale: A normal variant, where the foramen ovale (connection between the two upper chambers of the heart) fails to close after birth.
  • Peach seed poisoning: Peach seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the peach plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves.
  • Penetrating chest wound: A wound occurring in the chest caused by an object penetrating through the skin and into the chest cavity
  • Penetrating chest wounds: Multiple wounds in the chest caused by an object penetrating through the skin and into the chest cavity
  • Perniosis: A blood vessel disorder where exposure to cord damp weather results in skin lesions on the extremities.
  • Pickwickian syndrome: A syndrome characterized by obesity, somnolence, hypoventilation and erythrocytosis
  • Pierre Robin's sequence: A rare genetic disorder characterized by an underdeveloped jaw, cleft soft palate and abnormal tongue location.
  • Plant poisoning -- Amygdalin: Amygdalin is a chemical found naturally in various plants e.g. stone fruit kernels and raw almonds. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the amygdalin is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death. Amygdalin is believed by some to inhibit cancers but there has been no conclusive proof of this.
  • Plant poisoning -- Cyanogenic glycoside: Cyanogenic glycoside is a toxin found naturally in various plants e.g. cherries, plums, almonds, peaches, apricots, apples and cassava. The chemical is usually concentrated in the seeds, kernels or wilted leaves. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the cyanogenic glycoside is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Even chewing the leaves can result in conversion to cyanide due to the presence of digestive enzymes in the mouth. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Plant poisoning -- Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical metabolized by the human digestive system from a naturally occurring chemical called arbutin found in the leaves of plants such as blueberries, cranberries, bearberries and red whortleberries. The main symptoms are irritation of the gastrointestinal mucosa but severe poisoning can cause systemic symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning -- Lantadene: Lantadene is a toxin found naturally in a plant called lantana camara. The chemical is toxic to the liver and can cause various symptoms if ingested. The green fruit and leaves are the most toxic parts of the plant.
  • Pneumoconiosis: A group of lung diseases caused by inhaling dust.
  • Pneumonia: Lung infection or inflammation (as a symptom)
  • Pneumonia caused by serotype O11 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by an opportunistic pathogen called Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.
  • Pneumonia, Aspiration: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by breathing in liquids and solids (usually the stomach contents).
  • Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by bacteria.
  • Pneumonia, Staphylococcal: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by the Staphylococcal bacteria. The condition is not common and often occurs as a complication of influenza or other viral respiratory infections. This form of pneumonia is considered serious and up to a third of cases can result in death.
  • Pneumothorax: pneumothorax is the collection of air in the space around the lungs and chest wall
  • Polycythemia rubra: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased production of red blood cells by the bone marrow. The production of platelets and white blood cells may also be increased.
  • Primary pulmonary hypertension: Primary pulmonary hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the arteries that carry blood to the lungs for no apparent reason. Blood pressure in other parts of the body is normal or sometimes even low.
  • Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1: A rare condition characterized by electrolyte disorders caused by the kidney's inability to respond to aldosterone. Type 1 is differentiated from type II in that it involves sodium wasting.
  • Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1, autosomal dominant: A rare condition characterized by electrolyte disorders caused by the kidney's inability to respond to mineralocorticoids. Type 1 is differentiated from type II in that it involves sodium wasting. There are two forms of type 1: an autosomal recessive form which tends to be more severe than the autosomal dominant form. The recessive form tends to persist into adulthood whereas the dominant form is milder and symptoms tend to improve with age.
  • Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1, autosomal recessive: A rare condition characterized by electrolyte disorders caused by the kidney's inability to respond to mineralocorticoids. Type 1 is differentiated from type II in that it involves sodium wasting. There are two forms of type 1: an autosomal recessive form which tends to be more severe than the autosomal dominant form. The recessive form tends to persist into adulthood whereas the dominant form is milder and symptoms tend to improve with age.
  • Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis: An abnormal condition where phospholipids and proteins are deposited in the alveoli of the lung. More prevalent in males with some patients having no symptoms and others having an unproductive cough and progressive dyspnea with exertion. The condition increases the risk of secondary infection. Also called alveolar proteinosis.
  • Pulmonary arterio-veinous aneurysm: A very rare disorder where there is an abnormal opening between a pulmonary artery and vein which can affect blood oxygenation.
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula: A rare genetic defect where one or more the arteries and veins in the lung are connected via an abnormal opening or fistula which affects the oxygenation level of body tissues.
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation: A rare malformation where there is an abnormal opening between a lung artery and a lung vein which causes some blood to pass through the lungs without being oxygenated.
  • Pulmonary artery coming from the aorta: A rare congenital heart defect which is usually fatal. The pulmonary artery is abnormally placed and comes out of the aorta.
  • Pulmonary atresia -- intact ventricular septum: A very rare heart defect where the opening that allows blood to travel from the heart to the lung is narrowed or absent which impairs the body's ability to oxygenate blood. Death generally occurs without immediate medical attention.
  • Pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect: A congenital heart defect where the pulmonary artery is closed off so that blood is unable to flow out to the lungs via the pulmonary artery. An abnormal opening between the two sides of the heart also allow blood to flow between the two heart chambers. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of abnormality. Symptoms may be evident at birth or later.
  • Pulmonary cystic lymphangiectasis: A rare congenital condition where the lungs fail to develop normally. The disorder is characterized by the presence of dilated lymph ducts throughout the lungs.
  • Pulmonary edema: A condition which is characterized by engorgement of the pulmonary vessels and transudation of fluid into the alveoli
  • Pulmonary edema of mountaineers: A severe complication of mountain sickness resulting from a lack of oxygen at high altitudes.
  • Pulmonary embolism: The occurrence of an embolism which blocks blood vessels in the lungs
  • Pulmonary infections related to AIDS: It usually occurs due to decreased immunity.
  • Pulmonary lymphangiectasia, congenital: A rare congenital condition where the lungs fail to develop normally. The disorder is characterized by the presence of dilated lymph ducts throughout the lungs.
  • Pulmonary valve stenosis: Often a congenital defect but may be caused by such things as rheumatic fever or bacterial endocarditis. Severity depends on the degree of narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Pulmonary venous return anomaly: A rare disorder where one or more of the four veins that carry oxygenated blood from the lungs drain to the right atrium of the heart instead of the left atrium. Symptom severity is determined by the number of veins involved and the exact location of the heart that the veins drain into.
  • Purple skin: Purple or blue-purple coloring of the skin.
  • Raynaud's disease: It is a reversible ischemia of the peripheral arterioles. It is a painful sensation affecting the fingers and toes associated with whitening or redness
  • Raynaud's phenomenon: A condition where the body extremities sweat and turn blue and cold. Exposure to cold, emotional stress and smoking may trigger the condition. Also known as acrocyanosis.
  • Redness: Reddening of the skin.
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: A condition characterized by pain and reduced range of motion in the shoulder and hand of the affected arm.
  • Respiratory acidosis: respiratory acidosis is acidosis (abnormally increased acidity of the blood) due to decreased ventilation of the pulmonary alveoli, leading to elevated arterial carbon dioxide concentration
  • Respiratory arrest: A term used to indicate cessation of breathing.
  • Respiratory depression: Also known as bradyapnea is the decreased rate of breathing.
  • Respiratory distress syndrome, infant: A respiratory disorder caused by deficiency of pulmonary surfactant in premature infants which prevents normal lung functioning.
  • Respiratory failure: A condition which is due to marked impairment of respiratory function
  • Respiratory muscle paralysis: paralysis of the respiratory muscle especially the diaphragm
  • Respiratory paralysis: Respiratory paralysis occurs when the muscles associated with breathing become do weak to function properly. Breathing becomes difficulty and severe cases can result in death if breathing assistance is not delivered. The condition can result from such things as motor neuron disease, trauma and myopathy.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Right ventricle hypoplasia: An underdeveloped right heart ventricle which is smaller than normal and is thus less able to pump blood efficiently to the lungs. The age at which the symptoms become apparent varies depending on the severity of the defect.
  • Sakati syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Sardine poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some sardines contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the sardines does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The sardines are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Sea snake poisoning: The Sea snake is a poisonous snake found in the warmer western parts of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Sea snakes have scales but not gills or fins so they still need to go to the surface of the water to breathe. Sea snake venom is particularly poisonous but their bite fails to achieve any significant envenomation. The venom is toxic to the nervous system and muscles.
  • Sepsis: The presence of microorganisms in the blood circulation
  • Shaken Baby Syndrome: A condition caused by violent shaking of a baby.
  • Shallow breathing: Small breathes (usually with rapid breathing)
  • Shaver's disease: A progressive lung disorder caused by exposure to aluminium oxide which is present in bauxite fumes. The condition involves inflammation and damage to the air sacs in the lungs.
  • Shock: Physical and mental reaction to reduced circulation
  • Short stature webbed neck heart disease: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart disease, short stature and a webbed neck.
  • Shprintzen syndorme: An inherited syndrome of cardiac defects and craniofacial anomalies and various other abnormalities.
  • Silicosiderosis: A lung disorder caused by breathing in dust containing iron and silica.
  • Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust.
  • Skin color changes: Skin changes such as redness, blueness, or whitening.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Slickhead poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some slickhead contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the slickhead does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The slickhead are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Sneddon Syndrome: A rare progressive inherited disorder involving the blood vessel disease and neurological symptoms.
  • Spontaneous pneumothorax, familial type: A rare inherited disorder which causes the lungs to collapse spontaneously.
  • Streptococcal Group B invasive disease: Infection with bacteria called Group B Streptococcus which can cause severe symptoms or even death. The bacteria occur in the stomach and the urogenital tract of females and are normally harmless and cause no symptoms. However, it can cause a range of diseases in newborns, the elderly and people with poor immune systems.
  • Stridor: Noisy breathing such as wheezing
  • Subpulmonary stenosis: A narrowing in the artery that allows blood to flow from the right heart ventricle to the lungs in order to be oxygenated. Severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of narrowing.
  • Sudden infant death syndrome: The sudden death of an infant due to an unknown cause that occurs during sleep
  • Suffocation: The death of an individual due to a lack of oxygen
  • Sulphaemoglobinaemia: The presence of sulphaemoglobinaemia in excessive amounts in the blood plasma
  • Superior vena cava syndrome: A condition caused by compression or obstruction to the normal circulation of the superior vena cava which carries deoxygenated blood from the body tissues back to the heart.
  • Surfactant Metabolism Dysfunction: Surfactant metabolism dysfunction is a group of genetic conditions characterized by servere breathing problems or breathing failure in infants who were born at full term. A genetic defect results in a disruption of the lipids and proteins which reduced the surface tension in the lung alveoli and allows transfer of oxgent between the lungs and the blood supply.
  • Surfactant Metabolism Dysfunction, Pulmonary, 1: Surfactant metabolism dysfunction is a group of genetic conditions characterized by severe breathing problems or breathing failure in infants who were born at full term. A genetic defect results in a disruption of the lipids and proteins which reduced the surface tension in the lung alveoli and allows transfer of oxgen between the lungs and the blood supply. Type 1 involves a defect in the pulmonary associated surfactant protein B (SFTPB) and due to a genetic anomaly located on chromosome 2p12-11.2.
  • Surfactant Metabolism Dysfunction, Pulmonary, 2: Surfactant metabolism dysfunction is a group of genetic conditions characterized by severe breathing problems or breathing failure in infants who were born at full term. A genetic defect results in a disruption of the lipids and proteins which reduced the surface tension in the lung alveoli and allows transfer of oxygen between the lungs and the blood supply. Type 2 involves a defect in the pulmonary associated surfactant protein C (SFTPC) and due to a genetic anomaly located on chromosome 8p21.
  • Surfactant Metabolism Dysfunction, Pulmonary, 3: Surfactant metabolism dysfunction is a group of genetic conditions characterized by severe breathing problems or breathing failure in infants who were born at full term. A genetic defect results in a disruption of the lipids and proteins which reduced the surface tension in the lung alveoli and allows transfer of oxgen between the lungs and the blood supply. Type 3 involves a defect on chromosome 16p13.3 which is believed to affect the secretion of surfactant.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Tarpon poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some tarpon contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the tarpon does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The tarpon are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Taussig Bing syndrome: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. In the type III the hole is located just below the pulmonary artery.
  • Tetralogy of Fallot: A condition which is characterized pulmonary stenosis, interventricular septal defect, right ventricular hypertrophy and dextroposition of the aorta
  • Tonic seizure: Abnormal electrical activity in a part of the brain which results mainly in muscle stiffness and rigidity. Tonic seizures are considered relatively uncommon. They can occur at any age but are more common in childhood. Patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or multiple sclerosis are particularly susceptible to this type of seizure. Episodes usually only last for a matter of minutes and recovery can vary from minutes to hours.
  • Tonic-clonic seizure: formerly known as grand mal seizures. It involves the entire body causing muscle contraction and loss of consciousness
  • Tracheal agenesis without tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare condition characterized by an underdeveloped or absent trachea. There is no associated opening connecting the trachea to the esophagus. The condition is incompatible with life. There are three subtypes of the disorder depending on the specific tracheal defect.
  • Tracheal stenosis syndrome: A rare birth condition where a portion of the trachea is narrowed due to the cartilage rings that make up the trachea forming a complete or almost complete ring. The condition is associated with various other abnormalities.
  • Tracheoesophageal fistula without esophageal atresia: An inherited or acquired abnormal opening between the trachea and esophagus.
  • Transposition of great arteries: A congenital malformation where the aorta and pulmonary artery are transposed which causes oxygenated blood from the lungs to be sent back to the lungs and de-oxygenated blood to be sent to body tissues. Often there is some other defect such as an opening in the heart chambers which allows mixing of the blood and hence survival is possible for a short while at least.
  • Tricuspid atresia: A rare congenital malformation where the tricuspid valve is absent and hence the right atrium is not connected to the right ventricle
  • Truncus Arteriosus: A rare congenital heart vessel abnormality where the heart has only one artery coming out of it which forms the aorta and pulmonary artery and delivers blood to the body and the lungs. Normally the blood flow to the body and the lungs is carried out through separate blood vessels.
  • Twisted atrioventricular connections: A rare congenital heart defect where the heart appears to be twisted along its longitudinal axis so that the left atrium and the right ventricle are closer to each other than normal as is the right atrium and the left ventricle. Despite this anomaly, most hearts are still able to function normally depending on the severity of the anomaly. However, most cases have other associated heart defects which can affect heart function.
  • Type 1 Tracheal agenesis without tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare condition characterized by an underdeveloped or absent trachea. Type 1 is distinguished by a fibrous cord replacing the trachea making breathing impossible. There is no associated opening connecting the trachea to the esophagus. The condition is incompatible with life.
  • Type 2 Tracheal agenesis without tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare condition characterized by an underdeveloped or absent trachea. Type 2 is distinguished by a complete absence of the trachea but the main bronchi join at the carina in the middle. There is no associated opening connecting the trachea to the esophagus. The condition is incompatible with life as breathing is impossible.
  • Type 3 Tracheal agenesis without tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare condition characterized by an underdeveloped or absent trachea. Type 3 is distinguished by a complete absence of the trachea and the main bronchi don't join at the carina in the middle but run separately to the esohagus. There is no associated opening connecting the trachea to the esophagus. The condition is incompatible with life as breathing is impossible.
  • Unilateral pulmonary agenesis: A very rare birth defect where one side of the lung is incompletely developed or totally absent. The symptoms and severity of the condition is variable and other malformation are often associated with the condition.
  • VLCAD deficiency: A rare condition that is characterised by cardiomyopathy, fatty liver, skeletal myopathy, pericardial effusions, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death
  • Vaquez disease: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased red blood cell count.
  • Vascular malposition: A condition which is characterised by malposition of the great vessels
  • Vein of Galen aneurysm: A rare condition which is characterised by an aneurysm resulting from a intracranial vascular malformation
  • Velocardiofacial syndrome: A genetic disorder which can present with a wide range of phenotypic manifestations which has lead to a number of different names being assigned to the various presentations e.g. DiGeorge Syndrome and Cayler Anomaly Face Syndrome. There are nearly 200 different symptoms that can occur and the severity of the condition is also highly variable depending on the nature and severity of the symptoms that are present.
  • Ventricular septal defect: An abnormal connection between the 2 lower chambers (ventricles) of the heart.
  • Ventriculo-arterial discordance, isolated: A rare birth disorder where the right atrium is connected to the left ventricle and vice versa. The position of the heart ventricles is also inverted which allows normal blood oxygenation. Symptoms generally only occur later in life or if other heart defects are present which is usually the case.
  • Vicodin overdose: Vicodin is a prescription drug used to pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome: The malignant form of cerebrospinal meningitis
  • Waterhouse-Friederichsen syndrome: A rare syndrome that occurs as complication of septicemia (often due to meningococcal or pneumococcal infection) and involves blood coagulation in blood vessels, adrenal gland hemorrhages and ultimately kidney failure.
  • Weinstein Kliman Scully syndrome: A syndrome that is characterised by cardiomyopathy, hypogonadism and metablic anomalies
  • Western equine encephalitis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus (Alphavirus - Togaviraidae) and transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The infection primarily attacks that central nervous system and severity can range from asymptomatic to severe complications and even death in rare cases.
  • Wheezing: Breathing difficulty with specific wheezing sound.
  • Whitening: Whitening or reduced coloring of the skin
  • Whooping Cough: An infectious condition caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis
  • Wild cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Wrist blueness: A blue discolouration of the wrist.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Cyanosis:

The following list of conditions have 'Cyanosis' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Cyanosis:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Cyanosis' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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