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Symptoms » Death » Glossary
 

Glossary for Death

Medical terms related to Death or mentioned in this section include:

  • 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase II Deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • 3-Hydroxyisobutyric aciduria: A rare inborn metabolic disorder which causes brain and facial anomalies, seizures and growth problems.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1: A recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by methylglutaconic acid in the urine.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type V: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid.
  • 4p16.3 deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of chromosome 4 is deleted at a location called 16.3. The condition is characterized by malformations in most parts of the body as the deletion affects growth and development of the fetus.
  • ACAD9 deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9). The symptoms are variable and are usually triggered by a viral infection or ingestion of aspirin which can trigger a Reye-like episode which can cause death.
  • ACE Inhibitors -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of ACE Inhibitors during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • ADANE: A potentially fatal inherited neurological disease involving brain lesions. Symptoms tend to occur during childhood after an illness involving a fever. The disease is similar to Leigh syndrome but the course is acute rather than chronic.
  • AIDS-Associated Nephropathy: Kidney disease associated with AIDS.
  • AREDYLD: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities of the extremities, teeth, hair, nail and kidney as well as lipoatrophic diabetes.
  • Abdominal Injuries: Any injury involving the abdomen. Injuries may penetrating or caused by a fall or blow to the abdomen. Symptoms are variable depending on the nature of the injury.
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Absence of pulmonary artery: The absence of a pulmonary artery at birth.
  • Acanthoma: A rare benign or malignant epidermal tumor.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Achondrogenesis type 1A: A rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal cartilage formation and growth of bones. Type 1A differs from other types by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1A involves abnormal cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes) whereas type 1B involves an abnormal cartilage matrix. Type 1B is the most severe disorder.
  • Achondrogenesis type 1A and 1B: A rare lethal genetic disorder characterized by a low nasal bridge, very short limbs and incomplete bone formation of lower spine.
  • Achondrogenesis type 1B: A rare lethal genetic disorder characterized by a low nasal bridge, very short limbs and incomplete bone formation of lower spine.
  • Achondrogenesis type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death.
  • Achondrogenesis, Langer-Saldino Type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death.
  • Achondrogenesis, type 3: Severely abnormal bone development which invariably results in death before or soon after birth. Type III may actually be a part of achondrogenesis type II.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Acidemia, methylmalonic: An inborn error of metabolism where amino acids in the body aren't metabolized properly resulting in high levels of the acid throughout the body.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Ackee Fruit Food poisoning: Unripe ackee fruit contains a chemical called hypoglycin A and B which affect the central nervous system and fatty acid oxidation. Eating the unripe fruit can cause symptoms can occur in as little as two hours but is generally 6 to 48 hours. The ackee fruit is found mainly in Jamaica, West Africa, Central America, Sought Florida, southern California and Hawaii.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acral lentiginous melanoma: Acral lentigous melanoma is the most common variant of skin cancer seen in dark-skinned people. This form of melanoma appears on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet, or on nails. Lesions are usually brown, black, or multicolored with irregular borders, and flat or nodular.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Preis type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Preis type is very rare and the range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acrorenal syndrome recessive: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized by the association of kidney and hand and foot abnormalities.
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Interstitial Pneumonia: A relatively uncommon form of pneumonia that has no apparent cause. Symptoms tend to develop over a period of six months to one and a half years.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute subtype tends to progress rapidly and is the most prevalent form of the condition.
  • Acute appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute elemental mercury inhalation: Inhalation of elemental mercury can lead to breathing and lung symptoms of various degrees of severity depending on the level of exposure.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis: A rare degenerative brain disease where the patient suffers edema, many small hemorrhages, necrosis of blood vessel walls, demyelination of nerve fibers. Histiocytes, lymphocytes and neutrophils also enter the meninges. Symptoms include severe headache, fever, vomiting and sometimes convulsions and unconsciousness. Also called acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute mercury inhalation: Inhalation of mercury vapor can lead to serious symptoms and even death if sufficient quantities are inhaled. Mercury inhalation is more likely in confined or poorly ventilated spaces. Mercury from a broken thermometer can lead to symptoms if it occurs in a confined space.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myelofibrosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute panmyelosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement. The disease often progresses rapidly and results in death.
  • Acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis: A poorly defined condition which is more a description of a particular state rather than a distinct disorder. The condition involves the presence of panmyelosis and myelofibrosis. Bone marrow exposure to toxic substances is one cause of the condition.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Adamantinoma: A very aggressive malignant cancer of the jaw. Also called ameloblastoma, adamantoblastoma or epithelioma adamantinum.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adenocarcinoid tumor: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and tends to metastasize. The symptoms are determined by the location of the tumors.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: A type of cancer that occurs mainly in the genitourinary tract and the cells that make up the tumor are clear. It is very rare and most cases occur in females whose mothers used a drug called DES (synthetic estrogen) while pregnant.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: A type of cancer of the thyroid gland.
  • Adenosarcoma of the uterus: A tumor that develops from the glands that line the uterus.
  • Adenosine deaminase deficiency: A rare disorder where a deficiency in the activity of adenosine deaminase causes severe immunodeficiency which in turn results in frequent severe bacterial, viral and fungal infections.
  • Adenoviridae Infections: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family. The most common sites for infection are membrane linings such as the intestines, respiratory and urinary tract and the eyes. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact. The infection is contagious.
  • Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family that occurs in a patient with a weakened immune system. The infection in these people is serious and can be fatal. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital (General): Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is an inherited condition characterized by adrenal insufficiency. It is caused by a deficiency in an enzyme needed to produce certain adrenal hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Adrenomyodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency, dystrophic myopathy, severe psychomotor retardation and an overly-distended bladder which can cause death.
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • Adult T-Cell lymphoma: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The lymphoma subtype is aggressive and tends to affect the lymph nodes more than the blood.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: A condition which is characterized by fulminant pulmonary interstitial alveolar oedema.
  • Adult-onset asthma: Adult-onset asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during adulthood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. Allergies account for about half the cases of adult-onset asthma.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Aflatoxin B1 exposure: Aflatoxin B1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin B2 exposure: Aflatoxin B2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G1 exposure: Aflatoxin G1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G2 exposure: Aflatoxin G2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin exposure: Aflatoxins are toxins produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Aggressive systemic mastocytosis: The excessive proliferation of mast cells. Mast cells control the skin's response to minor injury and release a chemical called histamine which causes the skin to redden. In the aggressive form, mast cells accumulate in the liver, spleen and lymphatic system.
  • Agnathia-holoprosencephaly-situs inversus: A very rare disorder characterized by a small or absent jaw, developmental brain defect and internal organs situated on the wrong side of the body (situs inversus). The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 1: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 2: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 13q14-q21.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 3: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q13.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 4: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19p13.13.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 5: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Airway obstruction: airway obstruction is a blockage of the upper airway, which can be in the trachea, laryngeal (voice box), or pharyngeal (throat) areas or involve the bronch.
  • Al Gazali Hirschsprung syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by Hirschsprung disease (an intestinal disorder), nail abnormalities and facial anomalies.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- malignant recessive form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Alcoholic intoxication: The excessive consumption of alcohol can have toxic effects on the body and can ultimately result in death in severe cases.
  • Alcoholic liver disease: Alcoholic liver disease is the major cause of liver disease in Western countries, (in Asian countries, viral hepatitis is the major cause). It arises from the excessive ingestion of alcohol.
  • Allergic asthma: A form of asthma caused by inhalation of airborne allergenic substance.
  • Alopecia -- hypogonadism -- extrapyramidal disorder: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia, progressive movement problems and a lack of gonadal function which affects puberty.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase deficiency: A metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase which results in high levels of oxoglutaric acid in the urine as well as other severe symptoms.
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Alveolar capillary dysplasia: The abnormal development of the lung blood vessels. The normal barrier across which air and blood can diffuse fails to develop properly. Death usually results within weeks of birth but rare cases can survive for months.
  • Alzheimer disease 3, (early-onset Alzheimer disease): Alzheimer disease 3 is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and apraxia: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and apraxia. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and unusual plaques: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and unusual plaques in the brain. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Ambien overdose: Ambien is a prescription drug mainly used to treat insomnia. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Amelia, autosomal recessive: A rare disorder characterized by the complete absence of the arms and a partial absence of the legs. The disorder has been described in the 3 fetuses of one family.
  • Aminoacidopathies: Any of a group of inborn errors of metabolism which results in the build up in the body of one or more amino acids in the blood and/or urine. The range and severity of symptoms is hugely variable.
  • Amnesic shellfish poisoning: Rare shellfish poisoning sometimes causing amnesia.
  • Amniotic fluid syndrome: A rare disorder where large amounts of amniotic fluid suddenly enters the blood stream. The amniotic fluid contains debris which can block blood vessels and dilutes the blood which affects coagulation. This can occur when there is an opening in a blood vessel wall and can occur if the birth involves difficult labor, older women, dead fetus syndrome or large babies. The condition can result in rapid death of the mother.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Amyloid cardiopathy: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. The cardiac form involves deposits of amyloid in the heart muscle which affects its function. The electrical conduction system of the heart is impaired.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism-dementia complex: A nerve degeneration disorder that involves progressive dementia and parkinsonism which ultimately leads to death.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism/dementia complex 2: A nerve degeneration disorder that involves progressive dementia and parkinsonism which ultimately leads to death.
  • Anal cancer: A cancerous malignancy that is located anatomically in the anus
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and usually consists of white blood cells and null cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anaplastic small cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and consists mainly of small cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Andrade's syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by deposits of an abnormal protein called amyloid in various parts of the body including organs. The condition mainly involves neurological symptoms.
  • Anemia of pregnancy: Anemia of pregnancy is anemia that occurs during pregnancy. Women's bodies have a greater demand for iron during pregnancy and if intake is not sufficient, anemia can result. Anemia in pregnant women can lead to infant problems such as premature birth, fetal death, retarded growth and other problems.
  • Anemia, Blackfan Diamond: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare genetic condition where the bone marrow is unable to make sufficient red blood cells which leads low levels of red blood cells. There are eight subtypes of the condition which differ in the location of the genetic defect and the incidence of additional symptoms such as malformations. The severity of symptoms is variable but most cases are serious.
  • Anemia, Hemolytic, Warm Antibody: A rare autoimmune condition where the body's defense system attacks and destroys red blood cells. The onset of the condition is triggered by temperatures 37ºC or higher. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anencephaly: A birth defect where large parts of the brain is missing and the brainstem is malformed.
  • Anencephaly and spina bifida X-linked: A severe X-linked malformation syndrome involving anencephaly where a part or all of the brain and associated skull is missing as well as a defect or opening in the spinal column.
  • Aneurysm: Swelling or ballooning of part of an artery
  • Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva: A rare form of aortic aneurysm that occurs in the sinus of Valsalva. An aneurysm is a thinning and bulging of a blood vessel wall. The condition is generally asymptomatic unless it burst and causes life-threatening complications including heart failure. An unruptured aneurysm may affect the blood flow (causing palpitations and syncope) as the bulge pushes against surrounding structures.
  • Aneurysm, Dissecting: A tear that develops in a part of the aortic blood vessel wall. The three layers of the blood vessel wall separate and cause it to weaken and the aorta to dilate. The condition is fatal if untreated as the weak spot can burst resulting in a hemorrhage.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 10: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 10 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8q12.1.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 9: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.1.
  • Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Bleeding in the space around the brain that occurs from a leak in a weakened or dilated blood vessel under the arachnoid layer of the brain. Death can occur if treatment is not prompt.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Angiosarcoma of the breast: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the breast. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Angiosarcoma of the liver: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the liver. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Angiosarcoma of the scalp: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the scalp. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Anguillulosis: A infectious disease caused by an intestinal parasite called Strongyloides stercoralis (round worm). Infestation can occur directly through broken skin or through ingestion. Symptoms can take decades to develop in some cases. In rare cases, reinfection occurs and the parasites travel to other parts of the body such as the liver and lungs which can cause serious symptoms. The condition is highly deadly in immunocompromised patients.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypyothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia with pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare disorder characterized by absent or very small eyes and underdeveloped lung tissue.
  • Anorectal atresia: Congenital malformation where the anal or rectal opening is obstructed. The malformation is often associated with other abnormalities.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood.
  • Antepartum Eclampsia: Antepartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Antepartum means that it occurs before delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Antihypertensive drug allergy: Taking antihypertensive drugs (blood pressure-lowering drugs) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 1: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 2: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4q31.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 3: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 3 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 1: A rare familial disorder where the aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 11q23.3-q24.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 2: A rare familial disorder where the aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 5q13-q14.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 3: A rare familial disorder where the aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 3 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 3p22.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 4: A rare familial disorder where the aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 4 also involves another heart defect (patent ductus arteriosus) and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 16p13.13-p13.12.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 5: A rare familial disorder where the aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 5 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 9q33-q34.
  • Aortic arch interruption: A rare genetic birth defect where a portion of the aortic arch is missing or discontinued which severely impairs the flow of oxygenated blood to the lower body.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Aortic coarctation: A rare inherited birth defect where the heart blood vessel called the aorta has a narrowed area which affects blood flow. The degree of constriction is variable which mild cases asymptomatic until adulthood. The poor blood flow to the lower body gives results in it appearing less developed than that upper body.
  • Aorto-ventricular tunnel: A rare heart defect where a tunnel from between the ascending aorta and the cavity of the left or sometimes right heart ventricle. The severity of the condition is highly variable from asymptomatic for many years to fetal death. Often other heart anomalies are also associated.
  • Apnea: Periods of absence of breathing
  • Apnea of infancy (AOI): Temporary cessation of breathing in infants (under one year old) for longer than 15-20 seconds. The infants are not premature.
  • Appendiceal tumor: A tumor of the appendix. The condition is often misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appendix cancer: Cancer of the appendix. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appian-Plutarch syndrome: Symptoms caused by excessive doses of a drug called atropine.
  • Apple seed poisoning: Apple seeds contain a toxic chemical called amygdalin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Hospital admission is recommended if more than 50 apple seeds have been consumed.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Arachnidism: Poisoning from a spider bite.
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Arcobacter butzleri infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arctic bearded seal poisoning: The Arctic Bearded seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the arctic bearded seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. It is believed that eating more than 100-250 grams of the seal liver can result in human death.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arginase deficiency: A very rare urea cycle disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme (arginase) needed to convert ammonia to the urea which can then be removed in the urine. The condition leads to excess build-up of ammonia in the body which is toxic to the nervous system.
  • Aristolochic Acid poisoning: Aristolochic acid is derived from a forest herb from the Aristocholochia family. It is often used in herbal preparations such as Aristolochia Fang Ch, Bragantia and Asarum. It is usually used in herbal preparations to promote weight loss. The substance is believed to cause kidney failure and urinary tract cancer.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation (Type 1): A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 2: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. The extent of the deformity is greater in type 2 than type 1 and hence the symptoms are more severe and are often associated with a myelomeningocele (opening of the spine and spinal cord).
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 3: An extremely rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 3 involves the herniation of brain or brain stem tissue out of the back of the neck or head. The condition generally has a poor prognosis.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 4: Arnold-Chiari malformation is a rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 4 actually involves a lack of development of a portion of the base of the brain (cerebellum). The prognosis is very poor with death often occurring during infancy.
  • Arterial calcification of infancy: A rare disorder involving widespread calcification of arteries which obstructs blood flow.
  • Arterial dissections with lentiginosis: A rare familial syndrome characterized by the association of aortic dissection and multiple lentigines (brown skin spots). The aorta can rupture in some cases and result in sudden death.
  • Arteriosclerosis Obliterans: Arteriosclerosis that results in the narrowing and gradual blockage of the artery. Arteriosclerosis involves the deposition of cholesterol plaques and other material on the inside of the artery walls. The symptoms will depend on the location of the arteries affected and how severe the blockage is.
  • Arthrogryposis -- renal dysfunction -- cholestasis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, kidney dysfunction and liver problems.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Asherson syndrome: The failure of a muscle at the top of the esophagus to relax and allow food and liquid to pass through. Liquid and even food may accidentally be inhaled and can lead to pneumonia and death in some cases.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Aspartylglucosaminidase deficiency: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Aspartylglucosaminuria: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Aspartylglycosaminuria: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Asphyxia neonatorum: Respiratory failure in a newborn.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy 2: Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the ribcage The ribcage is restricted to the point where breathing is impaired and death during infancy is a common occurrence. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q13.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy 3: Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the ribcage The ribcage is restricted to the point where breathing is impaired and death during infancy is a common occurrence. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.5.
  • Aspirin-induced asthma: Aspirin-induced asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by the use of aspirin. A significant number of patients with aspirin-induced asthma also have steroid-dependant asthma where they require regular steroidal asthma medication to maintain normal lung functioning. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Asthma in pregnancy: Asthma in pregnancy refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is occurs during pregnancy. Women who are pregnancy may decide to stop taking their asthma medication in order to reduce the perceived risk of side effects to the developing fetus. The reality is that the potential harmful effects on the fetus are very small compared to the problems caused to mother and fetus if a severe asthma attack develops. Furthermore, uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy may also cause problems such as small birth weight or premature birth. Pregnant women should consult their physician in order to determine the optimal management of their condition. During pregnancy, asthma symptoms may become worse, improve or stay the same.
  • Astley-Kendall syndrome: A very rare syndrome involving abnormal skeletal development and resulting in short limbs, fragile bones and cartilage abnormalities. The condition generally results in stillbirth or death during early infancy.
  • Asymmetric septal hypertrophy: A disease of the heart muscle characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function.
  • Atamasco lily poisoning: The atamasco lily is a bulbous plant with long thin leaves and single white or pink flowers. The plant originated in the US. All parts of the plant contain a toxic chemical called lycorine as well as alkaloids. The bulb is the most toxic part of the plant. Eating the bulb can result in death.
  • Atelosteogenesis, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone formation abnormalities, short stature and early death.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Atherosclerosis, premature -- deafness -- diabetes mellitus -- photomyoclonus -- nephropathy -- degenerative neurologic disease: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Ativan overdose: Ativan is a prescription drug mainly used to treat anxiety. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Atopic asthma: Atopic asthma is one of the most common forms of asthma and is triggered by exposure to an allergen. Upon exposure to the allergen, the airways become constricted and inflamed which affects breathing. The severity of symptoms is variable. This form of asthma is more common in children than adults.
  • Atresia of urethra: A rare congenital malformation where the urethra ends blindly which makes it unuseable by the body to eliminate urine. This usually results in death unless surgical intervention provides alternative communication between the bladder and the amniotic sac. In rare cases, there is an abnormal opening between the bladder and the rectum which allow the urine to drain. The inability of the fluid to pass out of the body of the fetus results in a reduced amount of amniotic fluid which in turn affects the development of the lungs.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 2: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q14-q16 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Symptoms tend to occur in episodes initially and then becomes chronic with increased age.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 3: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 11p15.5 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 4: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 21q22.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 5: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q2.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 6: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p36.2 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 7: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 12p13 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 8: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16q22 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Symptoms tend to occur in episodes initially and then becomes chronic with increased age.
  • Atrial cardiomyopathy with heart block: Atrial heart disease involving a disruption of the electrical signals in the heart and causes heart rhythm problems.
  • Atrial fibrillation: A rhythm disturbance of the heart that results in irregular and chaotic ventricular contractions.
  • Atrial fibrillation, familial 1: A dominantly inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases.
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause.
  • Australian Sea Lion poisoning: The Australian Sea Lion is sometimes used as a food source and is found in the South-Southwest waters of Australia. Eating the liver of the Australian Sea Lion can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy, type 1: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia: Autonomic dysreflexia is a condition characterized by instability of the autonomic nervous system and often results in sudden high blood pressure.
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Autosomal Recessive Tetra-Amelia: A rare disorder characterized by the absence of all four extremities as well as skeletal, nervous system, craniofacial and other abnormalities. The condition is causes death before or soon after birth.
  • Autumn crocus poisoning: The Autumn crocus is a perennial herb which bears purplish-pink flowers. The plant is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant. The plant contains a chemical called colchicine which can be very poisonous if eaten. The plant is considered to be very toxic if eaten. Boiling the leaves before eating them appears to increase their toxicity. Most cases of poisoning are through accidental ingestion. The plant is sometimes mistaken for wild garlic.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • B-cell lymphomas: A group cancers involving the proliferation of lymphocytic B-cells. Examples include small lymphocytic lymphoma, immunoblastic lymphoma and lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • BBB syndrome, X-linked: A rare genetic disorder characterized by defects along the midline of the body. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably. There are two subtypes of the disorder: type I is inherited in a X-linked manner and type II is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Females with type I tend to have few if any symptoms - often the only symptom is wide-set eyes.
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bacterial pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) due to a bacterial infection. It can occur as a complication of a bacterial infection in some other part of the body. It is most often a complication of a respiratory infection but skin and oral infections may also be a cause. Bacterial pericarditis may also occur after heart surgery. It occurs predominantly in males aged 20 to 50 years. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Balo disease: A rare neurological disorder where the protective sheath around brain nerve fibres are progressively destroyed. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the affected brain area.
  • Baltic myoclonic epilepsy: A rare inherited type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy which tends to cause symptoms during childhood. The involuntary muscle movements tend to occur more frequently and become more severe with increasing age. Symptoms may occur following various stimuli such as light, stress or exercise.
  • Bard-Pic syndrome: A complication of advanced pancreatic cancer marked by jaundice and enlarged gallbladder.
  • Bare lymphocyte syndrome: An inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by T- and B-cell dysfunction (these cells are essential for helping fight infection). Lack of treatment can result in infant death from infection.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 1 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 2: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 2 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 1q42.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 3: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 3 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 5p15.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 4: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 4 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 12q13.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 5: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 5 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 9p21.
  • Basal Cell Carcinoma, Susceptibility to, 6: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing basal cell carcinoma. Type 6 is linked to a defective gene on chromosome 7q32.
  • Batten Disease: Rare childhood genetic degenerative nerve system disease.
  • Beemer-Ertbruggen syndrome: A rare lethal syndrome characterized primarily by hydrocephalus, heart malformations, and increased bone density. Only a couple of cases have been reported.
  • Bell mania: A rare life-threatening neuropsychiatric disorder involving delusions, hyperactivity and periods of fever. Death can occur within days or months without treatment.
  • Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus, loss of body fat, serious insulin resistance, high blood triglycerides and fatty liver. Type 2 is distinguished from type 2 by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 2 is caused by a defect on the BSCL2 gene on chromosome 11q13. Type 2 seems to be more severe with some cases resulting in premature death which can occur as early as the first year of life. Type 2 also involves mental retardation which is not seen in type 1.
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Berry aneurysm, cirrhosis, pulmonary emphysema, and cerebral calcification: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by brain aneurysms, liver cirrhosis, pulmonary emphysema and calcification of the brain (cerebrum).
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis: A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE): A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Bidirectional tachycardia: A rare form of abnormal heart rhythm. Causes includes digitalis toxicity, certain heart malformations and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.
  • Bilateral renal agenesis dominant type: A rare birth defect where both kidneys are absent. The disorder results in death within days of birth.
  • Bile duct cancer, extrahepatic: A rare cancer that develops in the part of the common bile duct that is outside the liver. The common bile duct channels bile from the gall bladder (which stores bile) and the liver (which makes bile) to the small intestine to assist digestion.
  • Biliary atresia, intrahepatic, non syndromic form: Congenital obstruction of the passages in the liver that carry bile. The nonsyndromic form is not associated with any other abnormalities.
  • Biliary atresia, intrahepatic, syndromic form: Congenital obstruction of the passages in the liver that carry bile. The syndromic form is associated with other congenital abnormalities such as heart and visceral defects.
  • Biliary cirrhosis: Biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions. The cause of primary biliary cirrhosis is not fully understood.
  • Biliary tract cancer: Cancer that develops in the gallbladder or bile ducts.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Bint Al Zahab-induced lead poisoning: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used by various ethnic groups (e.g. Indians, Saudi Arabians) to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Bird flu (avian influenza): Bird flu refers to influenza A invection. Influenza A is a viral respiratory infection that can usually occurs in birds (especially poultry) but can be transmitted to humans and cause serious illness. The virus is contagious and can cause severe illness especially in patients who are very young or old or have some other medical condition as well. The severity of symptoms can vary but usually involves respiratory and constitutional (e.g. headache, aching muscles) symptoms. The influenza virus can mutate and produce different strains though the symptoms are the same. This frequent mutation means that people need regular vaccinations to ensure they are protected against new strains as they arise.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Black henbane poisoning: Black henbane is a herb which has hairy stems and bears flowers and fruit. All parts of the plant contain tropane alkaloids which is toxic enough to cause death if eaten. Black henbane is often used for medicinal purposes to treat a variety of health conditions.
  • Black jetbead poisoning: The Black jetbead is a deciduous shrub which bears single white flowers and small groups of shiny black fruit. The fruit contains amygdalin which is very toxic and can cause severe poisoning or even death if eaten.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Black nightshade poisoning: The Black Nightshade is a herb which bears small white or purple flowers and dull black berries. The plant originated in South America. The berries contain solanine alkaloid which can be toxic if eaten in large quantities. The leaves and unripe berries are considered toxic whereas the ripe fruit is possibly edible.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bland-Garland-White syndrome: A rare birth malformation where the left coronary artery comes out of the pulmonary artery instead of the aorta. Usually, infants are usually healthy for a few months after which they start having symptoms of heart problems. Occasionally, patients may be asymptomatic even into adulthood but usually death occurs during infancy.
  • Bland-White -Garland syndrome: A heart disorder where the left coronary artery comes out of the pulmonary artery.
  • Blast crisis: The final phase of chronic myeloid leukemia which has a high mortality rate. Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The three phases of the condition are the chronic phase, aggressive phase and finally the blast crisis. A blast crisis is occurs when over 30% of the cells in the blood or bone marrow are immature blood cells (blast cells). Patients in the final stage of leukemia are more prone to relapses following treatment.
  • Blastoma: A type of tumor that originates from precursor cells or blasts (immature or embryonic tissue). The symptoms can vary greatly and are determined by the part of the body that is affected. Blastomas can occur in parts of the body such as the brain, liver, kidneys, nervous system, bones and the retina.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blepharophimosis -- nasal groove -- growth delay: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eyelid abnormalities, retarded growth and a nasal groove.
  • Blepharophimosis -- nasal groove -- growth retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eyelid abnormalities, retarded growth and a nasal groove.
  • Blepharophimosis, large cylindrical nose and severe intrauterine growth retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by eye and nose anomalies as well as severely retarded fetal growth.
  • Blood coagulation disorders, inherited: Inherited blood disorders where the ability to form clots is dysfunctional. The blood needs to be able to clot to prevent excessive bleeding in situations such as when the body suffers some sort of injury. With blood coagulation disorders, the blood's ability to clot may be impaired, resulting in excessive bleeding, or the blood may form clots too readily and result in thrombosis.
  • Bloodroot poisoning: The Bloodroot is a flowering herb that bears fruit and whose stem contains red juices. The plant tends to grow in mountainous areas. The thickened roots (rhizomes) of the plant contain isoquinoline alkaloids which are very toxic and can cause death if eaten in sufficient quantities.
  • Blue-ringed octopus poisoning: The blue-ringed octopus is found in shallow Australian ocean water and can deliver venomous, potentially fatal bite. The poison is present in the saliva of the octopus. The venom affects the neuromuscular system.
  • Body packer syndrome: Consuming packages of drugs for the purpose of concealing them for transportation.
  • Bokhoor-induced lead poisoning: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bone cement implantation syndrome: A complication that can occur after using bone cement during implantation of an internal prosthesis. Circulation may be affected and a blockage in the pulmonary artery may develop.
  • Bone dysplasia with medullary fibrosarcoma: A rare inherited bone disorder characterized by aggressive bone tumors and defective bone development. The tumors metastasized readily.
  • Bone dysplasia, lethal, Holmgren type: A rare lethal bone malformation syndrome.
  • Bone symptoms: Symptoms affecting the body's bones
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Boomerang dysplasia: A rare lethal disorder characterized by bone abnormalities (lack of bone ossification and missing bones) and a characteristic face.
  • Bottlebrush buckeye poisoning: The Bottlebrush buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in southern USA. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Brachymesomelia-renal syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney abnormalities and forearm and lower leg deformity. The condition describes a single reported case.
  • Brain abscess: abscess in the brain may involve any of the lobes of the brain
  • Brain malformation -- congenital heart disease -- postaxial polydactyly: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a brain defect, congenital heart disease and extra fingers.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumor, adult: A growth or tumor that develops in the tissues of the brain in adults. The tumor can be benign or malignant.
  • Breathing difficulties: Various types of breathing difficulty (dyspnea).
  • Brinton disease: Thickening and hardening of the stomach wall usually associated with diffuse stomach cancer or damage due to the consumption of caustic soda.
  • Bristowe's syndrome: Symptoms caused by a brain tumor that develops in the corpus callosum which connects the two brain hemispheres.
  • Brittle bone syndrome lethal type: A rare form of brittle bone disease caused by abnormal collagen production which results in weak bones which break easily. The condition can result in death, especially during the process of birth which can result in multiple severe fractures.
  • Broad bean poisoning: The broad bean is a vine which produces pea-like flowers and long, seed-filled pods. The seeds can be very toxic and can result in death if eaten. This toxic reaction only occurs to certain susceptible people who are unable to process certain chemicals in the plant. The resulting condition is called favism and is most common in people of Mediterranean descent.
  • Broken neck: Fracture of the bone or bones in the cervical spine.
  • Bronchiolitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bronchioles
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Ammonia inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Ammonia. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Chlorine inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Chlorine. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Diacetyl inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Diacetyl. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen bromide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen bromide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen chloride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen chloride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen fluoride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen fluoride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen sulfide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen sulfide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Methyl isocyanate inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Methyl isocyanate. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Nitrogen Oxide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Nitrogen oxides. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Ozone inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of ozone. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Phosgene inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Nitrogen oxides. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Polyamide-amine dyes inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Polyamide-amine dyes. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Sulphur dioxide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Sulphur dioxide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Thionyl chloride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Thionyl chloride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans with obstructive pulmonary disease: A rare condition involving the inflammation and thickening of the internal lung structures (bronchioles) which affects breathing. It can be triggered by certain infections, drug reactions or for no obvious reason. The condition often progresses to cause serious respiratory problems or even death though the rate of disease progression is variable.
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A condition which is characterized by dysplasia of the brochopulmonary vessels
  • Brown Recluse spider poisoning: The Brown Recluse spider is poisonous and is found mainly in southern and central areas of the US.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Brown-Symmers disease: A rare form of brain inflammation that occurs in children and can quickly lead to death. Symptoms usually start suddenly.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Brugada Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. The condition may be inherited in some cases. The mean age of sudden death is 40 years of age.
  • Brugada syndrome 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 1 is caused by a mutation in the SCN5A gene on chromosome 3p21. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Brugada syndrome 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 2 is caused by a mutation in the GPD1L gene on chromosome 3p22.3. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Brugada syndrome 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 3 is caused by a mutation in the CACNA1C gene on chromosome 12p13.3. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Brugada syndrome 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 14 is caused by a mutation in the CACNB2 gene on chromosome 10p12. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Budd chiari syndrome: A disorder where the main vein leaving the liver becomes blocked leading to symptoms such as liver enlargement and fluid buildup in the abdomen. Also called Chiari's syndrome or Rokitansky's disease.
  • Bufotenine poisoning: The skin glands of certain toads (Cane toad and Colorado river toad) contain a poison called bufotoxin.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Bullous dystrophy, macular type: A rare condition characterized by loss of scalp hair, increased skin pigmentation, small head, mental retardation, short stature and blisters. The blisters do not form necessarily on skin that has suffered trauma but occurs spontaneously.
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei: Gram negative, aerobic, motile rod shaped bacterium.
  • Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome: Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burnett's syndrome: Burnett's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burns: Injury from burns and scalds.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Byler Disease: A rare inherited conditions where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The conditions has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade.
  • Bywaters' syndrome: A trauma or accident involving the crushing of soft tissues and associated symptoms. Severe cases can result in death.
  • C1esterase deficiency: C1esterase deficiency is a condition characterized by swelling under the skin or mucosal tissue - the skin, respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract may be affected. The condition may be inherited or acquired. Symptoms tend to develop over a few days and then abate after two to five days. Swelling attacks may occur fairly regularly e.g. weekly or sporadically e.g. once or twice a year.
  • CDG syndrome (generic term): Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. The main symptom in all the disorders is psychomotor retardation but other variable symptoms also occur depending on the subtype of the disorder.
  • CDG syndrome type 3: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 3 has variable symptoms.
  • CDG syndrome type I: A rare genetic disorder where the body is unable to synthesize glycoproteins which results in multisystem problems.
  • CML-Like Syndrome, Familial: A very rare condition characterized by symptom similar to myelocytic leukemia that develop during infancy. The condition can result in death during the first years of life.
  • CMV antenatal infection: A rare condition where a fetus becomes infected with the cytomegalovirus through the mother.
  • COACH syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Calcific aortic disease with immunologic abnormalities, familial: A rare familial condition characterized by the abnormal calcification of the aorta and aortic valve. The calcification can narrow the aortic valve opening and hence affect blood flow. The condition also includes immunological abnormalities
  • California buckeye poisoning: The California buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in California. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • California encephalitis: An uncommon mosquito born virus (California encephalitis virus) which can cause brain inflammation in humans. The severity of symptoms is variable. The incubation period can last from a few days to a week. Infants and children tend to be more severely affected than adults who sometimes have no obvious symptoms.
  • Calla lily poisoning: A bulb plant which bears large colored or white flower-like structure on long leafless stems. It is often grown in gardens or used in flower arrangements. The plant contains chemicals including calcium oxalate crystals which are highly toxic if eaten. Death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Campomelia Cumming type: A rare syndrome characterized by limb and multiple abdominal organ abnormalities. The disorder results in death before birth or soon after.
  • Campomelic dwarfism: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bowed tibia, underdeveloped shoulder blades and a flat face.
  • Campomelic dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bowed tibia, underdeveloped shoulder blades and a flat face.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter hylointestinalis infection: Campylobacter hyloinstesinalis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis. Cattle, pigs, hamsters and deer are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Campylobacter jejuni subspecies doylei infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Campylobacter family. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Canada moonseed poisoning: The Canada moonseed is a woody deciduous vine which bears clusters of bluish or blackish fruit. The fruit is distinguished by the presence of crescent-shaped seeds. The fruit contains dauricine which is very toxic and can result in death if sufficient quantities are consumed.
  • Capillaria philippiensis infection: A fish borne parasite that can infect humans. Transmission most often occurs through ingestion of contaminated fish. Severity of symptoms tend to increase as the number of worms multiply in the intestines. Death can occur if the condition is left untreated.
  • Capillary leak syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy: A rare condition characterized by leaky blood vessels and an increased level of certain blood proteins (monoclonal gammopathy). Monoclonal gammopathy itself does not cause any symptoms unless it develops into plasma cell leukemia. The condition may vary from mild to severe enough to cause death.
  • Capnocytophaga: A bacterial infection caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus which is often found in normal healthy cats and dogs. The infections tends to occur mainly in immunocompromised patients, alcoholics or patients who have chronic respiratory disease or have had their spleen removed. The eyes are particularly sensitive to this infection. The incubation period can be as long as eight days.
  • Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited urea cycle disorder where the lack of the enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase prevents ammonia from being turned into urea and being excreted in the urine. Excess ammonia builds up in the body which can cause serious complications or even death if left untreated.
  • Carbon disulfide-induced cardiovascular disease: Chronic exposure to certain chemicals can cause cardiovascular disease. For example, exposure to Carbon disulfide can lead to heart disease and carries a risk of premature death as a result. Chronic exposure to these sort of chemicals is most likely to occur in a work environment. Carbon disulfide is used mainly in viscose rayon manufacturing but is also used as a solvent and in other process. Exposure usually occurs through inhalation of vapours but skin absorption can also occur. Reported cases haf cardiovascular disease has occurred among workers exposed to carbon disulfide concentrations of 20-60 ppm.
  • Carcinoma of the vocal tract: Cancer of the vocal cords in the larynx.
  • Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck: A type of cancer that occurs in the mucosal lining of parts of the head and neck e.g. esophagus, sinuses, nasal cavity, pharynx, mouth and lips. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the cancer.
  • Cardiac diverticulum: A rare congenital heart malformation involving the outpouching (diverticulum) of a ventricle which can affect heart function to varying degrees depending on the size and location of the defect.
  • Cardiac hydatid cysts with intracavitary expansion: A parasitic infection that occurs in the heart. Hydatid cyst is the larval stage of a parasite called echinococcus granulosus. Symptoms will depend on the exact location of the cyst. Usually the liver and lungs are involved.
  • Cardiac malformation: Any malformation or structural defect of the heart or it's structures. Some examples include atrioventricular septal defect, conotruncal malformations, transposition of great vessels and heart valve dysplasia. The symptoms vary in nature and severity depending on the type of malformation.
  • Cardioencephalomyopathy fatal infantile due to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called cytochrome C oxidase (COX) which is needed in the process of energy production by body cells. The fatal infant type generally affects the hear, brain and kidneys as well as the muscles.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hearing loss, type t RNA lysine gene mutation: A rare inherited disorder characterized by heart muscle disease and deafness. The deafness is inherited from the mother and is caused by a genetic defect. Patients may be asymptomatic for a number of years. The rate of progression of the disorder is variable with some patients being asymptomatic until adulthood.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hypotonia -- lactic acidosis: A rare syndrome characterized by heart muscle disease, reduced muscle tone and lactic acidosis from birth.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 10: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the heart's ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the heart's conduction system. Type 10 is caused by a defect in the ABC9 gene on chromosome 12p12.1.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1B: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1B is caused by a defect on chromosome 9q13.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1C: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1C is caused by a defect in the LDB3 gene on chromosome 10q21-q23.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1D: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1D is caused by a defect in the cardiac troponin gene on chromosome 1q32.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1G: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1G is caused by a defect in the titin gene on chromosome 2q24.3.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1H: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1H is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q14-q22.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1I: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1I is caused by a defect in the desmin gene on chromosome 2q35.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1J: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Hearing impairment also becomes apparent by the end of the second decade. Type 1J is caused by a defect in the LDB3 gene on chromosome 6q23.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1K: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1K is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q12-q16.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1L: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1L is caused by a defect in the delta-sarcoglycan gene on chromosome 5q33.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1M: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1M is caused by a defect in the CSRP3 gene on chromosome 11p15.1.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1N: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1N is caused by a defect in the telethonin gene on chromosome 17q12.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1P: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1P is caused by a defect in the phospholamban gene on chromosome 6q22.1.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1Q: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1Q is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q22.3-q31.1.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1R: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1R is caused by a defect in the ACTC gene on chromosome 15q14.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1S: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1S is caused by a defect in the heavy chain myosin 7 gene on chromosome 14q12.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1T: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1T is caused by a defect in the TMPO gene on chromosome 12q22.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1U: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1U is caused by a defect in the PSEN1 gene on chromosome 14q24.3.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1W: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1W is caused by a defect in the metavinculin gene on chromosome 10q22.1-q23.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1Y: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the heart's conduction system. Type 1Y is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 15q25.1.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated 1Z: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the heart's conduction system. Type 1Z is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21.2-p14.3.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated with conduction defect: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated with conduction defect type 1: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 1 is caused by a defect in the lamin A/C gene on chromosome 1q21.
  • Cardiomyopathy dilated with conduction defect type 2: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The disorder is caused by the degeneration of the hearts conduction system. Type 2 is caused by a defect in the cardiac sodium channel gene on chromosome 3p21.
  • Cardiomyopathy, X-linked, fatal infantile: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The condition occurs during infancy and results in death.
  • Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally.
  • Cardiomyopathy, fatal fetal, due to myocardial calcification: A rare syndrome characterized by heart muscle disease caused by calcium deposits in the heart muscle. The disorder causes fetal death.
  • Carnitine Deficiency Syndromes: Syndromes associated with the deficiency of carnitine.
  • Carnitine transporter deficiency: An inherited deficiency of carnitine caused by the impaired ability of the carnitine transporter protein to carry the carnitine to where it is needed. Instead the carnitine is excreted through the urine. Fasting or illness can trigger a severe attack.
  • Carolina Cherry Laurel poisoning: The Carolina cherry laurel is an evergreen tree which bears small white flowers and small green fruit which turns black when ripe. Most parts of the plant contain cyanogenic glycoside and amygdalin which can cause symptoms if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and eating sufficient quantities can lead to death.
  • Carotid Paraganglioma: A rare, usually benign tumor found in the carotid artery in the neck. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow.
  • Cartilaginous neoplasms: Tumors made up of cartilage tissue. The tumors may be benign or malignant and the symptoms will depend on the location and size of the tumors. The tumors can form on parts of the body such as the arm and leg bones or even in the pharynx. The tumors may cause no symptoms in some cases and are only discovered incidentally.
  • Cataract and cardiomyopathy: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital cataracts, heart muscle disease, lactic acidosis and skeletal muscle disease. The disorder involves the abnormal storage of lipids and glycogen in the skeletal and heart muscles. The cataracts progress rapidly and require surgery. The severity of the disorder ranges from stillbirth to survival into the fourth decade.
  • Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A very rare disorder where the blood clotting system becomes dysfunctional and clots too easily due to the abnormal presence of antphospholipid antibodies. It results in blood flow blockages to various body organs. It is possible that the condition has autoimmune origins. The disorder is often triggered by infections, certain drugs (e.g. anticoagulants), minor surgery and hysterectomy.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome: Caterpillars from the Lonomia genus have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome -- Lonomia achelous: Lonomia achelous caterpillars are native to Northern Brazil and Venezuela. They have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome -- Lonomia obliqua: Lonomia obliqua caterpillars are native to Southern Brazil and have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Cebagin-induced lead poisoning: Cebagin is a folk remedy used mainly by Middle Eastern people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Ceftazidime -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ceftazidime (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Central nervous system lymphoma, primary: A type of lymphoma that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). A lymphoma consists of cancerous lymphocytes which are a type of white blood cell. Symptoms vary according to the location of the lymphoma.
  • Central nervous system oxygen toxicity: High oxygen levels which affects the central nervous system. The condition can occur during deep dives with fatal consequences.
  • Central nervous system protozoal infections: A protozoal infection of the central nervous system (spinal cord or brain). The infection may originate in the central nervous system (primary infection) or may spread from another part of the body (secondary infection). The infection may occur in otherwise healthy individuals or in individuals who have a compromised immune system. Primary protozoal CNS infections include cerebral amebiasis, granulomatous amebic encephalitis and secondary infections include cerebral malaria and cerebral babesiosis.
  • Cephalic disorders: Various congenital brain defects
  • Cephalosporin-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Cephalosporin-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where a use of a medication called Cephalosporin triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Ceptaz -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ceptaz (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia -- oligophrenia -- congenital ataxia -- coloboma -- hepatic fibrosis: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy, Familial: A rare disorder where abnormal deposits of amyloid in the brain blood vessels causes spasticity, incoordination and dementia. Brain hemorrhage and strokes may also result in severe cases.
  • Cerebral cavernous malformations: A rare disorder where a group of small abnormal blood vessels in the brain. These blood vessels become enlarged, irregularly shaped and thin walled. They swell when filled with blood and are then often unable to return to their original shape and the thin walls means that they can leak blood and cause bleeding in the brain. Severity of symptoms depends on the number and location of the lesions.
  • Cerebral ventricle neoplasm: A tumor that occurs in the fluid-filled spaces of the brain called the ventricles. Symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the tumor and whether it is cancerous or not.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 2, late infantile type: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the progressive accumulation of certain chemicals (lipopigments) in body tissues due to deficiency of an enzyme (protease tri-peptidyl-peptidase) needed to process it.
  • Cervical Teratoma: A cervical teratoma is a very rare form of germ cell tumor that occurs in the neck. These tumors usually develop in the fetus and tend to be large and benign even though they grow continually. In rare cases they can occur in adults in which case they tend to be malignant. These tumors can be quite large and cause problems in other neck structures. Sometimes surgery is required in the uterus or during delivery in order to ensure the infant has access to an airway.
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2C has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in chromosome 12 and involves diaphragm and vocal cord weakness as well as hand and foot problems.
  • Chediak-Higashi like syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism only.
  • Chemical addiction: Addiction to and abuse of various substances.
  • Chemical burn -- airways: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical - usually through inhalation but can also occur through aspiration if the chemical is swallowed. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- ingestion: Burns to the mouth and gastrointestinal system caused by swallowing a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the gastrointestinal system are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- inhalation: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical through inhalation. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- skin: Burns to the skin caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine: 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine is a chemical used mainly in jet fuel and rocket fuel, plant growth agent, photography and various other industrial uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4-Aminopyridine: 4-Aminopyridine is a pesticide used mainly to control bird pests. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine: 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine is a chemical used as a designer drug for its hallucinogen and aphrodisiac effects. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetic Anhydride: Acetic Anhydride is a chemical used mainly in various industrial processes as well as the production of pharmaceutical products such as aspirin and acetyl salicylic acid. It is also used in the production of heroin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylic acid: Acrylic acid is a chemical used mainly in the production of resins and acrylic acids which are usually used in adhesives and coatings. It is also used in water treatment and in the production of plastics and detergents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Agrocide: Agrocide is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice as well as other agricultural insect pests. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Agronexit: Agronexit is a chemical insecticide used mainly as an agricultural insecticide. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldrin: Aldrin is a chemical once used mainly in insecticides for crops and as a termite preventative. The chemical can readily be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amidithion: Amidithion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amiton: Amiton is a chemical once used as an insecticide and acaricide - it is no longer in use due to its nerve toxicity. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anti-rust products: Anti-rust products contain various chemicals which are toxic if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aparasin: Aparasin Aparasin. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aphtiria: Aphtiria is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Athyl-Gusathion: Athyl-Gusathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinfos-methyl: Azinfos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinfosethyl: Azinfosethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinophos-methyl: Azinophos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos: Azinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.

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