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Symptoms » Delirium » Glossary
 

Glossary for Delirium

Medical terms related to Delirium or mentioned in this section include:

  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidosis: The accumulation of hydrogen ions or the depletion of the alkaline reserve in the body.
  • Acute Appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Advanced circadian rhythm disorder: A circadian rhythm sleep disorder where a person’s body clock runs faster than normal which results in a shortened sleep period with early awakening.
  • Adverse reaction: Term to describe unwanted, negative consequences sometimes associated with using medications, diagnostic tests or therapeutic interventions.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical which mainly involves irritation to the part of the body exposed to the chemical - eyes, skin and gastrointestinal. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Alcohol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alcohol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol intoxication: excess intake of alcohol can lead to serious consequences
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcoholism: High dependence on excessive amounts of alcohol.
  • Altered consciousness in adults: Altered consciousness in adults is a change in the usual level of alertness and orientation of an adult.
  • Alzheimer's-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Amantadine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amantadine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amiloride -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiloride during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amitriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amitriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphetamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amphetamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Anaesthesia: loss of sensations
  • Anticholinergic syndrome: Symptoms caused by overdose of anticholinergic drugs.
  • Apallic syndrome: A persistent vegetative state caused by brain damage.
  • Apomorphine -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on chickens indicate that the use of Apomorphine during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Appian-Plutarch syndrome: Symptoms caused by excessive doses of a drug called atropine.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arrhythmias: The occurrence of irregular heart beats
  • Aspirin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Aspirin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Atropine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atropine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Azotemia, familial: A rare condition where high serum urea level is inherited in a familial pattern. The high level of urea occurs despite normal kidney function.
  • Baclofen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Baclofen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Barbiturate abuse: Abuse of barbiturate medications
  • Barbiturate withdrawal: Symptoms of barbiturate withdrawal syndrome appear 12-20 hours after the last dose
  • Behavioral symptoms: Symptoms of personal behavior.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Box thorn poisoning: The leaves of the Box thorn plant contain a toxic chemical called atropine and possibly other toxic compounds. The box thorn plant is a spiny-stemmed shrub which originated in Europe. Symptoms can be quite serious depending on the quantity of the plant ingested.
  • Brain abscess: abscess in the brain may involve any of the lobes of the brain
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain infection: Inflammation of the parietal layer and the brain tissue.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumor: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal growth of tissue within the brain
  • Brill disease: A form of recurring typhus caused by a bacterium called Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by lice. The illness may occur years after the initial sickness and tends to be not as severe.
  • Brill-Zinsser disease: Reoccuring mild form of typhus.
  • Bromocriptine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bromocriptine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bubonic plague: Severe flea-borne bacterial disease
  • Buprenorphine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Buprenorphine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cerebral hemorrhage: Bleeding in the brain
  • Cerebral oedema:
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbon Tetrachloride: Carbon tetrachloride is a chemical used mainly in grain fumigants, insecticides and in the production of fluorocarbons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlordane: Chlordane is a poison use to control termites - is banned in the US and many other countries due to its harmful effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate: Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of commercial dynamite and blasting gelatin. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical used mainly in photography developing solution, pharmaceuticals, fur processing, paints, fuel, organic chemicals, plastics, stone coatings and styrene monomers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nickel Carbonyl: Nickel Carbonyl is a chemical used mainly in petroleum and rubber production and in electroplating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroglycerin: Nitroglycerin is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of explosives, dynamite, rocket propellant and smokeless powders. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phencyclidine: Phencyclidine is often used as an illegal recreational drug. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium: Thallium is an element used for such things as electronic devices, selenium rectifiers, gamma radiation detection apparatus, transmission equipment and infrared radiation detection. It is also used as a catalyst in various manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium Sulfate: Thallium Sulfate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of switches and closures in the semiconductor industry. It has historically also been used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chest infection: Inflammation of the chest due to pathology of the structures in the chest.
  • Chicken soup poisoning: The consumption of excessive amounts of chicken soup can result in serious symptoms due to very high salt levels in the body. Children and the elderly are more likely to be affected by the high salt levels of chicken soup however the condition is rarely seen. Chicken soup is often promoted as useful for treating colds, asthma or emaciation.
  • Chloroquine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chloroquine (an antimalarial drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chlorpheniramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpheniramine (an antihistamine medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chlorpromazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpromazine (a neuroleptic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Christmas Cherry poisoning: The Christmas Cherry is a small reddish-orange fruit. The plant contains a compound called solanocapsine which can cause symptoms if excessive amounts are consumed. The compound is found in all parts of the plant - especially the leaves and unripe fruit. Very large amounts would need to be consumed to cause symptoms due to the low toxicity of the compound.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Ciprofloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cirrhosis of liver: diffuse hepatic process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules
  • Clonazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clonazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clonidine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clonidine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cocaine abuse: Stimulant drug with various effects
  • Codeine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Codeine (an opiate drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cognitive impairment: General loss of mental or cognitive ability
  • Colchicine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Coma: Loss of consciousness for a long period
  • Confusion: Mental confusion and impaired thinking.
  • Confusion symptoms: Symptoms closely related to mental confusion.
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Daphne poisoning: Daphne is a shrub that contains a toxin called mezerein (skin irritant) in the bark as well as a toxin called daphnin. The bark, sap and berries are the most toxic parts of the plant. The plant is native to Europe and Asia but is also found in other parts of the world such as America. A single berry or leaf can cause symptoms and 2 or 3 can cause death in a child. About 12 berries or leaves can cause quite severe symptoms in adults.
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Decreased LOC: measurement of a person's arousability and responsiveness to stimuli from the environment
  • Decreased folate: Decrease in one of the B vitamins required for red blood cell production
  • Decreased level of consciousness: A persistent coma is called vegetative state.
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Dehydration: Loss and reduction in body water levels
  • Delirium in children: Delirium in children is a condition in which a child experiences sudden confusion and cognitive changes that can occur due to physical or mental diseases or disorders..
  • Delirium tremens: A condition which occurs due to the withdrawal of a substance particularly alcohol and results in tremors of the hands and arms
  • Dementia: Mental confusion and impaired thought.
  • Dementia With Lewy Bodies: Second most frequent cause of dementia in elderly adults.
  • Devil's trumpet poisoning: The Devil's trumpet is a shrubby plant with purple stems and large white or yellow flowers. The fruit is covered by a spiny shell. The plant originated in china and is often used as an ornamental outdoor plant. The plant contains tropane alkaloids which can be poisonous if eaten in large quantities.
  • Diabetic hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar attack from insulin or diabetes medications
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis: A metabolic acidosis that results from the accumulation of ketones when diabetes mellitus is poorly controlled
  • Diazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Digoxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digoxin (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diphenhydramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diphenhydramine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dobriner syndrome: An inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase. The condition is similar to but milder than intermittent porphyria and sometimes includes photosensitivity.
  • Domperidone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Domperidone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dothiepin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dothiepin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Drowsiness: Excessive tiredness or sleepiness
  • Drug abuse: Drug use as a symptom of other conditions
  • Drug overdose: A condition characterized by the consumption in excess of a particular drug causing adverse effects
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Ecstasy overdose: Ectsasy is an illegal and highly addictive recreational drug. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Electrolyte imbalance: impairment in the level of electrolytes in the body
  • Elephant's-ear poisoning: The Elephant's ear is a common garden plant which has large, heart-shaped leaves on long stalks. The plant contains calcium oxalate and saphotoxin which can cause poisoning if eaten and irritation upon contact with skin or eyes. The toxins are quite poisonous and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Encephalitis: Infection of the brain (as a symptom)
  • End Stage Liver Failure: Late stage of liver failure characterised by the onset of mental and neurological symptoms, due to build up of toxic metabolites.
  • Epidemic typhus: An infectious disease caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by body lice. The severity of the illness may range from moderate to fatal.
  • Epilepsy: Paroxysmal transient disturbances of brain function that may manifest as loss of consciousness, abnormal motor phenomena
  • Ethanol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethanol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ethosuximide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethosuximide (antiseizure medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ethotoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethotoin (an anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Flea-borne diseases: Diseases that are carried by fleas
  • Foxglove poisoning: The foxglove is a herb which produces fruit in a capsule and colored, tubular flowers. The leaves, flowers and seeds of the plant contain a very toxic chemical called digitalis glycoside which can cause serious symptoms or even death if eaten. Skin irritation can occur if contact with the skin occurs. NOTE: Patients who are taking certain medications (digoxin, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers) are more susceptible to foxglove poisoning.
  • Gangrene: Death (necrosis) of a portion of tissue or entire organ due to decreased perfusion with blood or infectious destruction of tissue.
  • Gastroenteritis: An infection of the bowel
  • Hallucinations: Seeing, hearing or sensing something that does not exist.
  • Head injury: Any injury that occurs to the head
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart conditions: Any condition that affects the heart
  • Heart failure: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently and effectively
  • Heat stroke: it is a life threatening condition. It is hyperthermia in an advanced state
  • Hepatic failure: loss of normal liver function and metabolism of products by the liver
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Pennyroyal Oil: Pennyroyal Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat delayed menstruation and as an insect repellent. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Wormwood: Wormwood can be used to treat worm infestations and as a sedative or hair tonic. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Heroin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Heroin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • High fever: Where a patient has an elevated temperature
  • Hydroxyzine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Hydroxyzine (an antihistamine) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Hypercalcaemia: Increased concentration of calcium in the blood
  • Hypercalcemia: Raised blood calcium levels
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypocalcaemia: Decreased concentration of calcium in the blood.
  • Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar levels
  • Hypoglycemic attack: Hypoglycemic attack is a sudden episode of low blood sugar.
  • Hypokalaemia: Decreased concentration of potassium in the blood
  • Hyponatraemia: Hyponatraemia means there is a lower than normal concentration of sodium in the blood.
  • Hyponatremia: An electrolyte disturbance involving low sodium levels in the blood. Symptoms are determined by the degree of imbalance. Very low sodium levels can cause water intoxication which can be very dangerous.
  • Hypoparathyroidism: causesd by lack of PTH
  • Hypophosphatemia: Low blood phosphate levels. Causes include malnourishment, chronic alcoholism excessive carbohydrate consumption, malabsorption, phosphaturia, liver failure, respiratory alkalosis and certain genetic disorders.
  • Hypopituitarism: A condition characterized by diminished hormonal section by the pituitary gland
  • Hypothermia: Low body temperature
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypoxia: This is where there is a reduction of oxygen supply to parts of the body below what is required for adequate perfusion
  • Inborn urea cycle disorder: A genetic disorder involving a deficiency of one of the enzymes needed in the urea cycle. The urea cycle is the process of removing ammonia from blood stream by converting it to urea and excreting it via urine. A build-up of ammonia in the blood is toxic to the body and can cause serious brain damage. The progressively severe symptoms usually become obvious within the first few weeks of birth. Nevertheless, mild or partial enzyme deficiencies may cause little or no symptoms or symptoms that don't start until later in life.
  • Increased intracranial pressure: Increased pressure inside the skull due to brain swelling or fluid accumulation
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Intermittent delirium: Intermittent delirium is a state that occurs on and off in which a person is seriously disorientated and confused and may experience hallucinations.
  • Intracranial hemorrhage: Intracranial hemorrhage is a condition in which there is bleeding within the cranium of the skull.
  • Isoniazid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Isoniazid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Japanese pagoda tree poisoning: A deciduous tree which bears clusters of fragrant, pea-like flowers. The plant originated in China and is often used as an ornamental tree. The seeds contain a chemical which can cause symptoms if eaten. The seeds are considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Junin virus:
  • Kidney failure: The inability of the kidney to function correctly in its function of excreting metabolites from the blood
  • Legionnaires' disease: A severe respiratory disease which is caused by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria. The condition can result in pneumonia and can be life-threatening.
  • Level of consciousness symptoms: Symptoms related to consciousness such as coma or loss of consciousness.
  • Level of consciousness, decreased: A decrease in the state of being conscious
  • Lhermitte-McAlpine syndrome: A type of neurodegenerative disorder that involves pyramidal and extrapyramidal symptoms. It can occur in middle-aged or old people and usually results in death within a year of onset.
  • Lidocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lidocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lithium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lithium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Liver failure: When the liver fails to function
  • Liver symptoms: Symptoms affecting the liver
  • Lorazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lorazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Low blood pressure: Low blood pressure refers to blood pressure that is lower than the range that is considered normal. This may or may not cause symptoms and a person with low blood pressure may be catastrophically unwell, or perfectly well depending on the cause. Blood pressure refers to the pressure of the blood circulating through the blood vessels.
  • Lysergic Acid Diethylamide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lysergic Acid Diethylamide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Machupo virus: A virus which is the cause of a form of hemorrhagic fever occurring in Bolivia
  • Malaria: A parasitic disease transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Malignant hypertension: Malignant hypertension is a condition characterized by very high blood pressure and swelling of the optic nerve. This type of hypertension is more common in people with kidney problems such as narrowed kidney blood vessels. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Marburg virus: Serious virus related to Ebola.
  • Marijuana -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Marijuana during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Marijuana overdose: Marijuana is a relatively common recreational drug sometimes used to manage pain or stress disorders. Very large amounts have to be smoked or eaten in order to result in overdose symptoms and death is extremely unlikely. The symptoms of excessive doses are more unpleasant than dangerous.
  • Memory symptoms: Symptoms related to memory ability such as forgetfulness.
  • Meningitis: Infection of the membrane around the brain (as a symptom)
  • Meningococcal disease: Dangerous bacterial infection causing meningitis or bacteremia.
  • Meningoencephalitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the brain and meninges
  • Mental problems: Symptoms affecting judgement, thought or intelligence.
  • Mercury poisoning -- Folk Remedies: Various folk remedies and medicines contain inorganic mercury and mercury salts. They can lead to mercury poisoning and severe cases can result in death. Children tend to be more sensitive to the effects of mercury poisoning than adults. Even low levels of exposure can cause neurological symptoms in infants and young children. Fetal exposure to mercury can also result in symptoms.
  • Mercury poisoning -- consumption of contaminated fish: Eating fish contaminated with mercury can lead to mercury poisoning in humans. The severity and range of symptoms experienced can vary greatly depending on the level and duration of exposure. Severe poisoning can lead to death. Pregnant women who eat mercury contaminated fish may give birth to infants who suffer symptoms such as ataxia, tremors, seizures, mental retardation and cerebral palsy. An epidemic was reported where hundreds of Japanese villagers suffered mercury poisoning after eating fish contaminated by a nearby factory. Nearly half of the victims eventually died and children born during that period suffered a variety of neurological problems.
  • Metabolic disorder: occurs when abnormal chemical reactions occur in the body
  • Methyldopa -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methyldopa during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Methylmalonicacidemia with homocystinuria, cbl D: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (cblD) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylphenidate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methylphenidate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Microcephaly brain defect spasticity hypernatremia: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a small head, brain defect, spasticity and high sodium level.
  • Mixed connective tissue disease: A rare disorder of the connective tissue which affects a range of body tissues and organs.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Myxedema: The most severe form of hypothyroidism characterized by swelling of extremities and face.
  • Narcolepsy 1: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder where characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Some cases are linked to a genetic anomaly - Type 1 is linked to an anomaly on chromosome 6p21.
  • Narcolepsy 2: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder where characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Some cases are linked to a genetic anomaly - Type 2 is linked to an anomaly on chromosome 4q13-q21.
  • Narcolepsy 3: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder where characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Some cases are linked to a genetic anomaly - Type 3 is linked to an anomaly on chromosome 21q11.2.
  • Narcolepsy 4: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder where characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Some cases are linked to a genetic anomaly - Type 1 is linked to an anomaly on chromosome 22q13.
  • Narcolepsy 5: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder where characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Some cases are linked to a genetic anomaly - Type 5 is linked to an anomaly on chromosome 14q11.2.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurocysticercosis: Brain/CNS infection with the tapeworm Cysticercosis
  • Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A severe, potentially fatal reaction to antipsychotic drugs.
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Norfloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Norfloxacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nortriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nortriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nutritional deficiency: Any deficiency of the nutrients that are required to sustain human life
  • Oleander poisoning: The oleander is a flowering shrub or small tree which bears clusters of flowers. The plant originated from Eurasia and is often used as an ornamental plant. The plant contains chemicals (cardiac glycosides: nerioside, oleandroside; saponins) which are very toxic if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The toxicity within a species can vary depending on the season. As little as seven leaves have been reported to cause poisoning symptoms. Poisoning can occur from inhaling smoke from burning oleander leaves.
  • Pain: Any type of pain sensation symptoms.
  • Pellagra: Dietary deficiency of vitamin B3 (niacin)
  • Personality symptoms: Symptoms or changes to the personality.
  • Pheochromocytoma: pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor that usually starts in the cells of the adrenal glands
  • Pituitary apoplexy: A rare disorder usually caused by bleeding or blood vessel blockage of a pituitary tumor. It causes symptoms such as headache, nausea, vision problems and altered consciousness.
  • Pizotifen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Pizotifen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Plague: Any epidemic disease with a high death rate.
  • Plant poisoning -- Angel's trumpet (D. suaveolans): Ingestion of Angel's trumpet can cause various symptoms which can be severe in some cases.
  • Plant poisoning -- Digitalis glycoside: Digitalis glycoside is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the foxglove. The main symptoms of relatively mild poisoning are gastrointestinal and the effect on the heart usually results in changes in heart rate. Serious cases can result in symptoms such as convulsions and hallucinations.
  • Plant poisoning -- Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical metabolized by the human digestive system from a naturally occurring chemical called arbutin found in the leaves of plants such as blueberries, cranberries, bearberries and red whortleberries. The main symptoms are irritation of the gastrointestinal mucosa but severe poisoning can cause systemic symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning -- Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium): Ingestion of Jimsonweed can cause various symptoms which can be severe in some cases.
  • Plant poisoning -- potato (Solanum tuberosum): Ingestion of green potatoes or potato sprouts can cause various symptoms which can be severe in some cases.
  • Pneumonia: Lung infection or inflammation (as a symptom)
  • Poisoning: The condition produced by poison
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Porphyria, Ala-D: A very rare inherited disorder where involving a lack of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Carbon tetrachloride: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Carbon tetrachloride has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Carbon tetrachloride is used in a variety of applications such as in cleaning agents, refrigerants and fire extinguishers. Exposure to the chemical is most likely to occur in an occupational setting or through exposure to contaminated air, water or soil near manufacturing plants or waste sites.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Lead: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Lead has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Oxazepam: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Oxazepam (a pharmaceutical drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenobarbital: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenobarbital (a pharmaceutical drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenytoin: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenytoin (an anticonvulsant medication) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Prednisolone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Prednisolone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Presbycusis: High frequency hearing loss associated with difficulty in speech differentiation.
  • Primidone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Primidone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Prochlorperazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Prochlorperazine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Psychiatric symptom: Psychiatric mental health symptoms such as psychosis.
  • Quinine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Quinine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Rabies: An infectious disease that can affect any mammal including humans and is transmitted through the saliva of an infected animal. The infectious agent is the Neurotropic lyssavirus which affects the salivary gland and also causes neurological symptoms.
  • Recrudescent typhus: A condition characterized by mild typhus occurring years after the initial infection
  • Reduced alertness: A condition which is characterized by a decreased level of consciousness
  • Respiratory acidosis: respiratory acidosis is acidosis (abnormally increased acidity of the blood) due to decreased ventilation of the pulmonary alveoli, leading to elevated arterial carbon dioxide concentration
  • Respiratory depression: Also known as bradyapnea is the decreased rate of breathing.
  • Respiratory failure: A condition which is due to marked impairment of respiratory function
  • Reye's syndrome: is a potentially fatal disease that causes numerous detrimental effects to many organs, especially the brain and liver
  • Rheumatic fever: An inflammatory disorder that can occur as a complication of untreated streptococcal bacterial infection such as strep throat or scarlet fever. The condition may affect the brain, skin, heart and joints.
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever: A bacterial disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and transmitted by ticks. The condition causes fever and a characteristic rash and may be fatal in severe or untreated cases.
  • Schizoaffective disorder: A psychiatric condition in which symptoms of a mood disorder occur with prominent psychotic symptoms
  • Seizures: Uncontrolled physical movements
  • Septic shock: serious medical condition caused by decreased tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery as a result of infection and sepsis, though the microbe may be systemic or localized to a particular site
  • Septicemia: A systemic inflammatory response to an infection.
  • Serotonin Syndrome: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Shallow breathing: Small breathes (usually with rapid breathing)
  • Shock: Physical and mental reaction to reduced circulation
  • Skull symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skull surrounding the brain.
  • Sleep dept: Sleep debt is a term used to describe the cumulative effects of insufficient sleep. It refers to the time difference between the recommended amount of sleep to the amount of sleep actually achieved.
  • Status epilepticus: A condition which is characterized by a continuous series of generalized tonic clonic seizures
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Stupor: Mental sub-responsiveness not as severe as coma
  • Subarachnoid haemorrhage: A condition which is characterized by haemorrhage of blood into the subarachnoid space
  • Subdural hematoma: A condition which is characterized by a blood clot beneath the dura mater
  • Surgical Wound Infection: Infection that occurs at the site of a surgery.
  • Syncope: Loss or interruption of consciousness.
  • Tacrolimus -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tacrolimus during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Temazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Temazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy: A condition which is characterized by complex partial seizures
  • Texas Mescalbean poisoning: Texas Mescalbean is a shrub which bears blueish-purple, scented flowers and a seed pod containing vibrant red seeds. The brightly colored seeds are often used to make necklaces. The seeds contain alkaloids which can cause symptoms if they are eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Thallium poisoning: The poisoning of a person with the element thallium
  • Thiamine deficiency: Dietary deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine)
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, acquired: A rare blood condition where small blood clots form in blood vessels which reduces the number of blood platelets and results in kidney failure, neurological symptoms and anemia. The condition may be familial or acquired - symptoms tend to recur regularly in the familial form.
  • Tolterodine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Anticholinergic: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called ibotenic acid which causes anticholinergic symptoms. Ibotenic acid is converted to muscimol during digestion. The two toxins have opposing actions which results in initial excitation symptoms followed by a prolonged coma-like sleep. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Amanita sp. - cothurnata, crenulata, frostiana, gemmata, muscaria and pantherina. Eating two to four mushrooms can result in impaired senses and eating more than twenty usually results in death.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Monomethylhydrazine: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called gyromitrin which is converted to monomethylhydrazine after digestion. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Gyromitra, Helvella, Sarcosphaera and Peziza. Poisoning may occur from inhaling fumes from cooking mushrooms. The amount of toxin varies amongst and within species but some are toxic enough to cause death. Urgent medical attention should be sought if mushroom poisoning is suspected.
  • Transient global amnesia: Sudden, short-term memory loss
  • Tumor: Abnormal tissue growth which may be malignant or benign.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Unconsciousness: A condition which is characterized by impaired consciousness
  • Unresponsiveness: Poor response to questions or actions
  • Urea Cycle Disorders: Any disorder that affects the urea cycle.
  • Uremia: Build up of toxins usually excreted by the kidneys, associated with real failure in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Urinary tract infection: Infection of the urinary tract
  • Urine retention: Excessive holding of urine in the body.
  • Vancomycin resistant enterococcal bacteremia: A condition which is characterised by bacteremia caused by an enterococci that is resistant to vancomycin.
  • Vasculitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation to blood vessels
  • Vicodin overdose: Vicodin is a prescription drug used to pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Viral hemorrhagic fever: A group of diseases caused by viruses which cause damage to blood vessels and result in hemorrhages and fever. The hemorrhaging does not always cause serious bleeding. The specific symptoms may vary depending on which particular virus is involved.
  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A deficiency of Vitamin B12 primarily causes anemias the body is unable to make sufficient quantities of normal red blood cells. Severe cases can lead to permanent nervous system problems. The vitamin B12 deficiency can result from absorption problems, insufficient dietary intake, certain medications (e.g. metformin), inherited conditions (e.g. transcobalamin deficiency) and certain chronic parasitic intestinal infestations.
  • Wernicke's encephalopathy: Brain condition with various effects
  • White snakeroot poisoning: White snakeroot is a herbaceous plant which is found mainly growing in the wild in the US and has round clusters of small white flowers. The plant contains a chemical called tremetol which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms in people who drink the raw milk or eat the meat from cows who have fed on the plant. The plant itself is considered very poisonous to humans and eating the plant can result in death.
  • Yellow fever: A viral infection transmitted by mosquito bites which can damage various organs such as the liver, heart, kidney and digestive tract.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Delirium:

The following list of conditions have 'Delirium' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Delirium:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Delirium' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: May 10, 2004

 

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