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Symptoms » Dementia » Glossary
 

Glossary for Dementia

Medical terms related to Dementia or mentioned in this section include:

  • A ?-protein amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. This particular form involves deposits of ?-proteins in the nerves resulting in Alzheimer's disease or around brain blood vessels which can cause strokes or brain bleeds.
  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Acute Alzheimers-like concentration difficulty: maybe to due to various causative agents
  • Acute Alzheimers-like confusion symptoms: unalterable confusion state
  • Acute Alzheimers-like memory loss: also known as dementia
  • Acute Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute episodes of Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms of Alzheimer's disease such as dementia can occur in bouts
  • Acute fulminant multiple sclerosis: Malignant Multiple Sclerosis, is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Thankfully very rare, this highly aggressive form is defined by its swift and relentless decline to significant disability or even death, often within a few weeks or months after the onset of the initial attack. It is characterized by widespread and progressive cerebral white matter destruction or by severe pathological involvement of clinically strategic regions such as brainstem, resulting in bulbar paralysis.
  • Adult Polyglucosan Body Disease: A condition which is a glycogen storage disease causing hepatosplenomegaly and failure to thrive
  • Aguecheek disease: Patients with liver disease who develop symptoms of dementia after eating lots of protein (meat has a high protein level) due to an intolerance to the nitrogenous compounds in the protein.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Alexander Syndrome: Brain myelin disorder causing mental degeneration.
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Aluminium poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to aluminium.
  • Aluminium toxicity: High body levels of aluminium resulting in symptoms. Usually occurs in patients with renal impairment.
  • Alzheimer disease 10: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 10 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 12: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 12 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 8p12-q22.
  • Alzheimer disease 13: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 14: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q25. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 15: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q22-q24. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 5: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 5 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12p11.
  • Alzheimer disease 6: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 6 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10q24.
  • Alzheimer disease 7: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 7 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 8: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 8 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Alzheimer disease 9: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 9 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Alzheimer disease type 1: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 1 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the APP gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease type 2: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 2 has a late onset - starts after the age of 65. It is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic mutations and environmental and lifestyle factors. The condition occurs when there is excessive production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease type 4: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 4 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the PSEN2 gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. The familial form is very rare and is completely inherited and has an early onset (usually in the 4th decade). It occurs when there is excessive production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 1: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, type 3: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 3 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the PSEN1 gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer's Disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Alzheimer's disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Alzheimer's disease without Neurofibrillary tangles: A form of Alzheimer's that involves only plaques and no neurofibrillary tangles. This form tends to have an older age of onset and death and a shorter disease duration.
  • Alzheimer's-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Alzheimers-like concentration difficulty: maybe to due to various causative agents
  • Alzheimers-like confusion symptoms: unalterable confusion state
  • Alzheimers-like memory loss: also known as dementia
  • Amelo-cerebro-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving degeneration of the central nervous system, seizures and abnormal tooth development.
  • Amnesia: A disorder in which the ability to store and recall new information, as well as past information may be lost.
  • Amyloid angiopathy: A blood vessel disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the blood vessel walls of the brain. The deposits can cause the blood vessel to become weak and rupture resulting in intracranial bleeding. Despite the potentially serious consequences the disorder is often asymptomatic until old age.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis VI: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In the Icelandic type, the amyloid deposits affect the brain blood vessels and cause hemorrhages.
  • Amyloidosis VII: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In the Ohio type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages as well as vision impairment.
  • Amyloidosis, cerebroarterial, hereditary, Iowa type: An inherited form of amyloidosis caused by a defect in the APP gene on chromosome 21q21. Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In this form, the deposits affect the brain arteries.
  • Amyloidosis, cerebroarterial, hereditary, Italian type: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In the Italian type, the amyloid deposits affect the brain blood vessels and cause hemorrhages.
  • Amyloidosis, oculoleptomeningeal: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In this particular type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages and vision impairment.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism-dementia complex: A nerve degeneration disorder that involves progressive dementia and parkinsonism which ultimately leads to death.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism/dementia complex 2: A nerve degeneration disorder that involves progressive dementia and parkinsonism which ultimately leads to death.
  • Angiomatosis, diffuse corticomeningeal, of Divry and Van Bogaert: A rare condition characterized by diffuse sclerosis and clusters of capillaries in parts of the brain as well as a marbled appearance to the skin.
  • Apnea: Periods of absence of breathing
  • Ataxia: Failure of muscular coordination
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Atherosclerosis, premature -- deafness -- diabetes mellitus -- photomyoclonus -- nephropathy -- degenerative neurologic disease: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Atherosclerosis- deafness -- diabetes -- epilepsy -- nephropathy: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Atlantic mussel food poisoning: Atlantic mussels contain a toxin called domoic acid which can affect nerve tissue. The mussels are found in the North Atlantic and Pacific coast and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Autoimmune limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by autoimmune processes.
  • Batten Disease: Rare childhood genetic degenerative nerve system disease.
  • Behavioral symptoms: Symptoms of personal behavior.
  • Beriberi: Disease due to vitamin B1 deficiency (thiamine)
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: This is a medical condition caused by the transmission of an infective prion causing an encephalopathy
  • Brain -- bone -- fat: A rare inherited disease characterized by bone cysts and progressive presenile dementia.
  • Brain cancer: Cancer of the brain.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain damage: A condition which is characterized by damage to the brain resulting in a decrease in function
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumor: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal growth of tissue within the brain
  • Bromides -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bromides during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cadasil: A rare inherited condition which affects the small blood vessels of the brain. Damage to the vessels causes strokes and other problems.
  • Calcification of basal ganglia with or without hypocalcemia: Calcification of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia. That calcification may be associated with conditions such as hypothyroidism, cytomegalovirus, and AIDS or may occur for no apparent reason. The severity of the condition may vary greatly from asymptomatic to neurological, psychiatric and movement disorders. The disorder may also progress at variable rates or remain stable depending on the underlying disease process.
  • Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy, Familial: A rare disorder where abnormal deposits of amyloid in the brain blood vessels causes spasticity, incoordination and dementia. Brain hemorrhage and strokes may also result in severe cases.
  • Cerebral Atrophy: Wasting away of the brain.
  • Cerebral Autosomal Recessive Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy: A rare inherited condition characterized primarily by progressive degeneration of the brain white matter and disease of the brain blood vessels as well as additional symptoms not involving the brain e.g. thin skin, alopecia and spinal disc disease.
  • Cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, hereditary, Dutch type: An inherited condition characterized mainly by brain hemorrhage and amyloid deposits in the brain blood vessels. The size and location of the hemorrhage determines the severity of symptoms. The condition was first described in a Dutch family.
  • Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosus: A rare syndrome where a genetic mutation results in a metabolic disorders caused by a deficiency of sterol 27-hydroxylase deficiency. The condition causes progressive neurological dysfunction, cataracts and premature atherosclerosis. Deposits of cholesterol and cholestanol can be found in any part of the body including the brain. The rate of progression and severity of symptoms varying amongst patients. The degree of neurological involvement is also variable.
  • Cerebrovascular accident: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). The 10 different type of the disorder are distinguished by the origin of the genetic defect.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 1, infantile: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the progressive accumulation of certain chemicals (lipopigments) in body tissues due to deficiency of an enzyme (palmitoyl-protein thioesterase) needed to process it.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 10: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 10 involves a deficiency of cathepsin D and involves an initial period of normal development with neurodegenerative symptoms starting during the early school years.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 2, late infantile type: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the progressive accumulation of certain chemicals (lipopigments) in body tissues due to deficiency of an enzyme (protease tri-peptidyl-peptidase) needed to process it.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 4: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the progressive accumulation of certain chemicals (lipopigments) in body tissues due to deficiency of an enzyme (palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1) needed to process it.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 5: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 5 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 6, late infantile: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 6 usually occurs between the ages of 2 to 6 years. Type 6 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 7: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 7 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 8: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 8 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Camphor: Camphor is a chemical used mainly in moth repellents, pharmaceuticals (preservative) cosmetics, explosives, varnishes and various therapeutic applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbon Tetrachloride: Carbon tetrachloride is a chemical used mainly in grain fumigants, insecticides and in the production of fluorocarbons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydrogen Sulfide: Hydrogen Sulfide is a chemical that can be used in production processes (paper, tanneries, sulfide ores) or it may be a byproduct of certain industries. It is also found naturally in sewers and manure. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methanol: Methanol is a chemical used mainly in fuel, paint removers, solvent, antifreeze and in the production process of many other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene: Toluene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides, degreasers, glues and pain removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Xylene: Xylene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and in the manufacture of glue, paint, paper, rubber, pharmaceuticals and polymers. It is also used as a solvent and clarifier for microscopic tissue examinations in laboratories. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Childhood disintegrative disorder: A rare disorder where a period of normal development (a couple of years) is followed by delays in the development of motor, social and language skills. Previously acquired skills are lost.
  • Choreoacanthocytosis amyotrophic: A rare inherited disease involving neurological degeneration and abnormal red blood cell shape. The disorder progresses slowly and causes involuntary movements, loss of cognitive ability, behavioral changes and seizures.
  • Chronic Alzheimers-like concentration difficulty: maybe to due to various causative agents
  • Chronic Alzheimers-like confusion symptoms: unalterable confusion state
  • Chronic Alzheimers-like memory loss: also known as dementia
  • Chronic Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Chronic Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephaliti: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic episodes of Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms of Alzheimer's disease such as dementia can occur in bouts
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Chronic meningitis: Chronic meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges with subacute onset and persisting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormalities lasting for at least one month.
  • Classic childhood ALD: Classic severe form of ALD in boys.
  • Coenzyme Q cytochrome c reductase deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (CoQ-Cytochrome C reductase) disrupts cellular processes. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. The deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms and conditions of variable severity such as cardiomyopathy, fatal infant conditions and Leber's myopathy.
  • Cognitive impairment: General loss of mental or cognitive ability
  • Complex 1 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Complex 2 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (succinate CoQ reductase) disrupts cellular processes. The deficiency may result variable symptoms and condition including conditions such as Leigh's syndrome, myopathy and Kearns-Sayre syndrome.
  • Confusion: Mental confusion and impaired thinking.
  • Confusion in children: Confusion in children is an abnormal mental condition in a child that can include such features as disorientation, trouble with thinking clearly or quickly, and forgetfulness.
  • Confusion leading to stupor: altered level of consciousness
  • Confusion symptoms: Symptoms closely related to mental confusion.
  • Corticobasal Degeneration: A rare progressive neurological disorder where parts of the brain deteriorate.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Deafness -- Opticoacoustic nerve atrophy -- dementia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by degeneration of the optic nerve (causing impaired vision), deafness due to nerve damage and dementia due to calcification of the central nervous system. Death usually results by about the age of 40 with extensive calcification of all parts of the nervous system.
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Decreased folate: Decrease in one of the B vitamins required for red blood cell production
  • Delirium: Severe mental deterioration
  • Delirium in children: Delirium in children is a condition in which a child experiences sudden confusion and cognitive changes that can occur due to physical or mental diseases or disorders..
  • Delirium tremens: A condition which occurs due to the withdrawal of a substance particularly alcohol and results in tremors of the hands and arms
  • Dementia: Mental confusion and impaired thought.
  • Dementia With Lewy Bodies: Second most frequent cause of dementia in elderly adults.
  • Dementia, familial Danish: A rare inherited form of dementia caused by the deposit of abnormal substances in the brain, spinal cord and retina and the degeneration of brain tissue. Deafness and cataracts usually started in the 20's with severe deafness occurring by the age of 45. Movement problems usually started after the age of 40 with death occurring in the 5th or 6th decade.
  • Dentatorubral Pallidoluysian Atrophy: A condition caused by an abnormality of the DNA sequence on chromosome 12
  • Depressive episode: Mood disorder where depression is not associated with a manic episode
  • Down Syndrome: A chromosome syndrome causing physical effects and mental retardation.
  • Dykes-Markes-Harper syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by dry, scaly skin, enlarged liver and spleen and a incoordination.
  • Dysphasic dementia, hereditary: An inherited form of dementia caused by nerve degeneration.
  • Encephalitis: Infection of the brain (as a symptom)
  • Ependymoma: A tumor that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Symptoms vary according to the aggressiveness, size and exact location of the tumor.
  • Epilepsy, myoclonic progressive familial: A progressive central nervous system disorder characterized by involuntary muscle jerking that can involve just the limbs or the whole body.
  • Episodes of Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms of Alzheimer's disease such as dementia can occur in bouts
  • Ethanol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethanol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Fahr's Syndrome: A rare neurologic disorder where calcium is deposited in various parts of the brain resulting in progressive loss of motor and mental function.
  • Familial chronic infantile diffuse sclerosis: A degenerative brain disease involving deterioration of the brain white matter which affects motor and mental functioning. The chronic infantile form starts during infancy and progresses slowly with survival possible to middle age.
  • Familial infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy -- late infantile: An infantile form of an inherited biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme called cerebroside sulfatase. The enzyme deficiency causes cerebroside sulfate to build up within the body and causes damage to the nervous system including the brain. The late infantile form of this disease is much more common than the juvenile or adult form.
  • Feigenbaum-Bergeron-Richardson syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Fochs-LADD: A rare familial disorder characterized by brain disease, calcification in the brain, bleeding in the brain and dementia.
  • Fronto-temporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17): A rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by a genetic anomaly and characterized by dementia and parkinsonism.
  • Frontotemporal dementia: A degenerative brain disease involving frontal and temporal brain lobes resulting in dementia. Degeneration of the frontal lobe causes behavioral and personality changes degeneration of the temporal lobe causes semantic dementia.
  • GSS: A rare familial brain disease caused by a pathogen called prions.
  • Genetic Parkinson disease: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Giant axonal neuropathy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by incoordination, vision problems and dementia caused by abnormalities of a nerve cell component.
  • Gliomatosis cerebri: A rare, aggressive type of malignant brain tumor. Cancerous glial cells infiltrate various parts of the brain and can result in a variety of symptoms.
  • Guam disease: A nerve degeneration disorder that occurs particularly in Guam and involves progressive dementia and parkinsonism which ultimately leads to death.
  • HHV-6 encephalitis: A rare condition that usually occurs in immunocompromised people such as those undergoing transplants or HIV patients. The condition causes neurological symptoms.
  • HIV-1, CRF01_AE: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/E occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1, CRF02_AG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/G involves both And G subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/G occurs mainly in west and central Africas well as Taiwan.
  • HIV-1, CRF04_ cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/B involves both And B subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF_cpx is made up of a combination of subtypes A, G, H, K, and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cyprus and Greece.
  • HIV-1, CRF05_ D/F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF D/F involves both D and F subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF D/F occurs mainly in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF06_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF06_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G, J and K - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Burkina Faso and Mali.
  • HIV-1, CRF07_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF07_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF08_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF08_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF11_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF11_cpx is extremely rare and appears to include a mix of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G and J - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF12_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF B/F has been diagnosed in Uruguay and Argentina.
  • HIV-1, CRF13_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF13_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G, J and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF14_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF14_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Spain.
  • HIV-1, CRF15_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF15_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B.
  • HIV-1, CRF16_ A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF16_ A2D involves a combination of subtypes A2 and D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Kenyand South Korea.
  • HIV-1, CRF17_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF17_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF18_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF18_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, F, G, H, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF19_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF19_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, D and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF20_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF20_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF21_A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF21_A2D involves a combination of subtypes A, D and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF22_01A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF22_01A1 involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF23_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF23_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF24_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF24_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF25_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF25_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon and Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1, CRF26_AU: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF26_AU involves a combination of subtypes And U.
  • HIV-1, CRF27_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF27_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, G, H, J, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF28_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF28_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF29_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF29_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF30_0206: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF30_0206 involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and CRF06 (A, G, J and K).
  • HIV-1, CRF31_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF31_BC involves a combination of subtypes B and C.
  • HIV-1, CRF32_06A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF32_06A1involves a combination of subtypes CRF06 (A, G, J, K) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF33_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF33_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Malaysia.
  • HIV-1, CRF34_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF34_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Thailand.
  • HIV-1, CRF35_AD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF35_AD involves a combination of subtypes And D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Afghanistan.
  • HIV-1, CRF36_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF36_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF37_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF37_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF38_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF38_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF39_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF39_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF40_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF40_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF41_CD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF41_CD involves a combination of subtypes C and D.
  • HIV-1, CRF42_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF42_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F1.
  • HIV-1, CRF43_02G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF43_02G involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and G. This type has been diagnosed in Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype A is most prevalent in West Africa.
  • HIV-1A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A1 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A2 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A3: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A3 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype B is most prevalent in Thailand, Australia, Japan, Europe and America. This subtype tends to be transmitted mainly by homosexual contact and intravenous drug use i.e. infection occurs mainly through blood exposure.
  • HIV-1C: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype C is most prevalent in Nepal, India and Southern and Eastern parts of Africa. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype and is transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype D is most prevalent in the Eastern and Central parts of Africa and tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1E: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype E has to date not occurred on its own but has occurred in combination with subtype A in a subtype called CRF A/E. This subtype occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype F is most prevalent in Eastern Europe, South America and Central Africa.
  • HIV-1F1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F1 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1F2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F2 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype G is most prevalent in Africa and central parts of Europe. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1H: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype H is most prevalent in central parts of Africa.
  • HIV-1J: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype J is most prevalent in central America.
  • HIV-1K: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype K is most prevalent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cameroon.
  • HIV-1M: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1 group M is the most common form of HIV accounting for roughly 90% of cases worldwide.
  • HIV-1N: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group N is very rare and has only been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1O: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group O is very rare and has only been diagnosed in the western parts of Central Africa. This type is more difficult to diagnose and the standard test kits are not sensitive enough to pick up the virus.
  • HIV-2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-2 is very rare and is generally only diagnosed in Africa but a number of cases have been diagnosed in the US. HIV-2 is less easily transmitted than HIV-1 and the time between infection and symptoms tends to be longer in HIV-2.
  • HIV-2A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV-2B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disease occurring in children and involving iron accumulation in the brain. It is characterized by dementia, rigidity and athetosis.
  • Hallervorden-Spatz disease: Nerve disorder causing movement problems.
  • Hartnup Disease: A disorder of amino acid transport resulting in light sensitive dermatitis, ataxia, migraines and personality changes.
  • Hashimoto's encephalitis: A rare but serious condition that can occur when thyroid antibodies, such as those present in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, involve the brain tissue and cause neurological symptoms.
  • Head injury: Any injury that occurs to the head
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heidenhain syndrome: A form of premature dementia caused by degeneration of the brain. It is considered a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Heidenhain syndrome is characterized mainly by eye problems whereas Creutzfeldt-Jakob predominantly involves ataxia.
  • Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an abnormal appearance of histiocytes in the blood
  • Herrmann syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by deafness, diabetes, kidney disease, brain dysfunction and muscle spasms.
  • Huntington's Disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Huntington's disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Hydrocephalus: A condition which is characterized by marked dilatation of the cerebral ventricles
  • Increased intracranial pressure: Increased pressure inside the skull due to brain swelling or fluid accumulation
  • Intermittent Alzheimers-like concentration difficulty: maybe to due to various causative agents
  • Intermittent Alzheimers-like confusion symptoms: unalterable confusion state
  • Intermittent Alzheimers-like memory loss: also known as dementia
  • Intermittent Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Intermittent confusion: Intermittent confusion is a mental state that comes and goes in which a person is disorientated to time, person, or place.
  • Intermittent delirium: Intermittent delirium is a state that occurs on and off in which a person is seriously disorientated and confused and may experience hallucinations.
  • Intermittent episodes of Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms of Alzheimer's disease such as dementia can occur in bouts
  • Irreversible confusion: unalterable confusion state
  • Jankovic-Rivera syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by involuntary muscle jerking and progressive muscle wasting in the hands and feet.
  • Jensen syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by degeneration of the optic nerve (causing impaired vision), deafness due to nerve damage and dementia due to calcification of the central nervous system. Death usually results by about the age of 40 with extensive calcification of all parts of the nervous system.
  • Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma: A type of brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. The tumor is derived from a type of cell called an astrocyte and it can occur in various parts of the brain as well as the optic pathways and the spinal cord. Malignancy is rare. Symptoms may vary depending on the size and location of the tumor.
  • Kidney disease: Reduced kidney function from various causes.
  • Kidney failure: The inability of the kidney to function correctly in its function of excreting metabolites from the blood
  • Kidney symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both kidneys.
  • Kuru: An infectious prion disease that is only found in New Guinea
  • Lafora body disease: A condition characterized by attacks of intermittent or continuous clonus of muscle groups
  • Lafora disease: A rare genetic disorder caused by the inclusion of a substance called Lafora bodies in cells throughout the body. The condition is progressive and causes progressive seizures and dementia.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Lesch-Nyhan syndrome: Inherited biochemical disorder of purine metabolism caused by the virtual absence of an enzyme called hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase or HPRT.
  • Leukoencephalopathy: Immune destruction of the myelin cover of nerves.
  • Level of consciousness, decreased: A decrease in the state of being conscious
  • Limbic encephalitis: Inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions.
  • Lissauer paralysis: Diffuse degeneration of one side of the cerebral cortex which causes dementia, weakness and seizures.
  • Liver conditions: Any condition that affects the liver
  • Liver failure: When the liver fails to function
  • Liver symptoms: Symptoms affecting the liver
  • Loss of memory: The loss of ones ability to recall things from ones memory
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • MELAS: A mitochondrial disorder characterized by stroke-like episodes, headaches, vomiting and other neurological symptoms.
  • Macrocytosis: Blood condition where average red blood cell size is increased
  • Manganese poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to manganese.
  • Marburg multiple sclerosis: Malignant Multiple Sclerosis, is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Thankfully very rare, this highly aggressive form is defined by its swift and relentless decline to significant disability or even death, often within a few weeks or months after the onset of the initial attack. It is characterized by widespread and progressive cerebral white matter destruction or by severe pathological involvement of clinically strategic regions such as brainstem, resulting in bulbar paralysis.
  • Marchiafava-Bignami disease: A progressive syndrome associated with alcohol abuse and/or nutritional disorder. It is characterized by fits, stupor, dementia and coma.
  • Marijuana abuse: Illicit depressant/hallucinogenic drug
  • Mc Leod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by neuromuscular, blood and central nervous system symptoms. The disease is slowly progressive.
  • Melanoma -- astrocytoma syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of a melanoma with a type of brain tumor called an astrocytoma. The exact symptoms may vary depending on the exact location of the brain tumor.
  • Memory symptoms: Symptoms related to memory ability such as forgetfulness.
  • Meningioma: A slow-growing tumor of the meninges that is not cancerous. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor.
  • Mental problems: Symptoms affecting judgement, thought or intelligence.
  • Mercury -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Mercury during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mercury poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to mercury.
  • Metachromatic Leukodystrophy: An inherited biochemical deficiency involving a deficiency of the enzyme called arylsulfatase A which leads to a harmful buildup of fatty material in the body.
  • Mild Alzheimers-like concentration difficulty: maybe to due to various causative agents
  • Mild Alzheimers-like confusion symptoms: unalterable confusion state
  • Mild Alzheimers-like memory loss: also known as dementia
  • Mild Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Mild episodes of Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms of Alzheimer's disease such as dementia can occur in bouts
  • Mitochondrial diseases: Any of a group of mitochondrial disorders affecting cell metabolism and especially muscles.
  • Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy syndrome: A rare genetic disorder which affects a number of body systems and manifests results in symptoms such as droopy eyelids, progressive eye muscle weakness, gastrointestinal dysmotility, brain disease, thin body, peripheral neuropathy and muscle disease.
  • Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by nerve degeneration. Deafness usually occurs early in life.
  • Morgellons Disease: A rare disorder involving a variety of skin symptoms such as unusual sensations, skin lesions and the presence of fiber-like particles in or on the skin. There is still dissension over whether this is an actual disorder or whether it is a psychotic disorder or a skin disorder. Further research is being planned.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis III: Disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism in children.
  • Multi-Infarct Dementia: also known as vascular dementia
  • Multiinfarct dementia: also known as vascular dementia
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Myoclonus epilepsy: A form of epilepsy (brain function disturbance) associated with involuntary muscle twitching (myoclonus)
  • Myoclonus hereditary -- progressive distal muscular atrophy: A rare inherited disorder characterized by myoclonus and progressive distal muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Myoclonus progressive epilepsy of Unverricht and Lundborg: A rare genetic brain disease characterized by convulsions which become progressively worse. Modern treatment can have a big effect on the prognosis.
  • Myoclonus with epilepsy with ragged red fibers: A rare disorder of mitochondrial metabolism characterized by myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red muscle fibers. Mitochondria are the part of the body cells that produce energy.
  • Myotonic Dystrophy: An inherited disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting as well as eye defects, heart abnormalities and other anomalies. The severity of the condition is greatly variable. There are two type of myotonic dystrophy with type 1 being more severe than type 2.
  • Myxedema: The most severe form of hypothyroidism characterized by swelling of extremities and face.
  • NADH CoQ reductase, deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders neurodegenerative disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuroaxonal dystrophy, infantile: An inherited disorder involving progressive muscular and coordination problems, impaired brain function and speech and vision impairment.
  • Neuroferritinopathy: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation results in a neurological disease resulting from abnormal iron and ferritin deposits in the brain.
  • Neurological disorders related to AIDS: It usually occurs due to decreased immunity.
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Neurological system tumors: Tumors of the nerves or neurological system, whether cancerous or benign.
  • Neuropathy -- ataxia -- retinitis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy ataxia and retinis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neurosarcoidosis: A rare disorder involving sarcoidosis of the nervous system. Sarcoidosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect virtually any part of the body. Neurosarcoidosis involves inflammation and abnormal deposits in parts of the nervous system including the brain and spinal cord which affects their functioning. Symptoms may be sudden and severe or may be mild and progress slowly. Symptoms are determined by the degree of nerve involvement.
  • Neurosyphilis: Syphilis affecting the nervous system.
  • Niemann-Pick disease, type C1: Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited metabolic disorder where lipids are not able to be metabolized adequately and hence build up and cause damage in various parts of the body such as the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow and brain. The different types of the disease are due to different genetic mutations. Type C is a juvenile or subacute form of the condition which usually starts during childhood and survival into adulthood is possible.
  • Niemann-Pick disease, type D: Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited metabolic disorder where lipids are not able to be metabolized adequately and hence build up and cause damage in various parts of the body such as the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow and brain. Type D is no longer a relevant term as research has shown that it has the same genetic mutation as Type C and is therefore the same condition.
  • Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: A block in the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain, causing enlarged ventricles and brain atrophy.
  • Nutritional deficiency: Any deficiency of the nutrients that are required to sustain human life
  • Nyssen-Van Bogaert syndrome: An adult form of an inherited biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme called cerebroside sulfatase. The enzyme deficiency causes cerebroside sulfate to build up within the body and causes damage to the nervous system including the brain.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy, type V: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain results in symptoms such as tremor, ataxia and mental deterioration.
  • Opticoacoustic nerve atrophy dementia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by degeneration of the optic nerve (causing impaired vision), deafness due to nerve damage and dementia due to calcification of the central nervous system. Death usually results by about the age of 40 with extensive calcification of all parts of the nervous system.
  • Ovarioleukodystrophy: A rare syndrome characterized by ovarian failure and degeneration of the brain white matter which causes mental and motor problems.
  • Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: A rare, inherited, progressive neurological movement disorder where accumulation of iron in the brain causes degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by cancers such as small cell lung cancer.
  • Paraneoplastic syndromes:
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK4): Type 4 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. This form of the condition tends to start around the age of 45 years and progresses rapidly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant, Lewy body: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene on chromosome 4q21.
  • Parkinson disease 9: A genetic form of Parkinson disease (a progressive degeneration of the central nervous system) that progresses rapidly once it starts. Dementia, spasticity and eye movement problems are also characteristic of this form of Parkinson disease.
  • Parkinson disease 9 (PARK9): Type 9 Parkinson disease is linked to a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene on chromosome 1p36. This condition progresses rapidly and usually starts during the second decade of life. Dementia, eye movement problems and wasting of the brain tissue occur in addition to the typical symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease, familial, Type 1: A form of Parkinson's disease involving a mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene on chromosome 4q21.
  • Parkinson disease, genetic types: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Parkinson's disease dementia, familial: A condition characterized by the association of parkinsonism with dementia. Eye muscle weakness and pyramidal signs also develop in the early stage of the disease.
  • Pediatric AIDS: Pediatric AIDS is an immune system disease in infants or children caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Symptoms in children are similar to those of an adult but their susceptibility to various AIDS-related conditions varies e.g. children are less susceptible to Kaposi sarcoma, taxoplasmosis and cryptococcosis than adults.
  • Pellagra: Dietary deficiency of vitamin B3 (niacin)
  • Pernicious anemia: A megaloblastic anaemia due to malabsorption of the vitamin B12
  • Personality symptoms: Symptoms or changes to the personality.
  • Pick's Disease: Degenerative dementia condition.
  • Pick's disease of the brain: A degenerative brain disease involving the frontal and temporal brain lobes resulting primarily in progressive dementia and loss of motor and language functions. It is characterized by the presence of proteins called Pick bodies in damaged nerve cells.
  • Poisoning: The condition produced by poison
  • Polyglucosan body disease, adult: A rare progressive metabolic disorder that starts during adulthood and is characterized by loss of sensation, muscle weakness and wasting, reduced bladder control and dementia. The condition is caused by a metabolic disorder where a deficiency of a particular branching enzyme results in a buildup of certain compounds (polyglucosan bodies) in various parts of the body but especially in the nerves.
  • Poor memory: The occurrence of poor memory in an individual
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Lead: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Lead has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Postpartum hyperthyroidism: Postpartum thyroiditis is a postpartum condition that results in temporary hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism.
  • Postpartum hypothyroidism: Postpartum hypothyroidism is a relatively common disorder that has previously been unrecognized and untreated. Although symptoms are temporary and usually mild, most women are relieved to learn that their symptoms are not all in their heads, that they are not "losing their minds," that they don't have a life-threatening disease, and that there are inexpensive, effective treatments to relieve their discomfort.
  • Postpartum thyroiditis: The occurrence of thyroiditis in a woman that occurs after the birth of a child
  • Presenile dementia, Kraepelin type: A form of dementia that occurs prematurely and is inherited in a familial pattern.
  • Primary Parkinsonism: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Prion diseases: Various diseases caused by abnormal proteins (prions) in the brain.
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A disorder characterized by reduced motor control, dementia and eye movement problems.
  • Progressive confusion: altered level of consciousness
  • Progressive confusion in pregnancy: Progressive confusion in pregnancy refers to progressive deterioration in the level of consciousness in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Progressive dementia: progressive decline in cognitive function due to brain damage
  • Pyridoxine deficiency: Deficiency of vitamin B6 which has many uses in the body.
  • Rasmussen encephalitis: A very rare disorder of the central nervous system which usually involves only one side of the brain and involves seizures, mental deterioration and progressive weakness on one side of the body.
  • Rasmussen subacute encephalitis: A very rare progressive brain disease possibly caused by immune system problems. Symptoms become progressively worse and then the condition often stabilizes with a long life possible despite permanent neurological damage.
  • Rasmussen's Encephalitis: Rare possibly-autoimmune brain condition.
  • Recurring Alzheimers-like concentration difficulty: maybe to due to various causative agents
  • Recurring Alzheimers-like confusion symptoms: unalterable confusion state
  • Recurring Alzheimers-like memory loss: also known as dementia
  • Recurring Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Recurring episodes of Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms of Alzheimer's disease such as dementia can occur in bouts
  • Reduced alertness: A condition which is characterized by a decreased level of consciousness
  • Sarcoid: A fleshy tumor.
  • Schilder's Disease: Rare nerve myelin condition.
  • Severe Alzheimers-like concentration difficulty: maybe to due to various causative agents
  • Severe Alzheimers-like confusion symptoms: unalterable confusion state
  • Severe Alzheimers-like memory loss: also known as dementia
  • Severe Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Severe confusion: serious , dangerous confusion
  • Severe episodes of Alzheimers-like symptoms: symptoms of Alzheimer's disease such as dementia can occur in bouts
  • Short-term memory loss: A condition which is characterized by the loss of a persons short term memory
  • Sjogren syndrome, secondary: An autoimmune disease where the body's immune system attacks parts of the body that produce moisture such as the eyes, mouth and gastrointestinal tract. Sjogren syndrome can occur on its own (primary) or with another connective tissue disease (secondary) such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, systemic sclerosis and polymyositis/dermatomyositis. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Slight confusion: patient is not fully oriented to time and place
  • Slowly resolving confusion: confusion at times may be temporary and may resolve over a period of time
  • Spastic paraplegia 15, autosomal recessive: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles as well as vision problems.
  • Spastic paraplegia 4, autosomal dominant: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles. The severity of the condition is very variable as is the age of onset.
  • Spinal Cord Tumor: Cancer of the spinal cord or central nervous system.
  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A condition characterised by a failure of muscle coordination due to pathology arising in the spinocerebellar tract of the spinal cord
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 12: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 5q31-q33 defect) characterized by variable symptoms such as arm tremors, gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) with other.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 17: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 6q27 defect) characterized by . Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, X-linked, 4: A rare neurological disorder involving mainly ataxia and dementia which starts during adulthood. The condition is slowly progressive.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, X-linked, type 4: A rare neurological disorder involving mainly ataxia and dementia which starts during adulthood. The condition is slowly progressive.
  • Spongiform encephalopathy: A rare inherited prion disease which has a range of manifestations resulting primarily from degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Stroke: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: A progressive neurological disorder involving inflammation of the brain caused by a complication of the measles virus. It can occur up to 10 years after the initial measles virus and may be due to a defective immune response to the virus or a reactivation of the virus.
  • Subacute sclerosing leukoencephalitis: A rare chronic form of brain inflammation that is associated with the measles virus. The patient usually appears to have a full recovery after the measles infection with symptoms developing usually between two and eight years after the infection. The condition tends to affect children and young adults mainly. The disease process involves the degeneration of the protective nerve sheaths (myelin) in the brain. Measles immunization is the most effective way of preventing the development of this complication of measles.
  • Subdural hematoma: A condition which is characterized by a blood clot beneath the dura mater
  • Sudden onset of confusion in children: Sudden onset of confusion in children is a rapid development of disorientation in a child.
  • Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system: A rare disorder where hemosiderin (free iron) is deposited in parts of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord tissue). It is often caused by repeated periods of bleeding in the brain (subarachnoid space).
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Tay Sachs: Rare genetic disease leading to fatty deposits in the brain.
  • Tay Sachs Disease: A condition which is causes GM2 gangliosidosis
  • Temporary confusion: brief or short term confusion
  • Temporary memory loss: The temporary occurrence of memory loss
  • Tertiary syphilis: A condition which is characterized by late generalized syphilis with involvement of many organs and tissues
  • Tome-Brune-Fardeau syndrome: A rare syndrome involving neurological impairment which manifests as movement disorders and dementia.
  • Transient delirium: linked to confusion and altered mental status
  • Transthyretin amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the transthyretin form, the amyloid protein consists of transthretin. The condition is characterized by slo-progressing peripheral sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy, kidney disease and heart disease. Abnormal amyloid deposits may also occur in the eyes and central nervous system. There are a number of subtypes of the disorder: familial oculoleptomeningeal amyloidosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomypathy as well as others. Neuropathic symptoms tend to start in the legs. Symptoms may vary depending on which parts of the body are affected.
  • Triose phosphate-isomerase deficiency: A very rare inherited condition involving a deficiency of triose phosphate-isomerase.
  • Tuberous sclerosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by harmartomatous skin nodules, seizures, phakomata and bone lesions.
  • Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis: A rare disorder characterized by neurological degeneration and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Unresponsiveness: Poor response to questions or actions
  • Unverricht-Lundborg syndrome: A rare inherited type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy which tends to cause symptoms during childhood. The involuntary muscle movements tend to occur more frequently and become more severe with increasing age. Symptoms may occur following various stimuli such as light, stress or exercise.
  • Van Bogaert disease: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.
  • Van Bogaert's disease: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.
  • Van Bogaert-Scherer-Epstein Disease: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.
  • Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: The bovine spongiform encephalopathy affects cattle but the variant form can infect humans. Human infection can occur by consuming infected cattle products, especially the brain and other central nervous system tissues.
  • Vascular Dementia:
  • Vasculitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation to blood vessels
  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A deficiency of Vitamin B12 primarily causes anemias the body is unable to make sufficient quantities of normal red blood cells. Severe cases can lead to permanent nervous system problems. The vitamin B12 deficiency can result from absorption problems, insufficient dietary intake, certain medications (e.g. metformin), inherited conditions (e.g. transcobalamin deficiency) and certain chronic parasitic intestinal infestations.
  • Vitamin deficiency: When there is any deficiency of vitamins in the body
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: A rare degenerative brain disorder caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Chronic alcoholics are prone to this condition.
  • Westphal-Leyden ataxia: A form of ataxia that starts in childhood and is associated with symptoms such as vomiting, vertigo, rigid muscles, seizures, mental disorder, loss of control over voluntary movements and dementia. Death generally occurs within a decade of onset of symptoms.
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • Wilson's Disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.
  • Wolfram's disease: A condition that is inherited and consists of multiple symptoms
  • Wright dick syndrome: A rare, dominantly inherited syndrome characterized mainly by sensory nerve impairment and dementia.
  • Xanthomatosis cerebrotendinous: A rare inherited condition where cholesterol is deposited in the brain and other parts of the body. The disease is classified as a lipid storage disorder due to the abnormal deposition of cholesterol and cholestanol in various parts of the body - especially the brain, lungs and Achilles tendon. The condition is possibly highly underdiagnosed.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Dementia:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Dementia:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Dementia' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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