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Symptoms » Dental symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Dental symptoms

Medical terms related to Dental symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • AREDYLD: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities of the extremities, teeth, hair, nail and kidney as well as lipoatrophic diabetes.
  • Aarskog Syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by facial, hand, genital and growth abnormalities.
  • Aarskog-Ose-Pande syndrome: A rare disorder involving lipodystrophy mainly in the face and buttocks as well as sparse hair, retarded bone age and minor face and eye anomalies. It is considered a variant of SHORT syndrome which tends to also include increased range of joint motion and more extensive lipodystrophy.
  • Abnormal teeth shape in children: Abnormal teeth shape in children includes any type of deformity or irregularity in the dentition or teeth.
  • Abscessed teeth: an abscessed tooth is a painful infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly Syndrome type 5: A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 5 (ACPS 5): A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrodysostosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short hands, small nose, mental deficiency and hand and foot deformities.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Catania form: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Catania form is very rare.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Palagonia type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Palagonia type is very rare and the symptoms are relatively mild.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Weyers type: A rare disorder characterized by facial abnormalities and extra digits, nail abnormalities and short limbs.
  • Acromegaloid facies -- hypertrichosis: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by thick lips and gums, thick upper eyelids, large hands and occasionally mental deficiency.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acrosphenosyndactylia: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities in the appearance of the face and head as well as finger and toe abnormalities. The bones of the skull fuse together too early which prevents it from growing normally. Various toes and fingers may be fused together.
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Acutane embryopathy: A rare disorder caused by fetal exposure to retinoids and resulting in mental and physical birth defects.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: A reoccurring periodontal disease which results in necrosis and ulceration of the gums. Symptoms may include fever, bone loss, breath odor and enlarge neck and throat lymph nodes. Also called trench mouth, Vincent's angina or Vincent's infection.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute sinusitis: An acute inflammation of the sinuses
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Adam and Eve poisoning: The Adam and Eve plant is a herb with heart-shaped leaves found in Europe. The plant contains a poisonous chemical called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause a variety of symptoms if ingested. Eye exposure can also cause symptoms due to the abrasive nature of the toxic chemical. Ingestion of the plant generally causes severe mouth pain. Skin exposure usually only causes minor, short-lived skin irritation.
  • African milk bush poisoning: The African milk bush originated from African and is a shrubby plant with small flowers. The milky sap contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if it is eaten or if the sap comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It can cause severe skin irritation and the high toxicity of the sap can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Aglossia: A congenital condition where the tongue is absent.
  • Aglossia-Adactylia syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of a missing tongue with missing fingers or toes. Other malformations are also variably present.
  • Aglossia-Hypoactylia syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of a missing tongue with missing fingers or toes. Other malformations are also variably present.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, eye problems and an unusual cherubic facial appearance.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran syndrome:
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Alopecia, anosmia, deafness, hypogonadism syndrome: A rare
  • Altered teeth shape: Altered teeth shape refers to a change in the shape of teeth.
  • Alveolar Bone Loss: Loss of bone tissue in the thickened bone ridge that holds the tooth sockets. Gum disease is the main cause of alveolar bone loss.
  • Alves Castelo dos Santos syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by hair, eye, skin and spinal abnormalities.
  • Amelo-cerebro-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving degeneration of the central nervous system, seizures and abnormal tooth development.
  • Amelogenesis Imperfecta: An inherited dental disorder where the tooth enamel is so thin and soft that the teeth appear yellow and are easily damaged. Can occur in baby and permanent teeth. Also called hereditary brown enamel or hereditary enamel.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta pigmented hypomaturation type: Amelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited tooth development disorder characterized by tooth enamel defects. The pigmented hypomaturation type is characterized by fragile tooth enamel which tends to be soft and rough and is usually a creamy to yellow/brown color.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta, hypoplastic/hypomaturation, X-linked 1: Amelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited tooth development disorder characterized by tooth enamel defects. The hypoplastic/hypomaturation X-linked 1 form is characterized by thin tooth enamel which is of normal strength. The surface of the enamel varies from smooth to pitted and the tooth color is variable.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta, hypoplastic/hypomaturation, X-linked 2: A rare inherited disorder involving abnormal formation of the tooth enamel which causes it to be thin and soft. The abnormality is inherited in a X-linked manner (Xq22-q28).
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Anauxetic dysplasia: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal skeletal and spinal development.
  • Andersen-Tawil syndrome: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation causes periods of muscle weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities and various physical development abnormalities. It is believed to be caused by problems with the way the body utilizes potassium.
  • Angelman syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a puppet-like gait, fits of laughter and characteristic facial features.
  • Ankylosis of teeth: A rare genetic disorder where the teeth fuse to the bone which can prevent them from erupting. Varying numbers of teeth may be affected.
  • Anodontia: A congenital defect characterized by the absence of some or all teeth.
  • Anonychia -- microcephaly: A very rare syndrome characterized by the absence of nails and a small head.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anthurium poisoning: Anthuriums have dark, glossy, heart-shaped leaves with glossy, heart-shaped flowers which can be red, white or other colors. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which an cause severe mouth pain if eaten. Large amounts would need to be eaten to cause poisoning. Eye and skin irritation can also occur on exposure to the plant.
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Aortic supravalvular stenosis: A rare congenital condition involving increased intestinal calcium absorption and characterized by development delay, distinctive facial features, small nails and short stature.
  • Apert syndrome: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities in the appearance of the face and head as well as finger and toe abnormalities. The bones of the skull fuse together too early which prevents it from growing normally. Various toes and fingers may be fused together.
  • Aplasia of lacrimal and salivary glands: A rare inherited disorder involving the absence of the salivary and tear-producing glands.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Aralia poisoning: Aralia is an evergreen shrub which produces clusters of small white flowers. The plant originated in Asia and Africa. The plant contains a toxic chemical called saponic glycoside and can cause skin irritation if skin contact occurs or other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low toxicity.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Asymmetric short stature syndrome: A rare disorder characterized mainly by short stature, unequal leg lengths and facial anomalies.
  • Atkin-Flatiz syndrome: A rare, X-linked syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation and facial anomalies.
  • Auriculo-condylar syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by variable ear and jaw abnormalities.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent teeth and craniofacial and eye abnormalities. The range of symptoms that can occur is somewhat variable.
  • Azalea poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Bacterial gingivitis:
  • Barber-Say syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by excessive hair growth, skin anomaly, large mouth and outward turned eyelids (ectropion).
  • Bd syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of mental retardation, small eyes and a movement disorder.
  • Bearsfoot hellebore poisoning: The Bearsfoot hellebore is a relatively small, flowering evergreen plant which originated in Europe. All parts of the plant contain protoanemonin which can be toxic if large quantities are consumed.
  • Benjamin syndrome: A rare disorder characterized mainly by anemia, bone abnormalities and mental and growth retardation.
  • Bentham-Driessen-Hanveld syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of undescended testes, long thin fingers and mental retardation.
  • Bleeding gums: Bleeding from or around the teeth gums
  • Bleeding gums in children: Bleeding gums in children occur when there is hemorrhaging, bleeding, or oozing of blood from the gums.
  • Bleeding gums in pregnancy: Bleeding gums in pregnancy refer to easy bleeding from the gums in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blue line on gums in children: Blue line on gums in children refers to the development of a blue line on the gums of a child.
  • Blue, gray or black stain in teeth in children: Blue, gray or black stain in teeth in children is the abnormal coloring or staining of the teeth in a child.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bork-Stender-Schmidt syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by unusual hair, retinal disease, dental problems and short fingers.
  • Borrone-Di Rocco-Crovato syndrome: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal defects. Only several reported cases of the condition.
  • Bosma-Henkin-Christiansen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a reduced sense of smell, an underdeveloped nose and hypogonadism.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Brachmann-De Lange Syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by very small stature, synophrys, thin downturning upper lip and micromelia.
  • Brachydactyly -- anonychia: A rare syndrome characterized by short toes and nail abnormalities.
  • Brachymetapody, anodontia, hypotrichosis, albinoidism: A rare syndrome characterized by short foot bones, total absence of teeth, reduced amount of hair and lack of skin pigmentation.
  • Branchial clefts with characteristic facies, growth retardation, imperforate nasolacrimal duct: A rare genetic disorder characterized by branchial defects, tear duct obstruction and pseudocleft of the upper lip.
  • Branchial clefts with characteristic facies, growth retardation, imperforate nasolacrimal duct, and: A rare genetic disorder characterized by branchial defects, tear duct obstruction and pseudocleft of upper lip.
  • Branchio-Oculo-Facial Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by branchial defects, lacrimal duct obstruction and pseudocleft of upper lip.
  • Breath symptoms: Breath-related symptoms including breath odor
  • Breathing symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Broken jaw: Fracture of the jaw bone (mandible)
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Buffalo nut poisoning: The buffalo nut is a deciduous flowering shrub. It grows mainly in mountainous areas. The seeds contain chemicals which can cause toxicity if large quantities are eaten.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Burning mouth: Burning-like pain in the mouth
  • Burning mouth syndrome, Type 1: A rare condition where there is a burning sensation in the mouth and tongue. Type 1 describes mouth burning that may be absent on waking but gets worse during the day. This type is often linked to conditions such as diabetes and nutritional deficiencies.
  • Burning mouth syndrome, Type 2: A rare condition where there is a burning sensation in the mouth and tongue. Type 2 describes constant mouth burning that does not fluctuate during the day. This form is often linked to reduced salivary gland functioning due to antidepressant use.
  • Burning mouth syndrome- Type 3: A rare condition where there is a burning sensation in the mouth and tongue. Type 3 describes mouth burning that comes and goes during the day and is often linked to anxiety and allergies (especially food additives).
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Caladium poisoning: All parts of the Caladium plant are poisonous, particularly the sap. It contains a compound called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries on sensitive eyes or mucosal tissues of the digestive tract. The plant is a common houseplant.
  • Calla poisoning: All parts of the Calla plant are poisonous, particularly the sap. It contains a compound called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries on sensitive eyes or mucosal tissues of the digestive tract.
  • Calvarial doughnut lesions -- bone fragility: A rare disorder characterized by a number of doughnut shaped lesions on the skull which makes the skull lumpy. Weak bones resulting in fractures without trauma and dental decay are also features of this disorder.
  • Cancer of floor of mouth: The floor of the mouth is a horseshoe-shaped area under the tongue, between the lower jaw bones (the mandible). When a malignant tumor grows in this area it is called floor of the mouth cancer.
  • Canker sores: Ulcers of the mouth or nearby areas
  • Carbohydrate deficiency glycoprotein syndrome type II: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect which involves the gene for a particular enzyme (Golgi localized N-acetyl-glucosaminyltransferase II). Type 2 tends to have more severe psychomotor retardation than type 1 but there is no peripheral neuropathy or underdeveloped cerebellum.
  • Cat Eye Syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving abnormalities of chromosome 22 and characterized by coloboma of the iris, down-slanting palpebral fissures and anal atresia.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Cerebellar ataxia -- ectodermal dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by balance and coordination problems and teeth and hair abnormalities.
  • Cerebellar hypoplasia -- endosteal sclerosis: A rare disorder character where a part of the brain (cerebellum) is underdeveloped and abnormally increased bone density (endosteal sclerosis).
  • Cerebro-oculo-dento-auriculo-skeletal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the brain, eyes, teeth, ears and skeleton.
  • Cerebro-oculo-nasal syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, nose and brain malformations.
  • Charlie M syndrome: A rare birth disorder characterized by facial abnormalities and malformed or missing parts of the ends of the arms and legs.
  • Chemical burn -- ingestion: Burns to the mouth and gastrointestinal system caused by swallowing a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the gastrointestinal system are suspected.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: 1,3-Dinitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in explosives. The chemical can be readily absorbed through the skin and cause systemic symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylic acid: Acrylic acid is a chemical used mainly in the production of resins and acrylic acids which are usually used in adhesives and coatings. It is also used in water treatment and in the production of plastics and detergents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Alkaline dry cell batteries: Alkaline dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals and eating the batteries can cause various symptoms if the chemical is released from the battery. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anti-rust products: Anti-rust products contain various chemicals which are toxic if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Asphalt: Asphalt is the substance used in road surfacing and is also used in electrical adhesive and paints. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Brodifacoum: Brodifacoum is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromadiolone: Bromadiolone is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromoform: Bromoform is a chemical with limited industrial uses but is used as a laboratory chemical and can be present in treated water. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium Oxide: Calcium oxide is a chemical used mainly in sewage treatment, dry cement and in the manufacture of products such as aluminum, glass and steel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium Polysulfide: Calcium polysulfide is a chemical used mainly in antifungal treatments for trees. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Camphor: Camphor is a chemical used mainly in moth repellents, pharmaceuticals (preservative) cosmetics, explosives, varnishes and various therapeutic applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Caulking products: Caulking products (e.g. silicon, acrylic, neoprene) are used to seal gaps and the chemicals in them can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorine: Chlorine is a chemical used mainly in bleaches, water disinfectants and in pulp mills. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Chlorine is very corrosive and extensive damage to body tissues can result. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloroacetophenone: Chloroacetophenone is a chemical used mainly in tear gas for riot control purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Clinitest tablet: Clinitest tablet are used to test sugar levels in urine. The tablets contain various chemicals (copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and eating them can cause serious symptoms. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cloth Dyes: Cloth dyes contain chemicals which are considered not toxic but the ingestion of large amounts cay cause symptoms. Some dyes contain corrosive ingredients which can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. Most household cloth dyes don't contain corrosive chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cuticle remover: Cuticle removers contain chemicals such as sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide which can cause serious symptoms if swallowed or inhaled in excessive quantities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dye remover: Dye removers can contain chemicals which are corrosive and can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. The damage may continue for a few weeks after ingestion so death can occur weeks after the incident. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Emulsion paints: Emulsion paints (latex or water-based) contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furniture polish: Furniture polish contains chemicals (hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jewelry cleaner: Jewelry cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lacquer: Lacquer contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lighter fluid: Lighter fluid contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metal cleaner: Metal cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metal polish: Metal polish contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mould remover: Mould removers contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if swallowed, inhaled or skin and eye exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oven Cleaners: Oven cleaners contain toxic chemicals which can cause serious symptoms on exposure. Severe gastrointestinal burns can be caused by ingesting oven cleaner. The burns can lead to perforation which involves a high risk of death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Para-Dichlorobenzene: Para-Dichlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide, mold and mildew preventer, moth repellent and toilet deodorant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pool Cleaners: Pool Cleaners contain various chemicals (mainly chlorine) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The chemicals are very damaging to the mucosal linings in the body. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Radium: Radium is a chemical used mainly as an anti-cancer agent . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfuric Acid: Sulfuric Acid is a chemical used mainly in car batteries and in the fur and leather industries. It is a significant component of air pollution and results in the production of "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tar remover: Tar remover contains various chemicals (mainly hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- White Phosphorus: White Phosphorus is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, water treatment, rodenticides and insecticides (for cockroaches). Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Window cleaner: Window cleaner contains various chemicals (usually alcohols and ammonia) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cherubism: An inherited condition marked by bone degradation of the jaws followed by development of fibrous tissue which causes the face to swell and hence have a cherubic appearance.
  • Chewing difficulty: Chewing difficulty is a condition in which a person struggles or is unable to chew normally.
  • Chitty-Hall-Webb syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by fractures, bowed shin bones, abnormal forearm bone (radius) and reduced bone mass.
  • Chlorophacinone rodenticide poisoning: Chlorophacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chondroectodermal dysplasia: An inherited skeletal dysplasia marked that results in short-limbed dwarfism, development of an extra finger as well as cardiovascular impairments. Also called Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.
  • Christmas Rose poisoning: The Christmas Rose plant contains proteoanemonin which can cause blisters and saponins which can cause irritation. The plant is found mainly in Europe. All parts of the plant are poisonous.
  • Chromosome 1, monosomy 1p31 p22: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as mental retardation, missing teeth and small eyes and jaw.
  • Chromosome 10, Monosomy 10p:
  • Chromosome 10p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 resulting in variable abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12, Isochromosome 12p Mosaic: A very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12p deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12p partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 13q partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Chromosome 17, deletion 17q23 q24: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 17p, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 18, Monosomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • Chromosome 18p minus syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the short arm of chromosome18 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 18q, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 18. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 21 monosomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is only one copy of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two leading to various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 2p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 6p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 8 recombinant syndrome: A rare recombinant chromosomal disorder involving chromosome 8 which results in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 8, monosomy 8p: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 8p inverted duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving the inverted duplication of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 resulting in three copies of the genetic material instead of the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the duplication.
  • Chromosome Xp11.23-p11.22 Duplication syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of a large head, lack of hair, scoliosis and a skin anomaly. The reported patients tend to involve parents who were related.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Cleft lip palate -- deafness -- sacral lipoma: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by an opening in the palate and lip, deafness and a lipoma in the end portion of the spine.
  • Cleft lip palate -- oligodontia -- syndactyly -- pili torti: A very rare syndrome characterized by a cleft lip and palate, webbed fingers, missing teeth and hair abnormality (pili torti).
  • Cleft palate: This when there is a congenital fissure of the median line of the palate.
  • Clefting -- ectropion -- conical teeth: A rare birth syndrome characterized by cleft lip and palate, cone-shaped teeth and everted lower eyelids.
  • Cleidocranial dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by collarbone defects, late ossification of cranial sutures and delayed tooth eruption.
  • Clematis poisoning: A flowering vine often used as an ornament house or garden plant. The plant contains a chemical (anemonin) which can cause severe mouth pain if eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause skin irritation.
  • Cockayne syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a senile-like appearance, hearing and vision impairment and sun sensitive skin.
  • Cockayne syndrome type 1: A rare inherited condition characterized by short stature, light sensitivity and a prematurely aged appearance. Type 1 is an early-onset form and involves progressive symptoms that usually start after 1 year of age.
  • Coffin-Lowry syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by down slanting space between eyelids, bulbous nose, soft hands and tapering fingers.
  • Colchicine poisoning: Ingestion of toxic quantities of colchicines. Colchicine is primarily used as a medicinal theapy for conditions such as gout and familial Mediterranean fever, scleroderma, secondary amyloidosis and pericarditis. The chemical is a natural chemical found in a plant called meadow saffron and ingestion of the plant can also result in poisoning. The plant is found in the northern parts of the world.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Complement component deficiency: Complement components are a part of the immune defense system involved in destroying and removing invading pathogens such as bacteria. A deficiency of the complement components can affect the ability of the body's immune system to function properly. The disorder which can be partial or complete and may be inherited or acquired. The severity of the symptoms is determined by which complement component (there are at least 30 of them) is deficient and whether the deficiency is partial or complete.
  • Complement receptor deficiency: Complement receptors are a part of the immune defense system and they initiate the process of destroying and removing invading pathogens. A deficiency of complement receptors thus affects the immune system. It may be inherited or be associated with autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus diabetic nephropathy patients on hemodialysis.
  • Cone rod dystrophy -- amelogenesis imperfecta: A rare genetic disorder characterized by degeneration of parts of the eye that absorb light (cone rod dystrophy) as well as teeth abnormalities.
  • Congenital aplastic anemia: A genetic disorder where the bone marrow does not produce enough blood cells. Fanconi's anemia is an example of congenital aplastic anemia.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type X -- Bombay blood group phenotype: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal neutrophil functioning which reduces the body's immunity. The abnormal neutrophils are unable to be transported to sites of infection due to their inability to adhere to certain blood vessel components which would normally lead them to the infection site. Infections may be life-threatening as the body is unable to destroy bacteria effectively. Type 2 LAD is where neutrophils can't adhere to necessary blood vessel components due to the absence of proteins on the blood vessel walls needed to bind and guide the neutrophils to the infection site.
  • Congenital syphilis: Syphilis inherited from mother during pregnancy.
  • Congenitally missing teeth in children:
  • Corn Lily poisoning: Corn Lily is a poisonous plant native to the Sierra Nevada mountains. It's appearance is similar to the corn grown as a crop. The plant poison primarily affects the nervous system.
  • Cornelia de Lange syndrome 1: A very rare disorder involving delayed physical development and various malformations involving the head, face and limbs. Type 1 is more severe than type 2 though the range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Corneodermatoosseous syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by thick, scaly skin on the palms and soles, corneal changes and dental problems.
  • Corsican Hellebore poisoning: The Corsican hellebore is often grown in gardens. It bears cupped, light green flowers. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin exposure to the plant can also cause skin irritation but it is usually minor and short-lived.
  • Cote-Katsantoni syndrome: A rare condition characterized by osteosclerosis, atrial septal defect, malabsorption, neutropenia, ectodermal dysplasia, growth retardation and mental retardation.
  • Coumachlor rodenticide poisoning: Coumachlor is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumafuryl rodenticide poisoning: Coumafuryl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumatetralyl rodenticide poisoning: Coumatetralyl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cranioectodermal dysplasia: A rare condition involving various congenital deformities such as short stature, long head, widely spaced eyes and teeth abnormalities.
  • Craniolenticulosutural dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by skeletal defects and an unusual facial appearance consisting mainly of a prominent forehead, wide-set eyes, broad nose and a prominent forehead with a birthmark.
  • Craniosynostosis Maroteaux Fonfria type: A rare disorder which is similar to a condition called Apert syndrome but also involves extra fingers and toes. Apert syndrome is characterized by abnormalities in the appearance of the face and head as well as finger and toe abnormalities. The bones of the skull fuse together too early which prevents it from growing normally
  • Craniosynostosis, anal anomalies, and porokeratosis: A very rare disorder characterized primarily by the premature fusion of skull bones (coronal sutures), anal anomalies and a skin disorder called porokeratosis.
  • Croton poisoning: The croton is a shrub which bears white flowers and leaves with white, red or yellow coloration through them. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause skin irritation.
  • Crystal meth addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crystal meth on a regular basis. Crystal meth is a powerful stimulant used illegally for its effects. It is highly addictive and known by street names such as ice, speed, glass, crank and chalk. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cuban lily poisoning: The Cuban lily is very toxic bulbous herb. It has long thin leaves with sprays of white, blue or purple bell-shaped flowers. The plant originated in Africa, Europe and Asia. Skin contact can cause skin irritation and eating parts of the plant can result in death. The toxic chemical in the plant is called cardiac glycoside.
  • Cutis Laxa with Bone Dystrophy: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa with Growth and Developmental Delay: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa with or without Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa, Autosomal Recessive, Type IIA: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa, Debre Type: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis laxa, recessive type 2: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by loose skin and delayed development.
  • Cyclic neutropenia: A rare blood disorder characterized by recurrent periods of extremely low blood levels of neutrophils which results in frequent infections. The low level usually occurs for about 7 days every 21 days. Levels of other blood components may also be affected.
  • Cyclic vomiting syndrome: recurrent attacks of intense nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain with or without headache/ migraine
  • Daphne poisoning: Daphne is a shrub that contains a toxin called mezerein (skin irritant) in the bark as well as a toxin called daphnin. The bark, sap and berries are the most toxic parts of the plant. The plant is native to Europe and Asia but is also found in other parts of the world such as America. A single berry or leaf can cause symptoms and 2 or 3 can cause death in a child. About 12 berries or leaves can cause quite severe symptoms in adults.
  • Darier disease: A slowly progressing inherited skin disorder characterized by small brownish warty bumps and nail abnormalities. The skin disorder because the skin cells are not held together properly.
  • Dark spots on teeth: dark spots on the teeth are due to discoloration or adherence of colored material or bacteria to the teeth
  • De Lange 1: A rare disorder involving a variety of congenital abnormalities including retarded growth, behavioral problems, characteristic facial features and upper limb abnormalities.
  • Deafness -- lymphoedema -- leukemia: A rare syndrome characterized by deafness, early-onset leukemia and lymphoedema in the lower legs.
  • Deafness oligodontia syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by missing teeth and deafness.
  • Deafness onychodystrophy dominant form: A rare dominantly inherited disorder characterized by deafness from birth, deformed nails and
  • Decreased salivary function: xerostomia o rdry mouth
  • Decreased salivation: also known as sialoschesis, is a condition characterised by reduced secretion of saliva by the salivary glands
  • Del (2) (q34-q36): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in the few reported cases. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Delayed eruption of teeth: A delay in the eruption of teeth during childhood.
  • Delayed teeth eruption in children: Delayed teeth eruption in children refers to a child who has a slow or late development of the teeth.
  • Delayed tooth eruption: Delayed tooth eruption is a condition in which there is a slow or late development of a tooth.
  • Deletion 8p: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Delphinium poisoning: Delphinium is a member of the Buttercup family and contains toxic alkaloids. It's seeds are very toxic but other parts of the plant are also poisonous. As the plant ages, it becomes less poisonous. Toxicity varies amongst species.
  • Dennis cohen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by unusual facial appearance, mental retardation, short stature and sparse hair.
  • Dental abnormalities in children: Dental abnormalities in children include any type of malformation or irregularity in the teeth, gums, palate or mouth of a child.
  • Dental abscess: Abscess of tooth, gum, or jawbone
  • Dental bleeding: Abnormal bleeding involving the teeth or gums.
  • Dental burning sensation: Abnormal burning sensation related to teeth pathology.
  • Dental caries: Decay of the teeth
  • Dental conditions: Conditions that affect ones dentition
  • Dental deformity: Dental anomalies are craniofacial abnormalities of form, function, or position of the teeth, bones, and tissues of the jaw and mouth.
  • Dental enamel erosion: enamel is the hard, protective coating of the tooth, which protects the sensitive dentine underneath. When the enamel is worn away, the dentine underneath is exposed, which may lead to pain and sensitivity
  • Dental infection: Infection involving the teeth or gums.
  • Dental inflammation: Usually due to inflammation of the tooth pulp which contains blood vessels and nerve fibers which is responsible for pain and inflammation.
  • Dental itch: Abnormal itching sensation felt in the tooth - usually due to appearance of wisdom tooth.
  • Dental lump: Small swelling due to dental pathology.
  • Dental numb: Abnormal sensation of numbness felt in the gums or teeth.
  • Dental pain: Any pain that is caused by ones dentition
  • Dental redness: Redness of the gums - usually due to some sort of inflammation.
  • Dental swelling: Swelling of the tissues around the teeth - usually due to inflammation or infection.
  • Dental symptoms: Symptoms affecting teeth or mouth area.
  • Dental tingling: Abnormal tingling sensation felt in the teeth.
  • Dental tissue neoplasm: A tumor that develops from tissues inside the mouth that form the teeth. There are a number of types of tumors that can develop from tooth forming tissues: ameloblastoma, Pindorg tumor, cementoblastoma and many others. The tumor may be benign or malignant but can cause dental problems even if it is benign.
  • Dentin abnormalities: Dentin abnormalities include any type of irregularity or anomaly of the teeth.
  • Dentin dysplasia -- sclerotic bones: A rare inherited disorder characterized by teeth and bone abnormalities.
  • Dentin dysplasia, coronal: A rare inherited disorder characterized by opalescent primary teeth and abnormal secondary teeth which appear normal.
  • Dentin dysplasia, radicular: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal dentin formation which results in abnormal tooth roots and pulp chambers.
  • Dentinogenesis: A medical term for the formation of dentin which is the main component of teeth. Abnormal dentinogenesis e.g. dentinogenesis imperfecta can result in various tooth abnormalities.
  • Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type III: A rare inherited dental disorder where the tops of primary and secondary teeth quickly erode leaving the inside of the tooth exposed.
  • Dentinogenesis imperfecta -- short stature -- hearing loss -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by teeth anomalies (dentinogenesis imperfecta), short stature, hearing loss and mental retardation.
  • Dentinogenesis imperfecta type Brandywine: A rare inherited dental disorder where the tops of primary and secondary teeth quickly erode leaving the inside of the tooth exposed.
  • Dentinogenesis imperfecta, type I: A rare inherited condition which occurs in people suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) and is characterized by tooth structure abnormalities.
  • Dentinogenesis imperfecta, type II: A rare inherited dental disorder where the tops of primary and secondary teeth quickly erode leaving the inside of the tooth exposed.
  • Dermato-cardio-skeletal syndrome Borrone type: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Dermatocardioskeletal syndrome, Boronne type: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by thick skin, thick gums, acne, short fingers and a heart defect.
  • Dermatoosteolysis, Kirghizian type: A rare condition characterized by a variety of abnormalities including missing teeth, recurring skin ulceration, eye problems and nail symptoms.
  • Dermo-odontodysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by tooth, skin, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Dieffenbachia poisoning: Dieffenbachia is a common houseplant which has large leaves. The plant contains poisonous chemicals (oxalic acid and asparagine) which can cause various symptoms if large amounts of the plant is ingested.
  • Difenacoum rodenticide poisoning: Difenacoum is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Difethialone rodenticide poisoning: Difethialone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Difficulty chewing: difficulty chewing can result from pain in the mouth, stiffness or pain in the jaw muscles, or problems with the teeth
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Diphacinone rodenticide poisoning: Diphacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Discolored teeth in children: Discolored teeth in children is a condition in which a child has unusual or abnormal coloring of the teeth.
  • Discoloured teeth in children:
  • Dislocated jaw: Improper separation of the jaw bones
  • Double tooth in children: Double tooth in children is a condition in which a child has two teeth that are fused together.
  • Down Syndrome: A chromosome syndrome causing physical effects and mental retardation.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Dry mouth: When the mouth is not as moist as usual.
  • Dry socket: Exposure of jaw bone after a tooth extraction
  • Dubowitz Syndrome: A rare genetic and developmental disorder characterized by infantile eczema, small stature, microcephaly and peculiar facial features.
  • Dubreuil-Chambardel syndrome: Tooth decay that occurs in the front teeth and usually other teeth are also involved eventually. Usually only the upper teeth are affected.
  • Dup(1) (q25-q32): A very rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of the long arm (q25-q32) of chromosome one is duplicated. The type and severity of symptoms may vary.
  • Dyschondrosteosis -- nephritis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal bone development and kidney disease.
  • Dyskeratosis Congenita: A rare genetic disorder characterized by sking pigmentation abnormalities, nail dystrophy and mucous membrane changes.
  • Dysosteosclerosis: A rare inherited condition characterized by bone development abnormalities (excessive hardening of bone and flattened vertebrae), characteristic facial features. Excessive bone growth at the base of the skull can damage the optic nerves and affect vision.
  • Dysostosis acral with facial and genital abnormalities: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by short stature and head, face, skeletal and genital abnormalities. The facial appearance is that of a two-month old fetus. The severity and range of symptoms is variable. This dominantly inherited form of Robinow syndrome tends to be milder than the recessive form.
  • Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A rare inherited skin blistering condition which can vary in severity depending on how it is inherited. Recessively inherited are more severe than dominantly inherited cases and can cause the loss of patches of skin and scarring which can impair limb function.
  • EEC syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by absence of fingers and toes, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip or cleft palate.
  • EEC syndrome without cleft lip/palate: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by hand, foot deformities as well as hair, skin, nail and tooth abnormalities (ectodermal dysplasia).
  • Ectodermal dysplasia: A group of rare inherited conditions which affect the ectodermal skin layer which includes the skin, hair, teeth and nails.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- blindness: A rare syndrome characterized mainly be mental retardation, vision loss, short stature and teeth and hair abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- ectrodactyly -- macular dystrophy: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skin, hair, nail and eye abnormalities as well as missing fingers.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- mental retardation -- CNS malformation: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, central nervous system disorders and skin, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- mental retardation -- central nervous system malformation: A rare syndrome characterized by severe mental retardation, hypothyroidism, abnormal brain development and hair, teeth and nail abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- neurosensory deafness: A rare syndrome characterized by nerve deafness, abnormally bent fifth fingers, ectodermal dysplasia and scoliosis.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia anhidrotic: A rare inherited condition involving skin, hair, teeth and nail abnormalities. The condition is characterized by the absence of sweat and sebaceous glands, underdeveloped hair and teeth, characteristic face and other physical deformities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia trichoodontoonychial type: A rare syndrome characterized by nail, tooth and hair abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia with natal teeth, Turnpenny type: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by missing teeth, sparse hair and dark velvety skin patches called acanthosis nigricans. The skin patches usually disappears during the second decade and may reoccur during pregnancy.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, Berlin type: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the absence of many or all teeth, a lack of hair, mental retardation and skin abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, Margarita type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, webbed digits, cleft lip, cleft palate, sparse hair, reduced sweating and teeth abnormalities. Progressive loss of scalp hair usually results in baldness by adulthood.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, hypohidrotic, autosomal dominant: A very rare inherited disorder that affects the development of skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands during the fetal stage.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, hypohidrotic, autosomal recessive: A rare genetic multisystem disorder characterized by hair, teeth, nail and skin abnormalities and absence of certain sweat glands.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, hypohidrotic, with immune deficiency: A rare genetic disorder characterized inability to sweat, immune system problems and hair and teeth abnormalities.
  • Ectrodactyly -- Ectodermal Dysplasia -- Cleft Lip/Palate Syndrome, Type 1: EEC (Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate) is a rare inherited condition characterized by split hand and foot deformities of variable severity, cleft lip or palate and teeth and hair anomalies. There are two main types of EEC which differ in the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11. The severity and type of symptoms and deformities is highly variable.
  • Ectrodactyly -- Ectodermal Dysplasia -- Cleft Lip/Palate Syndrome, Type 3: EEC (Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate) is a rare inherited condition characterized by split hand and foot deformities of variable severity, cleft lip or palate and teeth and hair anomalies. There are two main types of EEC which differ in the origin of the genetic defect. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3q27. The severity and type of symptoms and deformities is highly variable.
  • Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/cleft palate: A rare inherited condition characterized by abnormalities of the fingers, toes, hair, glands, eyes anr urinary tract.
  • Edentulism: Without teeth
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility - a combination of ED types I and II.
  • Elephant's-ear poisoning: The Elephant's ear is a common garden plant which has large, heart-shaped leaves on long stalks. The plant contains calcium oxalate and saphotoxin which can cause poisoning if eaten and irritation upon contact with skin or eyes. The toxins are quite poisonous and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Ellis -van creveld syndrome:
  • Epidermolysa bullosa simplex and limb girdle muscular dystrophy: A rare syndrome involving fragile skin that blisters easily as well as muscle weakness and wasting in the head and limbs. The severity of the blistering and muscle weakness is variable with some sufferers dying during infancy.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa inversa dystrophica: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily. The corneas, vulval and anal areas are involved as well as the trunk, neck, thighs and legs.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, generalized atrophic benign: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily and often results in scars after healing. The condition is generally quite mild compared to other skin disorders involving fragile blistering skin.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, late-onset, localized junctional, with mental retardation: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, hair and nail disorders, absence of teeth and areas fragile skin that blisters easily.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, lethal acantholytic: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by extremely fragile skin and mucous membranes which blisters and peels. The majority of the skin blisters and peels within a week of birth. Severe fluid loss and death follows soon after.
  • Epileptic encephalopathy, Lennox-Gastaut type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation and physical anomalies. The brain condition is progressive and results in loss of previously acquired skills.
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Euhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by tooth, hair and facial abnormalities.
  • Extrasystoles -- short stature -- hyperpigmentation -- microcephaly: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by shortness, increased skin pigmentation, small head and
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Faciocardiorenal syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a variety of abnormalities such as kidney anomaly, mental retardation, unusual facial features, heart problems and joint problems. Infant death or stillbirth may occur in some cases.
  • Facioskeletalgenital syndrome, Rippberger type: A rare syndrome characterized by facial, skeletal and genital abnormalities.
  • Factor V Quebec: An inherited bleeding disorder reported in Quebec, Canada.
  • Factor V deficiency: An inherited disorder where the deficiency of a blood component affects its ability to clot properly which can lead to bleeding problems. The severity of the disorder can vary from easy bruising to life-threatening hemorrhages.
  • Factor X deficiency: A rare blood clotting disorder which may be inherited or acquired in people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, leprosy and certain cancers. The underlying cause is the deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The condition may cause mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Friuli: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Fruili variant tends to only cause moderate bleeding problems and occurs mainly in an area of Italy called Fruili.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Kanazawa: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Kanazawa variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Ketchikan: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Ketchikan variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Nottingham: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Nottingham variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Padua: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Padau variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- San Antonio: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The San Antonia variant results in 14% of normal Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Santo Domingo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Santo Domingo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Shanghai: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Shangai variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- St. Louis II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The St. Louis II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Stockton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Stockton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Taunton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Taunton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Tokyo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Tokyo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Vorarlberg: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Vorarlberg variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee I: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee I variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- autosomal dominant: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The autosomal dominant variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Failure of secondary teeth to erupt in children: Failure of secondary teeth to erupt in children is a condition in which a child's adult teeth do not emerge.
  • Failure of teeth eruption in children: Failure of teeth eruption in children refers to a child whose teeth do not emerge.
  • False Hellebore poisoning: False Hellebore is a herbaceous plant which bears large clusters of greenish-yellow flowers on the ends of branches. The plant is found mainly growing in the wild in the US. The plant contains steroidal alkaloids which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Familial Expansile Osteolysis: An hereditary condition characterized by degradation of the bones of the body
  • Familial rectal pain: An inherited severe pain syndrome involving very short but severe episodes of pain in the eyes, rectum or under the jaw. Triggers for episodes include sudden falls, sexual encounters, eating, crying, yawning, vivid dreams and fights. Defecation is the main trigger in infants and younger children. The eye and jaw pain is more common in older children and adults. Patients vary with respect to the number of locations involved.
  • Fanconi-Albertini-Zellweger syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by congenital heart defect, brain abnormalities, unusual face and metabolic acidosis.
  • Fetal PCB syndrome: A condition that occurs in infants born to mothers exposed to PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) during pregnancy. The chemical is believed to affect calcium metabolism. In 1968 many cases occurred in Japan following consumption of cooking rice oil contaminated with PCB.
  • Fibromatosis, gingival 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by enlarged gum tissue. The severity of the condition is variable. The chromosome involved is 2p23.3-p22.3.
  • Finale rodenticide poisoning: Finale is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Flocoumafen rodenticide poisoning: Flocoumafen is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Fluorosis: Excessive fluoride in the body
  • Flynn-Aird syndrome: A rare inherited disorder where neurological degeneration causes symptoms such as dementia, ataxia, eye problems, skin disorders and muscle wasting.
  • Focal dermal hypoplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone, skin, teeth and pigmentation abnormalities as well as asymmetry of the face, trunk and extremities.
  • Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome: A rare condition causes weakness or mild paralysis of certain face and jaw muscles. The condition usually occurs when the blood supply to certain parts of the brain are interrupted eg blood clot.
  • Folgorat rodenticide poisoning: Folgorat is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Franceschini-Vardeu-Guala syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by premature puberty, lower lip pits and Kabuki syndrome. Kabuki syndrome is a mental retardation syndrome which also involves a range of physical abnormalities.
  • Frank-Ter Haar syndrome: A rare genetic bone disorder characterized by skeletal abnormalities, enlarged corneas and characteristic facial abnormalities.
  • Freire-Maia odontotrichomelic syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by tooth, hair and limb abnormalities.
  • Freire-Maia syndrome: An extremely rare syndrome characterized by tooth, hair and limb abnormalities. The abnormalities can be quite severe in some cases. The parents may have been related in the reported cases.
  • Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, skeletal abnormalities, hearing problems and wasting of arm and leg muscles.
  • Frontonasal dysplasia -- Klippel Feil syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by abnormal fusion of two or more vertebrae in the neck (Klippel Feil syndrome) as well as larynx and voice box abnormalities.
  • Fukuyama type muscular dystrophy: A rare inherited muscle wasting disease occurring predominantly in Japan and characterized by mental retardation and muscle weakness from infancy.
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gamborg nielsen syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by hair, tooth and nail disorders.
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gardner syndrome: A rare inherited disorder involving polyps in the colon and tumors in various other parts of the body and other abnormalities such as extra teeth.
  • Garland flower Daphne poisoning: Garland flower Daphne is a small shrub bearing clusters of small pink or white fragrant flowers and white or yellow berries. The plant originated in Europe and is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens. The plant contains chemicals which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. Severe cases can result in death. Skin irritation can also occur on skin exposure.
  • Gene-Wiedemann syndrome: An extremely rare birth disorder characterized by mental retardation and a variety of physical defects.
  • Genital anomaly -- cardiomyopathy: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of heart disease with genital abnormalities.
  • Ghost Teeth: A rare condition involving abnormal tooth development which tends to affect the upper teeth more than the lower teeth and usually only teeth on one side of the mouth are affected.
  • Gingival bleeding: bleeding from the gums
  • Gingival burning sensation: Abnormal burning sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gingival cancer: The gum is the soft tissue surrounding the base of the teeth, any malignant proliferation of cells of the gums is called gum cancer.
  • Gingival fibromatosis -- facial dysmorphism: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of thickened gums with unusual facial appearance.
  • Gingival fibromatosis and dental abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by fibromatosis of the gums and dental abnormalities.
  • Gingival fibromatosis in children:
  • Gingival fibrosis: Replacement of normal gum tissue with fibrous tissue.
  • Gingival infection: Acute or chronic inflammation of the gums.
  • Gingival inflammation: Acute or chronic inflammation of the gums.
  • Gingival lump: Small irregular swelling due to gingival or dental pathology.
  • Gingival numb: Abnormal sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gingival sensitivity: Raised responsiveness of the gums to stimulus.
  • Gingivitis: Inflammation of the gums
  • Gingivostomatitis: Mouth infection typically from first exposure to cold sores and subsequent viral HSV-1 infection.
  • Glanzmann Thrombasthenia: A haemorrhagic disorder which causes a prolonged bleeding time
  • Glossodynia: This is where the tongue is painful sometimes extremely
  • Glossopalatine Ankylosis -- Hypoglossia: Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis syndrome is characterized by a spectrum of disorders which can be categorized into a number of subtypes. Type III B involves mainly an abnormal band of tissue connecting the tongue to the hard palate or upper alveolar ridge. The tongue is also absent or underdeveloped.
  • Glossopalatine Ankylosis -- Hypoglossia -- Hypodactylia: Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis syndrome is characterized by a spectrum of disorders which can be categorized into a number of subtypes. Type III C involves mainly an abnormal band of tissue connecting the tongue to the hard palate or upper alveolar ridge. Other primary features include and absent or underdeveloped tongue as well as variable deficiencies of the digits.
  • Glossopalatine Ankylosis -- Hypoglossia -- Hypodactylomelia: Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis syndrome is characterized by a spectrum of disorders which can be categorized into a number of subtypes. Type III E involves mainly an abnormal band of tissue connecting the tongue to the hard palate or upper alveolar ridge. Other primary features include and absent or underdeveloped tongue as well as variable deficiencies of the limbs and digits.
  • Glossopalatine Ankylosis -- Hypoglossia -- Hypomelia: Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis syndrome is characterized by a spectrum of disorders which can be categorized into a number of subtypes. Type III D involves mainly an abnormal band of tissue connecting the tongue to the hard palate or upper alveolar ridge. Other primary features include and absent or underdeveloped tongue as well as variable deficiencies of the limbs.
  • Golden club poisoning: The golden club is a water plant that has rhizomes (thick roots) under the water and flowers on a long stem above the water. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries on sensitive eyes or mucosal tissues of the digestive tract. The plant is considered mildly toxic if eaten and can cause skin and eye symptoms on exposure. The roots and seeds may be eaten if they are prepared properly - boiled with frequent water changes.
  • Gorlin-Chaudhry-Moss Syndrome: A very rare inherited condition involving various physical and mental abnormalities.
  • Gradual onset of bleeding gums: Gradual onset of bleeding gums is the slow development of bleeding from the gums.
  • Gradual onset of toothache: Gradual onset of toothache is the slow development of discomfort or pain in a tooth.
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • Gray stain in teeth in children: Gray stain in teeth in children is the appearance of abnormal gray discoloration on the teeth of a child.
  • Gray-black staining on teeth in children: Gray-black staining on teeth in children refers to abnormal gray-black discoloration on the teeth of a child.
  • Green discoloration of teeth in children: Green discoloration of teeth in children is the appearance of an abnormal green color of a child's teeth.
  • Green dragon poisoning: The green dragon is a herbaceous plant which bears inconspicuous flowers. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Severe mouth pain is usually associated with eating parts of the plant which usually prevents further ingestion.
  • Grix-Blankenship-Peterson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, bone defects and head and face abnormalities.
  • Growth Hormone Deficiency: A deficiency in growth hormone which results in poor growth.
  • Growth Hormone Receptor Deficiency: Laron syndrome is a rare genetic disease where the body has sufficient growth hormones but lacks receptors to utilize the hormone and hence dwarfism results. Type 1 involves a defect in the growth hormone receptor gene which prevents the hormone from binding and being used. Hence there are high levels of free growth hormone in the plasma. Type II involves a problem with the processing of the growth hormone once it has been bound properly to the cell surface.
  • Gum abnormalities: are due to conditions causing focal or diffuse swelling of the gums
  • Gum bleeding: abnormal bleeding from the gums may be mostly due to nutritional deficiencies or blood dyscrasias
  • Gum bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the face.
  • Gum burning sensation: A burning sensation located on the gums
  • Gum disorder: Any condition which affects the gums
  • Gum disorders: Any disorder the affects the gums of the human mouth
  • Gum hypertrophy: Overgrowth of the gingiva (gums), usually the gum tissue in between teeth causing swelling and discomfort
  • Gum infection: An infection of any type that is located in the gums
  • Gum itch: A sensation that causes a desire to scratch the gums
  • Gum numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the gums
  • Gum numbness in children: Gum numbness in children is a loss of sensation in the gums of a child.
  • Gum pain: The occurrence of pain located in the gums
  • Gum pain in children: Gum pain in children is discomfort in the gums of a child.
  • Gum paresthesia/ tingling: A loss of sensation located on the gum
  • Gum rash: An eruption on the gums.
  • Gum retraction: Shrinkage of the gums causing retraction away from the teeth
  • Gum symptoms: Dental symptoms affecting the gums
  • Gum symptoms in pregnancy: Gum symptoms in pregnancy refers to changes in the gums of a woman who is pregnant.
  • Gum tingling/ paresthesias: A tingling and numbness located in the gum
  • Gums bleeding: Abnormal bleeding of the gums due to pathology related to the teeth or any systemic abnormality.
  • Gums bruise: Gums bruise is a contusion of the gums due to rupture of blood vessels in the gums.
  • Gums burning sensation: Abnormal burning sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gums infection: Acute or chronic infection of the gums.
  • Gums inflammation: Acute or chronic inflammation of the gums.
  • Gums lump: Small irregular swelling due to gum or dental pathology.
  • Gums numb: Abnormal sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gums sensitive: Raised responsiveness of the gums to stimulus.
  • Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease: Common contagious viral infant or child condition
  • Hand-Schuller-Christian Syndrome: A group of blood disorder involving excess production of histiocytes (type of immune cell) throughout the body. Accumulation of histiocytes results in non-cancerous growths which can damage organs and other body tissues such as bones. Symptom vary hugely and depend on location and size of tumor growths.
  • Hanhart syndrome type II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by retarded growth, distinctive facial features, delayed puberty, excess fatty deposits in breast and abdominal area, small jaw , small tongue, hand and foot deformities and missing teeth.
  • Harper dwarfism: A rare inherited disorder involving a range of abnormalities. It is a variant of the Seckel syndrome.
  • Havoc rodenticide poisoning: Havoc is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Hay-Wells Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by ankyloblepharon, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip and/or cleft palate.
  • Hay-Wells syndrome, recessive type: A rare recessively inherited genetic disorder characterized by ankyloblepharon, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip and/or cleft palate. The recessive form of this condition is distinguished by the presence at birth of adhesions between the upper and lower jaws.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart attack: An acute myocardial infarction
  • Heartburn: Heartburn is a burning sensation experienced behind the breastbone in the upper chest due to regurgitation of stomach contents.
  • Hemangioma thrombocytopenia syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a spreading congenital hemangioma (collection of abnormal blood vessels) usually on the skin as well as blood clotting problems.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 1: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children and can be life-threatening.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 2: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 10q22.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 3: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 17q25.1.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 4: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q24.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis: Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis is a very rare condition characterized by underdevelopment of the facial nerves (particularly sixth and seventh cranial nerves) which causes facial paralysis. There are two subtypes which differ in the origin of the genetic defect: type I is caused by a defect on chromosome 3q and type II is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q. The facial paralysis may affect one or both sides of the face.
  • Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis 2: Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis II is a very rare condition characterized by underdevelopment of the facial nerves (particularly sixth and seventh cranial nerves) which causes facial paralysis. It is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q. The facial paralysis may affect one or both sides of the face.
  • Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis I: Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis I is a very rare condition characterized by underdevelopment of the facial nerves (particularly sixth and seventh cranial nerves) which causes facial paralysis. It is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q. The facial paralysis may affect one or both sides of the face.
  • Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis II: Hereditary Congenital Facial Paresis II is a very rare condition characterized by underdevelopment of the facial nerves (particularly sixth and seventh cranial nerves) which causes facial paralysis. It is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q. The facial paralysis may affect one or both sides of the face.
  • Herpangina: A condition which is infective and caused by the coxsackie virus
  • Herpes stomatitis: Mouth infection with ulcers/blisters due to the herpes virus
  • Herrmann-Opitz craniosynostosi: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities and an unusual facial appearance.
  • Homocystinuria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving the amino acid methionine and resulting in a harmful accumulation of homocysteine in the body.
  • Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency: A rare genetic biochemical disorder where a deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthase results in high levels of methionine and homocysteine in the blood and reduced levels of cyteine in the blood. There are two subtypes of the disorder with varying manifestations. One type responds to Vitmain B6 supplementation and the other doesn't. Those who do respond to Vitamin B6 tend to have milder manifestations.
  • Homocystinuria due to defect in methylation cbl e: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (methionine synthase reductase) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects. It is a form of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Hooft disease: A rare disorder characterized by mental and physical retardation, red rash and low blood lipid level.
  • Hornova-Dlurosova syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation and amyloid (abnormal protein) deposits in the eyelids and gums.
  • Hot pepper poisoning: Hot pepper is a plant which bears small, elongated fruit which can be red, green or yellow. The fruit and leaves contain chemicals such as capsaicin and can cause severe skin, eye and mouth irritation. Eating large amounts can also cause gastrointestinal symptoms.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Dental symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Dental symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Dental symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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