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Symptoms » Double vision » Glossary
 

Glossary for Double vision

Medical terms related to Double vision or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Alcohol intoxication: excess intake of alcohol can lead to serious consequences
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Antepartum Eclampsia: Antepartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Antepartum means that it occurs before delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 2: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. The extent of the deformity is greater in type 2 than type 1 and hence the symptoms are more severe and are often associated with a myelomeningocele (opening of the spine and spinal cord).
  • Asthenopia: Asthenopia or eye strain refers to general eye symptoms such as vision blurring, eye pain, eye weakness, eye fatigue and headaches which can result from overuse of the eyes or uncorrected vision problems.
  • Astigmatism: A condition which is characterized by ametropia caused by differences in the curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye
  • Ataxia, episodic -- vertigo -- tinnitus -- myokymia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as tinnitus and vertigo. Stress, exhaustion, sudden movements and exertion may trigger the episodes. It is caused by a defect on chromosome 1q42.
  • Autoimmune Hypophysitis: Inflammation of part of the pituitary gland due to an autoimmune process resulting in impaired pituitary hormone production. The range and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the degree of damage to the pituitary gland.
  • Basilar artery migraine: Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blurred vision: Blurriness of vision or images.
  • Bonnier's syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by damage to Dieter's nucleus (the lateral nucleus of the vestibular nerve) or its connections.
  • Borries syndrome: Localized brain inflammation without the production of pus.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Brain cancer: Cancer of the brain.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain tumor: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal growth of tissue within the brain
  • Brain tumor, adult: A growth or tumor that develops in the tissues of the brain in adults. The tumor can be benign or malignant.
  • Brainstem glioma: tumour of the brain
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Bulging eyes: Bulging or protruding eyes
  • CAMFAK syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, small head, failure to thrive and spinal curvature.
  • Camurati-Engelmann Disease: A very rare genetic disease thickening of areas of bone causing pain, weakness and wasting. Usually affects the legs during childhood. Also called diaphyseal dysplasia.
  • Cataract: A condition which is characterized by an opacity of the lens of the eye
  • Cataracts: A condition which is characterized by opacities of the lens of the eyes
  • Central nervous system lymphoma, primary: A type of lymphoma that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). A lymphoma consists of cancerous lymphocytes which are a type of white blood cell. Symptoms vary according to the location of the lymphoma.
  • Cerebral Aneurysm: Dangerous swelling of a brain blood vessel that may rupture.
  • Cerebrovascular symptoms: Symptoms related to the brain's arteries
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbinoxamine: Carbinoxamine is a therapeutic treatment for allergic rhinitis. It is marketed under names such as Histex, Pediatiex and Carboxine. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbon Disulfide: Carbon Disulfide is a chemical used mainly in corrosion inhibitors, cold and nickel plating, photography applications and as a solvent in gums and resins. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide: Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide is a chemical used mainly in the production of a variety of electronic components. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethane: Trichloroethane is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent but also in inks and lubricants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chiari Malformation: Protrusion of the brain down the spinal column.
  • Choreoathetosis-spasticity, episodic: A dominantly inherited movement disorder characterized by episodes of involuntary movments. Symptom episodes are often triggered by fatigue, alcohol, physical exertion and stress.
  • Chromosome 1, 1p36 deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as heart problems, mental retardation, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and short stature. The symptoms are variable depending on the exact location of chromosomal deletion.
  • Chronic Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephaliti: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Cocaine-induced hypertension: Cocaine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of cocaine. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking cocaine and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of cocaine use.
  • Congenital glaucoma: A form of glaucoma affecting babies and younger children.
  • Conn Syndrome-induced hypertension: Conn Syndrome-induced hypertension is high blood pressure associated with Conn Syndrome. It results from excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal glands. The high blood pressure often responds poorly to the usual medications. Death can result in severe cases.
  • Coral snake poisoning: The Coral snake is a usually brightly colored, poisonous snake found mainly in America and Africa. The toxicity amongst species is variable. They are considered a shy snake and bites are usually the result of deliberate handling. Coral snakes have to bite for long enough to release the toxin through the fangs so envenomation tends to be rarer than for other snakes who can strike and envenomate rapidly. The snake venom contains toxins which mainly affect the nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Corneal inflammation: Inflammation of the cornea.
  • Corticosteroid-induced hypertension: Corticosteroid-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of corticosteroids. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking corticosteroids. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of corticosteroid therapy.
  • Cranial nerve palsy: damage to the cranial nerves or their branches
  • Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension: Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by a condition caused Cushing's syndrome where the adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of cortisol.
  • Cyclosporine-induced hypertension: Cyclosporine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking cyclosporine. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of cyclosporine use.
  • Decreased cerebral perfusion: compromised blood supply to the brain
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Demyelinating disorder: Any condition that is characterised by the destruction of the myelin sheaths of the nerves
  • Diabetes: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Double:
  • Double Vision in Both Eyes: Double vision occurring when looking through both eyes, present either at all times or on particular eye movements.
  • Double Vision in One Eye: Double vision occurring in one eye only (ie. is seen when the other eye is covered), either at all times or on particular eye movements; is almost always due to a problem with the eye itself and is thus less serious than if both eyes are affected.
  • Double vision in children: Double vision in children is a condition in which a child has double vision.
  • Drug-induced hypertension: Drug-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking certain drugs or medications e.g. corticosteroids, cyclosporine, amphetamines, alcohol and estrogens.
  • Duane Syndrome: An inherited eye movement disorder. The eye opening narrows and the eyeball pulls backwards when the eyes look towards the nose.
  • Eclampsia: serious complication of pregnancy and is characterised by high blood pressure and convulsions
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Elapid poisoning: Sea snakes, Kraits and cobras are from the Elapid group of snakes. The toxicity of the venom varies depending on the species. The venom is usually toxic to the nerves or heart. Early symptoms such as drowsiness can occur within 30 minutes with more severe symptoms developing over the next few hours. Severe envenomation can result in death within hours.
  • Endodermal sinus tumor: A form of malignant germ cell tumor that occurs mainly in young children. They can occur in the testis, ovaries, uterus, abdomen, thorax, tailbone region, vagina, liver, retroperitoneum and pineal ventricle of the brain. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • Erythropoietin-induced hypertension: Erythropoietin-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking erythropoietin which is sometimes used to treat anemia in conditions such as chornic kidney failure. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of erythropoietin use.
  • Exophthalmos: outward protrusion of the eyeball
  • Eye conditions: Any condition that affects the eyes
  • Eye muscle strain: An eye disorder caused by strain on the eye muscles. The eyes become tired when being used intensely such as occurs when working on the computer, driving or reading, long periods of time straining to see in dim light or extremely bright lights. Eye refraction problems can also cause eye strain.
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Eyelid swelling: A swelling located on the eyelid
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Facial fracture: Fracture of a bone in the face
  • Fisher (M.) syndrome: A rare type of nerve disease involving muscle coordination problems, eye muscle paralysis and absent reflexes. It appears to be caused by the body's own immune system destroying the protective layer around nerves. The condition is usually preceded by a viral illness and is not life-threatening.
  • Generalized Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease resulting from autoimmune dysfunction. In generalized myasthenia gravis weakness develops mainly in the limbs and trunk. The severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Most patients suffer increased severity of symptoms during the day with improvement after sleeping.
  • Gerlier disease: A disease that occurs usually in farm workers who are exposed to cattle. The condition is usually seen in some parts of Switzerland. Symptoms tend to resolve themselves within a few months.
  • Gradenigo's syndrome: A complication that can develop from a middle ear infection that spreads to the mastoid bone of the skull. The syndrome involves the association of headache, ear infection and sixth cranial nerve palsy.
  • Graves Disease: A condition which is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid resulting hyperthyroidism
  • Graves disease: A condition which is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid resulting hyperthyroidism
  • Hartnup Disease: A disorder of amino acid transport resulting in light sensitive dermatitis, ataxia, migraines and personality changes.
  • Head injury: Any injury that occurs to the head
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Head trauma: injury to the haed
  • High Blood Pressure/Hypertension:
  • High blood pressure: Excessive blood pressure.
  • Hyperaldosteronism-induced hypertension: Hyperaldosteronism -induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal glands. The high blood pressure often responds poorly to the usual medications. Death can result in severe cases.
  • Hypertension due to bilateral renal artery stenosis: Hypertension due to bilateral renal artery stenosis is high blood pressure resulting from narrowing kidney blood vessels which prevents the blood from flowing through the kidneys properly.
  • Hypertension-like disorders:
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hysteria: hysteria describes a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses
  • Increased intracranial pressure: Increased pressure inside the skull due to brain swelling or fluid accumulation
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Intracranial germ cell tumour: A brain tumor that arises from germ (sex) cells. This type of tumor tends to occur in patients under the age of 30, usually in the second decade. Symptoms depend on the size, exact location and rate of growth of the tumor.
  • Intrapartum Eclampsia: Intrapartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Intrapartum means that it occurs during the delivery of the baby. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Iritis: Inflammation of the iris
  • Keratoconus: A rare degenerative eye disorder where the corneas of the eye become progressively thinner and cone-shaped which affects vision.
  • Licorice-induced hypertension: Licorice-induced hypertension is a relatively quick increase in blood pressure due to eating licorice (either in the form of candy or as a herb). Blood pressure usually resumes to normalisation quite rapidly. Patients with existing blood pressure problems should avoid consuming licorice as it can cause their blood pressure to rise to dangerously high levels.
  • MN1: A rare genetic defect that can cause meningiomas to develop. A meningioma is a tumor of the meninges which is a membrane that encloses the brain and spinal cord The genetic defect occurs on chromosome 22. The tumor is usually slow-growing and benign.
  • Machado-Joseph Disease: Rare genetic muscle disease causing muscle weakness.
  • Malignant Teratocarcinosarcoma: A rare type of cancer that involves connective (bone, cartilage, fat) and epithelial (skin and lining of internal organs) tissue and tends to be of a large size. It often tends to occur in the nose, pharynx and sinus areas. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor.
  • Malignant germ cell tumor: Malignant tumors that are made up of germ cells which are immature cells that eventually become reproductive system tissues in males and females. The symptoms depend on the location of the tumor which may occur in the ovaries, testes or anywhere along the body's midline such as the chest, head, abdomen, pelvis and lower back.
  • Malignant hypertension: Malignant hypertension is a condition characterized by very high blood pressure and swelling of the optic nerve. This type of hypertension is more common in people with kidney problems such as narrowed kidney blood vessels. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Marfan syndrome: A genetic connective tissue disorder involving a defect of chromosome 15q21.1 which affects the production of the fibrillin needed to make connective tissue.
  • Meningioma: A slow-growing tumor of the meninges that is not cancerous. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor.
  • Mental retardation -- skeletal dysplasia -- abducens palsy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities and weakness of an eye muscle.
  • Migraine: Severe complex headaches that occur periodically
  • Mohave Rattle snake poisoning: The Mohave rattle snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in Mexico and south-western areas of the US. The type of venom in Mohave snakes varies amongst species. Those with Type A venom tend to affect the nervous system whereas those with Type B venom primarily affect the blood and tissues. Type A tends to be more toxic than type B. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Monosomy 1p36: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as heart problems, mental retardation, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and short stature. The range and severity of symptoms is variable with some cases being relatively mild.
  • Mucormycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the order Mucorales which is normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 1: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 2: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 3: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.2.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 4: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Myasthenia Gravis: An autoimmune disorder which interferes with nerve impulses to muscles and hence results in weak, easily fatigued muscles.
  • Myelinopathies: Disorders where the protective myelin sheath around nerves is destroyed which affects the transmission of nerve signals. The severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of myelin destruction and the nerves affected. Multiple sclerosis is an example of a myelin sheath disease.
  • Nasal decongestant-induced hypertension: Nasal decongestant-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking nasal decongestants. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking nasal decongestants and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of nasal decongestant use.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Occupational Cancer -- Nasal Cavity and Sinus cancer: Occupational exposure to wood dust can increase the risk of developing nasal cavity and sinus cancer.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Sino Nasal Carcinoma: Occupational exposure during soldering can increase the risk of developing sino nasal carcinoma.
  • Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease resulting from autoimmune dysfunction. In ocular myasthenia gravis, only the eye muscles are affected. A significant number of patients with ocular myasthenia gravis go on to develop symptoms in other muscles.
  • Oculomotor palsy: oculomotor nerve palsy is an eye condition resulting from damage to the third cranial nerve or a branch thereof
  • Orbit Tumour: Tumour growing in the eye socket (space behind or surrounding the eyeball); may be benign or malignant or due to secondary growth from another malignancy
  • Orbit tumor: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of a tumour in the eye
  • Orbital fracture: The orbit and its contents are affected by orbital floor fractures
  • Orbital lymphangioma: A tumor that develops from lymph vessels around the eye.
  • Orbital lymphoma: A tumor that develops in the soft tissue of the eye socket and can push against the eye causing problems with vision and eye movement.
  • Paralysis symptoms: Loss of body control and/or feeling.
  • Paranasal sinus cancer, adult: Cancer that develops in the paranasal sinus which are spaces behind the cheeks and nose.
  • Peripheral vision loss: Reduced or lost peripheral vision
  • Pheochromocytoma-induced hypertension: Pheochromocytoma-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by an adrenal gland tumor. The high blood pressure often responds poorly to the usual medications. Death can result in severe cases.
  • Pineal Teratoma: A type of brain tumor that occurs mainly in the pineal region of the brain.
  • Pinealoma: A slow-growing type of brain tumor that occurs in the pineal gland. The pineal gland produces a hormone called melatonin which is involved in regulating sleep patterns.
  • Pineoblastoma, adult: A rare type of highly malignant brain tumor that usually occurs in children. The tumor develops in the pineal region of the brain.
  • Postpartum Eclampsia: Postpartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Postpartum means that it soon after the delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure.
  • Primidone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Primidone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia: The progressive occurrence of weakness in the muscles that control eye movement
  • Radiation induced meningioma: A type of brain tumor caused by exposure of the head region to radiation. Radiation is often used to treat a number of conditions, particularly cancer. The tumor can develop years or even decades after the exposure. Symptoms are determined by the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Refractive error: Refractive error is a condition in which there is a problem with focusing light properly on the retina of the eye, resulting in blurred vision.
  • Renal hypertension: Renovascular hypertension is high blood pressure resulting from narrowing or damage to kidney blood vessels which prevents the blood from flowing through the kidneys properly.
  • Renovascular Hypertension: Renovascular hypertension is high blood pressure resulting from narrowing or damage to kidney blood vessels which prevents the blood from flowing through the kidneys properly.
  • Resistant hypertension: Resistant hypertension is a form of high blood pressure that doesn't respond to treatment. Blood pressure remains high even when a combination of three drugs is used. It can be caused by such things a secondary hypertension, fluid retention or if the patient doesn't stick to the treatment plan.
  • Retinopathy: Any disease that occurs to the retina that does not involve inflammation
  • Rhinocerebral mucormycosis: A rare opportunistic infection that tends to occur mainly in the brain and sinuses. The condition is usually fatal and generally only affects immunocompromised people such as patients with leukemia, lymphoma or those that have had organ transplants or chemotherapy. The infectious agent is saprophytic fungi.
  • Rhinocerebral zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis involves infection of the paranasal sinuses and the central nervous system.
  • Rollet syndrome: A rare disorder involving damage to a part of the eye orbit resulting in eye problems and skin sensation abnormalities involving the forehead, temples and top of the head.
  • Sea snake poisoning: The Sea snake is a poisonous snake found in the warmer western parts of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Sea snakes have scales but not gills or fins so they still need to go to the surface of the water to breathe. Sea snake venom is particularly poisonous but their bite fails to achieve any significant envenomation. The venom is toxic to the nervous system and muscles.
  • Secondary Hypertension: Secondary hypertension is high blood pressure resulting from an underlying cause such as kidney disease. Hypertension is a serious health condition due to the fact that it often causes no symptoms until it is severe.
  • Silent sinus syndrome: The silent sinus syndrome refers to the collapse of the orbital floor and maxillary sinus which can cause changes in facial appearance. The condition is quite uncommon and usually causes no pain when it occurs. It is believed that the condition is often undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. The cause of the condition is not fully understood but is believed to be an acquired condition in most cases.
  • Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma: A rare but aggressive tumor that occurs in the nasal or sinus cavities.
  • Sinus cancer: Cancer that originates from the mucosal tissue lining the sinus cavities or rarely from the bone itself.
  • Sinusitis: Inflammation of the sinus passages (as a symptom)
  • Sixth nerve palsy: A nerve disorder where the cranial nerve VI doesn't function properly and hence the eye can't look outwards towards the ears. The nerve impairment can result from ear infections, certain viral infections or other disorders.
  • Sixth nerve palsy, benign: A nerve disorder where the cranial nerve VI doesn't function properly and hence the eye can't look outwards towards the ears. The nerve impairment can result from ear infections, certain viral infections or other disorders.
  • Slowly Progressive Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. . Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Squint: Misalignment of the eyes so that both eyes are not looking in the same direction.
  • Strabismus: Strabismus is a misalignment of the eyes, also known as crossed eyes.
  • Strabismus-like double vision: It is the simultaneous perception of two images of a single object. These images may be displaced horizontally, vertically, or diagonally in relation to each other.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Superior orbital fissure syndrome: A neurological condition that can result from a fracture of the orbital fissure which is a cleft that lies behind the nose. The disorder that can also result from facial fractures, cavernous sinus infections or retrobulbar tumors or infections. Damage to the nerves that pass through the orbital fissure causes the symptoms.
  • Syncope: Loss or interruption of consciousness.
  • Temporal arteritis: Inflamed head artery causing headache.
  • Thymus Cancer: Cancer that occurs in the thymus
  • Thymus disorders: Any disorder that affects the thymus
  • Thyroid disorders: Any medical condition which affects the thyroid
  • Thyroid eye disease: Thyroid eye disease is an autoimmune eye condition that, while separate from thyroid disease, is often seen in conjunction with Graves' Disease.
  • Tick paralysis: Paralysis from Australian tick bites
  • Transient ischemic attack: temporary disturbance of blood supply to a restricted area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury: Brain injury from trauma or accident.
  • Venezuelan equine encephalitis: A mosquito-borne virus that usually affects horses and related animals but may also infect humans. Young, weak and old people may become very sick and in some cases death can occur. It occurs in Central and South America. The incubation period is 2-5 days. The period of illness is usually 3-8 days but relapses are possible.
  • Vision changes: Any change in vision or sight.
  • Vision distortion: Distortions or changes to vision
  • Visual hallucinations: The occurrence of hallucination that occur in ones vision
  • Visual problems: Any problems which might occur that affect ones vision
  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: A rare neurological condition caused by a stroke (involving the cerebellar artery) and resulting in symptoms such as facial paralysis or weakness on one side of body.
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • Zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Double vision:

The following list of conditions have 'Double vision' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Double vision:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Double vision' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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