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Symptoms » Face symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Face symptoms

Medical terms related to Face symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 11q Partial Trisomy: A very rare genetic disorder caused by a duplication of part of chromosome 11q. The characteristic symptoms of the disorder are delayed growth before and after birth, mental retardation (varying severity) and skull and facial defects. The type and severity of symptoms that can occur are variable.
  • 14q+ syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of genetic material from the long arm (q) of chromosome 14 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 14qter deletion Syndrome: A very rare genetic condition where a portion at the end of the long arm (q) of chromosome 14 is missing.
  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 1q proximal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the proximal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 1q terminal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the terminal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by high levels of a certain chemical (2-Hydroxyglutaric) which causes a serious progressive neurological disease and damage to the brain. The features of this disorder are variable and some cases are milder than others.
  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 2p21 deletion syndrome: This syndrome is a more severe form hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome as a larger portion of genetic material from chromosome 2p21 is deleted. It is characterized by infant seizures, reduced muscle tone, developmental delay, lactic acidosis and unusual facial appearance.
  • 2q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 2q22-q24 deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q22-q24) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 3 alpha methylglutaconicaciduria, type 3: A rare genetic condition where a gene mutation prevents the production of certain protein which leads to a build-up of an acid (3-methylglutaconic acid) which can have a negative impact on the body. The condition is characterized mainly by damage to the optic nerve.
  • 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase II Deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • 3-Hydroxyisobutyric aciduria: A rare inborn metabolic disorder which causes brain and facial anomalies, seizures and growth problems.
  • 3-M Syndrome: A rare genetic condition which is characterized by distinctive physical features and severe growth retardation that starts during the fetal stage. Intelligence is not affected.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving an enzyme deficiency which causes symptoms such as degeneration of the nervous system. The other features of the disorder are somewhat variable.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1: A recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by methylglutaconic acid in the urine.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Type 4 is characterized by symptoms which overlap type 1 and 3.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type V: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid.
  • 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency: A ver rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia involving a deficiency of 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase which results in reduced production of adrenal steroids (mineralocorticoids, sex steroids and glucocorticoids). The disorder can occur in classical, non-salt wasting and late-onset varieties.
  • 3C syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by cardiac malformations, cerebellar hypoplasia and cranial dysmorphism which gives the disease it's name.
  • 3q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 3 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 46,XX Gonadal dysgenesis epibulbar dermoid: A rare disorder characterized by gonad abnormalities and an eye disorder called epibulbar dermoid.
  • 46,XX chromosome 7 deletion p13: A chromosomal disorder where a small portion of chromosome 7 is deleted which results in a range of abnormalities.
  • 46,XY chromosome 7 deletion p13-p21: A chromosomal disorder where a small portion of chromosome 7 is deleted which results in a range of abnormalities.
  • 46,XY chromosome 7 deletion p14-p14: A chromosomal disorder where a small portion of chromosome 7 is deleted which results in a range of abnormalities.
  • 47 XYY syndrome: A genetic condition where males have an extra Y chromosome in each of their cells. Normally male cells have one X and one Y chromosome. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • 49,XXXXX syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder that affects only females and involves body cells having five copies of the X chromosome instead of the normal two.
  • 49,XXXXY syndrome: A rare sex chromosome abnormality where there are three extra copies of the X chromosome.
  • 4p16.3 deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of chromosome 4 is deleted at a location called 16.3. The condition is characterized by malformations in most parts of the body as the deletion affects growth and development of the fetus.
  • 8p-Syndrome, partial: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • ABCD syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by albinism, deafness, a black lock of hair and intestinal abnormalities.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • AChR deficiency and short channel open time: Extremely rare condition characterized by respiratory insufficiency from birth, facial dysplasia and paralysis of eye muscles.
  • ADP platelet receptor P2Y12, deficiency of: Deficiency of a compound (P2Y12) involved in the blood clotting process which results in bleeding problems.
  • ADULT syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by nail abnormalities, abnormal teeth development, tear duct obstruction, pigmentation anomalies and hand and foot abnormalities.
  • AIDS dysmorphic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving craniofacial anomalies and developmental delay that occurs in infants infected with AIDS during the fetal stage.
  • AIDS-like recurring respiratory infections: conditions which cause respiratory infections as in case of AIDS
  • ARDS: Acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • AREDYLD: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities of the extremities, teeth, hair, nail and kidney as well as lipoatrophic diabetes.
  • ARTS syndrome: A rare lethal syndrome characterized by deafness, optic atrophy and ataxia.
  • ATR-X syndrome: A rare X-linked disorder that affects males and is characterized by mental retardation and alpha thalassemia.
  • Aarskog Syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by facial, hand, genital and growth abnormalities.
  • Aarskog-Ose-Pande syndrome: A rare disorder involving lipodystrophy mainly in the face and buttocks as well as sparse hair, retarded bone age and minor face and eye anomalies. It is considered a variant of SHORT syndrome which tends to also include increased range of joint motion and more extensive lipodystrophy.
  • Aase Smith syndrome: A rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as cleft palate, joint contractures and hypoplastic anemia.
  • Aase Syndrome: A genetic condition which results in anaemia and some skeletal and joint deformities
  • Aase-Smith I syndrome: A very rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as joint contractures, anemia, hydrocephalus and cleft palate.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal paradox: Abdominal paradox is a condition in which the abdomen will contract inward as the chest expands during inspiration.
  • Abetalipoproteinemia: A rare genetic disorder involving fat metabolism. The disorder is also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome. Signs of the disease include acanthocytosis, little or no serum beta-lipoproteins and hypocholesterolemia. In severe cases, steatorrhea, ataxia, nystagmus, motor incoordination and retinitis pigmentosa may also occur.
  • Abidi X-linked mental retardation syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a number of physical abnormalities
  • Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome: A rare disorder involving a number of mainly physical abnormalities.
  • Ablinism I syndrome: A recessively inherited form of albinism involving the complete lack of skin, hair and eye pigments.
  • Abnormal ears: Abnormal ears are irregular, deformed or malfunctioning ears.
  • Abnormal eye movements: Uncontrollable eye movements are involuntary, rapid, and repetitive movement of the eyes.
  • Abnormal facies: queer looking kid or funny looking kid.
  • Abnormal hair growth in children: Abnormal hair growth in children is an excessive or lack of normal amounts of hair in a child.
  • Abnormal involuntary movements of the eyes: involuntary spasms of the eyelid muscles.
  • Abnormal involuntary movements of the face: repetitive, spasmodic movement often involving the eyes and facial muscles.
  • Abnormal involuntary movements of the mouth: repetitive spasmodic movements of the oral muscles
  • Abnormal involuntary movements of the tongue: repetitive spasmodic movements of the tongue.
  • Abnormal movement during inspiration: decreased or increased movement of the chest wall during inspiration
  • Abnormal pupillary response to light: the pupillary light reflex is the reduction of pupil size in response to light. A sluggish or slow pupillary response is known as an abnormal pupillary response to light
  • Abnormal pupillary size: pathological increase or decrease in the pupil size
  • Abnormal pupillary size in one eye: Abnormal pupillary size in one eye refers to an uncharacteristically small or large pupil in one eye.
  • Abnormal sensitivity to light: dislike of bright light
  • Abnormal sensitivity to light in both eyes: Abnormal sensitivity to light in both eyes is a condition in which the eyes are unusually sensitive to light, also called photosensitivity.
  • Abnormal sensitivity to light in one eye: Abnormal sensitivity to light in one eye is a condition in which one eye is unusually sensitive to light, also called photosensitivity.
  • Abnormal spasm of the facial muscles: a jerk usually caused by sudden muscle contractions
  • Abnormal spasm of the facial nerve: inflammation of the peripheral nervous system. Often representing as Bell's palsy
  • Abnormal taste sensation: Abnormal taste sensation refers to an unusual or unexpected taste in the mouth.
  • Abnormal teeth shape in children: Abnormal teeth shape in children includes any type of deformity or irregularity in the dentition or teeth.
  • Abrupt loss of vision in both eyes: Abrupt loss of vision in both eyes is a serious condition in which there is sudden blindness or decreased, disrupted, or blurred vision in both eyes.
  • Abrupt loss of vision in one eye: Abrupt loss of vision in one eye is a serious condition in which there is sudden blindness or decreased, disrupted, or blurred vision in one eye.
  • Abruzzo Erickson syndrome: A genetic disorder characterized by a combination of features including cleft palate, coloboma and deafness.
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Abscessed teeth: an abscessed tooth is a painful infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth
  • Absence of both eyebrows: Absence of both eyebrows is a lack of eyebrows.
  • Absence of doll's eye sign: Reflex movement of the eyes such that the eyes lower as the head is raised, indicating functional integrity of the nerve pathways involved in eye movement
  • Absence of septum pellucidum and septo-optic dysplasia: A rare birth defect where a thin membrane in the middle of the brain is missing. This brain abnormality is never present on it's own but is a characteristic of septo-optic dysplasia where the patient also has optic disk abnormalities and pituitary deficiencies.
  • Absence of septum pellucidum with porencephalia syndrome: A rare syndrome present at birth and characterized by the absence of the thin membrane in the middle of the brain (septum pellucidum) as well as abnormal cavities in the brain (porencephaly). The syndrome also involves other structural brain abnormalities.
  • Absence seizure: An epileptic seizure involving momentary loss of consciousness.
  • Absent abdominal musculature with microphthalmia and joint laxity: A rare disorder characterized mainly by small eyes, loose joints, a lack of abdominal muscles and facial anomalies.
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Absent corneal reflex: Loss of blinking when the edge of the cornea is touched.
  • Absent corneal reflex in one eye: Absent corneal reflex in one eye is the lack of a blink reflex in one eye.
  • Absent corpus callosum -- cataract -- immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by immunodeficiency, cleft lip or palate, cataract, reduced pigmentation and brain abnormalities.
  • Absent eyebrows: Absent eyebrows is a condition in which the eyebrows are not present.
  • Absent patellae -- scrotal hypoplasia -- renal anomalies -- facial dysmorphism -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by absent kneecaps, underdeveloped scrotum, kidney anomalies, unusual facial appearance and mental retardation.
  • Absidia species poisoning: Absidia species is a type of fungus found in plant debris but is also common in the environment. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Absolute Glaucoma: The final stage of blindness in glaucoma in which a glaucoma-induced increase in intraocular pressure results in permanent vision loss.
  • Acanthamoeba: Several conditions from infection with ameba.
  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the eye: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Acanthamoeba keratitis: Infection of the eye with a microscopic, free-living ameba (Acanthamoeba) that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Infection most often occurs through exposure to contaminated water while wearing contact lenses e.g. swimming or showering in infected waters.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Acatalasemia: A rare genetic deficiency where little or no catalase is produced.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Accessory muscle use: The use of accessory muscles
  • Accidental Eye Injury: The accidental injury to an eye
  • Accutane -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Accutane during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Achalasia -- Addisonianism -- Alacrimia syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- addisonianism -- alacrima syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Achard syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized primarily by a short head, long, slender bones, recessed lower jaw and loose hand and foot joints.
  • Achard-Thiers Syndrome: A rare hormonal disorder that occurs in diabetic postmenopausal women where body hair grows in a masculine manner. Hormonal therapy is used to correct the endocrine imbalance.
  • Aching eyes: A sensation of aching located in the eyes
  • Achlorhydria: Condition where there is no hydrochloric acid in the gastric juice
  • Achondrogenesis: A type of dwarfism where the main limbs are short and the head and trunk are hydropic (contain an accumulation of clear fluid).
  • Achondrogenesis type 1A and 1B: A rare lethal genetic disorder characterized by a low nasal bridge, very short limbs and incomplete bone formation of lower spine.
  • Achondrogenesis type 1B: A rare lethal genetic disorder characterized by a low nasal bridge, very short limbs and incomplete bone formation of lower spine.
  • Achondrogenesis type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death.
  • Achondrogenesis, Langer-Saldino Type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death.
  • Achondrogenesis, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death. It has been designated as a mild form of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.
  • Achondroplasia: A rare disease characterized by abnormal bone growth which results in short stature with short arms and legs, large head and characteristic facial features.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Achromatopsia: Patients who have achromatopsia (sometimes called achromatopia) do not have normal "cone vision.". Although the term may refer to acquired disorders such as color agnosia and cerebral achromatopsia, it typically refers to an autosomal recessive congenital color vision disorder, the inability to perceive color AND to achieve satisfactory visual acuity at high light levels (typically exterior daylight).
  • Achromatopsia 2: A rare form of colorblindness involving atypical rod monochromatism which and causing pendular nystagmus and photophobia.
  • Achromatopsia 3: A rare form of colorblindness which also involves myopia.
  • Achromatopsia incomplete, X-linked: An inherited form of blue color blindness.
  • Achromatopsia type 2: A rare form of colorblindness involving atypical rod monochromatism which and causing pendular nystagmus and photophobia.
  • Achromatopsia with Myopia: A rare form of colorblindness which also involves myopia.
  • Acid Reflux in pregnancy: Acid Reflux in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn.
  • Acid reflux: Condition which occurs when the acid reflux into the oesophagus exceeds the normal limit
  • Acid reflux into mouth: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acid regurgitation: The regurgitation of stomach contents
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidic tastes: Acidic or metallic taste in mouth
  • Ackerman syndrome: An extremely rare condition characterized primarily by glaucoma, upper lip deformity and abnormal tooth roots.
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the skin
  • Acne-like cheek symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acne-like facial skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the face.It is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acne-like facial symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the face
  • Acne-like forehead symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the forehaed
  • Acne-like nose symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the nose
  • Acoustic Neurinoma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Acoustic neuroma: A rare benign tumor that forms in the hearing canal. Can cause tinnitus, progressive hearing loss, headaches, facial numbness, papilledema, dizziness and an unsteady walk. Speaking and swallowing difficulty can occur in advanced stages. Also called acoustic neurilemoma, acoustic neurinoma and acoustic neurofibroma.
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acquired agranulocytosis: A blood disorder characterized by low levels of white blood cells (granular leukocytes) in the circulating blood. The condition is usually caused by certain drugs especially chemotherapy drugs.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acquired conductive hearing loss in children: Acquired conductive hearing loss in children is a type of hearing loss or deafness that is not present at birth and occurs in children due to an abnormality or disease of the outer or middle ear.
  • Acquired facial paralysis in children: Acquired facial paralysis in children is paralysis or the facial muscles in children that is due to a disease or cause that is not present at birth and is acquired later in life.
  • Acquired hypothyroidism: Acquired hypothyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland makes too little or no thyroid hormone. Acquired hypothyroidism can be caused by both thyroid disease (primary hypothyroidism) and hypothalamic-pituitary disease (central hypothyroidism)
  • Acquired progressive kinky hair: An acquired hair condition involving the progressive kinking of hair. It often precedes the early stages of male pattern alopecia.
  • Acquired prothrombin deficiency: A deficiency of prothrombin (vital for blood clotting) which is acquired through other conditions such as liver disease, anticoagulant drugs or vitamin K deficiency. The severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of deficiency.
  • Acquired stridor in children: Acquired stridor in children is an abnormal sound made during breathing that is not present at birth and is acquired later in life.
  • Acro-pectoro-renal field defect: A very rare genetic syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the genital and urinary systems as well as the absence of chest muscles at birth.
  • Acro-reno-ocular syndrome: A disorder characterized by eye abnormalities, kidney defects and abnormalities of the arm and hand bones.
  • Acrocallosal Syndrome (Schinzel Type): A rare condition characterized by absence of portion of the brain (corpus callosum), mental deficiency, duplicated toes, mental deficiency and other abnormalities.
  • Acrocallosal syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent corpus callosum of brain, duplication of thumb or big toe and extra fingers or toes.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly: A rare genetic condition characterized by limb abnormalities, extra digits and hydrocephalus. Other additional symptoms are variably present.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by head, hand and genital anomalies as well as mental retardation.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly, type 2 (ACPS 2): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly: A group of inherited disorders characterized by abnormalities involving the skull, face, hands and feet. Apert, Pfeiffer and Crouzon syndrome are examples of various types of the disorder.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly II: A rare inherited disorder characterized primarily by premature closure of skull bones, fusion of fingers and toes and eye and face abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly Syndrome type 5: A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 3 (ACPS 3): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include brachycephaly, ear deformities as well as craniofacial, finger and bone abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 5 (ACPS 5): A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A rare, chronic condition that occurs in infants and involves autosomal zinc malabsorption. Signs include blisters on the skin and mucous membranes, alopecia, diarrhea and failure to thrive. The condition may be fatal if untreated.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrodysostosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short hands, small nose, mental deficiency and hand and foot deformities.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Catania form: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Catania form is very rare.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Preis type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Preis type is very rare and the range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis atypical postaxial: A rare genetic disorder characterized by absence of some fingers and toes and characteristic facial features.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis autosomal recessive: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by facial, hand and foot anomalies. The disorder resembles Nager syndrome.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis postaxial, atypical: A rare disorder characterized by an unusual facial appearance, short stature and hand and foot bone anomalies. The disorder may be related to the fact that the infants were born to mothers with diabetes.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Nager type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped thumbs, forearm and cheekbones as well as ear defects.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Palagonia type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Palagonia type is very rare and the symptoms are relatively mild.
  • Acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the bones of the skeleton as well as mental retardation. Various facial, eye and urogenital anomalies are also present.
  • Acrogeria (Gottron Type): An extremely rare, mild form of progeria.
  • Acromegaloid changes, cutis verticis gyrata and corneal leukoma: A rare disorder characterized by acromegaly (enlarged extremeties) , furrowed skin on scalp and face and corneal leukomas.
  • Acromegaloid facial appearance syndrome: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by thick lips and gums, thick upper eyelids, large hands and occasionally mental deficiency.
  • Acromegaloid facies -- hypertrichosis: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by thick lips and gums, thick upper eyelids, large hands and occasionally mental deficiency.
  • Acromegaloid hypertrichosis syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by excess body hair and a coarse face. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Acromegaloid, Cutis Verticis Gyrata, Corneal Leukoma Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of acromegaly, cutis verticis gyrate and corneal leukoma.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acromegaly due to growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma: Pituitary adenomas are benign monoclonal neoplasms of the anterior pituitary gland, accounting for approximately 15% of intracranial tumors.
  • Acromelic frontonasal dysplasia: A very rare genetic malformation syndrome characterized by developmental abnormalities of the face and brain.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia: A rare genetic progressive skeletal disorder characterized by short limbs, a large head and lower thoracic kyphosis.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acromicric dysplasia: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acroosteolysis dominant type: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by breakdown of bone especially in the ends of the fingers and toes.
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Acrorenal mandibular syndrome: A very rare condition characterized by a split hand or foot deformity, kidney abnormalities and underdeveloped lower jaw.
  • Acrosphenosyndactylia: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities in the appearance of the face and head as well as finger and toe abnormalities. The bones of the skull fuse together too early which prevents it from growing normally. Various toes and fingers may be fused together.
  • Actinic cheilitis: Degeneration of the lip due to sun damage. The condition is considered precancerous.
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Acutane embryopathy: A rare disorder caused by fetal exposure to retinoids and resulting in mental and physical birth defects.
  • Acute (or transient) urinary incontinence: Acute (or Transient) Incontinence is caused by a new or recent medical problem that can be treated.
  • Acute AIDS-like recurring respiratory infections: conditions which causes respiratory infections as in case of AIDS
  • Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma: Primary angle closure is defined as an occludable drainage angle and features indicating that trabecular obstruction by the peripheral iris has occurred (ie, peripheral anterior synechiae, increased IOP, lens opacities, excessive trabecular pigmentation deposits).
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute COPD-like cough symptoms: usually comprises of cough with sputum
  • Acute COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute Dyspnoea: The acute sensation of shortness of breath
  • Acute Dyspnoea in pregnancy: acute dyspnoea in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of difficulty breathing occurring in a pregnant woman.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy: A acute acquired condition which is an inflammatory one affecting the retina of healthy young adults
  • Acute Tracheitis: Tracheitis is a bacterial infection of the trachea and is capable of producing airway obstruction
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vision Changes in Both Eyes (with pain or inflammation): Vision changes occurring in both eyes, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days with associated symptoms of pain and/or inflammation.
  • Acute Vision Changes in Both Eyes (without pain or inflammation): Vision changes occurring in both eyes, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days without symptoms of pain or inflammation.
  • Acute Vision Changes in One Eye (Without pain or inflammation): Vision changes occurring in one eye only, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days without symptoms of pain or inflammation.
  • Acute acid reflux into mouth: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute acid reflux into mouth during pregnancy: Reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn and followed by an episode of vomiting.
  • Acute acne-like cheek symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute acne-like facial skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the face.Itis a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute acne-like facial symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the face
  • Acute acne-like forehead symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the forehaed
  • Acute acne-like nose symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the nose
  • Acute allergy-like breathing symptoms: difficulty in breathing due to allergy symptoms
  • Acute allergy-like cough: allergic cough varies with the position of the body
  • Acute allergy-like eye redness: redness of the eye maybe due to conjunctival, scleral or corneal inflammation
  • Acute allergy-like runny eyes: allergy is one of the main factors for watering of eyes
  • Acute allergy-like runny nose: allergy is one of the main factors for runny nose
  • Acute allergy-like sneezing symptoms: allergy causes runny nose, sneezing and headache
  • Acute asthma-like breathing attacks: asthma sometimes causes sudden, acute episodes of dyspnea
  • Acute asthma-like breathing difficulty: also known as dyspnea
  • Acute asthma-like symptoms: sudden severe asthma usually presents with difficulty in breathing, wheeze, cough and stridor
  • Acute asthma-like symptoms at night: also known as paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea
  • Acute asthma-like symptoms non-responsive to treatment: some of the symptoms of asthma such as dyspnoea, wheeze and cough maybe be non-responsive to treatment
  • Acute asthma-like wheezing symptoms: wheeze is a continuous, coarse, whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing
  • Acute attack of asthma:
  • Acute blindness: An acute loss of vision
  • Acute chest pain: The sudden and acute onset of pain in the chest
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute chronic bronchitis-like cough: cough with white colored sputum
  • Acute chronic bronchitis-like symptoms: symptoms of cough with sputum
  • Acute congestive glaucoma: This is a closed angle type of glaucoma, caused by contact between the iris and trabecular meshwork, which in turn obstructs outflow of the aqueous humor from the eye.
  • Acute conjunctival inflammation: Acute conjunctival inflammation is the sudden onset of redness and irritation of the membranes that covers the white of the eyes and the inner part of the eyelids.
  • Acute cough: The noisy sudden expulsion of air from the respiratory tract
  • Acute cough in children: Acute cough in children is a sudden onset of coughing in a child.
  • Acute croup-like breathing difficulty: also known as laryngotracheobronchitis.Croup is characterized by a harsh "barking" cough and sneeze, inspiratory stridor (a high-pitched sound heard on inhalation), nausea/vomiting, and fever
  • Acute croup-like symptoms: also known as laryngotracheobronchitis. Croup is characterized by a harsh "barking" cough and sneeze, inspiratory stridor (a high-pitched sound heard on inhalation), nausea/vomiting, and fever
  • Acute cry: a brief, sharp, piercing vocal sound produced by a neonate or infant.
  • Acute diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many sudden changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Acute dyspnea following trauma: Acute dyspnea following trauma is a condition in which a person experiences a sudden onset of difficulty breathing after an injury or accident.
  • Acute emphysema-like cough symptoms: is usually associated with with white colored sputum
  • Acute emphysema-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute epiglottitis:
  • Acute episodic COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute episodic emphysema-like symptoms: symptoms like cough with sputum and dyspnea
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute expiratory wheeze in children: An acute expiratory wheeze in children is an abnormal whistling sound heard when a child breathes, often on exhalation.
  • Acute expiratory wheeze in infants: An acute expiratory wheeze in children is a condition in which there is an abnormal whistling sound heard when an infant breathes, often on exhalation.
  • Acute fulminant multiple sclerosis: Malignant Multiple Sclerosis, is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Thankfully very rare, this highly aggressive form is defined by its swift and relentless decline to significant disability or even death, often within a few weeks or months after the onset of the initial attack. It is characterized by widespread and progressive cerebral white matter destruction or by severe pathological involvement of clinically strategic regions such as brainstem, resulting in bulbar paralysis.
  • Acute gerd-like chest pain: must not be overlooked as it may be a medical emergency
  • Acute gerd-like sternum pain: Gerd presents with symptoms such as chest pain, heartburn and dysphagia
  • Acute gerd-like symptoms: conditions which causes symptoms present in GERD such as heartburn, dysphagia and chest pain
  • Acute hay fever-like breathing symptoms: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute hay fever-like cough: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute hay fever-like runny eyes: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute hay fever-like runny nose: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute hay fever-like sneezing symptoms: is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute headache: Headache, or cephalgia, is defined as diffuse pain in various parts of the head, with the pain not confined to the area of distribution of a nerve.
  • Acute heartburn after eating: food can be the precipitating factor to cause heartburn
  • Acute heartburn after exercise: exercise maybe be a precipitating factor to some conditions presenting with heartburn
  • Acute heartburn pain resistant to treatment: medication may sometimes not help a condition with heartburn
  • Acute heartburn unrelated to eating: acute heartburn which is constant and not related to eating or any other precipitating factor
  • Acute heartburn with acid reflux: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute heartburn without reflux: acute heartburn not related to reflux diseases
  • Acute heartburn-like chest pain: must not be overlooked as it may be a medical emergency
  • Acute heartburn-like sternum pain: must not be overlooked as it may be a medical emergency
  • Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis:
  • Acute ichthyosis-like facial skin symptoms: rough and dry facial skin
  • Acute lower respiratory conditions: An acute condition that occurs in the lower respiratory tract
  • Acute lung fibrosis symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Acute nausea and vomiting: Sudden onset unpleasant sensation in the abdomen causing a forcible regurgitation of stomach contents through the mouth
  • Acute nausea and vomiting in pregnancy: Acute nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of sickness in the stomach, associated with vomiting.
  • Acute nausea in pregnancy: Acute nausea in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of sickness in the stomach, often associated with vomiting.
  • Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: A reoccurring periodontal disease which results in necrosis and ulceration of the gums. Symptoms may include fever, bone loss, breath odor and enlarge neck and throat lymph nodes. Also called trench mouth, Vincent's angina or Vincent's infection.
  • Acute pain in both cheeks: Acute pain in both cheeks is pain or discomfort that occurs suddenly in both cheeks.
  • Acute pain in one cheek: Acute pain in one cheek is discomfort or pain that occurs suddenly in one cheek.
  • Acute pimples on cheek: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute pimples on ears: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute pimples on forehead: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute pimples on lips: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute pimples on nose: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment: A rare eye disease where the central vision in one or both eyes is affected by inflammation or fluid build up in the retina. The retina lies at the back of the eye. Symptoms such as fever, headache and malaise often precede the eye symptoms. The cause of the condition is unknown but may have autoimmune origins.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute psoriasis-like facial rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the face may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute pulmonary fibrosis-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea
  • Acute recurring COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute recurring emphysema-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute reflux-like symptoms: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute reflux-like symptoms in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like symptoms in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute reflux-like vomiting: acid reflux like disorders asociated with vomiting
  • Acute reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Acute retinal necrosis:
  • Acute retinal necrosis syndrome: An acute infection of the eye usually caused by the chicken pox virus (varicella-zoster), herpes simplex or cytomegalovirus. One or both eyes may be involved.
  • Acute rhinitis: An acute condition which affects the nasal mucous caused by inflammation
  • Acute rosacea-like cheek redness: rosacea is characterized by symptoms of facial flushing and a spectrum of clinical signs, including erythema, telangiectasia, coarseness of skin, and an inflammatory papulopustular eruption resembling acne
  • Acute rosacea-like facial redness: rosacea is characterized by symptoms of facial flushing and a spectrum of clinical signs, including erythema, telangiectasia, coarseness of skin, and an inflammatory papulopustular eruption resembling acne
  • Acute rosacea-like symptoms: rosacea is characterized by symptoms of facial flushing and a spectrum of clinical signs, including erythema, telangiectasia, coarseness of skin, and an inflammatory papulopustular eruption resembling acne
  • Acute seasonal COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute seasonal asthma-like symptoms: Acute seasonal asthma-like symptoms are symptoms of asthma, such as wheezing and shortness of breath, that occur suddenly during a particular season.
  • Acute sensorineural hearing loss by acute acoustic trauma or sudden deafness or surgery induced acoustic trauma: Sudden hearing loss caused by such things as very loud noise (such as an explosion) or surgery.
  • Acute severe asthma-like breathing attacks: asthma sometimes causes severe episodes of dyspnea
  • Acute sinusitis: An acute inflammation of the sinuses
  • Acute stress disorder: An acute anxiety state
  • Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome: The association of a sudden kidney disorder with eye inflammation. Autoimmune processes are believed to be involved.
  • Acute upper respiratory infection: Upper respiratory tract infections, are the illnesses caused by an acute infection which involves the upper respiratory tract: nose, sinuses, pharynx or larynx
  • Acute vision changes in one eye (painful or inflamed eye): Vision changes occurring in one eye only, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days with associated symptoms of pain and/or inflammation.
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Acute wheezing at night: wheeze is a continuous, coarse, whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing.
  • Acute wheezing attacks: wheeze is a continuous, coarse, whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing.
  • Acute wheezing symptoms: also known as laryngotracheobronchitis.Croup is characterized by a harsh "barking" cough and sneeze, inspiratory stridor (a high-pitched sound heard on inhalation), nausea/vomiting, and fever
  • Acute wheezing symptoms with stridor: in very severe respiratory cases wheezing maybe associated with stridor
  • Acute wheezing worse when lying down: also known as orthopnea is the dyspnoea which occurs on lying down and is relieved on sitting up
  • Acute zonal occult outer retinopathy: A very rare eye disorder where the retina at the back of the eye becomes inflamed. Vision loss usually starts suddenly and may then progress for a while. The cause of the inflammation is unknown. Usually vision returns to normal in 1 to 3 years but some people have permanent vision impairment
  • Acyclovir -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Acyclovir during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Adam Stokes attacks: Adam Stokes attacks refers to sudden episodes of lightheadedness, fainting and possibly convulsions, that are characteristic of Adam Stokes disease, caused by a heart rhythm abnormality.
  • Adam and Eve poisoning: The Adam and Eve plant is a herb with heart-shaped leaves found in Europe. The plant contains a poisonous chemical called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause a variety of symptoms if ingested. Eye exposure can also cause symptoms due to the abrasive nature of the toxic chemical. Ingestion of the plant generally causes severe mouth pain. Skin exposure usually only causes minor, short-lived skin irritation.
  • Adam-Stokes respirations: known as Adam- Stokes syndrome is a sudden transient attack of syncope occasionally associated with seizures
  • Adams Nance syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, small eyes and the presence of excess glycine in the urine.
  • Addiction symptoms: Symptoms related to addiction (physical or mental addiction)
  • Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs Dundar type: A rare disorder characterized by a thumb abnormality as well as mental retardation, foot defects and other anomalies.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: A malignant cancer in the form of cysts which may occur in the salivary glands, breast, mucous glands of the respiratory tract and sometimes in vulval vestibular glands. Also called adeoncystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma, cribriform carcinoma or cylindroma.
  • Adenoiditis: Infection of the adenoids in the nasal-throat region
  • Adenoids bleeding: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids blister: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. A raised lesion less than 0.5mm in diameter filled with fluid can appear on the adenoids in the following conditions.
  • Adenoids bruise: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids burning sensation: Abnormal sensations in the adenoids.
  • Adenoids infection: Infection of the adenoid lymphoid tissue usually due to bacterial or viral causative agents.
  • Adenoids inflammation: Infection of the adenoid lymphoid tissue usually due to bacterial or viral causative agents.
  • Adenoids itch: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids lump: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. Raised irregular swelling can appear in the adenoids due to the following cases.
  • Adenoids numb: Abnormal sensations in the adenoids.
  • Adenoids pain: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids rash: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. A raised lesion can appear on the adenoids in the following conditions.
  • Adenoids redness: Erythematous inflammatory changes in the adenoid tissue due to local inflammation.
  • Adenoids swelling: Increase in the size of the adenoids due to inflammatory changes in the adenoid tissue.
  • Adenoids tingling: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. Abnormal sensations in the adenoid.
  • Adenoids ulcer: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. A break in the lining mucous membrane can appear on the adenoids in the following conditions.
  • Adenoviridae Infections: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family. The most common sites for infection are membrane linings such as the intestines, respiratory and urinary tract and the eyes. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact. The infection is contagious.
  • Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family that occurs in a patient with a weakened immune system. The infection in these people is serious and can be fatal. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact.
  • Adenovirus-related Cold: An Adenovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Adenovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adie syndrome: A rare condition where the pupil of the eye is dilated and reacts very slowly to light and other stimulus. Knee and ankle reflexes are also impaired.
  • Adies Syndrome: A condition where the pupil of one eye responds slower to a stimulus such as light or change in distance than the other as well as reduced or absent tendon reflexes (eg in the ankle and knee jerk reflexes).
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • Adolescent cataract and infertility syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by cataracts and infertility in male adolescents.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital (General): Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is an inherited condition characterized by adrenal insufficiency. It is caused by a deficiency in an enzyme needed to produce certain adrenal hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy, autosomal, neonatal form: A rare inherited disorder involving the adrenal glands, testes and certain parts of the brain (white matter). It is a less severe form of leukodystrophy where an abnormality within the body cells prevents the metabolism of certain fats (long chain fatty acids).
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: A condition which is characterized by fulminant pulmonary interstitial alveolar oedema.
  • Adverse effects on ear: The occurrence of detrimental symptoms that affect the ear
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,1-Dichloroethene: 1,1-Dichloroethene is a chemical used in packaging, food wraps, carpet backing, adhesives and steel pipe coating. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane: 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane is a chemical used in soil fumigants and as a nematocide for various field crops. Commercial examples include Fumagon, Nemagon, Fumazone, Nemapax, Nemafume. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the route of exposure.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical which mainly involves irritation to the part of the body exposed to the chemical - eyes, skin and gastrointestinal. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- Allyl trichloride: Allyl trichloride is a chemical used mainly as a varnish or paint remover, cleaning agent or degreasing agent. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adversive syndrome: A rare condition where the patient turns compulsively when trying to move forwards. It can be caused by damage to a part of the brain called the Brodmann's area, neurosurghery, brain tumor or other brain lesions.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Aerotitis syndrome: Trauma to the blood vessels in the ears caused by rapid changes in atmospheric pressure. Blockage of the Eustachian tube in the ear prevents equalization of air pressure and a vacuum develops inside the ear. Yawning or chewing can sometimes alleviate symptoms by opening up the Eustachian tube.
  • African milk bush poisoning: The African milk bush originated from African and is a shrubby plant with small flowers. The milky sap contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if it is eaten or if the sap comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It can cause severe skin irritation and the high toxicity of the sap can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Agammaglobulinemia -- microcephaly -- craniosynostosis -- severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Agammaglobulinemia, microcephaly, and severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Agapanthus poisoning: The agapanthus is a flowering herb with long leaves, long thick stems and a cluster of blue or white flowers. The plant originated in South Africa. Skin and eye exposure to sap from the plant can cause irritation and eating the plant can cause severe mouth pain. The skin irritation tends to be short-lived.
  • Age-Related Hearing Impairment: Progressive deterioration of hearing ability that affects both ears and occurs with aging. The hearing loss is sensorineural in nature and is most noticeable at high frequencies. There are a number of risk factors associated with age-related hearing impairment: smoking, ototoxic medication, cardiovascular disease and exposure to loud noise. It is estimated that a third of people over the age of 60 have some hearing loss and more than half of people over the age of 75 years have hearing loss.
  • Age-related macular degeneration: Deterioration of the central field of vision.
  • Agenesis of the corpus callosum -- mental retardation -- coloboma -- micrognathia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, coloboma, small jaw and a brain anomaly.
  • Aggressive fibromatosis -- parapharyngeal space: A type of tumor that occur near in the space around the pharynx and is locally invasive but not malignant. They tend to occur mainly in the head and neck region and symptoms depend on the exact location and aggressiveness of the tumor. Tumors often reoccur after surgical removal which then requires further treatment with radiation and chemotherapy.
  • Aging: The medical conditions from getting older.
  • Aglossia-Adactylia syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of a missing tongue with missing fingers or toes. Other malformations are also variably present.
  • Aglossia-Hypoactylia syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of a missing tongue with missing fingers or toes. Other malformations are also variably present.
  • Agnathia-holoprosencephaly-situs inversus: A very rare disorder characterized by a small or absent jaw, developmental brain defect and internal organs situated on the wrong side of the body (situs inversus). The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Agnathia-microstomia-synotia: A rare disorder characterized by an absent or very small lower jaw, small mouth and ear lobes which are very close together or even fused (synotia).
  • Agonal respiration: ia an abnormal pattern of breathing characterised by shallow, slow, irregular inspirations followed by irregular pauses
  • Agranulocytosis: Extremely low level of white blood cells (basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils).
  • Aicardi syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where the structure connecting the two halves of the brain fails to develop which results in seizures and eye abnormalities .
  • Air and water in the pleura: Air and water in the pleura refers to the abnormal presence of air and water within the layers of the thin covering that protect the lungs.
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Air hunger: is the sensation of the urge to breathe
  • Air in the pleura: Air in the pleura is the abnormal presence of air within the layers of the thin covering that protect the lungs.
  • Air sickness: disturbance between the central nervous system and the inner ear which affects the balance and equilibrium
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Airway collapse: closure of the airway
  • Airway hyperactivity: increased airway sensitivity maybe due to various etiological factors
  • Airway obstruction: airway obstruction is a blockage of the upper airway, which can be in the trachea, laryngeal (voice box), or pharyngeal (throat) areas or involve the bronch.
  • Airway obstruction in children: Airway obstruction in children refers to an object or disease process that causes partial or total blockage of a child's breathing tube and leads to difficulty breathing or inability to breath.
  • Airway occlusion: swelling of the laryngeal mucosa
  • Akaba-Hayasaka syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prominent forehead, cloudy corneas, low nasal bridge, underdeveloped chest and short limbs.
  • Akesson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excessive skin folds and furrows on the scalp, mental retardation the failure of the thyroid to develop.
  • Aksu von Stockhausen syndrome: A rare condition observed in a Turkish family and characterized by various head and neck malformations that have resulted from abnormal development of the branchial arches.
  • Al Awadi syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by severe malformations involving the limbs and pelvis.
  • Al Awadi-Raas-Rothschild syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by severe malformations involving the limbs and pelvis. The exact type and severity of symptoms is variable. Most cases appear to occur in cases where the parents were related.
  • Al Gazali -- Nair syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by bone abnormalities, eye problems, seizures and developmental delay. The reported cases involved related parents.
  • Al Gazali Hirschsprung syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by Hirschsprung disease (an intestinal disorder), nail abnormalities and facial anomalies.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, eye problems and an unusual cherubic facial appearance.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran syndrome:
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alacrimia, congenital: A birth defect characterized by a lack of tear production occurs from infancy. The lack of tears may stem from defects in the glands that produce the tears or in the tear ducts which carry the tubes.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Alajouanine syndrome: A birth disorder characterized mainly by clubfoot, strabismus and facial paralysis. The facial paralysis is caused by damage to the 6th and 7th cranial nerve.
  • Alar cartilages hypoplasia -- coloboma -- telecanthus: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a cleft in the nose cartilage and an increased distance between the corner of the eye and the nose (telecanthus).
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- Adult benign dominant form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The adult benign form is associated with a normal life expectancy and is often asymptomatic.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- intermediate form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The intermediate form is more severe than the adult form but less severe than the infantile form. Life expectancy is usually normal.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- malignant recessive form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Albinism ocular late onset sensorineural deafness: A rare inherited condition characterized by a lack of eye pigmentation and deafness that usually starts in middle-age. Severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Albinism, ocular, autosomal recessive: A rare inherited condition characterized by reduced eye pigmentation with normal, or near normal hair and skin pigmentation.
  • Albinism-deafness of Tietz: Tietz syndrome is a relatively rare condition characterized by deafness and albinism. It should not be confused with the similarly named Tietz's syndrome which involves inflammation of chest cartilage.
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol breath odor: scent of air when we breathe out.
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Aldehyde syndrome: A metabolic anomaly where consumption of alcohol results in high levels of blood acetaldehyde which causes a variety of symptoms.
  • Alezzandrini syndrome: A rare condition involving degenerative eye disease in one eye, followed by other facial symptoms on the same side and hearing impairment. The condition progresses over months or years.
  • Allain Babin Demarquez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by premature fusion of skullbones, abnormal development of skeletal bones and hypertension.
  • Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized primarilty by mental retardation.
  • Allergenic cross-reactivity: Studies have indicated that a significant number of people with certain allergies will also have allergic responses to other allergens which have a similar protein. For example patients allergic to birch pollen will often have allergies to plant foods such as apples and peaches. Symptoms can range from mild response to severe allergic reactions. Cross-reactivity tends to have mainly oral allergy symptoms with breathing problems and anaphylactic reactions being extremely rare. Food allergies related to cross-reactivity tend to be less severe than those not related to cross-reactivity.
  • Allergic Disorders: A group of disorders that a caused by an allergic response to allergens
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: An allergic reaction that occurs in the bronchopulmonary tract due to the occurrence of aspergillosis
  • Allergic conjunctivitis: also known as vernal catarrah
  • Allergic contact dermatitis of the ear:
  • Allergic reaction: A hypersensitivity reaction produced by the body, which results in an exaggerated or inappropriate immune reaction to a particular substance.
  • Allergic rhinitis: An allergic reaction of the nasal mucosa that may occur seasonally
  • Allergic tension-fatigue syndrome: Variable symptoms caused by food allergy.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Allergy like cough: allergic cough varies with the position of the body
  • Allergy-like breathing symptoms: difficulty in breathing due to allergy symptoms
  • Allergy-like conditions: Medical conditions with similar effects to those of allergies.
  • Allergy-like eye redness: redness of the eye maybe due to conjunctival, scleral or corneal inflammation
  • Allergy-like runny nose: allergy is one of the main factors for runny nose
  • Allergy-like sneezing symptoms: allergy causes runny nose, sneezing and headache
  • Alopecia: Partial or total loss of hair due to aging, an endocrine disorder, drug reaction, anticancer medication or skin disease.
  • Alopecia Areata: A condition where hair loss occurs in patches for unknown reasons. Although the condition often disappears within a year, it often reoccurs.
  • Alopecia Totalis: An autoimmune disorder where there is a total loss of all head hair i.e. complete baldness.
  • Alopecia immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia and primary immunodeficiency.
  • Alopecia in children: Alopecia in children is hair loss or baldness in children.
  • Alopecia mental retardation hypogonadism: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, abnormal gonad functioning and a total lack of hair at birth. After childhood, sparse hair growth may occur.
  • Alopecia mental retardation syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by a lack of hair and mental retardation.
  • Alopecia universalis: Complete loss of all body hair.
  • Alopecia, anosmia, deafness, hypogonadism syndrome: A rare
  • Alopecia, epilepsy, pyorrhea, mental subnormality: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia, epilepsy, mental retardation and pus-producing gum and tooth inflammations.
  • Alopecia, mental retardation and neurological problems: A rare, newly described syndrome characterized by baldness, mental retardation and neurological problems.
  • Alopecia-contractures-dwarfism-mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by mental retardation, short stature, lack of hair and contractures.
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency, Type II: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) causes glycoplids to accumulate in body tissues and result in various symptoms. Type 2 occurs during the second or third decade of life and is milder than type I and doesn't involve neurological degeneration.
  • Alpha-mannosidosis type II: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-mannosidosase) which results in the accumulation of certain chemicals in the body which leads to progressive damage. This form of the condition is less severe than type I (infantile form).
  • Alpha-mannosidosis, adult-onset form:
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome -- mental retardation -- midface hypoplasia -- elliptocytosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of Alport syndrome, mental retardation, underdeveloped midface and a blood abnormality (elliptocytosis). Alport syndrome is an inherited condition involving progressive kidney damage and hearing loss.
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Alport syndrome with macrothrombocytopenia: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by progressive kidney damage and hearing loss as well as macrothrombocytopenia.
  • Alstrom disease: A rage genetic disorder involving a group of abnormalities affecting vision, hearing, kidney function and also characterized by obesity and diabetes mellitus.
  • Alstrom syndrome: A rare, hereditary genetic disorder which is progressive. Initial symptoms in infants are usually extreme light sensitivity, wobbling of the eyes and sometimes dilated dilated cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Young children quickly gain weight and become obese and as they get older, multiple organ systems may be affected causing blindness, hearing loss, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, liver disease, urological dysfunction, pulmonary fibrosis and renal failure.
  • Alström Syndrome: A progressive condition which is characterized by deafness, obesity and visual problems in childhood that may lead to diabetes and kidney failure in adulthood
  • Altered respiratory pattern: also known as as tachyapnea , characterised by an increased respiratory rate
  • Altered teeth shape: Altered teeth shape refers to a change in the shape of teeth.
  • Altered vital signs: vital signs are measures of various physiological statistics often taken by health professionals in order to assess the most basic body functions,altered vital signs indicate an underlying abnormality
  • Altered vital signs due to dehydration: Altered vital signs due to dehydration refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a lack of sufficient fluid in the body.
  • Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy: Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of encephalopathy.
  • Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident: Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a motor vehicle collision.
  • Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis: Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of diabetic ketoacidosis.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Face symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Face symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Face symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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