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Symptoms » Fetal symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Fetal symptoms

Medical terms related to Fetal symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • ACE Inhibitors -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of ACE Inhibitors during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Abortion: The loss of an intrauterine pregnancy prior to viability of the fetus.
  • Abortion in pregnancy: Abortion in pregnancy, also known as a miscarriage, refers to the loss of the foetus before viability in a woman who is pregnant. Therapeutic abortion refers to the deliberate use of medical or surgical techniques to terminate a pregnancy.
  • Abruptio Placentae in Pregnancy: Abruptio placentae, or placental abruption refers to the separation of the placenta from the wall of the uterus before delivery of the foetus in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Allanson-Pantzar-McLeod syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where abnormal development of kidney tubules results in severe kidney problems that start during the fetal stage.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Amelia, autosomal recessive: A rare disorder characterized by the complete absence of the arms and a partial absence of the legs. The disorder has been described in the 3 fetuses of one family.
  • Amniotic Bands: A rare condition where abnormal fetal development occurs when bands of tissue encircle parts of the fetus and affect the growth of that portion. The band of tissue develops from the internal womb lining. The location of the band on the fetus determines the symptoms and the seriousness of the condition.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amyoplasia congenital disruptive sequence: A rare genetic disorder characterized by congenital contractures of two or more different joints.
  • Anemia in fetus: Anemia in a fetus is an abnormally low number of blood cells in a developing baby during pregnancy that can be caused by a variety of disorders, diseases and conditions.
  • Anemia of pregnancy: Anemia of pregnancy is anemia that occurs during pregnancy. Women's bodies have a greater demand for iron during pregnancy and if intake is not sufficient, anemia can result. Anemia in pregnant women can lead to infant problems such as premature birth, fetal death, retarded growth and other problems.
  • Anencephaly and spina bifida X-linked: A severe X-linked malformation syndrome involving anencephaly where a part or all of the brain and associated skull is missing as well as a defect or opening in the spinal column.
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypyothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anorectal atresia: Congenital malformation where the anal or rectal opening is obstructed. The malformation is often associated with other abnormalities.
  • Antepartum Eclampsia: Antepartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Antepartum means that it occurs before delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Aorto-ventricular tunnel: A rare heart defect where a tunnel from between the ascending aorta and the cavity of the left or sometimes right heart ventricle. The severity of the condition is highly variable from asymptomatic for many years to fetal death. Often other heart anomalies are also associated.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex with deafness, inguinal hernias, and early death: A rare syndrome characterized multiple joint contractures throughout the body, deafness, inguinal hernias and death usually within months of birth.
  • Atelosteogenesis, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone formation abnormalities, short stature and early death.
  • Atresia of urethra: A rare congenital malformation where the urethra ends blindly which makes it unuseable by the body to eliminate urine. This usually results in death unless surgical intervention provides alternative communication between the bladder and the amniotic sac. In rare cases, there is an abnormal opening between the bladder and the rectum which allow the urine to drain. The inability of the fluid to pass out of the body of the fetus results in a reduced amount of amniotic fluid which in turn affects the development of the lungs.
  • Baraitser burn fixen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, a skin disorder and an expressionless face.
  • Bilateral renal agenesis dominant type: A rare birth defect where both kidneys are absent. The disorder results in death within days of birth.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Cardioencephalomyopathy fatal infantile due to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called cytochrome C oxidase (COX) which is needed in the process of energy production by body cells. The fatal infant type generally affects the hear, brain and kidneys as well as the muscles.
  • Cardiomyopathy, fatal fetal, due to myocardial calcification: A rare syndrome characterized by heart muscle disease caused by calcium deposits in the heart muscle. The disorder causes fetal death.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Centronuclear myopathy, congenital: A severe inherited form of muscle wasting disease which often results in infant death.
  • Cephalic disorders: Various congenital brain defects
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata lethal neonatal: A rare skeletal disorder which results in the infant's death before or soon after birth. Symptoms include a variety of severe skeletal abnormalities and an enlarged head.
  • Choriocarcinoma: Rare cancer of the placenta
  • Chromosome 1, Partial Trisomy: A rare genetic disorder where part of the genetic material from chromosome 1 is duplicated so there are three copies in the body's cells rather than the normal two copies. The type and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the size and location of the genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 1, pter-p36: A very rare chromosomal disorder where the end portion of the short arm of chromosome 1 is missing. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Chromosome 14 trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of genetic material from chromosome 14 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is duplicated.
  • Chromosome 16q, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 16. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material. Severe cases often result in spontaneous abortion or infant death.
  • Chromosome 22, trisomy: A very rare disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 22 in all the body cells. The condition is usually fatal soon after birth or during the fetal stage.
  • Chromosome 3 duplication syndrome: There is very little information on this very rare genetic condition where there is an extra copy of chromosome 3 in the body's cells. The condition is considered lethal.
  • Chromosome 8 ring: A rare chromosomal disorder involving chromosome 8 which causes various abnormalities such as mental retardation, ureter anomalies, finger defects and facial dysmorphism.
  • Chromosome 9, trisomy 9q32: A rare chromosomal disorder where duplication of a portion of chromosome 9 causes various abnormalities such as short stature and mental retardation and facial anomalies.
  • Ciclosporin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ciclosporin (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Classical Potter syndrome: A term that describes the physical appearance that occurs when kidney disease results in a reduced volume of amniotic fluid. In the classical type, both kidneys are absent.
  • Cocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cocaine fetopathy: Cocaine use during pregnancy resulting in various birth defects and other abnormalities.
  • Complete Trisomy 18 syndrome: Complete Trisomy 18 syndrome is the most severe form of Edwards syndrome and involves an extra copy of chromosome 18 in all of the body cells. This severe form causes mental retardation and numerous physical defects that often cause death before birth or during infancy.
  • Complex 5 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (ATP synthetase) disrupts cellular processes. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. The deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms and conditions of variable severity such as Leber's myopathy, Leigh syndrome, cardiomyopathy and NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa).
  • Congenital cardiovascular malformations: The abnormal development of heart blood vessels. Specific examples of this condition includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome, coarctation and tricuspid atresia.
  • Craniorachischisis: A rare malformation characterized by skull and spinal bone defects which leaves the brain and the nerves in the spine exposed. The severity of the condition is variable and generally results in death before or soon after birth. Often other defects such as imperforate anus or hernia is also present.
  • Cyclosporin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cyclosporin (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cyclosporine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cyclosporine (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dandy-Walker variant: A less severe form of a brain malformation called Dandy-Walker. The brain malformation involves the development of a cyst which may interfere with the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid and lead to hydrocephalus. Many patients don't have symptoms until adulthood or remain asymptomatic but some may be severely affected.
  • Death: The loss of life.
  • Death-related symptoms: Symptoms related to death or dying.
  • Dennis-Fairhurst-Moore syndrome: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by dwarfism, characteristic facial features, small eyes and reduced hair.
  • Diaphanospondylodysostosis: A rare disorder characterized by bone formation anomalies including a lack of bone formation in the spine during the fetal stage as well as kidney problems.
  • Diaphragmatic hernia, congenital: A birth defect involving an abnormal opening in the diaphragm which is a structure that assists breathing and keeps the abdominal organs from moving into the chest. The abdominal organs can protrude through this abnormal opening and restrict the growth of chest organs such as the lung and heart. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the size of the defect - some cases aren't diagnosed until adulthood.
  • Diethylstilbestrol: A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen
  • Diethylstilbestrol antenatal infection: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly caused by exposure to diethylstilbestrol (used to prevent complications during pregnancy such as miscarriage and prematurity) during pregnancy
  • Digitalis -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digitalis (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Digoxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digoxin (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Duplication 13: A rare and very severe chromosome disorder leading to mental retardation and physical defects. It is so severe that many babies die soon after birth. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is duplicated.
  • Duplication 18: A rare genetic chromosomal syndrome where the child has an extra third copy of chromosome 18. Most fetuses are aborted before term, but a live birth with this condition occurs with a frequency around 1-in-3000. Duplication 18 syndrome is more severe than the more common Down syndrome. Duplication 18 syndrome causes mental retardation and numerous physical defects that often cause an early infant death. The condition has variable severity depending on how many of the body's cells have the extra chromosome and how much of the extra chromosome is duplicated. In severe forms all cells have an extra copy of the complete chromosome 18 whereas milder forms may have only some cells having the extra chromosome. Other mild forms may have an extra copy of only part of chromosome 18 in some or all of the body cells.
  • Eclampsia: serious complication of pregnancy and is characterised by high blood pressure and convulsions
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Edward Syndrome: A rare genetic chromosomal syndrome where the child has an extra third copy of chromosome 18. Most fetuses are aborted before term, but a live birth with this condition occurs with a frequency around 1-in-3000. Duplication 18 syndrome is more severe than the more common Down syndrome. Duplication 18 syndrome causes mental retardation and numerous physical defects that often cause an early infant death. The condition has variable severity depending on how many of the body's cells have the extra chromosome and how much of the extra chromosome is duplicated. In severe forms all cells have an extra copy of the complete chromosome 18 whereas milder forms may have only some cells having the extra chromosome. Other mild forms may have an extra copy of only part of chromosome 18 in some or all of the body cells.
  • Edwards Syndrome: A rare inherited genetic disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is duplicated. Most affected individuals die during the fetal stage and surviving infants have serious defects and tend to live for only a short while.
  • Enalapril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Enalapril (an ACE inhibitor) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Endometrial conditions: Conditions that affect the female endometrium that is located in the uterus
  • Enterovirus antenatal infection: Fetal infection with enterovirus. The condition is extremely rare but infection around the time of birth often results in death or paralysis in survivors. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the exact type of virus involved and at what stage of development the infection occurs.
  • Etodolac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Etodolac (used mainly for arthritis) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Exencephaly: A rare, fatal birth defect where parts of the skull bones are missing causing the brain to protrude.
  • Factor XIII Deficiency: A very rare inherited or acquired blood disorder caused by a deficiency of Factor XIII which is involved in stabilizing blood clot formation. The condition manifests as bleeding problems.
  • Factor XIII deficiency, congenital: A very rare inherited blood disorder caused by a deficiency of Factor XIII which is involved in stabilizing blood clot formation. The condition manifests as bleeding problems.
  • Factor XIII, A1 subunit Deficiency: A very rare inherited or acquired blood disorder caused by a deficiency of subunit A of Factor XIII which is involved in stabilizing blood clot formation. The condition manifests as bleeding problems.
  • Factor XIII, B subunit Deficiency: A very rare inherited or acquired blood disorder caused by a deficiency of subunit B of Factor XIII which is involved in stabilizing blood clot formation. The condition manifests as bleeding problems.
  • Female pseudohermaphrodism -- anorectal anomalies: A very rare disorder characterized by ambiguous external genitals and anal and rectal anomalies.
  • Female reproductive symptoms: Symptoms affecting the female reproductive organs.
  • Female reproductive toxicity: There is mounting evidence which indicates that exposure to certain agents may produce adverse reproductive or fetal developmental effects. The possible range of effects includes reduced fertility, low birth weight, childhood cancer, spontaneous abortion and birth defects. Agents which may be implicated in these adverse effects includes anticancer drugs, carbon disulfide, carbon monoxide, lead, pesticides, organic solvents and tobacco smoke.
  • Female reproductive toxicity -- Alcohol: There is some evidence which indicates that some women exposed to alcohol may suffer adverse effects as a result. Possible adverse effects due to chronic maternal alcohol exposure includes irregular menstrual cycle, fetal alcohol syndrome and physical and behavioral problems. Scientists have been unable to establish the quantity of alcohol required to cause reproductive toxicity.
  • Female reproductive toxicity -- Dioxins: There is limited conflicting evidence which indicates that some women exposed to dioxins may suffer adverse effects as a result. Spontaneous abortion and menstrual disorders and birth defects are the possible adverse effects.
  • Female reproductive toxicity -- Ethylene Oxide: Exposure to Ethylene Oxide, a recognized reproductive toxicant, can negatively affect the female reproductive system. Ethylene Oxide is used in pesticides as well as disinfectants. The severity and nature of the adverse effect is variable and can be influenced by factors such as level of exposure and individual sensitivity to the chemical. Effects on the female reproductive systems can include such things as menstrual problems, altered sexual behavior, infertility, altered puberty onset, altered length of pregnancy, lactation problems, altered menopause onset and pregnancy outcome.
  • Female reproductive toxicity -- Pesticides: There is limited evidence which indicates that some women exposed to pesticides may suffer adverse effects as a result. Spontaneous abortion, infertility, menstrual disorders and birth defects are possible adverse effects. Generally, adverse effects are only likely to occur with chronic exposure such as occurs in occupational settings e.g. farm workers.
  • Fetal Growth Retardation: Impaired growth of the fetus due to any cause. Causes include maternal cyanotic heart disease, chronic maternal hypertension, placental abnormalities and multiple births.
  • Fetal alcohol syndrome: A condition which occurs in a new born fetus and is caused by the mother consuming excess alcohol during her pregnancy
  • Fetal aminopterin syndrome: A rare disorder which produces multiple abnormalities and results from a failed abortion attempt using the drugs aminopterin and methotrexate.
  • Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: A rare, potentially life-threatening disorder where the mother's blood platelets are incompatible with that of the fetus and the mother's antibodies cross the placenta and destroy fetal platelets.
  • Fetal death: The sudden unexpected death of a fetus
  • Fetal distress in neonate:
  • Fetal dyspnea:
  • Fetal health conditions: Medical conditions affecting the health of a fetus while inside the pregnant mother.
  • Fetal hydrops in neonates:
  • Fetal parainfluenza virus type 3: Maternal infection with parainfluenza virus type 3 can cause a serious infection in the fetus and result in hydrocephalus. The risk is greatest during the first half of the pregnancy.
  • Finnish lethal neonatal metabolic syndrome: A very rare lethal metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of complex III which causes brain, kidney and liver problems and ultimately results in early death.
  • Fluoxetine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Fluoxetine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Flurbiprofen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flurbiprofen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Food poisoning: Poisoning from a substance or microbe in food.
  • Fraser-Jequier-Chen syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by a cleft epiglottis and larynx, extra fingers and toes and kidney, pancreatic and bone abnormalities. The internal organs are also located on the opposite side of the body to normal (situs inversus totalis).
  • Gaucher disease -- perinatal lethal form: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormally tight skin and Gaucher disease which is a lipid storage disease. This is the most severe form of Gaucher disease.
  • Generalized pustular psoriasis of pregnancy: A form of psoriasis that occurs during the third trimester of pregnancy and is characterized by pustules rather the skin bumps. The skin under and around the pustules is red and variable areas of skin may be involved. The pustules tends to occur in localized areas and then spreads to other parts of the body. It usually tends to recur during following pregnancies or with subsequent use of oral contraceptives.
  • Graves disease: A condition which is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid resulting hyperthyroidism
  • Greenberg dysplasia: A very rare form of short-limbed dwarfism.
  • HELLP syndrome: A rare potentially fatal condition that occurs in pregnant women and is frequently associated with pre-eclampsia.
  • HEM dysplasia: A rare disorder characterized by hydrops, dwarfism and abnormal bone calcification. The condition generally results in fetal death.
  • Habitual abortion: The occurrence of two or more spontaneous abortions in a row. The condition may result from severe fetal abnormality, endocrine disorders, severe kidney problems, structural defects of the cervix or uterus or immune problems.
  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hemolytic anaemia, lethal -- genital anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by genital abnormalities and hemolytic anemia which often causes death.
  • Hemolytic anemia, lethal -- genital anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by genital abnormalities and hemolytic anemia which often causes death.
  • Hereditary hypothyroidism: Hereditary hypothyroidism is a condition in which there is a defect in the thyroid gland which leads to increased production of TSH reduced production of thyroid hormone.
  • Hermaphroditism: A very rare genetic disorder where a baby is born having both male and female internal sex organs.
  • Herrmann-Opitz craniosynostosi: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities and an unusual facial appearance.
  • Holoprosencephaly: A rare disorder where abnormalities of the fetal forebrain development lead to various birth defects.
  • Human parvovirus B19 infection -- fetal: Fetal infection with human parvovirus B19.
  • Hydrocephalus: A condition which is characterized by marked dilatation of the cerebral ventricles
  • Hydrops ectrodactyly syndactyly: A very rare disorder characterized mainly be webbed fingers and toes, hand defect and hydrops (abnormal accumulation of fluid in the fetus).
  • Hypertension of pregnancy: Pregnancy hypertension is the development of high blood pressure during pregnancy. Hypertension is a serious health condition due to the fact that it often causes no symptoms until it is severe. The increased blood pressure can cause complications in pregnancy women e.g. eclampsia and HELLP syndrome. The blood pressure usually returns to normal after delivery.
  • Hyperthermia induced defects: A rare disorder where hypothermia during pregnancy results in infant abnormalities involving growth, development and brain dysfunction.
  • Ibuprofen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ibuprofen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Impossible syndrome: A very rare syndrome (only one reported case) characterized a range of severe malformations, premature birth and stillbirth.
  • Indomethacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Indomethacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Interferon Alpha -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Interferon Alpha during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Intrapartum Eclampsia: Intrapartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Intrapartum means that it occurs during the delivery of the baby. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Intrauterine infections: Infection of the fetus while still inside the womb. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the type of infection and at what stage of pregnancy it occurs. Some cases are mild enough to be asymptomatic and others are severe enough to cause a miscarriage.
  • Japanese skimmia poisoning: Japanese skimmia is a shrub which bears clusters of whitish, scented flowers on a purple-red stalk and bright red fruit. The plant originated in Japan and is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens. The plant, especially the red fruit, contains toxic chemicals which can cause serious heart problems if large quantities are eaten. Ingesting the fruit can also result in loss of fetus. The plant is only considered toxic if large quantities are eaten.
  • Jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence: A rare disorder caused by obstruction of the jugular lymphatic system due to problems during the fetal stage of development.
  • Ketorolac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ketorolac during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lamotrigine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lamotrigine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease: A lethal genetic disorder involving multiple contractures and facial abnormalities.
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (LAAHD): A lethal disorder characterized by arthrogryposis and loss of anterior horn motor neurons which results in a lack of fetal movement.
  • Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS): A rare inherited lethal disorder characterized by multiple congenital contractures. There are two main types caused by different genetic defects. Type 2 differs from type 1 in that it includes additional head, face and eye symptoms and hydrops, joint webbing and fractures were usually absent.
  • Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1: A rare inherited lethal disorder characterized by multiple congenital contractures. Type 1 occurs as a result of a genetic defect on chromosome 9q34.
  • Limb-body wall complex: A rare condition where disruption of the amniotic band system can result in head, heart, lung, diaphragm, kidney or gonad abnormalities .
  • Listeriosis -- granulomatous infantiseptica: Listeria monocytogenes infection that is transmitted from a pregnant woman to the fetus.
  • Lodine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lodine (used mainly for arthritis) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lovastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lovastatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphoedema -- atrial septal defects -- facial changes: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by lymphoedema of the legs at birth, heart defects and facial anomalies.
  • Male reproductive toxicity -- Benzene: Exposure to Benzene, a recognized reproductive toxicant, can negatively affect the male reproductive system. Benzene is a widely used chemical - in pesticides and as a solvent in industries such as pesticide manufacturing, laboratory chemicals, printing, paper and pulp manufacture and pharmaceuticals manufacture. The severity and nature of the adverse effect is variable and can be influenced by factors such as level of exposure and individual sensitivity to the chemical. Effects on the male reproductive system can include such things as altered sexual behavior, altered fertility and problems with sperm shape or count.
  • Maternal chorioamnionitis:
  • Maternal hyperphenylalaninemia: A rare disorder where a mother suffering from phenylketonuria during pregnancy can result in various birth abnormalities.
  • Meclofenamate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Meclofenamate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mefenamic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mefenamic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Methadone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methadone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Methotrexate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methotrexate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Microcephaly, hiatal hernia and nephrotic syndrome: A rare genetic disorder primarily involving physical and developmental abnormalities as well as kidney disease.
  • Midline field defects: Congenital problems that occur along the vertical axis of the body. Defects can involve the brain, spine, heart, genitals and midline of the head and face.
  • Miscarriage: Symptoms related to miscarriage or stillbirth.
  • Miscarriage in Pregnancy: Miscarriage in pregnancy refers to foetal loss before 20 weeks gestation.
  • Misoprostol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Misoprostol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Multicystic renal dysplasia, bilateral: A rare congenital disorder where multiple cysts develop in the kidneys which affects their ability to function normally. The condition is results in death prior to or within weeks of birth.
  • Multiple pterygium syndrome lethal type: A rare syndrome characterized by skin, muscle and skeletal anomalies and fetal death.
  • Nabumetone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nabumetone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nemaline myopathy 2: A very rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemaline rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. There are at least 7 different subtypes of nemaline myopathy, each with a different genetic defect. The severity of the symptoms may vary greatly even among patients within a particular subtype of the disorder. Type 2 is caused by a defect on the nebulin gene on chromosome 2q22.
  • Nemaline myopathy 3: A very rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemaline rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. There are at least 7 different subtypes of nemaline myopathy, each with a different genetic defect. The severity of the symptoms may vary greatly even among patients within a particular subtype of the disorder. Type 3 is caused by a defect on the alpha-actin gene.
  • Neonatal hemochromatosis:
  • Nephrosis neuronal dysmigration Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder primarily involving physical and developmental abnormalities as well as kidney disease. The type and severity of symptoms that can occur is variable.
  • Nephrotic syndrome ocular anomalies: A rare disorder characterized by the association of particular eye anomalies with kidney disease. Kidney failure occurs before or soon after birth with death occurring within months of birth.
  • Nondisjunction: Failure of chromosomes to separate during the cell cycle, causing one daughter cell to receive 2 chromosomes and the other daughter cell to receive no chromosomes.
  • Oculopalatocerebral syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, small head, mental retardation, cleft palate and eye problems.
  • Oligohydramnios: An abnormally small amount of amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus during pregnancy.
  • Oral facial digital syndrome, type 4: A rare inherited disorder characterized by facial, digital and oral abnormalities. Type IV is differentiated from the other types by the presence of severe shinbone deformity.
  • Partial Trisomy 18 Syndrome: A rare genetic chromosomal syndrome where the child has an extra third copy of only part of chromosome 18 in the body's cells. It is a less severe form of Edwards syndrome - the most severe form involves and extra copy of the whole of chromosome 18 in all of the body's cells. The severity of the condition is highly variable depending on how many of the body's cells are involved and how much of the chromosome is involved.
  • Parvovirus antenatal infection: Fetal infection with human parvovirus B19 - serious abnormalities rarely occur.
  • Penicillamine, D -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Penicillamine, D during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease: A disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. The foetal form is one of several forms of Gaucher disease and is the rarest. The fetal form causes death before birth or soon after.
  • Phenylketonuria: A metabolic disorder where there is a deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase which leads to a harmful buildup of the phenylalanine in the body. Normally the phenylalanine is converted into tyrosine. The severity of the symptoms can range from severe enough to cause mental retardation to mild enough not to require treatment. Severity is determined by the level of impairment of enzyme activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase.
  • Placenta conditions: Any condition that affects the placenta
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder that affects approximately 5% of all women.
  • Polyploidy: When body cells contains more than 2 copies of each chromosome.
  • Posterior valve, urethra: A congenital defect where there is an abnormal membrane in the back of the male urethra which affects urine flow. The urine can flow back through the valve and cause problems for organs such as the urethra, bladder, ureters and even the kidneys. The severity of the condition is determined by the severity of the malformation. Severe defects can cause fetal death and mild defects may cause incontinence.
  • Potter syndrome: A congenital condition involving absence of kidneys resulting in decreased amniotic fluid and compression of the fetus. The affected baby has leg deformities, poorly developed lungs and a wrinkled, flattened facial appearance and often don't survive.
  • Potter syndrome type 2: A term that describes the physical appearance that occurs when kidney disease results in a reduced volume of amniotic fluid. In type 2, one kidney is absent and the other is small and malformed.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Pregnancy toxemia /hypertension: Preeclampsia is the development of high blood pressure, excess protein in the urine and swelling during pregnancy. Hypertension is a serious health condition due to the fact that it often causes no symptoms until it is severe. The blood pressure usually returns to normal after delivery.
  • Primary hypothyroidism: Primary hypothyroidism is a condition in which a defect in the thyroid gland leads to reduced production of thyroid hormone.
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: A rare group of muscle disorders which mainly affects the muscles closest to the trunk of the body. Muscles become progressively weak and wasted due to damage to motor neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem.
  • Radius absent -- anogenital anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by an absent radius (forearm bone) and anal and genital anomalies.
  • Reduced amniotic fluid: Reduced amniotic fluid is a less than normal quantity of amniotic fluid, which protects and cushions a developing fetus during pregnancy.
  • Reduced amniotic fluid in pregnancy: Reduced amniotic fluid in pregnancy (oligohydramnios) is the presence of a much smaller amount of liquor in the womb than is usual during pregnancy.
  • Renal adysplasia dominant type: An inherited disorder of kidney development where either one kidney fails to develop normally, one kidney is absent, one kidney fails to develop normally and one kidney is absent or both kidneys are absent. Severity of the condition is highly variable: if there is one normal kidney the condition can be asymptomatic but if both kidneys are absent then the condition is lethal.
  • Renal dysplasia -- limb defects syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal kidney development and various arm bone defects.
  • Reproductive toxicity -- Vinyl Chloride: Vinyl Chloride is a suspected reproductive toxicant and exposure to it has the potential to negatively affect the human reproductive system. Vinyl Chloride is used mainly to make PVC products. The severity and nature of the adverse effect is variable and can be influenced by factors such as sex, level of exposure and individual sensitivity to the chemical. Effects on the female reproductive systems can include such things as menstrual problems, altered sexual behavior, infertility, altered puberty onset, altered length of pregnancy, lactation problems, altered menopause onset and pregnancy outcome. Effects on the male reproductive system can include such things as altered sexual behavior, altered fertility and problems with sperm shape or count.
  • Reproductive toxicity -- Xylene (mixed isomers): Xylene (mixed isomers) is a suspected reproductive toxicant and exposure to it has the potential to negatively affect the human reproductive system. Xylene (mixed isomers) is used mainly as an industrial solvent and is used in the manufacture paints, lacquers, resins, inks and also in the manufacture of dyes, plastics and pharmaceuticals. The severity and nature of the adverse effect is variable and can be influenced by factors such as sex, level of exposure and individual sensitivity to the chemical. Effects on the female reproductive systems can include such things as menstrual problems, altered sexual behavior, infertility, altered puberty onset, altered length of pregnancy, lactation problems, altered menopause onset and pregnancy outcome. Effects on the male reproductive system can include such things as altered sexual behavior, altered fertility and problems with sperm shape or count.
  • Rh Disease: A disease that can occur when the mother's blood is not compatible with the fetal blood i.e. when an Rh-negative mother had a Rh-positive child. If the baby's blood is exposed to the mother's blood (through placenta, abortion, miscarriage, amniocentesis) the mother's body becomes sensitized and develops antibodies the Rh-positive blood. In future pregnancies, the mother's antibodies can attack the red blood cells of the unborn baby resulting in hemolytic disease. The severity of the disease is variable and can range from mild fetal anemia to severe anemia and even fetal death.
  • Rhesus isoimmunisation: The antibody mediated destruction of red blood cells by those sensitive
  • Richieri Costa Guion Almeida Cohen syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by premature fusion of skull bones, facial anomalies and various other abnormalities.
  • Rubella: A contagious viral infection caused by the Rubella virus which produces a rash and lymph node swelling. It can have serious implication in pregnant women as the virus can be transmitted through the placenta and cause serious fetal defects or even fetal death.
  • Rubella virus antenatal infection: A rare disorder caused by exposure of the fetus to maternal rubella and resulting in a range of abnormalities and fetal death is also possible.
  • Rudd-Klimek syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the tailbone with deformities of the urogenital area as well as other anomalies.
  • Samson-Viljoen syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by small ears, abnormal chest wall and facial, lip and palate clefts.
  • Schisis association: A medical term used to describe any condition involving two or more malformations of certain types. Malformations can include such things as oral clefts, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic hernias and omphaloceles.
  • Seckel-like syndrome, Majoor-Krakauer type: A very rare syndrome characterized by numerous abnormalities including poor fetal growth, reduced amniotic fluid and heart, brain spleen and kidney anomalies.
  • Septic abortion: An abortion associated with a uterine infection. The infection can occur during or just before or after an abortion. The infection can result from factors such as Chlamydia, IUD's or attempted abortion using infected tools.
  • Simvastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Simvastatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Situs inversus totalis with cystic dysplasia of kidneys and pancreas: A rare syndrome where the position of the internal organs of the chest and abdomen is transposed. In addition there are kidney and pancreatic abnormalities.
  • Slap-cheek syndrome: Viral infection where children get rosy cheeks.
  • Smoking: The smoking of cigarettes
  • Spondylo-humero-femoral dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone formation abnormalities, short stature and early death.
  • Spontaneous abortion: The expulsion from the uterus the products of conception that occurs naturally before the fetus is viable
  • Spontaneous abortion in pregnancy: Spontaneous abortion in pregnancy is the technical term for a miscarriage.
  • Stillbirth: Where a woman delivers a child who is dead
  • Stillbirth in pregnancy: Delivery of a baby who is deceased prior to birth, after twenty weeks gestation.
  • Sudden onset of anemia in utero: Sudden onset of anemia in utero refers to a fetus developing in the uterus who has a rapid development of low number of red blood cells.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • TORCH Syndrome: Infection of a fetus by any of a group of infectious agents which have been transmitted from the mother through the placenta. The infections include toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes virus, hepatitis and syphilis. The severity and nature of symptoms is determined by the type of infection.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Transplacental infections: An infection that passes from the mother to the fetus via the placenta. A large variety of infections can occur like this and the type and severity of symptoms can vary greatly depending on the type of infection and the stage of fetal development at which infection occurs. Examples of transplacental infections include cytomegalovirus, herpes virus, hepatitis, syphilis, toxoplasmosis and rubella.
  • Triosephosphate isomerase 1: A rare inherited blood disorder involving a deficiency of red cell triosephosphate isomerase which is involved in the glycolysis (glucose metabolism) process to produce energy. The disorder is characterized by anemia, recurring infection and often progressive neurological degeneration. The severity of the disorder is variable with some patients having central nervous system involvement while others don't.
  • Triploid syndrome: A complete extra set of chromosomes.
  • Trisomy 12 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 12 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Trisomy 13 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 13 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect. There appears to be a direct correlation between the number of cells in the body containing the chromosomal defect and severity of symptoms and survival.
  • Trisomy 18 Syndrome: A rare genetic chromosomal syndrome where the child has an extra third copy of chromosome 18. Most fetuses are aborted before term, but a live birth with this condition occurs with a frequency around 1-in-3000. Edwards syndrome is more severe than the more common Down syndrome. Edwards syndrome causes mental retardation and numerous physical defects that often cause an early infant death. The condition has variable severity depending on how many of the body's cells have the extra chromosome and how much of the extra chromosome is duplicated. In severe forms all cells have an extra copy of the complete chromosome 18 whereas milder forms may have only some cells having the extra chromosome. Other mild forms may have an extra copy of only part of chromosome 18 in some or all of the body cells.
  • Trisomy 18 mosaicism: A rare genetic chromosomal syndrome where the child has an extra third copy of chromosome 18 in only some of the body's cells. It is a less severe form of Edwards syndrome - the most severe form involves and extra copy of chromosome 18 in all of the body's cells. The severity of the condition is highly variable depending on how many of the body's cells are involved.
  • Trisomy 20 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 20 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Trisomy 4 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 4 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Urethral obstruction sequence: A condition which is characterised by the early obstruction of the urethra.
  • Urophathy distal obstructive polydactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by extra digits and an obstructive urinary system disorder.
  • Uterine fibroids: Benign nodules in the uterus wall.
  • Valproic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Valproic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Vasotec -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Vasotec (an ACE inhibitor) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Vitamin A embryopathy: A morbid condition of the embryo caused by the consumption of excess Vitamin A during pregnancy
  • Women's health symptoms: Symptoms related to women's health.
  • Young syndrome: Symptoms in a fetus that occur when the mother is suffering from advanced diabetes mellitus during pregnancy.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Fetal symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Fetal symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Fetal symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Fetal symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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