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Glossary for Gastrointestinal bleeding

Medical terms related to Gastrointestinal bleeding or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Anal Cancer: A cancerous malignancy that is located anatomically in the anus
  • Anal cancer: A cancerous malignancy that is located anatomically in the anus
  • Anal fissure: A painful ulcer linear to the margin of the anus
  • Analgesic syndrome: The use of large quantities of pain-killer drugs can sometimes cause serious kidney damage as well as various other problems.
  • Ancylostoma duodenale: An infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale which is a parasitic hookwork whichcan cause serious disease in humans - usually occurs in people who work barefoot in damp soil. The hookworms suck blood from the intestines of the host which can result in anemia if there is a large number of worms.
  • Angiodysplasia: Abnormality of small blood vessels - especially in the intestinal tract - which can result in bleeding. The size of the lesion involved determines the severity of the condition. Small amounts of bleeding from one lesion often goes unnoticed but multiple large lesions may cause heavy bleeding and result in black tarry stool and anemia.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Ankylostomiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a hookworm called Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus. Infection usually occurs when larva enter a break in the skin and then travel throughout the body until the reach the intestines.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy: A very rare condition that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks the intestinal wall and affect the way it absorbs food.
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Benign mucosal pemphigoid: A rare chronic disease involving blistering and scarring of the mucous membranes especially in the mouth and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Biliary cirrhosis: Biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions. The cause of primary biliary cirrhosis is not fully understood.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blood vessel symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood vessels
  • Bloody sputum: Blood stained matter ejected from the respiratory system
  • Bloody stool: Blood appearing in the stool.
  • Blue rubber bleb nevus: A very rare congenital vascular disorder characterized by multiple hemangiomas on the skin and internal organs.
  • Body skin hyperlaxity due to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiency: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder caused by a deficiency of a blood coagulation factor.
  • Bowel inflammation: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bowel portion of the gastrointestinal tract
  • COACH syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • Capecitabine poisoning: Capecitabine is used to treat metastatic colorectal and breast cancer . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited urea cycle disorder where the lack of the enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase prevents ammonia from being turned into urea and being excreted in the urine. Excess ammonia builds up in the body which can cause serious complications or even death if left untreated.
  • Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia -- oligophrenia -- congenital ataxia -- coloboma -- hepatic fibrosis: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • Chemical adverse reaction -- Cesium: Cesium is a chemical used mainly in the photosterilization of foods such as wheat and potatoes and in the manufacture of photoelectric cells. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount (and concentration) of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical burn -- ingestion: Burns to the mouth and gastrointestinal system caused by swallowing a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the gastrointestinal system are suspected.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorine: Chlorine is a chemical used mainly in bleaches, water disinfectants and in pulp mills. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Chlorine is very corrosive and extensive damage to body tissues can result. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethyl Phthalate: Dimethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly as an insect repellant . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethylnitrosamine: Dimethylnitrosamine is a chemical used mainly as a solving in the manufacture of plastics, rubbers, lubricants and rocket fuel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endothall: Endothall is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide and rodenticide but it is rarely used today. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glycol Ether: Glycol Ether is a chemical used mainly in nail polish removers, products to treat leather, anti-icing agents and as an industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Potassium Permanganate: Potassium Permanganate is a chemical used in various applications: topical antibacterial, photography, laboratory chemical, wood dye, water purification and bleaching processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Circulation symptoms: Symptoms affecting the circulatory system
  • Colonic diverticulosis: Diverticulosis, otherwise known as "diverticular disease", is the condition of having diverticula in the colon which are outpocketings of the colonic mucosa and submucosa through weaknesses of muscle layers in the colon wall.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 1: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 10: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 11: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 2: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8q24.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 3: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 4: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 5: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p14.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 6: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8q23.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 7: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 8: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 9: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16q.
  • Colorectal Polyps: Polyp growths in the colon or rectum.
  • Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon (bowel) or rectum.
  • Congenital hepatic fibrosis: A rare inherited birth disorder characterized by fibrosis (scarring) of the liver which affects its ability to function. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients being symptomatic during infancy while others may be asymptomatic for most of their life.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome: A rare non-inherited disorder characterized by numerous growths in the mucous lining of the intestine and stomach, hair loss, dark pigmented skin spots and loss of fingernails.
  • Death Angel poisoning: The Death Angel is a poisonous white, long-stemmed mushroom found mainly in the US.
  • Degos Disease: A rare disorder where lesions caused by blood vessel inflammation and blockage form on the skin and eventually in the internal organs, especially in the small intestine.
  • Dicoumarol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dicoumarol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Digestive tract cancer:
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Diverticular disease and diverticulitis:
  • Duodenal ulcer: A peptic ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). The word "peptic" refers to pepsin, a stomach enzyme that breaks down proteins. If a peptic ulcer is located in the stomach it is called a gastric ulcer.
  • Duodenal ulcer due to antral G-cell hyperfunction: A rare disease where duodenal ulcers form due to the over-functioning antral G-cells. G-cells secrete gastrin which is a hormone that initiates gastric acid production in the stomach. Excessive stomach acid can lead to ulcers.
  • Dysentery: severe diarrhoea with passage of blood and mucus
  • Ehlers danlos syndrome: An inherited disorder of the connective tissue causing it to become weak and fragile. Connective tissue is found in skin, muscles, tendons and ligaments and hence all of these may be affected by weakness
  • Endometriosis: Misplaced uterus tissue causing scar tissue.
  • Entamoeba histolytica: Parasitic digestive infection.
  • Epstein's Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the association of kidney disease, deafness and a blood disorder.
  • Esophageal varices: Abnormally dilated blood vessels in the wall of the esophagus. The condition is asymptomatic unless the blood vessel bursts which can result in death.
  • Esophagus Cancer: Cancer of the esophagus in the throat.
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Factor X deficiency: A rare blood clotting disorder which may be inherited or acquired in people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, leprosy and certain cancers. The underlying cause is the deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The condition may cause mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Friuli: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Fruili variant tends to only cause moderate bleeding problems and occurs mainly in an area of Italy called Fruili.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Kanazawa: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Kanazawa variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Ketchikan: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Ketchikan variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Nottingham: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Nottingham variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Padua: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Padau variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- San Antonio: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The San Antonia variant results in 14% of normal Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Santo Domingo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Santo Domingo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Shanghai: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Shangai variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- St. Louis II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The St. Louis II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Stockton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Stockton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Taunton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Taunton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Tokyo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Tokyo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Vorarlberg: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Vorarlberg variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee I: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee I variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- autosomal dominant: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The autosomal dominant variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Familial polyposis -- classical: An inherited condition where polyps develop in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The polyps are initially benign but may become malignant if untreated.
  • Fasciolopsiasis: Infection with a type of intestinal fluke (Fasciola buski). Infection occurs by eating infected aquatic plants. The adult fluke attaches itself to the intestinal wall and causes ulcers which may be asymptomatic unless there is an extensive infestation.
  • Fructose-1-phosphate aldolase deficiency, hereditary: An inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of the enzyme fructose-1-phsophate aldolase prevents fructose being metabolized resulting in fructose intolerance.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Gardner syndrome: A rare inherited disorder involving polyps in the colon and tumors in various other parts of the body and other abnormalities such as extra teeth.
  • Gastric cancer, borrmann 4: A form of malignant gastric tumor which results in the stomach tissue becoming thick and rigid.
  • Gastric erosion: Inflammation of the stomach lining
  • Gastric lymphoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the lining of the stomach. The tumor may be primary or have spread there from other parts of the body. This type of tumor is more common in old people.
  • Gastritis: gastritis is inflammation of the gastric mucosa of the stomach
  • Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Cancer that develops from stroma cells in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The primary locations are the small intestine, esophagus and esophagus with symptoms being determined by the location, stage and size of the tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In gastrointestinal amyloidosis, amyloid deposits occur in the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding: Bleeding in any part of the digestive tract
  • Gastrointestinal disorders: Medical disorders of the gastrointestinal system, from entry to exit in the digestive system.
  • Gastrointestinal neoplasm: A growth or excessive proliferation of cells in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract which includes the esophagus, intestine, pharynx and stomach. The growth may be benign or malignant. The symptoms are determined by the size, location and stage of the tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal tumors: Any tumor of the gastrointestinal (digestive) system, including cancers and benign tumors.
  • Gold poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to gold.
  • Hantavirosis: Infection by hantavirus which is a virus from the family Bunyaviridae. Infection generally causes severe febrile illness which can involve bleeding, shock and even death in some cases. The disease is transmitted by infected rodents.
  • Hematochezia: is the passage of bright red, bloody stools from the rectum
  • Hemorrhagic proctocolitis: Inflammation of the rectum and colon that results in bleeding.
  • Hemorrhoids: A condition characterized by the prolapse of an anal cushion that may result in bleeding and pain
  • Hepatoma: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver.
  • Hereditary amyloidosis: An inherited form of amyloidosis which is characterized by a build up of the protein amyloid in tissues and organs. This form of amyloidosis tends to affect mainly the nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the amyloid deposits.
  • Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by epistaxes and multiple telangiectases.
  • Heterophyiasis: Infection with a type of intestinal fluke (Heterophyes heterophyes). Infection usually occurs through eating raw or undercooked contaminated freshwater fish. The adult fluke attaches itself to the intestinal wall and causes ulcers which may be asymptomatic unless there is an extensive infestation.
  • Hookworm: Worm spread through feces with poor sanitation.
  • Ileitis: Inflammation of the lower end of the small intestine
  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Reduced blood platelets causing visible skin blemishes from bleeding or bruising.
  • Indomethacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Indomethacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Internal bleeding: The loss of blood internally from the circulation
  • Intestinal bleeding: Bleeding in any part of the digestive tract
  • Intestinal hemorrhage: The loss of blood from the circulation into the gastrointestinal system
  • Iron poisoning: Excessive ingestion of iron - often occurs when children ingest adult iron tablets.
  • Kaposi's Sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Korovnikov syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by enlarged spleen and increased blood platelets which leads to bleeding problems. It is considered to by a form of Banti's disease.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Liver symptoms: Symptoms affecting the liver
  • Lower abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the lower abdominal region.
  • Malignant Buotonneuse fever: A serious complication of Buotonneuse fever that tends to occur mainly in patients who are old or have other conditions such as heart disease.
  • Mallory weiss syndrome: A laceration of the lining of the gastroesophageal junction or just above it - often caused by severe vomiting.
  • Melena: Black, tarry stools with an offensive odour caused by an upper gastrointestinal bleed.
  • Menkes Disease: Genetic disease of copper deficiency.
  • Mercury -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Mercury during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Microscopic Polyangiitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of microscopic blood or lymph vessels
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes: A group of syndromes characterized by a disruption in the production of blood cells. Often the bone marrow increases production of various blood cells but because many of them are defective, they are destroyed before the reach the blood stream.
  • Myeloproliferative disease:
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1): Neurofibromatosis Type 1 is a genetic disorder often leading to the development of nerve tumors. The condition is also characterized by skin pigmentation abnormalities.
  • Neurofibromatosis, familial intestinal: A rare type of familial tumor that arises from intestinal nerves.
  • Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver: A rare liver condition characterized by the development of nodules in the liver - the size and number of nodules is variable but they are often quite small. The nodules are not separated by fibrous tissue. The condition is generally asymptomatic in the early stages but its progressive nature and can lead to severe portal hypertension and its complications as well as liver failure. The disorder is often associated with particular conditions: rheumatic diseases, blood cancer and other cancers, kidney transplants, sarcoidosis and certain drugs (liver toxic drugs and azathiprine in particular).
  • Omsk hemorrhagic fever: A hemorrhagic fever caused by a virus. A serious outbreak occurred in Omsk and hence the name. Transmission occurs through tick bites. The infection has two phases: the first acute phase involves symptoms such as fever, rash and muscle pain and the second phase occurs after a week or two and involves the central nervous system (e.g. delirium, convulsions).
  • Osler's disease: Genetic disease causing multiple teleangiectasias
  • Pancreatic cancer: Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas
  • Pancreatic cancer, adult: Cancer that develops in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas produces digestive juices and certain hormones such as insulin that regulate sugar levels in the body and tumors can in some cases causes excessive hormone secretion.
  • Pancreatic carcinoma, familial: Cancer (malignant) that develops in the pancreas and tends to run in families. The pancreas produces digestive juices and certain hormones such as insulin that regulate sugar levels in the body.
  • Pancreatic islet cell tumors (non-functioning tumor): A tumor that arises from the pancreatic islet cells and may involve cells that produce excess pancreatic hormones.
  • Pelvic fracture: A fracture in the bone of the pelvis
  • Peptic Ulcer: Ulcer on the lining of the stomach or duodenum
  • Peptic ulcer / duodenal ulcer:
  • Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome: A hereditary disorder involving the presence of numerous polyps in the lining of the small intestine and pigmentation around the lips, inside the mouth and on the palms and soles.
  • Phenprocoumon -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenprocoumon during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Phenylbutazone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenylbutazone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Phosgene oxime -- inhalation exposure: Phosgen oxime has no useful purpose but may be manufactured for use as a chemical weapon. The chemical is poisonous and exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation and absorption through the skin. Inhalation causes mainly respiratory symptoms. The severity of symptoms will vary depending on the extent and duration of the exposure.
  • Phosgene oxime exposure: Phosgene oxime has no useful purpose but may be manufactured for use as a chemical weapon. The chemical is poisonous and exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation and absorption through the skin. Symptoms will vary depending on the method of exposure, degree of exposure and duration of exposure. The chemical can penetrate clothing.
  • Plant poisoning -- Anthraquinone: Anthraquinone is a toxin found naturally in plants such as aloe vera, senna, rhubarb and Cascara buckthorn. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal which can range in severity depending on the amount consumed. Severe cases can result in kidney damage and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Portal hypertension: Portal hypertension is a condition in which the blood pressure is abnormally high in the portal vein system, which carries blood from the digestive organs to the liver.
  • Portal hypertension due to intrahepatic block: A blockage that forms in the portal vein (caries blood from the digestive tract to the liver) due to liver problems.
  • Rattle snake poisoning: The Rattle snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in America. They are distinguished by a characteristic rattle at the tip of their tail.
  • Rectal bleeding: Bleeding from the anus or rectum.
  • Rectal cancer: A growth or excessive proliferation of cells in the rectum which is the final portion of the digestive system before the anus. The growth may be benign or malignant.
  • Sabia virus: An arbovirus causing fever, rashes and hemorrhagic bleeding
  • Secondary Biliary Cirrhosis: Secondary biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to a secondary cause which results in blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions.
  • Shigellosis: An infectious disease which affects the intestinal tract and is caused by the Shigella bacteria. The condition may be severe, especially in children, but may be asymptomatic in some cases. The disease can be transmitted through fecal-oral contact.
  • Sigmoid diverticulitis: Colonic diverticulitis is a condition resulting from the perforation of a colonic diverticulum which leads to inflammatory changes occurring mainly in the pericolic structures.
  • Small Intestine Cancer: Cancer of the small intestine.
  • Small intestine cancer, adult: Cancer (malignant) that develops in the small intestine of adults.
  • Small intestine diverticulosis: Small intestinal diverticulosis refers to the clinical entity characterized by the presence of multiple saclike mucosal herniations through weak points in the intestinal wall.
  • Sternal malformation vascular dysplasia association: A rare disorder characterized by a cleft of the sternum and facial hemangiomata.
  • Stomach bleeding: A condition which is characterized by bleeding from the stomach
  • Stomach cancer: Stomach or gastric cancer can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs
  • Striped Blister Beetle poisoning: The striped blister beetle is native to many parts of America and Canada. Animals that accidentally eat the beetles can become quite ill and they can also cause symptoms in humans if accidentally ingested. The beetles contain toxic substances called cantharidin and pederin which can cause symptoms through skin or eye exposure as well as through ingestion.
  • Strongyloidiasis: A parasitic infectious disease involving the intestines and caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Infection usually occurs in crowded, unsanitized populations.
  • Stuart factor deficiency, acquired: A rare blood clotting disorder which causes mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X (Stuart factor). This disorder can be inherited or acquired by people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, certain cancers and leprosy.
  • Thrombasthenia: An inherited blood clotting disorder where abnormal blood platelet function causes results in excessive bleeding.
  • Thrombocytopathy: A blood disorder where abnormal blood platelets affect blood coagulation.
  • Thrombocytopenia: Decreased concentration of platelets in the blood.
  • Thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune: A rare blood disorder where a low number of platelets impairs the bloods ability to clot and results in bleeding into the skin and mucous membranes.
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis: A skin condition causing widespread blisters to erupt over greater than 30% of the body.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Vasculitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation to blood vessels
  • Von Willebrand disease: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a deficiency or defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems
  • Von Willebrand disease, dominant form: A condition that is characterised by autosomal inheritance and is a disorder that is charaterised by prolonged bleeding time.
  • Von Willebrand disease, platelet type: A condition that is characterised by autosomal inheritance and is a disorder that is charaterised by prolonged bleeding time.
  • Von Willebrand disease, recessive form: A condition that is characterised by autosomal inheritance and is a disorder that is charaterised by prolonged bleeding time.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The different subtypes have different methods of treatment so an correct diagnosis is important. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 3: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 3 is the most severe form of von Willebrand Disease.
  • Warfarin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Warfarin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Watermelon stomach: The dilation of the blood vessels in the antral of the stomach
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • Whipworm: Any nematode of the genus trichuris
  • Willebrand disease, acquired: A bleeding disorder characterised by prolonger bleeding time
  • Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder that affects only males and is characterized by recurring infections, eczema and reduced level of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia).
  • Yellow fever: A viral infection transmitted by mosquito bites which can damage various organs such as the liver, heart, kidney and digestive tract.
  • Zellweger Syndrome: Zellweger spectrum disorders are a group of rare, genetic, multisystem disorders that were once thought to be separate entities. These disorders are now classified as different expressions (variants) of one disease process. Collectively, they form a spectrum or continuum of disease. Zellweger syndrome is the most severe form; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy is the intermediate form; and infantile Refsum disease is the mildest form.
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: A rare disorder where excessive levels of the hormone gastrin are released into the stomach which increases stomach acidity which results in peptic ulcer development. A hormone secreting pancreatic or duodenal tumor is usually the cause.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Gastrointestinal bleeding:

The following list of conditions have 'Gastrointestinal bleeding' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Gastrointestinal bleeding:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Gastrointestinal bleeding' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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