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Glossary for Generalized tonic-clonic seizures

Medical terms related to Generalized tonic-clonic seizures or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Brain abscess: abscess in the brain may involve any of the lobes of the brain
  • Brain cancer: Cancer of the brain.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumor: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal growth of tissue within the brain
  • Cerebral Aneurysm: Dangerous swelling of a brain blood vessel that may rupture.
  • Cerebrovascular symptoms: Symptoms related to the brain's arteries
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 3, Juvenile: A progressive genetic disorder where defective lipid metabolism that causes blindness, neurological deterioration, dementia leading to total incapication within years and death within 10-15 years.
  • Clonic seizures: Abnormal electrical activity in a part of the brain which results in rhythmic jerking limb movements. Limbs on one or both side of the body may be affected. The duration of the episodes is variable but usually only lasts a few minutes. Clonic seizures can occur at any age and episodes are generally not followed by tiredness and confusion. Clonic seizures usually start in early childhood.
  • Eclampsia: serious complication of pregnancy and is characterised by high blood pressure and convulsions
  • Encephalitis: Infection of the brain (as a symptom)
  • Epilepsy juvenile absence: A rare form of epilepsy that occurs around the time of puberty. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures occur when waking up and myoclonic seizures can also occur.
  • Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal: A condition characterized by clusters of seizures usually during the first days of life. The seizures are harmless and tend to resolve spontaneously during the first year though many cases resolve by 6 weeks of age. The seizures are not necessary associated with fevers but they can be. There are various subtypes of the condition, each with a different origin of the genetic defect.
  • Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal, 1: A condition characterized by clusters of seizures usually during the first days of life. The seizures are harmless and tend to resolve spontaneously during the first year though many cases resolve by 6 weeks of age. The seizures are not necessary associated with fevers but they can be. There are various subtypes of the condition, each with a different origin of the genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20q13.3.
  • Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal, 2: A condition characterized by clusters of seizures usually during the first days of life. The seizures are harmless and tend to resolve spontaneously during the first year though many cases resolve by 6 weeks of age. The seizures are not necessary associated with fevers but they can be. There are various subtypes of the condition, each with a different origin of the genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q24.
  • Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal, 3: A condition characterized by clusters of seizures usually during the first days of life. The seizures are harmless and tend to resolve spontaneously during the first year though many cases resolve by 6 weeks of age. The seizures are not necessary associated with fevers but they can be. There are various subtypes of the condition, each with a different origin of the genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5.
  • Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal, Autosomal Recessive: A condition characterized by clusters of seizures usually during the first days of life. The seizures are harmless and tend to resolve spontaneously during the first year though many cases resolve by 4 months of age. The seizures are not necessary associated with fevers but they can be. There are various subtypes of the condition, each with a different origin of the genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5.
  • Epilepsy, Juvenile Absence, Susceptibility to, 1: A susceptibility to juvenile absence seizures linked to a particular gene - 6p12-p11.
  • Epilepsy, Juvenile Absence, Susceptibility to, 2: A susceptibility to juvenile absence seizures linked to a particular gene - 3q26.
  • Epilepsy, generalized -- paroxysmal dyskinesia: An epileptic disorder characterized by generalized epilepsy and sudden episodes of involuntary abnormal movements. The abnormal movements may be triggered by fatigue, stress or alcohol. Patients may suffer only the seizures or only the dyskinesia or both.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 1: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8q13-q21
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 10: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q26.2-q26.33.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 2: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 19p13.3.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 3: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q24.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 3A: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 3A is linked to a defect on the SCN1A gene on chromosome 2q24.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 3B: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 3B is linked to a defect in the SCN9B gene on chromosome 2q24.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 4: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q14.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 5: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q22-q24.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 6: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18p11.2.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 7: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q22.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 8: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31.1-q33.1.
  • Familial Febrile Convulsions, 9: Childhood seizures associated with fevers. Certain genetic defects are linked to a predisposition for developing these types of seizures. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p24.2-p23.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 4: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p24.
  • Head injury: Any injury that occurs to the head
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Head trauma: injury to the haed
  • Hepatic encephalopathy: Caused by marked liver disease that results in disturbances of consciousness
  • Hyponatremia: An electrolyte disturbance involving low sodium levels in the blood. Symptoms are determined by the degree of imbalance. Very low sodium levels can cause water intoxication which can be very dangerous.
  • Hypoparathyroidism: causesd by lack of PTH
  • Infant epilepsy with migrant focal crisis: A rare disorder characterized by infant epilepsy and progressive brain disease.
  • Kidney failure: The inability of the kidney to function correctly in its function of excreting metabolites from the blood
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myoclonic epilepsy benign, adult, familial: A rare familial disorder characterized by muscle jerking and seizures in adults. The disorder is not progressive and is fairly harmless with only minor fine motor control problems.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Renal failure: A condition characterized by a failure of the kidney to excrete toxic metabolites from the body
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Seizures: Uncontrolled physical movements
  • Stroke: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Generalized tonic-clonic seizures:

The following list of conditions have 'Generalized tonic-clonic seizures' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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