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Symptoms » Gum symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Gum symptoms

Medical terms related to Gum symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acromegaloid facies -- hypertrichosis: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by thick lips and gums, thick upper eyelids, large hands and occasionally mental deficiency.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: A reoccurring periodontal disease which results in necrosis and ulceration of the gums. Symptoms may include fever, bone loss, breath odor and enlarge neck and throat lymph nodes. Also called trench mouth, Vincent's angina or Vincent's infection.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Alveolar Bone Loss: Loss of bone tissue in the thickened bone ridge that holds the tooth sockets. Gum disease is the main cause of alveolar bone loss.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacterial gingivitis:
  • Bleeding gums: Bleeding from or around the teeth gums
  • Bleeding gums in children: Bleeding gums in children occur when there is hemorrhaging, bleeding, or oozing of blood from the gums.
  • Bleeding gums in pregnancy: Bleeding gums in pregnancy refer to easy bleeding from the gums in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Blue line on gums in children: Blue line on gums in children refers to the development of a blue line on the gums of a child.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Borrone-Di Rocco-Crovato syndrome: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal defects. Only several reported cases of the condition.
  • Breath symptoms: Breath-related symptoms including breath odor
  • Breathing symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Carbohydrate deficiency glycoprotein syndrome type II: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect which involves the gene for a particular enzyme (Golgi localized N-acetyl-glucosaminyltransferase II). Type 2 tends to have more severe psychomotor retardation than type 1 but there is no peripheral neuropathy or underdeveloped cerebellum.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Brodifacoum: Brodifacoum is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromadiolone: Bromadiolone is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chlorophacinone rodenticide poisoning: Chlorophacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chromosome Xp11.23-p11.22 Duplication syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of a large head, lack of hair, scoliosis and a skin anomaly. The reported patients tend to involve parents who were related.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Complement component deficiency: Complement components are a part of the immune defense system involved in destroying and removing invading pathogens such as bacteria. A deficiency of the complement components can affect the ability of the body's immune system to function properly. The disorder which can be partial or complete and may be inherited or acquired. The severity of the symptoms is determined by which complement component (there are at least 30 of them) is deficient and whether the deficiency is partial or complete.
  • Complement receptor deficiency: Complement receptors are a part of the immune defense system and they initiate the process of destroying and removing invading pathogens. A deficiency of complement receptors thus affects the immune system. It may be inherited or be associated with autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus diabetic nephropathy patients on hemodialysis.
  • Congenital aplastic anemia: A genetic disorder where the bone marrow does not produce enough blood cells. Fanconi's anemia is an example of congenital aplastic anemia.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type X -- Bombay blood group phenotype: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal neutrophil functioning which reduces the body's immunity. The abnormal neutrophils are unable to be transported to sites of infection due to their inability to adhere to certain blood vessel components which would normally lead them to the infection site. Infections may be life-threatening as the body is unable to destroy bacteria effectively. Type 2 LAD is where neutrophils can't adhere to necessary blood vessel components due to the absence of proteins on the blood vessel walls needed to bind and guide the neutrophils to the infection site.
  • Coumachlor rodenticide poisoning: Coumachlor is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumafuryl rodenticide poisoning: Coumafuryl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumatetralyl rodenticide poisoning: Coumatetralyl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Darier disease: A slowly progressing inherited skin disorder characterized by small brownish warty bumps and nail abnormalities. The skin disorder because the skin cells are not held together properly.
  • De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by sunlight sensitivity, skin atrophy and pigmentation and skin tumors as well neurologic involvement.
  • Deafness -- lymphoedema -- leukemia: A rare syndrome characterized by deafness, early-onset leukemia and lymphoedema in the lower legs.
  • Dental abscess: Abscess of tooth, gum, or jawbone
  • Dental symptoms: Symptoms affecting teeth or mouth area.
  • Dental tissue neoplasm: A tumor that develops from tissues inside the mouth that form the teeth. There are a number of types of tumors that can develop from tooth forming tissues: ameloblastoma, Pindorg tumor, cementoblastoma and many others. The tumor may be benign or malignant but can cause dental problems even if it is benign.
  • Dermato-cardio-skeletal syndrome Borrone type: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Difenacoum rodenticide poisoning: Difenacoum is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Difethialone rodenticide poisoning: Difethialone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Diphacinone rodenticide poisoning: Diphacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Dry socket: Exposure of jaw bone after a tooth extraction
  • Epileptic encephalopathy, Lennox-Gastaut type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation and physical anomalies. The brain condition is progressive and results in loss of previously acquired skills.
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Factor V Quebec: An inherited bleeding disorder reported in Quebec, Canada.
  • Factor V deficiency: An inherited disorder where the deficiency of a blood component affects its ability to clot properly which can lead to bleeding problems. The severity of the disorder can vary from easy bruising to life-threatening hemorrhages.
  • Factor X deficiency: A rare blood clotting disorder which may be inherited or acquired in people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, leprosy and certain cancers. The underlying cause is the deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The condition may cause mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Friuli: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Fruili variant tends to only cause moderate bleeding problems and occurs mainly in an area of Italy called Fruili.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Kanazawa: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Kanazawa variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Ketchikan: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Ketchikan variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Nottingham: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Nottingham variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Padua: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Padau variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- San Antonio: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The San Antonia variant results in 14% of normal Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Santo Domingo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Santo Domingo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Shanghai: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Shangai variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- St. Louis II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The St. Louis II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Stockton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Stockton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Taunton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Taunton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Tokyo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Tokyo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Vorarlberg: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Vorarlberg variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee I: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee I variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- autosomal dominant: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The autosomal dominant variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Fetal PCB syndrome: A condition that occurs in infants born to mothers exposed to PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) during pregnancy. The chemical is believed to affect calcium metabolism. In 1968 many cases occurred in Japan following consumption of cooking rice oil contaminated with PCB.
  • Fibromatosis, gingival 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by enlarged gum tissue. The severity of the condition is variable. The chromosome involved is 2p23.3-p22.3.
  • Finale rodenticide poisoning: Finale is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Flocoumafen rodenticide poisoning: Flocoumafen is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Folgorat rodenticide poisoning: Folgorat is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Frank-Ter Haar syndrome: A rare genetic bone disorder characterized by skeletal abnormalities, enlarged corneas and characteristic facial abnormalities.
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gingival bleeding: bleeding from the gums
  • Gingival burning sensation: Abnormal burning sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gingival cancer: The gum is the soft tissue surrounding the base of the teeth, any malignant proliferation of cells of the gums is called gum cancer.
  • Gingival fibromatosis in children:
  • Gingival fibrosis: Replacement of normal gum tissue with fibrous tissue.
  • Gingival infection: Acute or chronic inflammation of the gums.
  • Gingival inflammation: Acute or chronic inflammation of the gums.
  • Gingival lump: Small irregular swelling due to gingival or dental pathology.
  • Gingival numb: Abnormal sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gingival sensitivity: Raised responsiveness of the gums to stimulus.
  • Gingivitis: Inflammation of the gums
  • Glanzmann Thrombasthenia: A haemorrhagic disorder which causes a prolonged bleeding time
  • Gradual onset of bleeding gums: Gradual onset of bleeding gums is the slow development of bleeding from the gums.
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • Grix-Blankenship-Peterson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, bone defects and head and face abnormalities.
  • Gum abnormalities: are due to conditions causing focal or diffuse swelling of the gums
  • Gum bleeding: abnormal bleeding from the gums may be mostly due to nutritional deficiencies or blood dyscrasias
  • Gum bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the face.
  • Gum burning sensation: A burning sensation located on the gums
  • Gum disorder: Any condition which affects the gums
  • Gum disorders: Any disorder the affects the gums of the human mouth
  • Gum hypertrophy: Overgrowth of the gingiva (gums), usually the gum tissue in between teeth causing swelling and discomfort
  • Gum infection: An infection of any type that is located in the gums
  • Gum itch: A sensation that causes a desire to scratch the gums
  • Gum numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the gums
  • Gum numbness in children: Gum numbness in children is a loss of sensation in the gums of a child.
  • Gum pain: The occurrence of pain located in the gums
  • Gum pain in children: Gum pain in children is discomfort in the gums of a child.
  • Gum paresthesia/ tingling: A loss of sensation located on the gum
  • Gum rash: An eruption on the gums.
  • Gum retraction: Shrinkage of the gums causing retraction away from the teeth
  • Gum swelling: Gum swelling occurs when there is puffiness or enlargement of the gums.
  • Gum symptoms: Dental symptoms affecting the gums
  • Gum symptoms in pregnancy: Gum symptoms in pregnancy refers to changes in the gums of a woman who is pregnant.
  • Gum tingling/ paresthesias: A tingling and numbness located in the gum
  • Gums bleeding: Abnormal bleeding of the gums due to pathology related to the teeth or any systemic abnormality.
  • Gums bruise: Gums bruise is a contusion of the gums due to rupture of blood vessels in the gums.
  • Gums burning sensation: Abnormal burning sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gums infection: Acute or chronic infection of the gums.
  • Gums inflammation: Acute or chronic inflammation of the gums.
  • Gums lump: Small irregular swelling due to gum or dental pathology.
  • Gums numb: Abnormal sensation felt in the gum.
  • Gums sensitive: Raised responsiveness of the gums to stimulus.
  • Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease: Common contagious viral infant or child condition
  • Hand-Schuller-Christian Syndrome: A group of blood disorder involving excess production of histiocytes (type of immune cell) throughout the body. Accumulation of histiocytes results in non-cancerous growths which can damage organs and other body tissues such as bones. Symptom vary hugely and depend on location and size of tumor growths.
  • Havoc rodenticide poisoning: Havoc is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hemangioma thrombocytopenia syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a spreading congenital hemangioma (collection of abnormal blood vessels) usually on the skin as well as blood clotting problems.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 1: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children and can be life-threatening.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 2: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 10q22.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 3: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 17q25.1.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 4: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q24.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Hornova-Dlurosova syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation and amyloid (abnormal protein) deposits in the eyelids and gums.
  • Hyalinosis, infantile systemic: A rare genetic disorder involving abnormal deposits of hyaline throughout various body tissues. Manifestations include progressive joint contractures, skin abnormalities and pain.
  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Reduced blood platelets causing visible skin blemishes from bleeding or bruising.
  • Immune thrombocytopenia: A rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks blood platelets which affect the blood's ability to clot.
  • Impacted tooth: Tooth that does not emerge from under the gums
  • Indandione rodenticide poisoning: Indandione is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Infantile sialic acid storage disorder: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of sialic acid in the tissues and excretion of sialic acid in the urine. The disorder results in death within the first few years of life - usually in infancy.
  • Itchy gums in children: Itchy gums in children occurs when a child's gums are irritated, inflamed, scratchy, and itchy.
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer that occurs in children and involves the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Klerat rodenticide poisoning: Klerat is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Laband Syndrome:
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Lathosterolosis: A very rare disorder where an enzyme (sterol C5-desaturase) deficiency prevents the normal synthesis of cholesterol in the body. The deficiency causes various malformations, mental retardation and liver disease.
  • Lead line in the gums: bluish discoloration of the gums at the margin of the teeth
  • Lead lines: Lead lines refers to the appearance of abnormal lines on the bones on X-ray imagery or in the mouth that indicate lead poisoning.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid: A form of blood cancer that causes a proliferation of the precursors or immature red blood cells, platelets and certain white blood cells such as granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Aggressive-Phase: Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The aggressive phase of myeloid leukemia follows the chronic form and is a sign that the condition is progressing more rapidly to a blast crisis which is the final stage of leukemia.
  • Leukocyte Adhesion Defect: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal neutrophil functioning which reduces the body's immunity. The abnormal neutrophils are unable to be transported to sites of infection due to their inability to adhere to certain blood vessel components which would normally lead them to the infection site. Infections may be life-threatening as the body is unable to destroy bacteria effectively.
  • Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency, Type I:
  • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal neutrophil functioning which reduces the body's immunity. The abnormal neutrophils are unable to be transported to sites of infection due to their inability to adhere to certain blood vessel components which would normally lead them to the infection site. Infections may be life-threatening as the body is unable to destroy bacteria effectively. Type 1 LAD specifically involves a lack of receptor proteins on the neutrophil which prevents it from adhering.
  • Lymphangiectasies and lymphedema Hennekam type: A rare disorder characterized by buildup of lymphatic fluid in the limbs, face and genitals, seizures and mental and growth retardation.
  • Lymphoedema -- lymphangiectasia -- mental retardation: A rare disorder characterized by buildup of lymphatic fluid in the limbs, face and genitals, seizures and mental and growth retardation.
  • Machupo virus: A virus which is the cause of a form of hemorrhagic fever occurring in Bolivia
  • Matikus rodenticide poisoning: Matikus is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Megaloblastic Anemia 1: A rare genetic blood disorder where a defect in the vitamin B12 receptor means that it can't be absorbed from food during digestion. As a result of the low vitamin B12 levels, the body produces increased numbers of abnormal enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts).
  • Megaloblastic anemia: Megaloblastic anemia, also called pernicious anemia, is a condition in which there is a low number of red blood cells most often caused by a lack of vitamin B12.
  • Megarbane-Jalkh Syndrome: A rare condition reported in two related infants and involving a range of abnormalities such as developmental delay, unusual facial features, wrinkled skin, liver failure and fragile bones. One of the infants died before the age of 2 years due to liver failure.
  • Mouser rodenticide poisoning: Mouser is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Mouth infection: Any infection that occurs in ones mouth
  • Mouth pain: Pain or burning of the mouth
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Mouth ulcers: Ulcers or sores in the mouth region.
  • Myeloproliferative disease:
  • Oculodental syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by corneal dystrophy, enlarged gums and missing teeth
  • Owren Parahemophilia: An inherited disorder where the deficiency of a blood component affects its ability to clot properly which can lead to bleeding problems. The severity of the disorder can vary from easy bruising to life-threatening hemorrhages.
  • Periodontitis: Dental infection of the gums and/or related bones.
  • Periodontitis as in case of leukemia: Periodonditis is a dental disorder that results from progression of gingivitis, involving inflammation and infection of the ligaments and bones that support the teeth.
  • Periodontitis in children:
  • Periodontitis-like bleeding gums: Bleeding gums are mainly due to inadequate plaque removal from the teeth at the gum line.
  • Pindone rodenticide poisoning: Pindone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Progeria short stature pigmented nevi: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by premature aging, short stature, and immune system deficiency. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Quebec platelet disorder: An inherited bleeding disorder reported in Quebec, Canada.
  • Raine syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by increased bone density which ultimately results in death.
  • Ratak Plus rodenticide poisoning: Ratak Plus is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Rib symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ribs
  • Rodend rodenticide poisoning: Rodend is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Sabia virus: An arbovirus causing fever, rashes and hemorrhagic bleeding
  • Scurvy: Severe disease from vitamin C deficiency
  • Selective Vitamin B12 malabsorption with Proteinuria: A rare genetic blood disorder where a defect in the vitamin B12 receptor means that it can't be absorbed from food during digestion. As a result of the low vitamin B12 levels, the body produces increased numbers of abnormal enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts).
  • Severe congenital neutropenia: A rare inherited blood disorder involving a lack of neutrophils which are a type of white blood cell needed to fight bacterial infections.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Smoking Cessation:
  • Sore gums: Sore or tender gums
  • Spongy gums: Certain conditions may cause the gums to become soft, red and swollen which are also known as spongy gums
  • Stuart factor deficiency, acquired: A rare blood clotting disorder which causes mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X (Stuart factor). This disorder can be inherited or acquired by people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, certain cancers and leprosy.
  • Sudden onset of bleeding gums: Sudden onset of bleeding gums refers to the rapid development of gums that bleed.
  • Swollen gums: Swelling of the gums or the gum region
  • Talon rodenticide poisoning: Talon is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Tender gums: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of gums which are tender
  • Throat symptoms: Symptoms affecting the throat
  • Thrombasthenia: An inherited blood clotting disorder where abnormal blood platelet function causes results in excessive bleeding.
  • Thrombocytopathy: A blood disorder where abnormal blood platelets affect blood coagulation.
  • Tooth abnormalities as seen in diabetes: are acquired and inherited conditions which alter the size, shape and number of teeth.
  • Vincent's disease: Form of gingivitis causing ulcers
  • Vitamin C deficiency: Indequate vitamin C in the diet
  • Volak rodenticide poisoning: Volak is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Volid rodenticide poisoning: Volid is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Von Willebrand disease: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a deficiency or defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems
  • Von Willebrand disease, dominant form: A condition that is characterised by autosomal inheritance and is a disorder that is charaterised by prolonged bleeding time.
  • Von Willebrand disease, platelet type: A condition that is characterised by autosomal inheritance and is a disorder that is charaterised by prolonged bleeding time.
  • Von Willebrand disease, recessive form: A condition that is characterised by autosomal inheritance and is a disorder that is charaterised by prolonged bleeding time.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 1: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a deficiency in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Most cases of von Willebrand disease are type 1 which is the mildest form of the condition. Patients rarely have severe bleeding problems but may bleed excessively during surgery, dental work or due to a traumatic injury.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The different subtypes have different methods of treatment so an correct diagnosis is important. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2A: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2B: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable. Type 2B often requires a different medication to the other subtypes.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2M: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. Type 2M is very rare. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 2N: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 2 vWD is further subdivided into 4 subtypes, each with a different underlying genetic defect. The severity of the bleeding symptoms is variable.
  • Von Willebrand disease, type 3: A rare inherited blood coagulation disorder characterized by a defect in plasma protein called the von Willebrand factor which leads to bleeding problems. Type 3 is the most severe form of von Willebrand Disease.
  • Willebrand disease, acquired: A bleeding disorder characterised by prolonger bleeding time
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum: A rare pigmentary disease that is caused by an enzyme deficiency
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 1: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation - type 1 has the lowest level of repair and the most neurological complications.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 2: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type B is often associated with signs of Cockayne syndrome.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 3: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Neurological symptoms are rarely experienced in type 3.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type D involves neurological symptoms.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 6: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. The skin and neurological symptoms in Type 6 tend to be mild.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 7: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type G usually involves severe neurological symptoms.
  • Zimmerman-Laband syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by fibrosis of the gums and ear, nose, nail and finger abnormalities.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Gum symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Gum symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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