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Symptoms » Hemoptysis » Glossary
 

Glossary for Hemoptysis

Medical terms related to Hemoptysis or mentioned in this section include:

  • Absence of pulmonary artery: The absence of a pulmonary artery at birth.
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: A malignant cancer in the form of cysts which may occur in the salivary glands, breast, mucous glands of the respiratory tract and sometimes in vulval vestibular glands. Also called adeoncystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma, cribriform carcinoma or cylindroma.
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: An allergic reaction that occurs in the bronchopulmonary tract due to the occurrence of aspergillosis
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated disease: A kidney disorder involving varying degrees of kidney impairment. Severe cases lead to kidney failure whereas mild cases have normal kidney function.
  • Asbestosis: Lung condition from asbestos exposure
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Benign lung Tumor: Benign lung tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplastic lesions originating from pulmonary structures.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Bloody sputum: Blood stained matter ejected from the respiratory system
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Breath symptoms: Breath-related symptoms including breath odor
  • Breathing symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Bronchial adenomata syndrome: A type of bronchial tumor that causes various respiratory symptoms.
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Bronchitis: Inflammation of the bronchi as a symptom
  • Bronchogenic carcinoma: When cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner, the condition is called lung cancer .
  • Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited urea cycle disorder where the lack of the enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase prevents ammonia from being turned into urea and being excreted in the urine. Excess ammonia builds up in the body which can cause serious complications or even death if left untreated.
  • Carcinoma of the vocal tract: Cancer of the vocal cords in the larynx.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Petroleum Distillates -- Naphtha: Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfuric Acid: Sulfuric Acid is a chemical used mainly in car batteries and in the fur and leather industries. It is a significant component of air pollution and results in the production of "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene Diisocyanate: Toluene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of elastomers and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vanadium: Vanadium is an element used mainly in steel alloys but is also used in glass coatings, electric fuel cells and other applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chronic Bronchitis: A condition which is characterized by the chronic inflammation of ones or more of the bronchi
  • Chronic berylliosis: A condition that results from long term exposure to beryllium in the form of dust or fumes. The lungs, skin eyes or blood may be affected.
  • Chronic bronchitis: A condition which is characterized by the chronic inflammation of ones or more of the bronchi
  • Chronic lower respiratory diseases: General term for various chronic respiratory diseases including COPD, emphysema and chronic bronchitis
  • Chronic respiratory conditions: Chronic disorders of the respiratory (breathing) systems, such as COPD, emphysema, and others.
  • Cirrhosis of liver: diffuse hepatic process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Common ventricle: A congenital heart defect where the wall separating the two heart ventricles is completely missing.
  • Congenital bronchogenic cyst: A rare birth condition characterized by the formation of a cyst in the middle of the chest, usually near the area where the trachea branches off. The condition may be asymptomatic but if the cyst is large enough it may cause problems by compressing nearby structures such as the trachea.
  • Congenital mitral malformation: Malformations of the mitral valve that are present at birth. The mitral valve allows blood to flow between the two chambers on the left side of the heart. Types of mitral malformation are atresia (absent mitral valve), stenosis (narrowed mitral valve) and parachute mitral valve.
  • Congenital mitral stenosis: A heart malformation that is present at birth. The mitral valve is narrower than normal which affects blood flow between the upper and lower chambers on the left side of the heart. It usually occurs in conjunction with other malformations
  • Constant hemoptysis: Constant hemoptysis is the steady coughing up of bloody sputum out of the lungs.
  • Cough: Any type of coughing symptom.
  • Coughing blood: Blood in coughed up material.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Dengue fever: An acute viral disease characterized by fever, rash and myalgia and caused by a flavivirus which is transmitted by mosquitoes.
  • Dicoumarol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dicoumarol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Dirofilaria immitis infection: Infection with the dog heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) which is transmitted from dogs to humans through mosquito bites.
  • Drooling: Excessive saliva in the mouth.
  • Dry cough: Dry non-productive cough without producing sputum
  • Echinococcus granulosus: A infection caused by a type of small tapeworm
  • Eisenmenger Syndrome: Increased lung blood pressure that can result from conditions such as a hole in the wall between the two heart chambers.
  • Epidermoid carcinoma: A non-small-cell type of lung cancer. The cancer develops from cells that line the inside of the lungs.
  • Esophageal carcinoma: A cancer of the esophagus.
  • Esophageal disorder:
  • Esophageal varices: Abnormally dilated blood vessels in the wall of the esophagus. The condition is asymptomatic unless the blood vessel bursts which can result in death.
  • Esophagus symptoms: Symptoms affecting the esophagus (digestive throat passage)
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: A rare, potentially life-threatening disorder where the mother's blood platelets are incompatible with that of the fetus and the mother's antibodies cross the placenta and destroy fetal platelets.
  • Follicular hamartoma -- alopecia -- cystic fibrosis: A rare syndrome characterized by small benign growths that develop in hair follicles, alopecia and cystic fibrosis.
  • Francisella tularenis infection: Francisella tularenis is a type of bacteria that can cause infection involving the skin, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. The nature and severity of symptoms varies depending on the location of the infection. The bacteria primarily causes localized tissue necrosis. The pathogen is considered a possible biological weapon.
  • Goodpasture syndrome: A rare disease involving inflammation of membranes in the lung and kidneys.
  • Goodpasture's syndrome: A condition which is characterized by glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage with circulating antibodies against basement membranes.
  • Gradual onset of hemoptysis: Gradual onset of hemoptysis is the slow development of bloody or blood tinged sputum, secretions that are coughed up out of the lungs.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart failure: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently and effectively
  • Hemophilia: Blood disease usually genetic causing failure to clot.
  • Hemoptysis: Where a person coughs up blood
  • Hemoptysis in adolescents: Hemoptysis in adolescents is the coughing up of blood or bloody phlegm by an adolescent.
  • Hemoptysis in children: Hemoptysis in children refers to the coughing up of blood or bloody phlegm by a child.
  • Hemoptysis in infants: Hemoptysis in infants is a condition in which an infant coughs up blood or bloody phlegm.
  • Hemoptysis in newborns: Hemoptysis in newborns is the coughing up of blood or bloody phlegm by a newborn infant.
  • Hemorrhagic fever: A group of diseases caused by viruses which cause damage to blood vessels and result in hemorrhages and fever. The hemorrhaging does not always cause serious bleeding. The specific symptoms may vary depending on which particular virus is involved.
  • Hemorrhagic thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder characterized by increased number of platelets in the blood which often results in an enlarged spleen, bleeding and blood vessel blockages.
  • Hemosiderosis: A rare lung condition where bleeding into the lungs causes lung damage due to the accumulation of iron. The severity of the condition is determined by the amount of bleeding.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Clove: Clove can be used as a herbal agent that can be used topically for tooth pain or as a local anesthetic in dentistry. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction or even anaphylaxis in some people.
  • Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by epistaxes and multiple telangiectases.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Histoplasmosis: Lung infection from fungus Histoplasma capsulatum
  • Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: A rare disorder involving bleeding into the lungs which can eventually cause damage to the lungs.
  • Injury: Any damage inflicted in the body
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Large cell carcinoma: Large cell carcinoma is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the lungs. This non-small cell lung cancer that represents 10% to 20% of all tumors that start in the bronchi, which are the main branches of the trachea that lead to the lungs.
  • Laryngeal carcinoma: Cancer of the laryngeal area. Smoking and alcohol increase the risk of this cancer.
  • Lemierre's syndrome: A very rare condition where a throat infection leads to secondary infection and blood clot formation in the internal jugular vein. The infected blood clot can then travel to other parts of the body and cause problems. The usual bacterial culprit is Fusobacterium necrophorum.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Leukocytoclastic angiitis -- systemic: Inflammation of small blood vessels. Usually the small blood vessels in the skin are involved but sometimes small blood vessels in other organs such as joints, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract may be involved. Symptoms become more serious once there is systemic (organ) involvement and death may result in some severe cases.
  • Linguatula serrata infection: Infection with a parasite called Linguatula serrata. Infection usually occurs through eating raw liver or lymph nodes from infected sheep or goats. Symptoms are usually caused by the larva migrating through parts of the body.
  • Liver symptoms: Symptoms affecting the liver
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 1: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q23-q25.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 2: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q25.1.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 3: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15p15.33.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 4: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.33.
  • Lung abscess: The formation of a localized collection of puss in a cavity in the lungs
  • Lung cancer: Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. Most lung tumors are malignant.
  • Lung conditions: Various conditions affecting the lungs or related airways.
  • Lung symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both lungs.
  • Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A very rare progressive disease where an unusual type of muscle cell (smooth muscle) infiltrates the lungs which eventually obstructs the flow of air through the lungs. The cause is unknown and generally occurs in women of child bearing age.
  • Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia: A relatively rare form of lung disease characterized by the buildup of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the air spaces or alveoli of the lungs. The condition can affect children or adults and is frequently associated with conditions such as HIV and autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Symptoms may develop gradually over a period of months or even years in some cases.
  • Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis: A rare, progressive blood vessel disease where nodular lesions destroy blood vessels - lungs, skin and nervous system are mainly involved.
  • Meadows syndrome: A rare condition that affects pregnant women during the last trimester or within two months after birth. It is characterized by breathing difficult, chest pain, congestive heart failure, heart rhythm abnormalities, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal symptoms and embolisms.
  • Mediastinal endodermal sinus tumors: A rare yolk sac tumor that occurs in the mediastinal area (the area that separates the lungs). It is a type of cancer that originates from immature cells (germ cells) that evolve into gonadal tissue but can also be found in other parts of the body such as the chest. The tumors tend to be quite aggressive and often metastasize.
  • Melioidosis: Bacterial infection from soil or water.
  • Mesothelioma: Type of lung cancer associated with asbestos.
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the pleura (chest lining) or peritoneum (abdominal lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibres. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant -- pleural: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the pleura (chest lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibers. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Microscopic Polyangiitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of microscopic blood or lymph vessels
  • Mitral stenosis: Narrowing of the mitral heart valve
  • Mixed type non small cell carcinoma: It is the presence of mixed histological of small cell and non small cell cancer variety
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Mucormycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the order Mucorales which is normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.
  • Mycobacterium xenopi: A form of mycobacterium
  • Nocardiosis: A rare infectious disease caused by the bacteria Nocardia asteroides which primarily affects the lung but may also involve the brain, soft tissues and other organs.
  • Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: It is any type of lung cancer other than small cell carcinoma (SCLC). As a class, NSCLCs are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy, compared to small cell carcinoma
  • Nosocomial pneumonia: A form of pneumonia which is contracted in a hospital
  • Occupational Cancer -- Lung cancer: Occupational exposure to arsenic can increase the risk of developing lung cancer.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Mesothelioma: Occupational exposure to asbestos can increase the risk of developing mesothelioma.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Respiratory tract cancer: People employed in occupations which involves chronic exposure to arsenic, asbestos, cadmium, beryllium, chromium, diesel exhaust, silica and nickel can lead to an increased risk of developed respiratory tract cancers such as bronchial cancer, lung cancer and tracheal cancer.
  • Oropharyngeal cancer: Oropharyngeal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the oropharynx. The oropharynx is the middle part of the pharynx (throat) behind the mouth, and includes the back one-third of the tongue, the soft palate, the side and back walls of the throat, and the tonsils.
  • Osler's disease: Genetic disease causing multiple teleangiectasias
  • Paracoccidioidomycosis: Infection by the fungus Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis which usually affects the lungs but can also involve the skin, mucous membranes, lymphatic system and other parts of the body.
  • Paragonimiasis: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs, and sometimes other organs, where they cause problems. Occasionally the parasites infect the brain which can occasionally result in death. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Penetrating chest wound: A wound occurring in the chest caused by an object penetrating through the skin and into the chest cavity
  • Penetrating chest wounds: Multiple wounds in the chest caused by an object penetrating through the skin and into the chest cavity
  • Phenprocoumon -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenprocoumon during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Plague: Any epidemic disease with a high death rate.
  • Pleuropulmonary blastoma: A type of tumor that originates from precursor cells or blasts (immature or embryonic tissue) in the lungs or covering of the lungs.
  • Pneumonia: Lung infection or inflammation (as a symptom)
  • Primary pulmonary hypertension: Primary pulmonary hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the arteries that carry blood to the lungs for no apparent reason. Blood pressure in other parts of the body is normal or sometimes even low.
  • Productive cough: A cough which occurs in associated with the production of phelgm
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula: A rare genetic defect where one or more the arteries and veins in the lung are connected via an abnormal opening or fistula which affects the oxygenation level of body tissues.
  • Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation: A rare malformation where there is an abnormal opening between a lung artery and a lung vein which causes some blood to pass through the lungs without being oxygenated.
  • Pulmonary artery agenesis: A rare defect where the pulmonary artery or a portion of it fails to develop. The pulmonary artery has two branches, each of which goes to a different lung. The affected lung tends to be smaller and the bronchial arteries that supply it tend to be enlarged.
  • Pulmonary artery, isolated unilateral absence of (Isolated UAPA): A very rare malformation where either the right or left pulmonary artery is missing and there are no other heart abnormalities. The severity of the condition is variable with some infants being severely affected while others are asymptomatic for decades.
  • Pulmonary edema: A condition which is characterized by engorgement of the pulmonary vessels and transudation of fluid into the alveoli
  • Pulmonary embolism: The occurrence of an embolism which blocks blood vessels in the lungs
  • Pulmonary embolus: Pulmonary embolus is a condition in which a blood clot, piece of fat, or other solid substance travels through the bloodstream and lodges in a blood vessel of the lungs causing a blockage.
  • Pulmonary haemosiderosis, primary: A rare condition characterized by anemia, coughing up blood and iron deposits in the lungs. The disorder is the result of recurring bleeding in the lungs which leads to a buildup of iron in the lungs. Symptoms may develop slowly or quickly and may become evident at any age.
  • Pulmonary hemangiomatosis: A rare condition characterized by the proliferation of small blood vessels or capillaries in various parts of the lungs - pleura, bronchial and venous walls and alveolar septa.
  • Pulmonary hypertension: The occurrence of hypertension the blood vessels of the lungs
  • Pulmonary infections related to AIDS: It usually occurs due to decreased immunity.
  • Pulmonary oedema: Caused by changes in the hydrostatic forces in capillaries or increased capillary permeability that results in diffuse oedema in pulmonary tissues and air spaces
  • Pulmonary valve stenosis: Often a congenital defect but may be caused by such things as rheumatic fever or bacterial endocarditis. Severity depends on the degree of narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Pulmonary veins stenosis: A congenital malformation where the pulmonary veins are narrowed.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Rhodococcus equi: A rare form of bacterial infection that usually affects horses and foals but can cause infection mainly in immunocompromised people. Infection usually starts at the site of some sort of trauma. Symptoms and severity may vary considerably depending on the location and extent of the infection.
  • Rib symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ribs
  • Salivary gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the salivary glands or salivation.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Small Cell Lung Cancer: Small cell lung cancer is a cancer of the small cells which make up some of the lung tissue. It tends to be a more aggressive cancer than large cell lung cancer and can metastasize to other parts of the body. This type of cancer nearly always occurs in a people with a history of smoking.
  • Small cell lung cancer, adult: Small cell lung cancer is a cancer of the lung tissue which is made up of small cells. It tends to be a more aggressive cancer than large cell lung cancer and can metastasize to other parts of the body.
  • Spitting blood: Blood in the sputum or coughing blood
  • Sputum symptoms: Sputum symptoms such as when coughing
  • Stachybotrys chartarum: A toxic black slimy mold that can be found in damp indoor environments. Exposure can occur through the skin, ingestion or inhalation. It can causes conditions such as "sick building syndrome".
  • Stomatitis: Inflammation of the oral mucous membranes.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Throat symptoms: Symptoms affecting the throat
  • Tonsillitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the tonsils
  • Torulopsis: A type of yeast infection caused by Torulopsis glabrata. The fungus is often found in normal healthy skin, respiratory system, genitourinary system and gastrointestinal system and it generally only becomes a problem in weakened or immunocompromised people. They type of symptoms are determined by where and how severe the infection is.
  • Tracheal cancer: The trachea (windpipe) is the tube that connects your mouth and nose to your lungs. It goes on to divide into the two airways (right and left bronchi) which supply air to each lung. . The most common types of tracheal cancer are squamous cell carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma.
  • Tracheobronchopathia osteoplastica: A rare condition where bone or cartilage nodules develop in the walls of the trachea and main bronchi. The condition may stabilize or progress slowly but rarely does it affect airflow to a significant degree.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Tuberculosis, pulmonary: Lung infection caused by a contagious bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection occurs through inhalation of contaminants from infected people. Infection may spread from the lungs to other organs. The infection may incubate for years, be asymptomatic or produced symptoms within weeks. Immunocompromised people may suffer severe symptoms.
  • Uremia: Build up of toxins usually excreted by the kidneys, associated with real failure in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Vasculitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation to blood vessels
  • Vasculitis hypersensitivity: A condition which is characterised by a reaction that results in the inflammation of the blood vessels
  • Vomiting: Vomiting or retching symptoms.
  • Vomiting blood: Blood appearing in vomited material.
  • Warfarin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Warfarin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • Wet cough: Wet productive cough producing sputum
  • Zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Hemoptysis:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Hemoptysis:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Hemoptysis' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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