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Glossary for Hyperpigmented patches of skin

Medical terms related to Hyperpigmented patches of skin or mentioned in this section include:

  • Acanthosis nigricans: A diffuse colour change to the skin with dark pigmentation, particularly in the axillae
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acromelanosis: A birth anomaly where there is patches of increased pigmentation in the ends of the fingers and toes. The pigmentation may spread to surrounding areas of skin.
  • Addison's Disease: A rare progressive hormonal disorder characterized by insufficient production of certain hormones called adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Altered pigmentation: discoloration of the skin can be caused by various factors
  • Atopic dermatitis 1: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q21. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 2: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 3: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 4: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17q25.3. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 5: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q12-q14. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Atopic dermatitis 6: Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and itching. Dry, red, itchy patches of skin tend to develop most often in the folds of the arms and knees, wrists, face and hands. Atopic dermatitis often runs in a family which means that a genetic anomaly may increase a person's susceptibility to developing the skin condition. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. The genetic anomaly means that the patient is more susceptible to developing atopic dermatitis. The condition is often associated with hay fever and asthma.
  • Bullous dystrophy, macular type: A rare condition characterized by loss of scalp hair, increased skin pigmentation, small head, mental retardation, short stature and blisters. The blisters do not form necessarily on skin that has suffered trauma but occurs spontaneously.
  • Candidiasis familial chronic mucocutaneous, autosomal dominant, with thyroid disease: A dominantly inherited condition characterized by poor immunity to fungal infections (particularly those caused by Candida albicans) as will as thyroid disease. Persistent fungal infections tend to affect the nails, skin or mucous membranes. The degree of severity is variable with some cases leading to fugal infection of the brain which is usually fatal.
  • Cirrhosis of the liver: Scarring of the liver from alcohol or other causes.
  • Cushing's syndrome: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, Berlin type: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the absence of many or all teeth, a lack of hair, mental retardation and skin abnormalities.
  • Eczema: Skin rash usually from allergic causes.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Fowler-Christmas-Chapple syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of polycystic ovaries with the abnormal functioning of the urinary valve.
  • Graves Disease: A condition which is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid resulting hyperthyroidism
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hyperpigmented patches of skin in pregnancy: Appearence of darker patches of skin in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Liver symptoms: Symptoms affecting the liver
  • Melanoma: Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It is the leading cause of death from skin disease. It involves cells called melanocytes, which produce a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is responsible for skin and hair color.
  • Nevus of ota retinitis pigmentosa: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormal pigmentation of the eye and the skin surrounding the eye.
  • Osteopathia striata pigmentary dermopathy white forelock: A rare disorder characterized by longitudinal striations on long bones and pigmentation abnormalities affecting the skin and hair.
  • Pigmentation symptoms: Symptoms related to pigmentation levels in the skin.
  • Poikilodermatomyositis -- mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation , muscle inflammation and weakness and pigmentation abnormalities.
  • Polycystic ovaries urethral sphincter dysfunction: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of polycystic ovaries with the abnormal functioning of the urinary valve.
  • Porphyria Cutanea Tarda: A rare metabolic condition involving a deficiency of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. This results in a buildup of porphyrins in the skin which makes it sensitive to light. Most symptoms tend to primarily affected the areas of skin most exposed to sun e.g. back of hands and arms.
  • Primordial short stature -- microdontia -- opalescent and rootless teeth: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature and very small abnormal teeth.
  • Scleroderma: A rare, progressive connective tissue disorder involving thickening and hardening of the skin and connective tissue. There are a number of forms of scleroderma with some forms being systemic (involving internal organs).
  • Skin color changes: Skin changes such as redness, blueness, or whitening.
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin pain: Pain affecting the skin.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Thumb deformity, alopecia, pigmentation anomaly: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a deformed thumb, lack of hair and abnormal pigmentation.
  • Thyrotoxicosis: hypermetabolic clinical syndrome resulting from serum elevations in thyroid hormone levels, specifically free thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or both.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Hyperpigmented patches of skin:

The following list of conditions have 'Hyperpigmented patches of skin' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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