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Symptoms » Leg symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Leg symptoms

Medical terms related to Leg symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 1q proximal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the proximal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 2q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1: A recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by methylglutaconic acid in the urine.
  • 3q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 3 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • 49,XXXXX syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder that affects only females and involves body cells having five copies of the X chromosome instead of the normal two.
  • 49,XXXXY syndrome: A rare sex chromosome abnormality where there are three extra copies of the X chromosome.
  • 4p16.3 deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of chromosome 4 is deleted at a location called 16.3. The condition is characterized by malformations in most parts of the body as the deletion affects growth and development of the fetus.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • ARTS syndrome: A rare lethal syndrome characterized by deafness, optic atrophy and ataxia.
  • Aagenaes syndrome: A rare inherited birth abnormality involving underdeveloped lymph vessels which results in swollen legs and liver problems.
  • Aarskog Syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by facial, hand, genital and growth abnormalities.
  • Aase-Smith I syndrome: A very rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as joint contractures, anemia, hydrocephalus and cleft palate.
  • Abdominal Aneurysm: Dilatation of a section of the abdominal aorta, usually due to a weakness in the wall of the artery
  • Abdominal chemodectomas with cutaneous angiolipomas: A rare genetic condition involving the growth of a tumor-like mass of lymphatic tissue in the abdomen.
  • Abnormal carrying angle of elbow in children: Abnormal carrying angle of elbow in children is an abnormality of a child's elbow.
  • Abnormal extensor reflex: also known as decerebrate posture
  • Abnormal flexor response: An abnormal flexor response is an abnormal reflex to stimulation.
  • Abnormal palmar crease: An abnormal palmar crease is an atypical or unusual crease in the palm of the hand.
  • Absence of doll's eye sign: Reflex movement of the eyes such that the eyes lower as the head is raised, indicating functional integrity of the nerve pathways involved in eye movement
  • Absence of femoral pulse on one side: Absence of femoral pulse on one side is a lack of a pulse that is normally felt in the inguinal area between the hip and the groin on one side.
  • Absence of pedal pulse on both sides: Absence of pedal pulse on both sides is a lack of pulses that are usually felt on the top of both feet.
  • Absence of pedal pulse on one side: Absence of pedal pulse on one side refers to a lack of a pulse that is usually felt on the top of one foot.
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Absent femoral pulse: the femoral pulse is palpated below the inguinal ligament and about midway between symphysis pubis and anterior superior iliac spine, it is absent in ceratin conditions
  • Absent patellae -- scrotal hypoplasia -- renal anomalies -- facial dysmorphism -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by absent kneecaps, underdeveloped scrotum, kidney anomalies, unusual facial appearance and mental retardation.
  • Absent pedal pulse: the distal pulse of the foot, also referred to as pedal pulse, may be taken at either of two sites: the posterior tibial pulse (located behind the medial ankle) or the dorsalis pedis pulse (located on the anterior surface of the foot, lateral to the large tendon of the great toe), it may be absent in certain conditions
  • Acanthocheilonemiasis: A rare tropical infection caused by a particular threadworm usually found in Africa. It may cause skin rashes, muscle and joint pains, neurologic disorders and skin lumps. The cerebrospinal fluid may also contain the larvae.
  • Acanthokeratodermia: An uncommon skin condition involving excessive growth of the horny part of the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Patients also suffer thickening of the nails.
  • Accessory navicular bone: An abnormal bone that develops in the arch in the middle of the foot. Often there are no symptoms but if the bone is large it may rub against shoes and cause problems.
  • Acetaminophen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Acetaminophen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Achalasia -- Addisonianism -- Alacrimia syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- addisonianism -- alacrima syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Achard syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized primarily by a short head, long, slender bones, recessed lower jaw and loose hand and foot joints.
  • Acheiropodia: Rare congenital defect where hands and feet are missing.
  • Achilles tendon bruise: An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Achilles tendon burning sensation: burning sensation of the Achilles tendon usually due to systemic disorders.
  • Achilles tendon bursitis due to running: It is estimated that Achilles tendonitis accounts for around 11% of all running injuries. The Achilles tendon is the large tendon at the back of the ankle. The achilles tendon can become inflamed through overuse as well as a number of contributory factors. The Achilles tendon has a poor blood supply which is why it is slow to heal.
  • Achilles tendon deformity: Alteration in the normal position and function of the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon infection: Infection of the Achilles tendon is usually due to any secondary infectious disorder.
  • Achilles tendon inflammation: Infection of the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon lump: Small palpable mass in the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon numb: Abnormal sensations felt in the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon pain: Achilles tendon also known as the calcaneal tendon is the tendon of the posterior part of the leg.
  • Achilles tendon redness: Erythematous changes in the skin overlying the Achilles tendon usually due to inflammation.
  • Achilles tendon sensitive: Increased responsiveness to stimulation.
  • Achilles tendon spasm: Sudden involuntary contraction of the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon stiff: tendon stiffness due to physical trauma or abnormal muscle contraction.
  • Achilles tendon swelling: Inflammatory changes associated with the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon tingling: Prickling or stinging sensation felt in the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendonitis: Achilles tendonitis is a condition of irritation and inflammation of the large tendon in the back of the ankle.
  • Aching joints: A sensation of aching located in the joints
  • Aching muscles of both arms: Aching muscles of both arms is an aching of the muscles of both arms.
  • Achondrogenesis: A type of dwarfism where the main limbs are short and the head and trunk are hydropic (contain an accumulation of clear fluid).
  • Achondroplasia: A rare disease characterized by abnormal bone growth which results in short stature with short arms and legs, large head and characteristic facial features.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidemia, isovaleric: A rare genetic condition where the body can't process proteins adequately. More specifically, there are insufficient levels of the enzyme needed to break down an amino acid called leucine. This results in a build up of isovaleric acid which can harm the brain and nervous system. Some people suffer severe symptoms from birth and others suffer milder symptoms that come and go and are affected by such things as infections or consumption of high protein food.
  • Acidic dry cell batteries inhalation poisoning: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals which can cause symptoms if inhaled. The smoke emitted from burning batteries can also cause poisoning symptoms if sufficient quantities are inhaled. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Ackerman syndrome: An extremely rare condition characterized primarily by glaucoma, upper lip deformity and abnormal tooth roots.
  • Acne-like arm skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the arm
  • Acne-like behind-knee skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the skin behind the knee
  • Acne-like calf skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the calf skin
  • Acne-like elbow skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the elbow
  • Acne-like forearm skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the forearm skin
  • Acne-like hand skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the hand
  • Acne-like knee skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acne-like leg skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acro coxo mesomelic dysplasia: A rare inherited form of dwarfism characterized mainly by shortening of the middle and end parts of the limbs.
  • Acro-reno-ocular syndrome: A disorder characterized by eye abnormalities, kidney defects and abnormalities of the arm and hand bones.
  • Acrocallosal Syndrome (Schinzel Type): A rare condition characterized by absence of portion of the brain (corpus callosum), mental deficiency, duplicated toes, mental deficiency and other abnormalities.
  • Acrocallosal syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent corpus callosum of brain, duplication of thumb or big toe and extra fingers or toes.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly: A rare genetic condition characterized by limb abnormalities, extra digits and hydrocephalus. Other additional symptoms are variably present.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by head, hand and genital anomalies as well as mental retardation.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly, type 2 (ACPS 2): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly II: A rare inherited disorder characterized primarily by premature closure of skull bones, fusion of fingers and toes and eye and face abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly Syndrome type 5: A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 3 (ACPS 3): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include brachycephaly, ear deformities as well as craniofacial, finger and bone abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 5 (ACPS 5): A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrodermatitis in children: Acrodermatitis in children is a type of dermatitis or skin condition in children.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrodysplasia scoliosis: A rare inherited genetic disorder characterized by short fingers and toes, scoliosis and other spine anomalies.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Preis type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Preis type is very rare and the range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis atypical postaxial: A rare genetic disorder characterized by absence of some fingers and toes and characteristic facial features.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Weyers type: A rare disorder characterized by facial abnormalities and extra digits, nail abnormalities and short limbs.
  • Acrogeria (Gottron Type): An extremely rare, mild form of progeria.
  • Acromegaloid changes, cutis verticis gyrata and corneal leukoma: A rare disorder characterized by acromegaly (enlarged extremeties) , furrowed skin on scalp and face and corneal leukomas.
  • Acromegaloid, Cutis Verticis Gyrata, Corneal Leukoma Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of acromegaly, cutis verticis gyrate and corneal leukoma.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia: A rare genetic progressive skeletal disorder characterized by short limbs, a large head and lower thoracic kyphosis.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia Brahimi Bacha type: A very rare genetic malformation syndrome characterized primarily by developmental abnormalities of the face and skeletal bones.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia Hunter Thompson type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acromicric dysplasia: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Acropectoral syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by extra fingers and toes, fusion of fingers and toes and anomalies involving the abdominal and chest wall.
  • Acropectorovertebral dysplasia: A rare inherited genetic disorder characterized by abnormalities involving the fingers, toes, palate and chest bones.
  • Acrorenal syndrome recessive: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized by the association of kidney and hand and foot abnormalities.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute acne-like arm skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the arm
  • Acute acne-like behind-knee skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the skin behind the knee
  • Acute acne-like calf skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the calf skin
  • Acute acne-like elbow skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the elbow
  • Acute acne-like foot skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the foot
  • Acute acne-like forearm skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the forearm skin
  • Acute acne-like hand skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the hand
  • Acute acne-like knee skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute acne-like leg skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute chronic knuckle pain: severe pain of the heads of the metacarpal bones
  • Acute elbow pain: conditions of the elbow which can cause acute pain for a long period of time
  • Acute feet pain: Acute feet pain is the sudden onset of pain in the feet.
  • Acute foot pain: Acute foot pain is a condition in which there is a sudden onset of pain in one foot.
  • Acute forearm pain: forearm pathologies which cause acute pain for a short duration
  • Acute ichthyosis-like arm skin symptoms: rough skin on the arm
  • Acute ichthyosis-like behind-knee skin symptoms: rough and dry skin behind the knee
  • Acute ichthyosis-like calf skin symptoms: rough and dry skin
  • Acute ichthyosis-like elbow skin symptoms: rough elbow skin
  • Acute ichthyosis-like foot skin symptoms: rough and dry skin foot skin
  • Acute ichthyosis-like forearm skin symptoms: rough and dry skin of the forearm
  • Acute ichthyosis-like hand skin symptoms: rough and dry skin of the hands
  • Acute ichthyosis-like knee skin symptoms: rough skin on the knee
  • Acute ichthyosis-like leg skin symptoms: rough skin on the legs
  • Acute idiopathic polyneuritis: An inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nerves The condition is characterized by weakness, numbness or tingling in the legs or arms or occasionally loss of movement and feeling in the legs, arms, upper body and face. Some patients have minor symptoms and others suffer severe symptoms such as paralysis. Also called Guillain-Barre syndrome, infectious polyneuritis or acute febrile polyneuritis.
  • Acute injuries of both knees related to sports: Acute injuries of both knees related to sports is the sudden onset of sports-related trauma to the knees.
  • Acute injuries of the knee related to sports: The knee joint is the largest joint in the body, consisting of 4 bones and an extensive network of ligaments and muscles. Injuries to the knee joint are amongst the most common in sporting activities.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute pain in both thumbs: Acute pain in both thumbs is discomfort or pain that occurs suddenly in both thumbs.
  • Acute paronychia:
  • Acute pimples on arms: also known as acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute pimples on legs: also known acne, the inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute psoriasis-like arm rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis
  • Acute psoriasis-like behind-knee rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like calf rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the calf may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like elbow rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the elbow may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like foot rash: Psoriasis like lesions on the foot may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like forearm rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like hand rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the hand may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like knee rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the knee may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like leg rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the leg may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute quadricep pain in the lower limb: Acute quadricep pain in the lower limb is sudden pain or discomfort in the thigh.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Acute sole pain on both sides: Acute sole pain on both sides is discomfort or pain that occurs suddenly on both soles of the feet.
  • Acute sole pain on one side: Acute sole pain on one side is a condition in which there is sudden discomfort or pain on the sole of one foot.
  • Acute thumb pain: Acute thumb pain is sudden pain or discomfort in the thumb.
  • Acute toe pain in both feet: Acute toe pain in both feet is a condition in which there is a sudden onset of pain or discomfort in one or more toes in both feet.
  • Acute toe pain in one foot: Acute toe pain in one is a sudden onset of pain or discomfort in one or more toes on one foot.
  • Acute triceps pain on both sides: Acute triceps pain on both sides is pain or discomfort that occurs suddenly in both upper arms.
  • Acute triceps pain on one side: Acute triceps pain on one side is pain or discomfort that occurs suddenly in one upper arm.
  • Acute upper arm pain on both sides: Acute upper arm pain on both sides is discomfort or pain that happens suddenly in both upper arms.
  • Acute upper arm pain on one side: Acute upper arm pain on one side is a condition in which discomfort or pain happens suddenly in one upper arm.
  • Adactyly: Congenital absence of fingers or toes.
  • Adamantinoma: A very aggressive malignant cancer of the jaw. Also called ameloblastoma, adamantoblastoma or epithelioma adamantinum.
  • Adams-Oliver Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by scalp, skull and limb abnormalities. The range and severity of the symptoms can vary greatly from mild to severe.
  • Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs Dundar type: A rare disorder characterized by a thumb abnormality as well as mental retardation, foot defects and other anomalies.
  • Adduction and extension of the arms: position of the upper limb due various etiologies
  • Adduction of the arms: position of the upper limb due various etiologies
  • Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: A type of cancer that occurs mainly in the genitourinary tract and the cells that make up the tumor are clear. It is very rare and most cases occur in females whose mothers used a drug called DES (synthetic estrogen) while pregnant.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Adult SMA: Form of Spinal Muscular Atrophy in adults.
  • Adult hypophosphatasia: An rare inherited bone disorder due to an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency of alkaline phosphate. The condition involves the early loss of primary teeth and childhood rickets followed by a reasonable health until mid-adulthood when dental and skeletal abnormalities again become prevalent.
  • Adult-onset ALD: Form of ALD in adults.
  • Alajouanine syndrome: A birth disorder characterized mainly by clubfoot, strabismus and facial paralysis. The facial paralysis is caused by damage to the 6th and 7th cranial nerve.
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Albuterol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Albuterol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alcoholic, reversible acute muscular: Muscle cramps associated with chronic alcohol abuse.
  • Alexander Syndrome: Brain myelin disorder causing mental degeneration.
  • Allain Babin Demarquez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by premature fusion of skullbones, abnormal development of skeletal bones and hypertension.
  • Allergic tension-fatigue syndrome: Variable symptoms caused by food allergy.
  • Alopecia congenita keratosis palmoplantaris: An extremely rare condition characterized by thickening of skin on the palms and soles and lack of hair.
  • Alopecia mental retardation syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by a lack of hair and mental retardation.
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome -- mental retardation -- midface hypoplasia -- elliptocytosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of Alport syndrome, mental retardation, underdeveloped midface and a blood abnormality (elliptocytosis). Alport syndrome is an inherited condition involving progressive kidney damage and hearing loss.
  • Alport syndrome with macrothrombocytopenia: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by progressive kidney damage and hearing loss as well as macrothrombocytopenia.
  • Alprazolam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alprazolam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alternating Hemiplegia: Episodes of one-sided paralysis.
  • Alves Castelo dos Santos syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by hair, eye, skin and spinal abnormalities.
  • Amelo-onycho-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare disorder characterized primarily by tooth and nail abnormalities and reduced sweating ability.
  • Aminopterin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to ? during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amitriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amitriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amnion rupture sequence: A rare disorder where the amniotic sac is ruptured resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Amniotic Bands: A rare condition where abnormal fetal development occurs when bands of tissue encircle parts of the fetus and affect the growth of that portion. The band of tissue develops from the internal womb lining. The location of the band on the fetus determines the symptoms and the seriousness of the condition.
  • Amobarbital -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amobarbital during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amoxicillin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amoxicillin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphetamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amphetamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ampicillin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Ampicillin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophy, neurogenic scapuloperoneal, New England type: An inherited disorder involving muscle wasting and weakness in the shoulder and lower leg. The exact symptoms that occur may vary from patient to patient with males often being more affected than females. An interesting observation of this condition is that symptoms and rate of progression tends to be more severe with each passing generation.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anauxetic dysplasia: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal skeletal and spinal development.
  • Ancylostoma duodenale: An infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale which is a parasitic hookwork whichcan cause serious disease in humans - usually occurs in people who work barefoot in damp soil. The hookworms suck blood from the intestines of the host which can result in anemia if there is a large number of worms.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, hypochromic microcytic: A blood disorder where red blood cells are too small and lack sufficient iron. It can be inherited or caused by insufficient iron in the diet or from a genetic disorder.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Aniridia -- absent patella: A rare genetic condition characterized by an abnormal or missing kneecap as well as the absence of the iris of the eye.
  • Ankle bleeding: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle blister: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle blueness: A blue discolouration of the ankle
  • Ankle bruise: A haematoma that occurs at the ankle.
  • Ankle burning sensation: A burning sensation located in the ankle
  • Ankle clonus: a rhythmic contraction of the calf muscles following a sudden dorsiflexion of the foot, the leg being semiflexed
  • Ankle coldness: A cold sensation occurring at the ankle
  • Ankle deformity: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle fracture: Ankle fracture refers to a broken bone in the ankle.
  • Ankle infection: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle inflammation: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle itch: A sensation that causes a desire to scratch the skin of the ankle
  • Ankle lump: A palpable lesion located anatomically at or near the ankle joint
  • Ankle numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the ankle region of the foot.
  • Ankle pain: Pain affecting the ankle joint
  • Ankle pain in children: Ankle pain in children is any discomfort or pain in the ankle of a child.
  • Ankle pain on both sides: Ankle pain on both sides refers to pain or discomfort in both ankles.
  • Ankle pain on one side: Ankle pain on one side is a condition in which there is discomfort or pain in one ankle.
  • Ankle paralysis: A loss of the motor and or sensory function of the ankle due to either a muscular or neural mechanism
  • Ankle paresthesia (tingling): A loss of sensation located at or around the ankle region of the foot.
  • Ankle paresthesia of both sides: Ankle paresthesia of both sides is a condition in which there is numbness, tingling or other abnormal sensations in both ankles.
  • Ankle paresthesia of one side: Ankle paresthesia of one side is a condition in which there is numbness, tingling or other abnormal sensations in one ankle.
  • Ankle rash: An eruption on the skin of the ankle.
  • Ankle redness: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula. Most traumatic events involving the ankle result in ankle sprains.
  • Ankle spasm: A sudden involuntary contraction of the muscles surrounding the ankle joint.
  • Ankle sprain: Damage to the ankle ligaments.
  • Ankle stiffness: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula. Most traumatic events involving the ankle result in ankle sprains.
  • Ankle swelling: Ankle swelling often from injury or fluid retention.
  • Ankle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ankle
  • Ankle tingling/paresthesias: A tingling sensation located on the ankle.
  • Ankle ulcer: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle weakness: A decrease in the usual strength of the movements of the ankle
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Annular constricting bands: Bands of amniotic tissue which can constrict parts of the body (especially the limbs) and result in deformity, swelling or even amputation of a body part. The severity and part of the body involved varies from case to case.
  • Anonychia -- ectrodactyly: A very rare syndrome characterized by the absence of nails and the absence of all or part of one or more fingers or toes (ectrodactyly).
  • Anonychia -- microcephaly: A very rare syndrome characterized by the absence of nails and a small head.
  • Anonychia -- onychodystrophy: A rare birth malformation characterized by absent nails and dystrophic nails.
  • Anonychia onychodystrophy brachydactyly type b: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized abnormal or absent nails, permanently flexed fingers and a broad, finger-like thumb.
  • Anonychia-onychodystrophy with brachydactyly type B and ectrodactyly: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized abnormal or absent nails, missing fingers, permanently flexed fingers and a broad, finger-like thumb.
  • Anophthalmia -- hand and foot defects -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, hand and foot defects and absent eyes.
  • Anophthalmia -- short stature -- obesity: A very rare syndrome characterized by absent eyes, short stature and obesity.
  • Anophthalmos with limb anomalies: A rare disorder characterized by absent eyes
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Anterior knee pain related to sports: The knee joint is the largest joint in the body, consisting of 4 bones and an extensive network of ligaments and muscles. Injuries to the knee joint are amongst the most common in sporting activities.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antithrombin Deficiency: Antithrombin deficiency refers the deficiency or impaired activity of a substance that inactivates enzymes involved in blood coagulation. Antithrombin prevents the blood from clotting too readily and if its activity is impaired then the blood becomes more prone to clotting which can result in severe problems. Severity of the condition can vary amongst patients and the symptoms can vary considerably depending on the location of blood clots and size of the blood clot.
  • Antithrombin Deficiency, type I: Type I Antithrombin deficiency refers the deficiency of a substance that inactivates enzymes involved in blood coagulation. Antithrombin prevents the blood from clotting too readily and if there are insufficient quantities of it then the blood becomes more prone to clotting which can result in severe problems. Severity of the condition can vary amongst patients and the symptoms can vary considerably depending on the location of blood clots and size of the blood clot. Type I may be inherited or acquired through such things as kidney or liver disease. Acquired cases tend to have a lower risk of blood clots compared to inherited cases.
  • Antithrombin Deficiency, type II: Type II Antithrombin deficiency refers the malfunction of a substance that inactivates enzymes involved in blood coagulation. Antithrombin prevents the blood from clotting too readily and if it is unable to function properly then the blood becomes more prone to clotting which can result in severe problems. Severity of the condition can vary amongst patients and the symptoms can vary considerably depending on the location of blood clots and size of the blood clot. Type II is an inherited condition.
  • Antithrombin III deficiency, congenital: A rare blood disorder where a congenital deficiency of antithrombin III causes excessive blood coagulation which results in blood clot formation.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antley-Bixler Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, choanal atresia and craniofacial and limb abnormalities.
  • Antley-Bixler-like syndrome -- ambiguous genitalia -- disordered steroidogenesis: A rare genetic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase) which causes steroid abnormalities. The condition results in ambiguous genitalia in females due to excessive androgen during fetal growth. Patients can also have the bone symptoms of Antley-Bixler syndrome.
  • Aortic arch anomaly with peculiar facies and mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, characteristic facial anomalies and abnormal position of the aorta.
  • Aortic coarctation: A rare inherited birth defect where the heart blood vessel called the aorta has a narrowed area which affects blood flow. The degree of constriction is variable which mild cases asymptomatic until adulthood. The poor blood flow to the lower body gives results in it appearing less developed than that upper body.
  • Aphalangia -- syndactyly -- microcephaly: A very rare syndrome characterized by the absence of one or more bones of the fingers and toes, a small head and fusion of fingers.
  • Aplasia cutis congenital -- intestinal lymphangiectasia: A rare disorder characterized by a skin defect and dilated intestinal lymph vessels.
  • Aplasia/hypoplasia of pelvis, femur, fibula, and ulna with abnormal digits and nails: A rare syndrome characterized by the underdevelopment or absence of the pelvis, thigh bone, shin bone and ulna (forearm bone) as well as digital and nail abnormalities.
  • Arachnidism: Poisoning from a spider bite.
  • Arachnodactyly: Hands and fingers, and feet and toes, are abnormally long and slender.
  • Arachnodactyly in children: Arachnodactyly in children refers to a child who has unusually long and thin fingers that are the result of a congenital syndrome.
  • Arachnoid Cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the spinal cord and brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Arm blister: A small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin of the arm.
  • Arm blueness: A blue discolouration of the arm
  • Arm bruise: Injury or trauma to the arm tissue which is often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Arm burning sensation: Abnormal burning sensation in the arm.
  • Arm cold: Abnormal sensation of coldness in the arm.
  • Arm coldness: A cold sensation occurring on the arm
  • Arm coldness in children: Arm coldness in children is an abnormally cold or cool sensation in the arm of a child.
  • Arm deformity: Malformation or distortion of the arm.
  • Arm infection: Infection of the tissues of the arm.
  • Arm inflammation: Inflammation of the tissues of the arm.
  • Arm itch: A sensation that causes a desire to scratch the skin of the arm
  • Arm lump: Raised small swellings seen on the arm.
  • Arm numb: Abnormal sensation of numbness in the arm.
  • Arm numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Arm pain: Pain or discomfort of one or both arms
  • Arm pain in children: Arm pain in children is a sensation of pain or discomfort of an arm in a child.
  • Arm paralysis: A loss of the motor and or sensory function of the arm due to either a muscular or neural mechanism
  • Arm paresthesia: Arm tingling, prickling, numbness or burning sensations
  • Arm rash: An eruption on the skin of the arm.
  • Arm redness: Erythema due to inflammatory changes in the arm.
  • Arm sensitive: Increased responsiveness of the arm to any form of stimulus.
  • Arm spasm: Involuntary contractions of muscles in the arm.
  • Arm stiffness: Lacking the ease or comfort of arm joint movement.
  • Arm swelling: Swelling of the arm due to an inflammatory reaction.
  • Arm symptoms: Symptoms affecting the arm
  • Arm tingling: Abnormal tingling sensation in the arm.
  • Arm tremor: The occurrence of a physical tremor located in the arm
  • Arm weakness: Weakness of the muscles of the arm.
  • Arm weakness in children: Arm weakness in children is a lack of strength of the arm of a child.
  • Armpit lump in children: Armpit lump in children is a mass or growth in the armpit or axilla of a child.
  • Armpit rash in children: Armpit rash in children is an abnormal condition or eruption of the skin of the armpit or axilla in a child.
  • Arms are adducted and extended: position of the upper limb due various etiologies
  • Arterial occlusive disease: A condition which is characterized by occlusion of arterioles
  • Arterial occlusive disease, progressive -- hypertension -- heart defects -- bone fragility -- brachysyndactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by narrowing or blockage of a number of arteries (in the kidneys, abdomen, brain and heart) as well as fragile bones, heart defects and finger abnormalities. Fractures and high blood pressure often start during the first years of life.
  • Arteriosclerosis Obliterans: Arteriosclerosis that results in the narrowing and gradual blockage of the artery. Arteriosclerosis involves the deposition of cholesterol plaques and other material on the inside of the artery walls. The symptoms will depend on the location of the arteries affected and how severe the blockage is.
  • Arthralgia in lower limb: unilateral arthralgia
  • Arthralgia of both lower limbs: Bilateral arthralgia
  • Arthritis: A condition which is characterized by the inflammation of a joint
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthritis-related enthesitis: Inflammation of the entheses due to arthritis. The enthuses is the site at which the tendon or ligament attaches to the bone.
  • Arthrogryposis: A condition which is characterized by the persistent flexure of a joint
  • Arthrogryposis -- severe scoliosis: A rare disorder characterized by severe scoliosis and permanent flexion of muscles in the ends of the limbs. Other variable features may alsobe present.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita neurogenic type: A rare non-progressive syndrome characterized by congenital contractures that originates from a nerve problem (spinal motor neuron depletion).
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, distal, X-linked: A rare condition characterized by the presence of contractures at birth as well as various other anomalies. The condition is X-linked.
  • Arthrogryposis, congenital -- myopathic seizures: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation and muscle problems.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2A: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that involves additional symptoms such as facial and spinal anomalies.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2E: A rare syndrome characterized by contractures of the fingers and jaw.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, with hypopituitarism, mental retardation, and facial anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, permanent flexion of fingers, low pituitary hormone level and facial anomalies.
  • Arthrogryposis-like disorder: A rare disorder characterized by joint contractures of the knees and ankles resulting in wasting or overgrowth of nearby muscles.
  • Ashley syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by an unusual facial appearance and muscle and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short limbs, underdeveloped iliac wings and a narrow rigid thoracic cage that often results in asphyxiation.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy 2: Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the ribcage The ribcage is restricted to the point where breathing is impaired and death during infancy is a common occurrence. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q13.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy 3: Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the ribcage The ribcage is restricted to the point where breathing is impaired and death during infancy is a common occurrence. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.5.
  • Asterixes: A flapping tremor that occurs at the wrist, hand or hip joints.
  • Asterixis: The intermittent loss of sustained contraction of the arms against ones will.
  • Asymmetric limbs in children: Asymmetric limbs in children refers to a condition in which the arms and/or legs are not evenly formed or shaped in a child.
  • Asymmetrical brachial pulses: difference in the reading of the brachial artery on palpation of the right and left brachial artery in the cubital fossae
  • Asymmetrical paralysis in the legs: loss of function of one of the lower limb
  • Asymmetrical paralysis of the lower limbs: Asymmetrical paralysis of the lower limbs is an uneven loss or lack of normal movement in the legs.
  • Ataxia -- apraxia -- mental retardation, X-linked: A rare X-linked syndrome characterized mainly by ataxia, apraxia and mental retardation. The symptoms are generally nonprogressive.
  • Ataxia -- diabetes -- goiter -- gonadal insufficiency: A rare disorder characterized by diabetes, goiter, insufficient hormone production by the gonads and progressive ataxia.
  • Ataxia -- oculomotor apraxia, type 1: A nerve disorder which affects the motor nerves and results in movement problems which includes the eyes. Gait problems are usually the first symptom and this is followed by speaking difficulty, intention tremor and then eye movement problems.
  • Ataxia spastic congenital miosis: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized mainly by ataxia, spasticity and small pupils that respond poorly to light.
  • Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome: A nerve disorder which affects the motor nerves and results in movement problems which includes the eyes. Gait problems are usually the first symptom and this is followed by speaking difficulty, intention tremor and then eye movement problems.
  • Atelosteogenesis Type III: A very rare inherited skeletal ossification disorder. Unlike types I and II, survival past infancy is possible in type III.
  • Atelosteogenesis, type 2: A very rare inherited skeletal disorder involving the bone and cartilage and resulting in various bone abnormalities.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Atherosclerosis: A condition which is a form of arteriosclerosis where atheromas are caused by the aggregation of cholesterol and lipids
  • Athlete's foot: A condition which is characterized by a chronic superificial infection of the foot caused by a fungi
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Atropine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atropine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Behavioral disorder with hyperactivity and/or inattention.
  • Atypical coarctation of aorta: Coarctation of the aorta is a rare inherited birth defect where the heart blood vessel called the aorta has a narrowed area which affects blood flow. The degree of constriction is variable which mild cases asymptomatic until adulthood. The poor blood flow to the lower body gives results in it appearing less developed than that upper body. The atypical form of the condition involves the abdominal aorta, the ascending aorta or the descending thoracic aorta. The disease may be a congenital anomaly, caused by arteritis or associated with conditions such as Williams syndrome and neurofibromatosis.
  • Auralcephalosyndactyly: A very rare syndrome characterized by ear abnormalities, premature fusion of skull bones and syndactyly (fusion of digits).
  • Aureomycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Aureomycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autoimmune peripheral neuropathy: Damage to peripheral nerves that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks it.
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Autosomal Dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth with hearing loss: A dominantly inherited form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which also involves hearing loss. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a progressive nerve disease that affects the peripheral nerves and hence the muscles primarily in the limbs.
  • Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2G:
  • Avascular necrosis of femoral head, familial form: A familial hip joint disorder where bone growth abnormalities caused by an interrupted blood supply to the head of the femoral bone results in it's degeneration and deformity. When the body creates a new blood supply, new healthy bone can be formed.
  • Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly -- hydrocephaly -- skeletal abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, excess fluid inside the skull and eye anomalies.
  • Axial osteosclerosis: A rare bone abnormality involving patches of increased bone density which tend to occur in the spine, pelvis and the ball part of the hip joint.
  • Axillary Swelling: Enlargement, swelling or lump in the axillary (armpit) region.
  • Axillary lump infection: Axillary lump infection is an infected lump or bump in the armpit.
  • Axillary lymphadenopathy: in localized axillary lymphadenopathy, the enlargement is restricted to lymph nodes in the axillary areas (both arm pits)
  • Axillary mass: A mass located in the armpit
  • Azathioprine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Azathioprine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Bangstad syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by diabetes, goiter, insufficient hormone production by the gonads and progressive ataxia.
  • Banki syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal curvature of fingers, thin middle sections of long bones, fusion of certain wrist bones (lunate and cuneiform bones) and other hand abnormalities.
  • Baraitser burn fixen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, a skin disorder and an expressionless face.
  • Barbiturate abuse: Abuse of barbiturate medications
  • Bardet-Biedl Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a defect in chromosome 11q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 10: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 10 is caused by a defect in chromosome 12q.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 11: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 11 is caused by a defect in chromosome 9q33.1.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 12: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 12 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a defect in chromosome 16q21.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 3 is caused by a defect in chromosome 3p12-q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 4 is caused by a defect in chromosome 15q22.3.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 5: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 5 is caused by a defect in chromosome 2q31.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 6 is caused by a defect in chromosome 20p12.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 7 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 8: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 8 is caused by a defect in chromosome 14q32.11.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 9: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 9 is caused by a defect in chromosome 7p14.
  • Barnicoat-Baraitser syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by extra digits and excessive growth resulting in an increased birth weight and size.
  • Bartenwerfer syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by dwarfism and facial and skeletal abnormalities. The disorder is a variant of Morquio disease.
  • Bartsocas Papa syndrome: A rare condition characterized by webbing of skin as well as various other physical and mental abnormalities.
  • Bartter Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder of kidney metabolism characterized by reduced blood acidity and low potassium levels.
  • Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive: A neurological disease that affects the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. The disease responds well to biotin administration but relapses within a month if the biotin is stopped. If the condition is diagnosed late or there are recurring episodes, the patient may suffer ongoing symptoms such as paraparesis, mild mental retardation or dystonia.
  • Basilar artery migraine: Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness.
  • Basilar impression primary: A congenital bone abnormality where the skull and vertebrae meet which can compress some of the brain structures and result in neurological abnormalities. The defect is often associated with other vertebral abnormalities. In severe cases, the cerebrospinal fluid flow may be obstructed which can cause fluid to build up inside the skull (hydrocephalus).
  • Baughman syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by fused eyelids, curly hair and abnormal nails.
  • Beals syndrome: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by joint contractures, arachnodactyly and a crumpled appearing ear.
  • Beclomethasone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Beclomethasone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Behind knee itch: A sensation thatcauses a desire to scratch the skin behind the knee
  • Behind knee lump: A palpable lesion located anatomically behind the knee
  • Behind knee pain: A feeling of distress and agonycaused by the stimulation of pain nerve endings behind the knee
  • Behind knee rash: An eruption on the skin behind the knee.
  • Behind knee swelling: Swelling behind the knee
  • Bejel: An infectious disease related to syphilis but is transmitted through nonsexual skin contact. Often starts with a sore in the mouth and then progresses to affect the skin and bones.
  • Bellini-Chiumello-Rinoldi syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by mental retardation, short stature and unusual shaped ends of long bones.
  • Benadryl -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Benadryl during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Benazepril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benazepril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Benzthiazide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benzthiazide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, loss of body fat, hepatomegaly, enlarged genitals, increased skeletal growth and other abnormalities.
  • Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus, loss of body fat, serious insulin resistance, high blood triglycerides and fatty liver. Type 1 is distinguished from type 2 by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1 is caused by a defect on the AGPAT2 gene on chromosome 9q34.3. Type 1 seems to be less severe with some cases of type 2 resulting in premature death which can occur as early as the first year of life. Type 2 also involves mental retardation which is not seen in type 1.
  • Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus, loss of body fat, serious insulin resistance, high blood triglycerides and fatty liver. Type 2 is distinguished from type 2 by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 2 is caused by a defect on the BSCL2 gene on chromosome 11q13. Type 2 seems to be more severe with some cases resulting in premature death which can occur as early as the first year of life. Type 2 also involves mental retardation which is not seen in type 1.
  • Beriberi: Disease due to vitamin B1 deficiency (thiamine)
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Berylliosis: Beryllium poisoning which causes granulomas and pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Bessel-Hagen disease: A dominantly inherited disorder characterized by growth of multiple tumors made up of cartilage on the bones.
  • Bethlem myopathy: A rare, slow-progressing, genetic muscle disorder where the muscle gradually weaken and become wasted.
  • Biaxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Biaxin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Biceps blister: A small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin.
  • Biceps bruise: An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Biceps burning sensation: Occurs due to vasospasm that results in decrease blood supply.
  • Biceps cold: Occurs due to vasospasm that results in decrease blood supply to the arm.
  • Biceps deformity: Malformation or distortion of the biceps.
  • Biceps infection: Infection of the muscle and tendons of the arm.
  • Biceps inflammation: Inflammation of the muscle and tendons of the arm.
  • Biceps lump: Raised small swellings seen on the biceps.
  • Biceps numb: Occurs due to vasospasm that results in decrease blood supply.
  • Biceps redness: Erythema due to inflammatory changes in the arm.
  • Biceps rupture: Occurs when there is a rupture of the biceps muscle or tendon separating it into two distinct segments
  • Biceps rupture on both sides:
  • Biceps rupture on one side:
  • Biceps spasm: Occurs due to vasospasm that results in decrease blood supply to the arm.
  • Biceps swelling: Swelling of the biceps due to an inflammatory reaction.
  • Biceps tingling: Occurs due to vasospasm that results in decrease blood supply.
  • Biceps weakness: Weakness of the biceps muscle.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis: A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE): A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Biemond syndrome type 2: A rare inherited condition characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and underdeveloped genitals.
  • Biemond syndrome type 3: A rare inherited condition characterized by the inability to feel pain as well as other anomalies.
  • Big toe infection: Infection of the big toe.
  • Big toe inflammation: Inflammation of the muscles and tendons of the big toe.
  • Big toe sensitive: raised responsiveness of the foot to stimulus.
  • Big toe spasm: Involuntary muscle contractions in the big toe.
  • Big toe stiff: Inability to contract the muscles of the big toe.
  • Big toe swelling: Edema or swelling of the big toe.
  • Bilateral Renal Agenesis: Failure of both kidneys to from during embryogenesis.
  • Bilateral increase of soft tissue around the terminal phalanges: also known as clubbing
  • Bindewald-Ulmer-Muller syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a heart defect, and mental and growth retardation.
  • Bird-headed dwarfism with progressive ataxia, Insulin-resistant diabetes, goiter and primary gonadal insufficiency: A rare disorder characterized by diabetes, goiter, insufficient hormone production by the gonads and progressive ataxia.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Leg symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Leg symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Leg symptoms or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Leg symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Leg symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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