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Glossary for Lower abdominal symptoms

Medical terms related to Lower abdominal symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 46,XX testicular DSD: A sex chromosome disorder in males which affects gonadal development and causes infertility. Males have XX chromosomes instead of the normal XY.
  • 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development: A sex chromosome disorder in males which affects gonadal development and causes infertility. Males have XX chromosomes instead of the normal XY.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • AIDS-Related Complex: Patients with only mild symptoms of HIV infections.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal chemodectomas with cutaneous angiolipomas: A rare genetic condition involving the growth of a tumor-like mass of lymphatic tissue in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal conditions: Medical conditions affecting the abdominal region.
  • Abdominal cystic lymphangioma: A rare form of benign tumor that occurs in infants. It is essentially a malformation of one of the abdominal lymph vessels where a portion is dilated and form a lymph fluid-filled cyst. Symptoms may vary depending on the exact location and size of the cyst.
  • Abdominal pain: Pain in the abdominal area or stomach.
  • Abdominal pain similar to Inflammatory bowel disease: it is a lower central abdominal pain
  • Abdominal pain that worsens with menses: also known as dysmenorrhea
  • Abdominal swelling: Swelling or bloating of the abdomen
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abetalipoproteinemia: A rare genetic disorder involving fat metabolism. The disorder is also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome. Signs of the disease include acanthocytosis, little or no serum beta-lipoproteins and hypocholesterolemia. In severe cases, steatorrhea, ataxia, nystagmus, motor incoordination and retinitis pigmentosa may also occur.
  • Abnormal enlargement of bladder: rapid increase in the size of the urinary bladder
  • Abnormal infrequent menstrual bleeding: also known as oligomenorrhea is the infrequent uterine bleeding episodes with intervals of more than 35 days
  • Abnormal stool texture: Abnormal stool texture refers to an abnormal consistency of feces.
  • Abnormal stool texture in children: Abnormal stool texture in children is a condition in which a child's bowel movement is too loose, too hard, is greasy, or has any other unusual texture.
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding: The loss of blood from the uterus that varies from that which is considered normal
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding: refers to vaginal bleeding at any time during the menstrual cycle other than normal menstruation
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding in children: Abnormal vaginal bleeding in children is any kind of bleeding or hemorrhage from the vagina in a girl who has not yet reached menses or puberty.
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding in pregnancy: Bleeding from the vagina during pregnancy that occurs after conception but before the onset of labour.
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge: Abnormal vaginal discharge includes any type of discharge from the vagina that is not expected or typical, is heavier than usual, is bloody, is more watery than usual, and/or has an unusual smell.
  • Abnormally decreased urination: known as oliguria
  • Abrupt watery diarrhoea: Multiple episodes of watery diahorrea
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Absence of bowel movement: absence of peristalsis
  • Absence of vaginal bleeding: also called amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation in a women of reproductive age group. It maybe be primary or secondary
  • Absent bowel sounds: Absent bowel sounds, called ileus, is a condition in which the examiner is unable to hear any bowel sounds after listening to the abdomen. This indicates a lack of intestinal activity.
  • Absent menses: amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Accessory navicular bone: An abnormal bone that develops in the arch in the middle of the foot. Often there are no symptoms but if the bone is large it may rub against shoes and cause problems.
  • Achard-Thiers Syndrome: A rare hormonal disorder that occurs in diabetic postmenopausal women where body hair grows in a masculine manner. Hormonal therapy is used to correct the endocrine imbalance.
  • Achlorhydria: Condition where there is no hydrochloric acid in the gastric juice
  • Achor-Smith syndrome: A dietary deficiency disorder involving low blood potassium levels which leads to other problems such as diarrhea, anemia, muscle wasting and kidney problems.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Acorn poisoning: Acorns contain tannic acid which affects the metabolism of proteins and causing serious symptoms if large amounts are consumed. The amount of tannin in the acorn varies amongst species - higher tannin content results in a more bitter tasting acorn.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acquired hypothyroidism: Acquired hypothyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland makes too little or no thyroid hormone. Acquired hypothyroidism can be caused by both thyroid disease (primary hypothyroidism) and hypothalamic-pituitary disease (central hypothyroidism)
  • Acquired prothrombin deficiency: A deficiency of prothrombin (vital for blood clotting) which is acquired through other conditions such as liver disease, anticoagulant drugs or vitamin K deficiency. The severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of deficiency.
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A rare, chronic condition that occurs in infants and involves autosomal zinc malabsorption. Signs include blisters on the skin and mucous membranes, alopecia, diarrhea and failure to thrive. The condition may be fatal if untreated.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Acute Crohns-like diarrhea symptoms: conditions which can cause acute severe diarrhoea
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute diarrhea in children: Acute diarrhea in children is a condition in which there is a sudden onset of loose, runny, or watery stools or bowel movements in children.
  • Acute diarrhoea: A sudden onset of diarrhoea
  • Acute gastritis: Acute gastritis is the sudden onset of irritation or inflammation of the stomach.
  • Acute ibd-like abdominal pain: conditions which causes abdominal pain similar to that in case of inflammatory bowel disease
  • Acute ibd-like diarrhea: conditions which can cause acute altered bowel habits
  • Acute ibd-like symptoms: symptoms of IBD include altered bowel habits, weight loss and pain abdomen
  • Acute ibs-like abdominal pain: conditions which cause acute abdominal pain similar to that in case of inflammatory bowel disease
  • Acute ibs-like diarrhea: conditions which can cause acute diarrhoea like in case of IBS
  • Acute ibs-like symptoms: symptoms of IBD include altered bowel habits, weight loss and pain abdomen
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute mercury inhalation: Inhalation of mercury vapor can lead to serious symptoms and even death if sufficient quantities are inhaled. Mercury inhalation is more likely in confined or poorly ventilated spaces. Mercury from a broken thermometer can lead to symptoms if it occurs in a confined space.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute oophoritis:
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute prostate-related urinary dribbling: weak urinary stream
  • Acute prostate-related urinary symptoms: Symptoms include urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, voiding at night (nocturia), weak urinary stream, hesitency (needing to wait for the stream to begin), intermittency (when the stream starts and stops intermittently), straining to void, dysuria (burning sensation in the urethra), and dribbling
  • Acute prostate-related weak urinary stream: weak urinary stream
  • Acute prostatitis: An acute condition which affects the prostate which is the result of infammation
  • Acute tin poisoning: Acute ingestion of tin can cause various adverse symptoms.
  • Acute uterine pain: pathologies of the uterus which cause pain for a short duration
  • Acute uterine pain in pregnancy: Acute uterine pain in pregnancy refers to sudden onset of pain in the lower abdomen originating from the uterus in a woman who is pregnant
  • Acute zinc toxicity: Acute ingestion of zinc can cause symptoms.
  • Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency: A rare genetic disorder where an enzyme (2, 8-dihydroxyadenine) deficiency results in urinary tract stone formation.
  • Adenocarcinoid tumor: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and tends to metastasize. The symptoms are determined by the location of the tumors.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: A type of cancer that occurs mainly in the genitourinary tract and the cells that make up the tumor are clear. It is very rare and most cases occur in females whose mothers used a drug called DES (synthetic estrogen) while pregnant.
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Adenomatous Polyposis of the Colon, autosomal dominant: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and occurs in a familial pattern. Most patients have at least one parent with the condition.
  • Adenomyosis: presence of ectopic endometrial tissue in the myometrium
  • Adenophorea Infections: A parasitic roundworm infection. Roundworms can be found in water and soil environments as well as on plants and in animals.
  • Adenosarcoma of the uterus: A tumor that develops from the glands that line the uterus.
  • Adenoviridae Infections: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family. The most common sites for infection are membrane linings such as the intestines, respiratory and urinary tract and the eyes. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact. The infection is contagious.
  • Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family that occurs in a patient with a weakened immune system. The infection in these people is serious and can be fatal. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact.
  • Adhesions: A fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • Adnexal tenderness: Tenderness of the appendages or secondary structures of the uterus.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital (General): Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is an inherited condition characterized by adrenal insufficiency. It is caused by a deficiency in an enzyme needed to produce certain adrenal hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital, due to 11-Beta-hydroxylase deficiency: A rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia characterized by a deficiency of 11-Beta-hydroxylase which results in excess androgen production and hypertension. The disorder can occur in virilizing, hypertensive and salt-wasting forms and symptoms may range from mild to severe.
  • Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked: A genetic disorder which affects the body tissues that produce hormones. It is characterized by underdeveloped adrenal glands which results adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenomyodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency, dystrophic myopathy, severe psychomotor retardation and an overly-distended bladder which can cause death.
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Adverse reaction: Term to describe unwanted, negative consequences sometimes associated with using medications, diagnostic tests or therapeutic interventions.
  • Agammaglobulinemia, alymphocytotic type: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder involving a lack of T and B lymphocytes which makes the patient susceptible to bacterial and viral infections.
  • Agammaglobulinemias, Primary: A group of inherited conditions characterized by a defective immune system.
  • Aganglionosis, total intestinal: A developmental defect of the intestinal tract where the muscles of the intestines are unable to function and move food along the digestive tract. This form of Hirschsprung disease is differentiated from the other types by the location of the genetic defect.
  • Aging: The medical conditions from getting older.
  • Ahumada-Del Castillo Syndrome: A form of secondary amenorrhea often resulting from a pituitary gland tumor. The condition causes galactorrhea and amenorrhea even when the patient is not pregnant.
  • Al Gazali Hirschsprung syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by Hirschsprung disease (an intestinal disorder), nail abnormalities and facial anomalies.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcoholic intoxication: The excessive consumption of alcohol can have toxic effects on the body and can ultimately result in death in severe cases.
  • Allergic Disorders: A group of disorders that a caused by an allergic response to allergens
  • Allergic colitis:
  • Allergic reaction: A hypersensitivity reaction produced by the body, which results in an exaggerated or inappropriate immune reaction to a particular substance.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Allergy-like conditions: Medical conditions with similar effects to those of allergies.
  • Aloe poisoning: Aleo vera is often used on the skin to treat such things as burns and dermatitis. The sap from the leaves contain a chemical called anthraquinone glycoside which can cause skin irritation in susceptible people but can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Alpha-mannosidosis type II: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-mannosidosase) which results in the accumulation of certain chemicals in the body which leads to progressive damage. This form of the condition is less severe than type I (infantile form).
  • Alpha-mannosidosis, adult-onset form:
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Altered bladder habits: causes of retention
  • Altered bladder habits in pregnancy: Altered bladder habits in pregnancy are normal and consist of nocturia and frequency of micturition.
  • Altered bowel habit: An altered bowel habit is any abnormal unusual bowel movement or change in the normal pattern of bowel movements in an individual.
  • Altered bowel habit in pregnancy: Altered bowel habit in pregnancy refers to a change in the normal pattern of bowel movements in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Altered stool texture: Altered stool texture is a change in the consistency of feces.
  • Alternating Bowel Habit IBS: It is a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and alteration of bowel habits in the absence of any organic cause. IBS may be associated with pain disorders.
  • Alternating constipation and diarrhea as in case of ulcerative colitis: alternate bouts of constipation and diarrhoea
  • Alternating constipation and diarrhoea: altenate bouts of constipation and diarrhoea
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amaryllis poisoning: The Amaryllis plant is a bulbous, flowering herb which originated from South America. The bulb contains alkaloids such as lycorine which are toxic but a large quantity would need to be eaten to cause poisoning.
  • Amebiasis: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebic dysentery.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Amenorrhea: Absence of menstrual periods.
  • Ammonia-smelling urine: Ammonia-smelling urine refers to urine with an odor of ammonia.
  • Ammonia-smelling urine in children: Ammonia-smelling urine in children is urine with an abnormal smell of ammonia, often indicating a urinary tract infection in children.
  • Amnesic shellfish poisoning: Rare shellfish poisoning sometimes causing amnesia.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amyloid Neuropathies: A peripheral nerve disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the nerves. Sensory, autonomic or motor nerves may be affected. The degree of nerve involvement, and hence symptoms, are variable.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Amyloidosis, familial cutaneous: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. The familial cutaneous form is characterized by brown skin pigmentation as well as systemic symptoms such as failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastrointestinal problems and pneumonia.
  • Anaesthesia complications: Complications that occur due to anaesthesia
  • Anal bleeding: The loss of blood per rectum
  • Anal cancer: A cancerous malignancy that is located anatomically in the anus
  • Anal conditions: Conditions that affect the anus
  • Anal fissure: A painful ulcer linear to the margin of the anus
  • Anal lump: Lump in the anal area as a symptom
  • Anal sphincter dysplasia: A malformation of the anal canal.
  • Anal sphincter myopathy, internal: A rare disorder where abnormalities of the anal muscles results in severe intermittent anal pain. The pain occurs at intervals during the day and every hour during the night.
  • Analgesic syndrome: The use of large quantities of pain-killer drugs can sometimes cause serious kidney damage as well as various other problems.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anatomic obstruction: occurs whenever movement through the intestine is blocked temporarily by an anatomic growth
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Ancylostoma duodenale: An infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale which is a parasitic hookwork whichcan cause serious disease in humans - usually occurs in people who work barefoot in damp soil. The hookworms suck blood from the intestines of the host which can result in anemia if there is a large number of worms.
  • Andrade's syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by deposits of an abnormal protein called amyloid in various parts of the body including organs. The condition mainly involves neurological symptoms.
  • Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Females with male XY genetics but inability to respond to testosterone.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Angiodysplasia: Abnormality of small blood vessels - especially in the intestinal tract - which can result in bleeding. The size of the lesion involved determines the severity of the condition. Small amounts of bleeding from one lesion often goes unnoticed but multiple large lesions may cause heavy bleeding and result in black tarry stool and anemia.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Anguillulosis: A infectious disease caused by an intestinal parasite called Strongyloides stercoralis (round worm). Infestation can occur directly through broken skin or through ingestion. Symptoms can take decades to develop in some cases. In rare cases, reinfection occurs and the parasites travel to other parts of the body such as the liver and lungs which can cause serious symptoms. The condition is highly deadly in immunocompromised patients.
  • Ankylostomiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a hookworm called Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus. Infection usually occurs when larva enter a break in the skin and then travel throughout the body until the reach the intestines.
  • Anorectal abscess: collection of pus in the anorectal region
  • Anorectal disorders: Conditions that affect the anorectum
  • Anorectal stricture: Narrowing of the anorectal canal.
  • Anorexia: This is known as a lack of or loss of appetite for food
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anorexia nervosa, genetic types: There is mounting evidence that anorexia nervosa may be caused by genetic factors which when combined with psychosocial factors can increase a persons risk of developing the condition.
  • Anterior pituitary hyperhormonotrophic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the excessive production of various hormones (gonadotrophic, thyrotrophic, lactotrophic and pancreatrophic hormone).
  • Anterior spinal artery stroke: An interruption to the blood supply in the anterior spinal artery which affects sensation, motor control and bowel control. The symptoms may improve to varying degrees once the blood supply returns to normal. The severity of the disorder depends on the exact location of the defect and how long it persists for.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antidiarrheal agent poisoning: Antidiarrheal agents contain chemicals such as atropine and diphenoxylate which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anxiety: Excessive worry, anxiety, or fear.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Anxiety-tension syndrome: Anxiety associated with physical symptoms such as tense muscles and fatigue.
  • Aplasia cutis congenital -- intestinal lymphangiectasia: A rare disorder characterized by a skin defect and dilated intestinal lymph vessels.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Appendiceal tumor: A tumor of the appendix. The condition is often misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appendicular pain: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix bleeding: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix cancer: Cancer of the appendix. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appendix deformity: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix infection: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix inflammation: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix lump: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation and swelling of the appendix .
  • Appendix obstruction: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix redness: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix swelling: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Appendix symptoms: Symptoms affecting the appendix of the digestive tract.
  • Appendix ulcer: The appendix is a blind ended tube connected to the caecum, from which it develops embryologically. Blockage of the lumen of the appendix can lead to inflammation .
  • Arcobacter butzleri infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arctic bearded seal poisoning: The Arctic Bearded seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the arctic bearded seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. It is believed that eating more than 100-250 grams of the seal liver can result in human death.
  • Aromatase deficiency: A congenital deficiency of the enzyme called aromatase which is needed to convert androgens to estrogens.
  • Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency: A rare inborn error of metabolism involving the deficiency of an enzyme (aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase) needed to process aromatic amino acids. This results in a deficiency of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. The condition manifests as movement and neurological problems.
  • Arthralgia similar to that in Inflammatory bowel disease: pain in the joints similar to that of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Arthropathies similar to that in inflammatory bowel disease: disorders of the joints
  • Ascariasis: Large intestinal roundworm from 6 to 13 inches.
  • Ascaris lumbricoides: Common roundworm infecting human intestines. Causing restlessness, fever, diarrhea.
  • Asherman Syndrome: A condition where adhesions form inside the uterus because of uterine surgery or infection. The adhesions may cause menstruation to cease and/or infertility.
  • Asherman's syndrome: Scarring and adhesions that develop in the uterus and can result in menstrual and fertility problems.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Asparagus berry overdose: The asparagus plant has bright red berries which can cause skin and gastrointestinal problems which are relatively minor and short-lived. The young shoots of the asparagus plant can also cause problems.
  • Aspartylglycosaminuria: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Astrovirus: An RNA virus that may affect the gastrointestinal system
  • Astroviruses:
  • Atamasco lily poisoning: The atamasco lily is a bulbous plant with long thin leaves and single white or pink flowers. The plant originated in the US. All parts of the plant contain a toxic chemical called lycorine as well as alkaloids. The bulb is the most toxic part of the plant. Eating the bulb can result in death.
  • Ataxia, spastic, 3, autosomal recessive: A recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by spasticity and ataxia.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Athyrotic hypothyroidism sequence: A rare congenital disorder characterized by a thyroid gland defect.
  • Atlantic mussel food poisoning: Atlantic mussels contain a toxin called domoic acid which can affect nerve tissue. The mussels are found in the North Atlantic and Pacific coast and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Atresia of small intestine: A rare birth defect where developmental abnormalities result in a part of the small intestine being completely absent or blocked.
  • Attenuated congenital adrenal hyperplasia: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Attenuated familial polyposis: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The attenuated form of the condition is distinguished by the development of polyps in old age rather than during the first decades of life.
  • Australian Sea Lion poisoning: The Australian Sea Lion is sometimes used as a food source and is found in the South-Southwest waters of Australia. Eating the liver of the Australian Sea Lion can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Autoimmune Endometriosis: An endometriosis that is caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy: A very rare condition that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks the intestinal wall and affect the way it absorbs food.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy, type 1: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Autoimmune oophoritis: An autoimmune condition where the body's own immune system attacks the ovaries and causes them to become inflamed. It can lead to ovarian function stopping prematurely.
  • Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome, type 1: A very rare autoimmune disorder characterized by autoimmune polyendocrinopathy (APE), candidiasis (C) and ectodermal dysplasia (ED).
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Autumn crocus poisoning: The Autumn crocus is a perennial herb which bears purplish-pink flowers. The plant is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant. The plant contains a chemical called colchicine which can be very poisonous if eaten. The plant is considered to be very toxic if eaten. Boiling the leaves before eating them appears to increase their toxicity. Most cases of poisoning are through accidental ingestion. The plant is sometimes mistaken for wild garlic.
  • Azalea poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • BEEC: A rare syndrome characterized by a birth defect where the bladder is inside out and protrudes from the lower abdominal wall. The urethra and genitals are also abnormally formed. The degree of malformation is variable.
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Baber's syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital liver cirrhosis with Fanconi syndrome.
  • Babesiosis: A protozoal infection which is transmitted to human via the bite of certain ticks.
  • Bacillus cereus type II food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Back Impairment: An impairment of the function of the back
  • Back conditions: A group of conditions that affect the back
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacterial colitis:
  • Bacterial digestive infections: Bacterial infections affecting the gastrointestinal
  • Bacterial septicemia: Sepsis of the bloodstream caused by bacteraemia.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Balsam apple poisoning: The Balsam apple is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Balsam pear poisoning: The Balsam pear is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Bannayan-Zonana syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal polyposis, pigmentation of penis and benign tumor-like growths.
  • Banti Syndrome: A rare conditions where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Banti's syndrome: A chronic, progressive condition marked by enlargement of the spleen which is associated with anemia, splenomegaly, ascites, jaundice, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Bardet-Biedl Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a defect in chromosome 11q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 10: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 10 is caused by a defect in chromosome 12q.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 11: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 11 is caused by a defect in chromosome 9q33.1.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 12: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 12 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a defect in chromosome 16q21.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 3 is caused by a defect in chromosome 3p12-q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 4 is caused by a defect in chromosome 15q22.3.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 5: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 5 is caused by a defect in chromosome 2q31.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 6 is caused by a defect in chromosome 20p12.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 7 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 8: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 8 is caused by a defect in chromosome 14q32.11.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 9: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 9 is caused by a defect in chromosome 7p14.
  • Bare lymphocyte syndrome: An inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by T- and B-cell dysfunction (these cells are essential for helping fight infection). Lack of treatment can result in infant death from infection.
  • Barrett syndrome: Barrett's syndrome refers to cellular changes in the lower portion of the oesophagus as a result of chronic reflux. The changes in the cells of the esophagus can lead to cancer of the esophagus (adenocarcinoma).
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Bartter's syndrome, antenatal type 1: A rare genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. A defect in the NKCC2 gene impairs the functioning of the Na-Cl cotransporter and leads to electrolyte imbalance. The rate of death is high prior to diagnosis.
  • Bartters syndrome, antenatal , type 2: A rare genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. A defect in the ROMK gene impairs the ATP-regulated potassium channel functioning and leads to electrolyte imbalance.
  • Bearn-Kunkel syndrome: A type of autoimmune liver disease characterized by liver damage, very high blood gammaglobulin levels and increased plasma cells.
  • Bearsfoot hellebore poisoning: The Bearsfoot hellebore is a relatively small, flowering evergreen plant which originated in Europe. All parts of the plant contain protoanemonin which can be toxic if large quantities are consumed.
  • Bedwetting in children: Bedwetting in children is the inability to control urination during sleep in a child who is old enough to be toilet trained.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bence Jones Proteins: The presence of free light chains in the urine
  • Bence jones protein: Bence Jones protein is a type of abnormal protein that may be found in the urine associated with certain conditions and diseases that produce high levels of protein in the urine.
  • Benign Prostate Hyperplasia: Non-cancerous prostrate enlargement common with aging
  • Benign mucosal pemphigoid: A rare chronic disease involving blistering and scarring of the mucous membranes especially in the mouth and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Benign ovarian cyst:
  • Benign peptic ulcer: Benign ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach.
  • Benzthiazide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benzthiazide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bernard-Soulier Syndrome: A congenital bleeding disorder marked by inability of platelets to coagulate or by insufficient platelets. The platelets that are present are often large.
  • Bertielliasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a nematode called Bertiella. The parasite commonly infects koalas, possums and primates but can occur in humans. Transmission usually occurs through accidental ingestion of infected fleas.
  • Biemond syndrome type 2: A rare inherited condition characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and underdeveloped genitals.
  • Bilateral adnexal tenderness: grave gynaecological complication
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 1: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-beta-hydroxy-delta-5-C27-steroid oxidoreductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 3: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect involved a deficiency of 7-alpha-hydroxylase which is an enzyme needed to prevent the accumulation of 27-hydroxycholesterol which is toxic to the liver.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile duct cysts: The formation of a cyst (dilation or swelling) in the bile duct which can obstruct the flow of bile and result in jaundice.
  • Bile duct paucity in Graft-Versus-Host Disease: A reduced number of ducts that carry bile through and from the liver (bile duct) that results from graft-versus-host disease.
  • Bile duct paucity in Liver Allograft Rejection: A reduced number of ducts that carry bile through and from the liver (bile duct) that results from liver allograft rejection.
  • Bile duct paucity, non syndromic form: A reduced number of ducts that carry bile through and from the liver (bile duct) that is not associated with a syndrome. Paucity of bile ducts is associated with many liver conditions such as biliary cirrhosis and sclerosing cholangitis.
  • Biliary Atresia: A rare condition that can affect newborns where the bile duct that carries the bile from the liver to the small intestine is blocked or missing.
  • Biliary atresia, intrahepatic, syndromic form: Congenital obstruction of the passages in the liver that carry bile. The syndromic form is associated with other congenital abnormalities such as heart and visceral defects.
  • Biliary conditions: Medical conditions affecting the biliary system (liver, bile ducts, gallbladder, etc.) in digestion.
  • Biliary hypoplasia: An underdeveloped biliary duct system which is involved in transporting bile. The bile ductules may be completely absent or be fewer in number than normal.
  • Biliary tract cancer: Cancer that develops in the gallbladder or bile ducts.
  • Bint Al Zahab-induced lead poisoning: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used by various ethnic groups (e.g. Indians, Saudi Arabians) to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Bird of Paradise poisoning: Various parts of the Bird of Paradise plant are poisonous - the seeds contain toxic tannins and the leaves can contain hydrocyanic acid. Eating five seed pods can result in poisoning symptoms but the plant is generally considered to have low toxicity.
  • Birth control pill poisoning: Birth control pill contain hormones such as estrogen and progestin and excessive ingestion of the pills can result in relatively minor symptoms - usually there are no serious problems associated with the ingested of many birth control pills at one time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Black nightshade poisoning: The Black Nightshade is a herb which bears small white or purple flowers and dull black berries. The plant originated in South America. The berries contain solanine alkaloid which can be toxic if eaten in large quantities. The leaves and unripe berries are considered toxic whereas the ripe fruit is possibly edible.
  • Black stool: Darkening or blackness of stool
  • Black tarry stools:
  • Black urine in children: Black urine in children refers to urine that is black in color in children.
  • Bladder burning sensation: Burning urination pain due to inflammatory bladder conditions.
  • Bladder cancer: Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder.
  • Bladder conditions: Any condition affecting the bladder
  • Bladder distention: A condition which is characterized by anatomical distention of ones bladder
  • Bladder fullness: distension of the lower central portion of the abdomen
  • Bladder incontinence: The inability to control ones bladder function
  • Bladder infection: Infection of the bladder.
  • Bladder infections: The occurrence of bacterial or other infections of the bladder
  • Bladder infections in pregnancy: Bladder infections in pregnancy cause pain in the suprapubic area, burning pain with micturition, urinary frequency, and are sometimes associated with pyelonephritis.
  • Bladder inflammation: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the epithelial lining of the bladder
  • Bladder lump: Irregular small swelling in the bladder.
  • Bladder obstruction: Bladder obstruction can be acute or chronic.
  • Bladder pain: Pain affecting the bladder
  • Bladder pain in pregnancy: Bladder pain in pregnancy is usually caused by a urinary tract infection.
  • Bladder redness: Erythematous inflammation of the urinary bladder due to infection.
  • Bladder swelling: Bladder swelling can be acute or chronic in nature.
  • Bladder symptoms: Symptoms related to the bladder and urination.
  • Bladder symptoms in pregnancy: Bladder symptoms in pregnancy are usually represented by pain in the suprapubic area, burning pain with micturition, urinary frequency, and are sometimes associated with pyelonephritis.
  • Bladder ulcer: Break in the continuity of the lining mucous membrane of the bladder.
  • Bladder weakness: Weakness in the detrusor muscle contractility.
  • Blastocystis hominis: Common parasitic condition often causing digestive symptoms.
  • Bleeding Heart poisoning: Bleeding heart is a vine plant that can cause skin reactions on exposure and systemic symptoms such as convulsions if eaten. The leaves and roots are the most toxic parts of the plant and contain a toxic chemical called isoquinoline. Large amounts of the plant need to be eaten for poisoning to occur. The plant is native to North America.
  • Bleeding after sex: Vaginal bleeding after sexual intercourse
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Bleeding that occurs after a woman has stopped menstruating: postmenopausal bleeding
  • Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by inner canthal folds, lateral displacement of inner canthi and drooping upper eyelid. The severity of symptoms is variable. There are two subtypes of the condition: Type 2 involves eye anomalies as well as female fertility problems whereas type 1 only involves the eye anomalies.
  • Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by inner canthal folds, lateral displacement of inner canthi and drooping upper eyelid. The severity of symptoms is variable. There are two subtypes of the condition: Type 2 involves eye anomalies as well as female fertility problems whereas type 1 only involves the eye anomalies.
  • Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus: A rare genetic disorder characterized by inner canthal folds, lateral displacement of inner canthi and drooping upper eyelid.
  • Blind loop syndrome: A rare intestinal defect where there is a small loop in the intestines that allow digesting material to enter but not exit. The symptoms are variable depending on the size and location of the pouch.
  • Blood in stools as in case of inflammatory bowel disease: presence of blood in stools
  • Blood in urine: Hematuria is blood in the urine.
  • Blood in urine in children: Blood in urine in children is a condition in which there is visible blood or microscopic blood in the urine of a child.
  • Blood lily poisoning: The Blood lily is a bulbous herb which produces red flowers and berries. The plant originated from Africa. The bulb contains a poisonous chemical called lycorine as well as other alkaloids which can cause symptoms if ingested. The bulb is considered to have relatively low toxicity.
  • Blood streaked diarrhea: Blood streaked diarrhea is loose or watery stool that occurs more frequently than usual and contains streaks of blood.
  • Blood streaked diarrhoea: presence of blood in stools
  • Bloodroot poisoning: The Bloodroot is a flowering herb that bears fruit and whose stem contains red juices. The plant tends to grow in mountainous areas. The thickened roots (rhizomes) of the plant contain isoquinoline alkaloids which are very toxic and can cause death if eaten in sufficient quantities.
  • Bloody diarrhea: Diarrhea with blood in stool
  • Bloody stool: Blood appearing in the stool.
  • Bloody vaginal discharge: discharge from the vagina other than normal menstruation
  • Blue Cohosh poisoning: Blue Cohosh is a small flowering herb which has clusters of greenish-yellow flowers and fruit with a couple of blue seeds. The plant originated in the US and is often found in forests or wooded areas. Eating the raw seeds or roots can cause poisoning symptoms and skin contact can also result in skin irritation. The roasted seeds are sometimes used as a safe coffee substitute. The toxic compounds in the plant are alkaloids and saponins. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Blue Diaper Syndrome: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by vision problems, bluish urine, fever and digestive anomalies.
  • Blue urine: Blue coloration of the urine
  • Blue urine in children: Blue urine in children is a condition in which the urine is blue.
  • Body packer syndrome: Consuming packages of drugs for the purpose of concealing them for transportation.
  • Body skin hyperlaxity due to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiency: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder caused by a deficiency of a blood coagulation factor.
  • Bog rosemary poisoning: Bog rosemary is a type of heath found in bogs and cold peat areas of the more northern parts of the world. It is a small shrub with tall thin stems. The flowers are whit or pink. The plant contains a chemical called grayanotoxin which can cause various symptoms if eaten. The plant is only considered poisonous if large amounts are eaten.
  • Bokhoor-induced lead poisoning: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Boron overuse: Consumption of high doses of the mineral boron can cause various symptoms.
  • Boston Ivy poisoning: The leaves of the Boston Ivy plant oxalates which is toxic to humans. The severity of symptoms depends on the quantity of leaves consumed. Skin symptoms can also occur if the skin comes into contact with the leaves.
  • Bottlebrush buckeye poisoning: The Bottlebrush buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in southern USA. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Boucher-Neuhauser syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by spinocerebellar ataxia, eye abnormalities and a failure of the pituitary to stimulate gonadal development during puberty.
  • Bowel conditions: Medical conditions that affect the bowels
  • Bowel incontinence: Loss of full control of the bowel
  • Bowel inflammation: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bowel portion of the gastrointestinal tract
  • Bowel infrequency: Less common bowel motions
  • Bowel infrequency in pregnancy: Bowel infrequency in pregnancy is defined as emptying the bowels less frequently, with a bowel movement that is usually drier and harder to pass.
  • Bowel ischemia: A condition which is characterized by an acute vascular insufficiency of the colon
  • Bowel movements: Changes in type or frequency of bowel motions
  • Bowel movements in pregnancy: Bowel movements in pregnancy can be normal but constipation is common.
  • Bowel obstruction: A condition which is characterized by the obstruction of the gastrointestinal system
  • Bowel problems: Symptoms affecting the bowel
  • Bowel problems in pregnancy: Bowel problems in pregnancy usually relate to constipation, which is the less frequent and more difficult passage of stools that are harder and drier than normal.
  • Bowel sounds, absent [Silent abdomen]: The absence of any bowel sounds located in the abdomen
  • Bowel sounds, hypoactive: The presence of hypoactive bowel sounds in the abdomen
  • Bowel spasm: A bowel spasm is a contraction or rippling of the small intestine or large intestine.
  • Box thorn poisoning: The leaves of the Box thorn plant contain a toxic chemical called atropine and possibly other toxic compounds. The box thorn plant is a spiny-stemmed shrub which originated in Europe. Symptoms can be quite serious depending on the quantity of the plant ingested.
  • Boxwood poisoning: The boxwood is an evergreen, woody, flowering shrub often used as a hedge. The leaves contain steroidal alkaloids which can cause skin irritation upon skin contact with the sap or various other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Brainerd diarrhea: Diarrheal condition of unknown cause.
  • Breakthrough bleeding: Breakthrough bleeding includes any type of mild to severe bleeding or hemorrhaging that occurs after initial bleeding has stopped.
  • Brennemann's syndrome: Abdominal symptoms that can result from an upper respiratory infection. The abdominal symptoms are caused by inflammation of the abdominal lymph nodes. The condition is most likely to occur in children.
  • Brewery urine odor in children: Brewery urine odor in children refers to an abnormal brewery type smell of a child's urine.
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bright red blood on toilet paper:
  • Broad bean poisoning: The broad bean is a vine which produces pea-like flowers and long, seed-filled pods. The seeds can be very toxic and can result in death if eaten. This toxic reaction only occurs to certain susceptible people who are unable to process certain chemicals in the plant. The resulting condition is called favism and is most common in people of Mediterranean descent.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Brown urine: The occurrence of brown urine
  • Brown-Symmers disease: A rare form of brain inflammation that occurs in children and can quickly lead to death. Symptoms usually start suddenly.
  • Buckeye poisoning: Buckeye is a shrub or small tree which contains a toxic compound called aesculin that can cause gastrointestinal or neuromuscular symptoms. Young leaves, flowers and bark are the most toxic parts of the plant. The plant is most common in parts of North America. Eating only one or two seeds may simply cause vomiting or diarrhea but repeated exposure or eating large amounts can cause more serious symptoms.
  • Buckthorn poisoning: The Buckthorn is a shrubby plant which bears black berries. The berries contain glycosides which can cause mild toxicity if eaten.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome: Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burnett's syndrome: Burnett's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burning bush poisoning: The burning bush is a shrub that has bright red leaves in autumn and bears red berries. The plant contains toxic chemicals such as lobelamine and lobeline which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Burning during urination: The experience of burning sensation when urinating
  • Burning during urination in pregnancy: Burning during urination refers to discomfort when urinating in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Burning micturition: Burning micturition is an uncomfortable or painful burning sensation in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning micturition in males: Burning micturition in males is a condition in which a male experiences an uncomfortable or painful burning sensation in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning on urination in female children: Burning on urination in female children occurs when a girl experiences stinging or burning pain when urinating.
  • Burning on urination in male children: Burning on urination in male children occurs when a boy experiences stinging or burning pain when urinating.
  • Burning urination in female children: Burning urination in female children is a condition in which a girl experiences burning in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning urination in male children: Burning urination in male children refers to a boy who experiences burning in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning urination in pregnancy: Burning urination in pregnancy is a condition in which a pregnant woman has burning in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning when urinating: burning micturition is a classical presentation of infection
  • Burning when you urinate: burning micturition is a classical presentation of infection
  • Bush lily poisoning: The Bush lily is a perennial herb which bears long strappy leaves, small funnel-shaped flowers and red berries. The plant originated in South Africa and is often grown in gardens or utilized as a houseplant. The plant contains alkaloids which can cause toxicity symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Buttercup poisoning: The buttercup plant contains a toxic compound called protoanemonin. The plant is most toxic while it is flowering with the sap being poisonous portion of the plant. Poisoning by eating the plant is unlikely due to the fact that skin contact is quite painful.
  • Byler Disease: A rare inherited conditions where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The conditions has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade.
  • C1esterase deficiency: C1esterase deficiency is a condition characterized by swelling under the skin or mucosal tissue - the skin, respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract may be affected. The condition may be inherited or acquired. Symptoms tend to develop over a few days and then abate after two to five days. Swelling attacks may occur fairly regularly e.g. weekly or sporadically e.g. once or twice a year.
  • CCFDN: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized by cataracts during infancy, unusual facial appearance and neuropathy.
  • CDG syndrome type 1B: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1B has a phosphomannose isomerase enzyme defect.
  • COACH syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • Caladium poisoning: All parts of the Caladium plant are poisonous, particularly the sap. It contains a compound called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries on sensitive eyes or mucosal tissues of the digestive tract. The plant is a common houseplant.
  • Calcification of basal ganglia with or without hypocalcemia: Calcification of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia. That calcification may be associated with conditions such as hypothyroidism, cytomegalovirus, and AIDS or may occur for no apparent reason. The severity of the condition may vary greatly from asymptomatic to neurological, psychiatric and movement disorders. The disorder may also progress at variable rates or remain stable depending on the underlying disease process.
  • California buckeye poisoning: The California buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in California. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Calla lily poisoning: A bulb plant which bears large colored or white flower-like structure on long leafless stems. It is often grown in gardens or used in flower arrangements. The plant contains chemicals including calcium oxalate crystals which are highly toxic if eaten. Death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Calla poisoning: All parts of the Calla plant are poisonous, particularly the sap. It contains a compound called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries on sensitive eyes or mucosal tissues of the digestive tract.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Lower abdominal symptoms:

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The following list of medical conditions have 'Lower abdominal symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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