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Symptoms » Mouth symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Mouth symptoms

Medical terms related to Mouth symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 11q Partial Trisomy: A very rare genetic disorder caused by a duplication of part of chromosome 11q. The characteristic symptoms of the disorder are delayed growth before and after birth, mental retardation (varying severity) and skull and facial defects. The type and severity of symptoms that can occur are variable.
  • 14q+ syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of genetic material from the long arm (q) of chromosome 14 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 18-Hydroxylase deficiency: A rare genetic, metabolic defect where a deficiency of the enzyme 18-Hydroxylase which results in a reduced amount of aldosterone and salt wasting.
  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 1q terminal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the terminal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 2q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 2q22-q24 deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q22-q24) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 3-Hydroxyisobutyric aciduria: A rare inborn metabolic disorder which causes brain and facial anomalies, seizures and growth problems.
  • 3-M Syndrome: A rare genetic condition which is characterized by distinctive physical features and severe growth retardation that starts during the fetal stage. Intelligence is not affected.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3C syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by cardiac malformations, cerebellar hypoplasia and cranial dysmorphism which gives the disease it's name.
  • 3q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 3 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 46,XY chromosome 7 deletion p13-p21: A chromosomal disorder where a small portion of chromosome 7 is deleted which results in a range of abnormalities.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • 4p16.3 deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of chromosome 4 is deleted at a location called 16.3. The condition is characterized by malformations in most parts of the body as the deletion affects growth and development of the fetus.
  • 8p-Syndrome, partial: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • ACTH deficiency, isolated: An inherited deficiency of adrenocorticotropic hormone. The condition results from a genetic defect.
  • ADANE: A potentially fatal inherited neurological disease involving brain lesions. Symptoms tend to occur during childhood after an illness involving a fever. The disease is similar to Leigh syndrome but the course is acute rather than chronic.
  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • AIDS-like recurring respiratory infections: conditions which cause respiratory infections as in case of AIDS
  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • ARDS: Acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • AREDYLD: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities of the extremities, teeth, hair, nail and kidney as well as lipoatrophic diabetes.
  • Aarskog Syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by facial, hand, genital and growth abnormalities.
  • Aarskog-Ose-Pande syndrome: A rare disorder involving lipodystrophy mainly in the face and buttocks as well as sparse hair, retarded bone age and minor face and eye anomalies. It is considered a variant of SHORT syndrome which tends to also include increased range of joint motion and more extensive lipodystrophy.
  • Aase Smith syndrome: A rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as cleft palate, joint contractures and hypoplastic anemia.
  • Aase Syndrome: A genetic condition which results in anaemia and some skeletal and joint deformities
  • Aase-Smith I syndrome: A very rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as joint contractures, anemia, hydrocephalus and cleft palate.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal Hernia: A protrusion of the intraabdominal contents through a defect in the abdominal wall
  • Abdominal Injuries: Any injury involving the abdomen. Injuries may penetrating or caused by a fall or blow to the abdomen. Symptoms are variable depending on the nature of the injury.
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal conditions: Medical conditions affecting the abdominal region.
  • Abdominal cystic lymphangioma: A rare form of benign tumor that occurs in infants. It is essentially a malformation of one of the abdominal lymph vessels where a portion is dilated and form a lymph fluid-filled cyst. Symptoms may vary depending on the exact location and size of the cyst.
  • Abdominal paradox: Abdominal paradox is a condition in which the abdomen will contract inward as the chest expands during inspiration.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Aberrant subclavian artery abnormality: A rare defect where one the subclavian artery arises from an abnormal location on the aortic arch. The defect may cause compression of organs such as the airway and the voice box.
  • Abnormal involuntary movements of the mouth: repetitive spasmodic movements of the oral muscles
  • Abnormal involuntary movements of the tongue: repetitive spasmodic movements of the tongue.
  • Abnormal movement during inspiration: decreased or increased movement of the chest wall during inspiration
  • Abnormal taste sensation: Abnormal taste sensation refers to an unusual or unexpected taste in the mouth.
  • Abnormal teeth shape in children: Abnormal teeth shape in children includes any type of deformity or irregularity in the dentition or teeth.
  • Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced: Conditions arising from the use of radiation therapy to treat various cancers. Radiation therapy can result in minor abnormalities such as dry, flaky skin or serious abnormalities such as cancer.
  • Abruzzo Erickson syndrome: A genetic disorder characterized by a combination of features including cleft palate, coloboma and deafness.
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Abscessed teeth: an abscessed tooth is a painful infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth
  • Absence of pulmonary artery: The absence of a pulmonary artery at birth.
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Absent corpus callosum -- cataract -- immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by immunodeficiency, cleft lip or palate, cataract, reduced pigmentation and brain abnormalities.
  • Absent patellae -- scrotal hypoplasia -- renal anomalies -- facial dysmorphism -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by absent kneecaps, underdeveloped scrotum, kidney anomalies, unusual facial appearance and mental retardation.
  • Abuse dwarfism syndrome: Retarded growth, intelligence and social behavior due to child abuse. The child abuse can take the form of mental or physical cruelty or neglect.
  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the central nervous system: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Acarophobia: Unfounded fear of tiny parasites or the false belief that they have infested the skin.
  • Acatalasemia: A rare genetic deficiency where little or no catalase is produced.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Accessory muscle use: The use of accessory muscles
  • Accutane -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Accutane during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Acetaminophen poisoning: Excessive ingestion of a drug called acetaminophen.
  • Achalasia: A rare condition where the patients muscles, such as the cardiac sphincter of the stomach, are unable to relax.
  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Achalasia -- alacrimia syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the association of achalasia (lack of peristaltic motion) and alacrimia (absent tears).
  • Achalasia, familial esophageal: A rare familial disorder where the esophagus lacks the normal peristaltic motions that help food move through the digestive system.
  • Achalasia, primary: A rare motor disorder of the esophagus characterized by inability of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal muscle to relax as well as dilation of the esophagus. The disorder is not associated with any other disease or disorder.
  • Achard syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized primarily by a short head, long, slender bones, recessed lower jaw and loose hand and foot joints.
  • Achard-Thiers Syndrome: A rare hormonal disorder that occurs in diabetic postmenopausal women where body hair grows in a masculine manner. Hormonal therapy is used to correct the endocrine imbalance.
  • Achluophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the night or darkness.
  • Achondrogenesis: A type of dwarfism where the main limbs are short and the head and trunk are hydropic (contain an accumulation of clear fluid).
  • Achondrogenesis type 1A and 1B: A rare lethal genetic disorder characterized by a low nasal bridge, very short limbs and incomplete bone formation of lower spine.
  • Achondrogenesis type 1B: A rare lethal genetic disorder characterized by a low nasal bridge, very short limbs and incomplete bone formation of lower spine.
  • Achondrogenesis type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death.
  • Achondrogenesis, Langer-Saldino Type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death.
  • Achondrogenesis, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, abnormal bone formation and early death. It has been designated as a mild form of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Achromatopsia: Patients who have achromatopsia (sometimes called achromatopia) do not have normal "cone vision.". Although the term may refer to acquired disorders such as color agnosia and cerebral achromatopsia, it typically refers to an autosomal recessive congenital color vision disorder, the inability to perceive color AND to achieve satisfactory visual acuity at high light levels (typically exterior daylight).
  • Acid Reflux in pregnancy: Acid Reflux in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn.
  • Acid reflux: Condition which occurs when the acid reflux into the oesophagus exceeds the normal limit
  • Acid reflux / heartburn:
  • Acid reflux into mouth: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acid regurgitation: The regurgitation of stomach contents
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidemia, isovaleric: A rare genetic condition where the body can't process proteins adequately. More specifically, there are insufficient levels of the enzyme needed to break down an amino acid called leucine. This results in a build up of isovaleric acid which can harm the brain and nervous system. Some people suffer severe symptoms from birth and others suffer milder symptoms that come and go and are affected by such things as infections or consumption of high protein food.
  • Acidemia, methylmalonic: An inborn error of metabolism where amino acids in the body aren't metabolized properly resulting in high levels of the acid throughout the body.
  • Acidemia, propionic: An inherited genetic disorder where the body is incapable of processing some proteins and fats resulting in the accumulation of certain substances in the body which causes the symptoms of the condition. The condition can be life threatening.
  • Acidic tastes: Acidic or metallic taste in mouth
  • Acidosis: The accumulation of hydrogen ions or the depletion of the alkaline reserve in the body.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Ackee Fruit Food poisoning: Unripe ackee fruit contains a chemical called hypoglycin A and B which affect the central nervous system and fatty acid oxidation. Eating the unripe fruit can cause symptoms can occur in as little as two hours but is generally 6 to 48 hours. The ackee fruit is found mainly in Jamaica, West Africa, Central America, Sought Florida, southern California and Hawaii.
  • Acne-like nose symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the nose
  • Acorn poisoning: Acorns contain tannic acid which affects the metabolism of proteins and causing serious symptoms if large amounts are consumed. The amount of tannin in the acorn varies amongst species - higher tannin content results in a more bitter tasting acorn.
  • Acousticophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of noise.
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acquired agranulocytosis: A blood disorder characterized by low levels of white blood cells (granular leukocytes) in the circulating blood. The condition is usually caused by certain drugs especially chemotherapy drugs.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acquired stridor in children: Acquired stridor in children is an abnormal sound made during breathing that is not present at birth and is acquired later in life.
  • Acrocallosal Syndrome (Schinzel Type): A rare condition characterized by absence of portion of the brain (corpus callosum), mental deficiency, duplicated toes, mental deficiency and other abnormalities.
  • Acrocallosal syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent corpus callosum of brain, duplication of thumb or big toe and extra fingers or toes.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly, type 2 (ACPS 2): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly Syndrome type 5: A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 3 (ACPS 3): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include brachycephaly, ear deformities as well as craniofacial, finger and bone abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 5 (ACPS 5): A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrocephaly -- pulmonary stenosis -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by a pointy skull, narrowed pulmonary valve and mental retardation.
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A rare, chronic condition that occurs in infants and involves autosomal zinc malabsorption. Signs include blisters on the skin and mucous membranes, alopecia, diarrhea and failure to thrive. The condition may be fatal if untreated.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Catania form: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Catania form is very rare.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Preis type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Preis type is very rare and the range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis atypical postaxial: A rare genetic disorder characterized by absence of some fingers and toes and characteristic facial features.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis autosomal recessive: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by facial, hand and foot anomalies. The disorder resembles Nager syndrome.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis postaxial, atypical: A rare disorder characterized by an unusual facial appearance, short stature and hand and foot bone anomalies. The disorder may be related to the fact that the infants were born to mothers with diabetes.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Nager type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped thumbs, forearm and cheekbones as well as ear defects.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Palagonia type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Palagonia type is very rare and the symptoms are relatively mild.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Weyers type: A rare disorder characterized by facial abnormalities and extra digits, nail abnormalities and short limbs.
  • Acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the bones of the skeleton as well as mental retardation. Various facial, eye and urogenital anomalies are also present.
  • Acrogeria (Gottron Type): An extremely rare, mild form of progeria.
  • Acromegaloid facies -- hypertrichosis: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by thick lips and gums, thick upper eyelids, large hands and occasionally mental deficiency.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acromegaly due to growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma: Pituitary adenomas are benign monoclonal neoplasms of the anterior pituitary gland, accounting for approximately 15% of intracranial tumors.
  • Acromicric dysplasia: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acrorenal mandibular syndrome: A very rare condition characterized by a split hand or foot deformity, kidney abnormalities and underdeveloped lower jaw.
  • Acrosphenosyndactylia: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities in the appearance of the face and head as well as finger and toe abnormalities. The bones of the skull fuse together too early which prevents it from growing normally. Various toes and fingers may be fused together.
  • Actinic cheilitis: Degeneration of the lip due to sun damage. The condition is considered precancerous.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Actinomycotic appendicitis: Chronic suppurative appendicitis resulting from infection by Actinomyces israelii. . It is extremely rare, but it is important to diagnose it, since failure to treat it adequately may result in protracted illness with extensive local spread.
  • Acutane embryopathy: A rare disorder caused by fetal exposure to retinoids and resulting in mental and physical birth defects.
  • Acute (or transient) urinary incontinence: Acute (or Transient) Incontinence is caused by a new or recent medical problem that can be treated.
  • Acute AIDS-like recurring respiratory infections: conditions which causes respiratory infections as in case of AIDS
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute COPD-like cough symptoms: usually comprises of cough with sputum
  • Acute COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute Dyspnoea: The acute sensation of shortness of breath
  • Acute Dyspnoea in pregnancy: acute dyspnoea in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of difficulty breathing occurring in a pregnant woman.
  • Acute Interstitial Pneumonia: A relatively uncommon form of pneumonia that has no apparent cause. Symptoms tend to develop over a period of six months to one and a half years.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute acid reflux into mouth: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute acid reflux into mouth during pregnancy: Reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn and followed by an episode of vomiting.
  • Acute acne-like nose symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the nose
  • Acute allergy-like breathing symptoms: difficulty in breathing due to allergy symptoms
  • Acute allergy-like cough: allergic cough varies with the position of the body
  • Acute allergy-like runny nose: allergy is one of the main factors for runny nose
  • Acute allergy-like sneezing symptoms: allergy causes runny nose, sneezing and headache
  • Acute appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute asthma-like breathing attacks: asthma sometimes causes sudden, acute episodes of dyspnea
  • Acute asthma-like breathing difficulty: also known as dyspnea
  • Acute asthma-like symptoms: sudden severe asthma usually presents with difficulty in breathing, wheeze, cough and stridor
  • Acute asthma-like symptoms at night: also known as paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea
  • Acute asthma-like symptoms non-responsive to treatment: some of the symptoms of asthma such as dyspnoea, wheeze and cough maybe be non-responsive to treatment
  • Acute asthma-like wheezing symptoms: wheeze is a continuous, coarse, whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing
  • Acute attack of asthma:
  • Acute bronchitis: Respiratory inflammation of the bronchi leading to the lungs
  • Acute chest pain: The sudden and acute onset of pain in the chest
  • Acute cholecystitis: Acute inflammation of the gall bladder, usually due to obstruction by a gall stone
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute chronic bronchitis-like cough: cough with white colored sputum
  • Acute chronic bronchitis-like symptoms: symptoms of cough with sputum
  • Acute cough: The noisy sudden expulsion of air from the respiratory tract
  • Acute cough in children: Acute cough in children is a sudden onset of coughing in a child.
  • Acute croup-like breathing difficulty: also known as laryngotracheobronchitis.Croup is characterized by a harsh "barking" cough and sneeze, inspiratory stridor (a high-pitched sound heard on inhalation), nausea/vomiting, and fever
  • Acute croup-like symptoms: also known as laryngotracheobronchitis. Croup is characterized by a harsh "barking" cough and sneeze, inspiratory stridor (a high-pitched sound heard on inhalation), nausea/vomiting, and fever
  • Acute cry: a brief, sharp, piercing vocal sound produced by a neonate or infant.
  • Acute dyspnea following trauma: Acute dyspnea following trauma is a condition in which a person experiences a sudden onset of difficulty breathing after an injury or accident.
  • Acute elemental mercury inhalation: Inhalation of elemental mercury can lead to breathing and lung symptoms of various degrees of severity depending on the level of exposure.
  • Acute emphysema-like cough symptoms: is usually associated with with white colored sputum
  • Acute emphysema-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute epiglottitis:
  • Acute episodic COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute episodic emphysema-like symptoms: symptoms like cough with sputum and dyspnea
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute expiratory wheeze in children: An acute expiratory wheeze in children is an abnormal whistling sound heard when a child breathes, often on exhalation.
  • Acute expiratory wheeze in infants: An acute expiratory wheeze in children is a condition in which there is an abnormal whistling sound heard when an infant breathes, often on exhalation.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute gastritis: Acute gastritis is the sudden onset of irritation or inflammation of the stomach.
  • Acute gerd-like chest pain: must not be overlooked as it may be a medical emergency
  • Acute gerd-like sternum pain: Gerd presents with symptoms such as chest pain, heartburn and dysphagia
  • Acute gerd-like symptoms: conditions which causes symptoms present in GERD such as heartburn, dysphagia and chest pain
  • Acute hay fever-like breathing symptoms: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute hay fever-like cough: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute hay fever-like runny nose: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute hay fever-like sneezing symptoms: is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute heartburn after eating: food can be the precipitating factor to cause heartburn
  • Acute heartburn after exercise: exercise maybe be a precipitating factor to some conditions presenting with heartburn
  • Acute heartburn pain resistant to treatment: medication may sometimes not help a condition with heartburn
  • Acute heartburn unrelated to eating: acute heartburn which is constant and not related to eating or any other precipitating factor
  • Acute heartburn with acid reflux: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute heartburn without reflux: acute heartburn not related to reflux diseases
  • Acute heartburn-like chest pain: must not be overlooked as it may be a medical emergency
  • Acute heartburn-like sternum pain: must not be overlooked as it may be a medical emergency
  • Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis: A rare degenerative brain disease where the patient suffers edema, many small hemorrhages, necrosis of blood vessel walls, demyelination of nerve fibers. Histiocytes, lymphocytes and neutrophils also enter the meninges. Symptoms include severe headache, fever, vomiting and sometimes convulsions and unconsciousness. Also called acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.
  • Acute infections: An infection that occurs acutely
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute lower respiratory conditions: An acute condition that occurs in the lower respiratory tract
  • Acute lung fibrosis symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Acute mercury inhalation: Inhalation of mercury vapor can lead to serious symptoms and even death if sufficient quantities are inhaled. Mercury inhalation is more likely in confined or poorly ventilated spaces. Mercury from a broken thermometer can lead to symptoms if it occurs in a confined space.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute nausea and vomiting: Sudden onset unpleasant sensation in the abdomen causing a forcible regurgitation of stomach contents through the mouth
  • Acute nausea and vomiting in pregnancy: Acute nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of sickness in the stomach, associated with vomiting.
  • Acute nausea in pregnancy: Acute nausea in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of sickness in the stomach, often associated with vomiting.
  • Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: A reoccurring periodontal disease which results in necrosis and ulceration of the gums. Symptoms may include fever, bone loss, breath odor and enlarge neck and throat lymph nodes. Also called trench mouth, Vincent's angina or Vincent's infection.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute pharyngitis: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction of the pharynx
  • Acute pimples on lips: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute pimples on nose: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute pulmonary fibrosis-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea
  • Acute radiation sickness: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Acute irradiation sickness usually occurs after abdominal irradiation and lasts for hours or days.
  • Acute recurring COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute recurring emphysema-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute reflux-like symptoms: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute reflux-like symptoms in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like symptoms in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute reflux-like vomiting: acid reflux like disorders asociated with vomiting
  • Acute reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Acute seasonal COPD-like symptoms: symptoms such as dyspnea, cough with sputum , wheeze etc
  • Acute seasonal asthma-like symptoms: Acute seasonal asthma-like symptoms are symptoms of asthma, such as wheezing and shortness of breath, that occur suddenly during a particular season.
  • Acute severe asthma-like breathing attacks: asthma sometimes causes severe episodes of dyspnea
  • Acute sinusitis: An acute inflammation of the sinuses
  • Acute tin poisoning: Acute ingestion of tin can cause various adverse symptoms.
  • Acute upper respiratory infection: Upper respiratory tract infections, are the illnesses caused by an acute infection which involves the upper respiratory tract: nose, sinuses, pharynx or larynx
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Acute wheezing at night: wheeze is a continuous, coarse, whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing.
  • Acute wheezing attacks: wheeze is a continuous, coarse, whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing.
  • Acute wheezing symptoms: also known as laryngotracheobronchitis.Croup is characterized by a harsh "barking" cough and sneeze, inspiratory stridor (a high-pitched sound heard on inhalation), nausea/vomiting, and fever
  • Acute wheezing symptoms with stridor: in very severe respiratory cases wheezing maybe associated with stridor
  • Acute wheezing worse when lying down: also known as orthopnea is the dyspnoea which occurs on lying down and is relieved on sitting up
  • Acute zinc toxicity: Acute ingestion of zinc can cause symptoms.
  • Acyclovir -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Acyclovir during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain, deficiency of: A rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage. There are three subtypes of the disorder each with varying severity: severe early-onset form, an intermediate form and an adult-onset form.
  • Adam Stokes attacks: Adam Stokes attacks refers to sudden episodes of lightheadedness, fainting and possibly convulsions, that are characteristic of Adam Stokes disease, caused by a heart rhythm abnormality.
  • Adam and Eve poisoning: The Adam and Eve plant is a herb with heart-shaped leaves found in Europe. The plant contains a poisonous chemical called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause a variety of symptoms if ingested. Eye exposure can also cause symptoms due to the abrasive nature of the toxic chemical. Ingestion of the plant generally causes severe mouth pain. Skin exposure usually only causes minor, short-lived skin irritation.
  • Adam-Stokes respirations: known as Adam- Stokes syndrome is a sudden transient attack of syncope occasionally associated with seizures
  • Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs Dundar type: A rare disorder characterized by a thumb abnormality as well as mental retardation, foot defects and other anomalies.
  • Adenocarcinoid tumor: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and tends to metastasize. The symptoms are determined by the location of the tumors.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: A type of cancer of the thyroid gland.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: A malignant cancer in the form of cysts which may occur in the salivary glands, breast, mucous glands of the respiratory tract and sometimes in vulval vestibular glands. Also called adeoncystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma, cribriform carcinoma or cylindroma.
  • Adenoid disorders: A disorder of the adenoids of the throat
  • Adenoiditis: Infection of the adenoids in the nasal-throat region
  • Adenoids bleeding: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids blister: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. A raised lesion less than 0.5mm in diameter filled with fluid can appear on the adenoids in the following conditions.
  • Adenoids bruise: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids burning sensation: Abnormal sensations in the adenoids.
  • Adenoids infection: Infection of the adenoid lymphoid tissue usually due to bacterial or viral causative agents.
  • Adenoids inflammation: Infection of the adenoid lymphoid tissue usually due to bacterial or viral causative agents.
  • Adenoids itch: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids lump: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. Raised irregular swelling can appear in the adenoids due to the following cases.
  • Adenoids numb: Abnormal sensations in the adenoids.
  • Adenoids pain: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx.
  • Adenoids rash: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. A raised lesion can appear on the adenoids in the following conditions.
  • Adenoids redness: Erythematous inflammatory changes in the adenoid tissue due to local inflammation.
  • Adenoids swelling: Increase in the size of the adenoids due to inflammatory changes in the adenoid tissue.
  • Adenoids tingling: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. Abnormal sensations in the adenoid.
  • Adenoids ulcer: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. A break in the lining mucous membrane can appear on the adenoids in the following conditions.
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Adenophorea Infections: A parasitic roundworm infection. Roundworms can be found in water and soil environments as well as on plants and in animals.
  • Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anaemia due to: Deficiency of a chemical (adenosine triphosphate) resulting in anemia.
  • Adenoviridae Infections: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family. The most common sites for infection are membrane linings such as the intestines, respiratory and urinary tract and the eyes. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact. The infection is contagious.
  • Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family that occurs in a patient with a weakened immune system. The infection in these people is serious and can be fatal. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact.
  • Adenovirus-related Cold: An Adenovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Adenovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Adenoviruses: Common viruses causing common cold and various other ailments.
  • Adhesions: A fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenal hypofunction: A condition which is characterized by a lack of production of hormones from the adrenal gland.
  • Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked: A genetic disorder which affects the body tissues that produce hormones. It is characterized by underdeveloped adrenal glands which results adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy, autosomal, neonatal form: A rare inherited disorder involving the adrenal glands, testes and certain parts of the brain (white matter). It is a less severe form of leukodystrophy where an abnormality within the body cells prevents the metabolism of certain fats (long chain fatty acids).
  • Adult Panic-Anxiety Syndrome: A psychiatric disorder involving anxiety and panic attacks that occur for no obvious reason.
  • Adult SMA: Form of Spinal Muscular Atrophy in adults.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: A condition which is characterized by fulminant pulmonary interstitial alveolar oedema.
  • Adult-onset asthma: Adult-onset asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during adulthood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. Allergies account for about half the cases of adult-onset asthma.
  • Adverse reaction: Term to describe unwanted, negative consequences sometimes associated with using medications, diagnostic tests or therapeutic interventions.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical which mainly involves irritation to the part of the body exposed to the chemical - eyes, skin and gastrointestinal. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- Allyl trichloride: Allyl trichloride is a chemical used mainly as a varnish or paint remover, cleaning agent or degreasing agent. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Aelurophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of cats.
  • Aerophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of fresh air, breezes and flying.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Aflatoxicosis: Poisoning from ingestion of aflatoxins.
  • Aflatoxin B1 exposure: Aflatoxin B1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin B1- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Aflatoxin B1 during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Aflatoxin B2 exposure: Aflatoxin B2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G1 exposure: Aflatoxin G1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G2 exposure: Aflatoxin G2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin exposure: Aflatoxins are toxins produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • African milk bush poisoning: The African milk bush originated from African and is a shrubby plant with small flowers. The milky sap contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if it is eaten or if the sap comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It can cause severe skin irritation and the high toxicity of the sap can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Agammaglobulinemia -- microcephaly -- craniosynostosis -- severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Agammaglobulinemia, microcephaly, and severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Agapanthus poisoning: The agapanthus is a flowering herb with long leaves, long thick stems and a cluster of blue or white flowers. The plant originated in South Africa. Skin and eye exposure to sap from the plant can cause irritation and eating the plant can cause severe mouth pain. The skin irritation tends to be short-lived.
  • Agenesis of the corpus callosum -- mental retardation -- coloboma -- micrognathia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, coloboma, small jaw and a brain anomaly.
  • Aggressive fibromatosis -- parapharyngeal space: A type of tumor that occur near in the space around the pharynx and is locally invasive but not malignant. They tend to occur mainly in the head and neck region and symptoms depend on the exact location and aggressiveness of the tumor. Tumors often reoccur after surgical removal which then requires further treatment with radiation and chemotherapy.
  • Aglossia: A congenital condition where the tongue is absent.
  • Aglossia-Adactylia syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of a missing tongue with missing fingers or toes. Other malformations are also variably present.
  • Aglossia-Hypoactylia syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of a missing tongue with missing fingers or toes. Other malformations are also variably present.
  • Agnathia-holoprosencephaly-situs inversus: A very rare disorder characterized by a small or absent jaw, developmental brain defect and internal organs situated on the wrong side of the body (situs inversus). The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Agnathia-microstomia-synotia: A rare disorder characterized by an absent or very small lower jaw, small mouth and ear lobes which are very close together or even fused (synotia).
  • Agonal respiration: ia an abnormal pattern of breathing characterised by shallow, slow, irregular inspirations followed by irregular pauses
  • Agranulocytosis: Extremely low level of white blood cells (basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils).
  • Agyria: Abnormal condition where the body excessively absorbs silver salts and deposits it in the tissues. Symptoms include gray skin and mucous membranes.
  • Agyrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of crossing roads. It includes a fear of being attacked on the street or being unable to defend oneself while crossing the road.
  • Aichmophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of pointy objects or needles.
  • Air and water in the pleura: Air and water in the pleura refers to the abnormal presence of air and water within the layers of the thin covering that protect the lungs.
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Air hunger: is the sensation of the urge to breathe
  • Air in the pleura: Air in the pleura is the abnormal presence of air within the layers of the thin covering that protect the lungs.
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Airway collapse: closure of the airway
  • Airway hyperactivity: increased airway sensitivity maybe due to various etiological factors
  • Airway obstruction: airway obstruction is a blockage of the upper airway, which can be in the trachea, laryngeal (voice box), or pharyngeal (throat) areas or involve the bronch.
  • Airway obstruction in children: Airway obstruction in children refers to an object or disease process that causes partial or total blockage of a child's breathing tube and leads to difficulty breathing or inability to breath.
  • Airway occlusion: swelling of the laryngeal mucosa
  • Akaba-Hayasaka syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prominent forehead, cloudy corneas, low nasal bridge, underdeveloped chest and short limbs.
  • Aksu von Stockhausen syndrome: A rare condition observed in a Turkish family and characterized by various head and neck malformations that have resulted from abnormal development of the branchial arches.
  • Al Awadi syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by severe malformations involving the limbs and pelvis.
  • Al Awadi-Raas-Rothschild syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by severe malformations involving the limbs and pelvis. The exact type and severity of symptoms is variable. Most cases appear to occur in cases where the parents were related.
  • Al Gazali Hirschsprung syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by Hirschsprung disease (an intestinal disorder), nail abnormalities and facial anomalies.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, eye problems and an unusual cherubic facial appearance.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran syndrome:
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albatross syndrome: Symptoms that occur after partial or total surgical removal of the stomach in patients with personality disorders. The symptoms experienced may be due to a peptic ulcer, salicylate addiction or for no detectable reason.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol breath odor: scent of air when we breathe out.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Alcoholic intoxication: The excessive consumption of alcohol can have toxic effects on the body and can ultimately result in death in severe cases.
  • Aldehyde syndrome: A metabolic anomaly where consumption of alcohol results in high levels of blood acetaldehyde which causes a variety of symptoms.
  • Alektorophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of chickens.
  • Alexander Syndrome: Brain myelin disorder causing mental degeneration.
  • Algophobia: An anxiety disorder where the sufferer is fearful of experiencing pain or seeing others experiencing it.
  • Allain Babin Demarquez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by premature fusion of skullbones, abnormal development of skeletal bones and hypertension.
  • Allergenic cross-reactivity: Studies have indicated that a significant number of people with certain allergies will also have allergic responses to other allergens which have a similar protein. For example patients allergic to birch pollen will often have allergies to plant foods such as apples and peaches. Symptoms can range from mild response to severe allergic reactions. Cross-reactivity tends to have mainly oral allergy symptoms with breathing problems and anaphylactic reactions being extremely rare. Food allergies related to cross-reactivity tend to be less severe than those not related to cross-reactivity.
  • Allergic Disorders: A group of disorders that a caused by an allergic response to allergens
  • Allergic asthma: A form of asthma caused by inhalation of airborne allergenic substance.
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: An allergic reaction that occurs in the bronchopulmonary tract due to the occurrence of aspergillosis
  • Allergic rhinitis: An allergic reaction of the nasal mucosa that may occur seasonally
  • Allergic tension-fatigue syndrome: Variable symptoms caused by food allergy.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Allergy like cough: allergic cough varies with the position of the body
  • Allergy-like breathing symptoms: difficulty in breathing due to allergy symptoms
  • Allergy-like runny nose: allergy is one of the main factors for runny nose
  • Allergy-like sneezing symptoms: allergy causes runny nose, sneezing and headache
  • Alopecia -- hypogonadism -- extrapyramidal disorder: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia, progressive movement problems and a lack of gonadal function which affects puberty.
  • Alopecia, anosmia, deafness, hypogonadism syndrome: A rare
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia -- Hemoglobin H disease: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Hemoglobin H disease involves defects in three of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is moderate to severe anemia.
  • Alpha thalassemia major: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia major is very rare involves defects in all of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition leads to infant death before or soon after birth.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Alpha-mannosidosis type II: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-mannosidosase) which results in the accumulation of certain chemicals in the body which leads to progressive damage. This form of the condition is less severe than type I (infantile form).
  • Alpha-mannosidosis, adult-onset form:
  • Alpine syndrome: A condition that occurs in some people who go to low altitude winter resorts (1500 metres). It tends to mostly affect people who have been fasting when they arrive.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome -- mental retardation -- midface hypoplasia -- elliptocytosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of Alport syndrome, mental retardation, underdeveloped midface and a blood abnormality (elliptocytosis). Alport syndrome is an inherited condition involving progressive kidney damage and hearing loss.
  • Alport syndrome with macrothrombocytopenia: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by progressive kidney damage and hearing loss as well as macrothrombocytopenia.
  • Altered respiratory pattern: also known as as tachyapnea , characterised by an increased respiratory rate
  • Altered teeth shape: Altered teeth shape refers to a change in the shape of teeth.
  • Altered vital signs: vital signs are measures of various physiological statistics often taken by health professionals in order to assess the most basic body functions,altered vital signs indicate an underlying abnormality
  • Altered vital signs due to dehydration: Altered vital signs due to dehydration refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a lack of sufficient fluid in the body.
  • Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy: Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of encephalopathy.
  • Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident: Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a motor vehicle collision.
  • Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis: Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of diabetic ketoacidosis.
  • Altered vital signs in meningitis: Altered vital signs in meningitis is a condition in which there is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of meningitis.
  • Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism: Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of pulmonary embolism.
  • Alveolar Bone Loss: Loss of bone tissue in the thickened bone ridge that holds the tooth sockets. Gum disease is the main cause of alveolar bone loss.
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Alves Castelo dos Santos syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by hair, eye, skin and spinal abnormalities.
  • Alzheimer disease 10: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 10 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 12: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 12 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 8p12-q22.
  • Alzheimer disease 13: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 14: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q25. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 15: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q22-q24. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 16: Alzheimer disease 16 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq21.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 2, late-onset: Alzheimer disease 2 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q13.2. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 3, (early-onset Alzheimer disease): Alzheimer disease 3 is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 5: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 5 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12p11.
  • Alzheimer disease 6: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 6 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10q24.
  • Alzheimer disease 7: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 7 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 8: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 8 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Alzheimer disease 9: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 9 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Alzheimer disease, early-onset, with cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 1: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 11: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 9p22.1. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and apraxia: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and apraxia. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and unusual plaques: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and unusual plaques in the brain. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 4: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q31-q42. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer's disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amaryllis poisoning: The Amaryllis plant is a bulbous, flowering herb which originated from South America. The bulb contains alkaloids such as lycorine which are toxic but a large quantity would need to be eaten to cause poisoning.
  • Amastia, bilateral, with ureteral triplication and dysmorphism: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by the absence of both breasts, triplicated ureters (normally they are duplicated), facial anomalies and various other defects.
  • Amathophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of dust.
  • Amaxophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of riding in a vehicle or being in one.
  • Amelo-cerebro-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving degeneration of the central nervous system, seizures and abnormal tooth development.
  • Amelo-onycho-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare disorder characterized primarily by tooth and nail abnormalities and reduced sweating ability.
  • Ameloblastoma: A congenital tumor of the pituitary gland. Also called craniopharyngioma, craniopharyngeal duct tumor, pituitary adamantinoma or Rathke's pouch tumor.
  • Amelogenesis Imperfecta: An inherited dental disorder where the tooth enamel is so thin and soft that the teeth appear yellow and are easily damaged. Can occur in baby and permanent teeth. Also called hereditary brown enamel or hereditary enamel.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta pigmented hypomaturation type: Amelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited tooth development disorder characterized by tooth enamel defects. The pigmented hypomaturation type is characterized by fragile tooth enamel which tends to be soft and rough and is usually a creamy to yellow/brown color.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta, hypoplastic/hypomaturation, X-linked 1: Amelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited tooth development disorder characterized by tooth enamel defects. The hypoplastic/hypomaturation X-linked 1 form is characterized by thin tooth enamel which is of normal strength. The surface of the enamel varies from smooth to pitted and the tooth color is variable.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta, hypoplastic/hypomaturation, X-linked 2: A rare inherited disorder involving abnormal formation of the tooth enamel which causes it to be thin and soft. The abnormality is inherited in a X-linked manner (Xq22-q28).
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Aminopterin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to ? during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Ammonia breath odor: the odor of ammonia on the breath is described as urinous or "fishy" breath
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Amphetamines -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Amphetamines during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphoric breath sounds: unusual hollow breath sound usually heard due to cavities in the bronchial system
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Amychophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being scratched or clawed.
  • Amyloid Neuropathies: A peripheral nerve disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the nerves. Sensory, autonomic or motor nerves may be affected. The degree of nerve involvement, and hence symptoms, are variable.
  • Amyloid angiopathy: A blood vessel disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the blood vessel walls of the brain. The deposits can cause the blood vessel to become weak and rupture resulting in intracranial bleeding. Despite the potentially serious consequences the disorder is often asymptomatic until old age.
  • Amyloid cardiopathy: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. The cardiac form involves deposits of amyloid in the heart muscle which affects its function. The electrical conduction system of the heart is impaired.
  • Amyloid cardiopathy, familial: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. The familial cardiac form is inherited and involves deposits of amyloid in the heart muscle which affects its function. The electrical conduction system of the heart is impaired.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis, Familial: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the familial form, the type of amyloid involved is usually a plasma protein called transthyretin. The main parts of the body affected are the nerves, heart and kidneys.
  • Amyloidosis, Inherited: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the inherited form, the type of amyloid involved is usually a plasma protein called transthyretin. The main parts of the body affected are the nerves, heart and kidneys.
  • Amyloidosis, inflammatory: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. Secondary amyloidosis is caused by a chronic infection of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, tuberculosis and osteomyelitis. The main organs affected in secondary amyloidosis are usually the kidneys, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The peripheral and autonomic nerves and the heart are rarely affected.
  • Amyloidosis, oculoleptomeningeal: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In this particular type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages and vision impairment.
  • Amyoplasia congenital disruptive sequence: A rare genetic disorder characterized by congenital contractures of two or more different joints.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2, juvenile: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 3: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 7: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20p13.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q13.3 and is a dominantly inherited, late-onset form.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 1: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 1 is characterized by adult onset and relatively fast progression of symptoms. It usually occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 2: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is characterized by childhood or adolescent onset of symptoms which progress very slowly over decades. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 3: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is characterized late adulthood onset of symptoms which progress slowly over 5 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 4: A generally fatal progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is characterized by the onset of symptoms before the age of 25 and slow progression over the next few decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 6: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 7: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between less than 5 years to several decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Mouth symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Mouth symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Mouth symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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