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Symptoms » Movement disorders » Glossary
 

Glossary for Movement disorders

Medical terms related to Movement disorders or mentioned in this section include:

  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Ataxia: Failure of muscular coordination
  • Athetosis: Involuntary, slow contraction particularly in the hands.
  • Autosomal Dominant Genetic Diseases: Any conditions that are related to any non-sex-determining chromosome
  • Behavioral symptoms: Symptoms of personal behavior.
  • Benign essential blepharospasm: A neurological disorder where certain eye muscles fail to function properly.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Cerebral Palsy: Any brain disorder causing movement disability
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with pyramidal features, autosomal dominant: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 5 has an autosomal dominant inheritance, progresses slowly and involves movement disorders.
  • Chorea: The occurrence of rapid, jerky, dyskinetic movements that are involuntary
  • Essential tremor: An inherited disorder characterized by fine shaking of the head, hand and face.
  • Feline spongiform encephalopathy: A prion disease believed to affect felines in a similar fashion to bovine spongiform encephalitis
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Huntington's disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Inborn urea cycle disorder: A genetic disorder involving a deficiency of one of the enzymes needed in the urea cycle. The urea cycle is the process of removing ammonia from blood stream by converting it to urea and excreting it via urine. A build-up of ammonia in the blood is toxic to the body and can cause serious brain damage. The progressively severe symptoms usually become obvious within the first few weeks of birth. Nevertheless, mild or partial enzyme deficiencies may cause little or no symptoms or symptoms that don't start until later in life.
  • Megaloblastic Anemia 1: A rare genetic blood disorder where a defect in the vitamin B12 receptor means that it can't be absorbed from food during digestion. As a result of the low vitamin B12 levels, the body produces increased numbers of abnormal enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts).
  • Megaloblastic anemia: Megaloblastic anemia, also called pernicious anemia, is a condition in which there is a low number of red blood cells most often caused by a lack of vitamin B12.
  • Mitochondrial diseases: Any of a group of mitochondrial disorders affecting cell metabolism and especially muscles.
  • Movement disorders: A disorder which affects ones ability to control their movements
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Pernicious anemia: A megaloblastic anaemia due to malabsorption of the vitamin B12
  • Progressive Rubella Panencephalitis: A very rare complication of rubella infection where neurological symptoms develop following a congenital rubella infection and very rarely with childhood rubella. It is believed that the condition is the result of persistent rubella virus infection.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome: A neurological disorder where legs develop and crawling, aching skin sensation which is relived by moving the legs.
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever: A bacterial disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and transmitted by ticks. The condition causes fever and a characteristic rash and may be fatal in severe or untreated cases.
  • Rubella panencephalitis: A very rare complication of rubella infection where neurological symptoms develop following a congenital rubella infection and very rarely with childhood rubella. It is believed that the condition is the result of persistent rubella virus infection.
  • Selective Vitamin B12 malabsorption with Proteinuria: A rare genetic blood disorder where a defect in the vitamin B12 receptor means that it can't be absorbed from food during digestion. As a result of the low vitamin B12 levels, the body produces increased numbers of abnormal enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts).
  • Slowly Progressive Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. . Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Sydenham's chorea: A condition which is self limiting and is characterized by involuntary movements
  • Tics: A condition which is characterized by an involuntary, compulsive, rapid and repetitive movement
  • Tourette Syndrome: A neurological disorder involving vocal and movement tics where where uncontrollable movements or verbal utterances are made.
  • Tremor: The occurrence of involuntary trembling
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Movement disorders:

The following list of conditions have 'Movement disorders' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Movement disorders:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Movement disorders' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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