Assessment
Questionnaire

Have a symptom?
See what questions
a doctor would ask.
 
Symptoms » Muscle atrophy » Glossary
 

Glossary for Muscle atrophy

Medical terms related to Muscle atrophy or mentioned in this section include:

  • ACTH -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on mice indicate that the use of ACTH during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • AIDS wasting syndrome: A condition where AIDS patients suffer from symptoms such as weight loss, fever, malaise, lethargy, oral thrush and immunologic abnormalities normally associated with AIDS.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency of: A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (short-chain fatty acids) into energy. Symptoms are exacerbated by fasting or acute illness. The severity of symptoms is variable with some patients remaining virtually asymptomatic their whole life while other suffer symptoms from infancy.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adult SMA: Form of Spinal Muscular Atrophy in adults.
  • Adult progressive spinal muscular atrophy, Aran Duchenne type: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness, wasting and paralysis due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Muscle weakness and wasting usually starts in the hands and may gradually spread to other muscle groups.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Alcoholic Neuropathy: Neurological changes due to nerve damage from long-term alcohol consumption
  • Alcoholism: High dependence on excessive amounts of alcohol.
  • Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized primarilty by mental retardation.
  • Alves Castelo dos Santos syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by hair, eye, skin and spinal abnormalities.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 3: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 4, juvenile: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9q34.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 5: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 15q15.1-q21.1.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 7: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20p13.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q13.3 and is a dominantly inherited, late-onset form.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 11: An inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 11 is differentiated by the origin of the genetic defect involved (6q21).
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 9: An inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is differentiated by the origin of the genetic defect involved (14q11).
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 1: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 1 is characterized by adult onset and relatively fast progression of symptoms. It usually occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 2: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is characterized by childhood or adolescent onset of symptoms which progress very slowly over decades. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 3: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is characterized late adulthood onset of symptoms which progress slowly over 5 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 4: A generally fatal progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is characterized by the onset of symptoms before the age of 25 and slow progression over the next few decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 5: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adolescent onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 6: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 7: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between less than 5 years to several decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 8: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 8 is characterized by adult onset and relatively slow progression of symptoms. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Andersen disease: An rare inborn error of metabolism involving glycogen storage and characterized by cirrhosis and sometimes liver failure. Lack of the amyl-transglucosidase enzyme and abnormal glycogen causes the condition.
  • Andrade's syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by deposits of an abnormal protein called amyloid in various parts of the body including organs. The condition mainly involves neurological symptoms.
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Arthritis: A condition which is characterized by the inflammation of a joint
  • Arthritis pain: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement.
  • Arthrogryposis, congenital -- myopathic seizures: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation and muscle problems.
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Balo's concentric sclerosis: Demyelination of the brain producing a variety of symptoms depending on the area of the brain affected.
  • Balo's concentric sclerosis (rare variant of MS): Balo's Concentric Sclerosis is a rare demyelinating disorder characterized pathologically by concentric rings of alternating demyelinated and relatively myelin preserved white matter. The pathogenesis of the concentric lesion may be explained by periodic suppression of demyelination in a rapidly expanding area of inflammation, allowing remyelination or only transient incomplete demyelination to occur.
  • Banti Syndrome: A rare conditions where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Banti's syndrome: A chronic, progressive condition marked by enlargement of the spleen which is associated with anemia, splenomegaly, ascites, jaundice, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Bard-Pic syndrome: A complication of advanced pancreatic cancer marked by jaundice and enlarged gallbladder.
  • Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A muscular dystrophy charaterised by enlargement of muscles
  • Bethlem myopathy: A rare, slow-progressing, genetic muscle disorder where the muscle gradually weaken and become wasted.
  • Blood vessel conditions: Conditions that affect the blood vessels
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: This is a medical condition caused by the transmission of an infective prion causing an encephalopathy
  • Bruyn-Scheltens syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by limb weakness and muscle wasting in the hands and feet.
  • Buerger's disease: Buergers's disease is a recurring inflammation and thrombosis (clotting) of small and medium arteries and veins of the hands and feet
  • Burns: Injury from burns and scalds.
  • Cachexia: physical wasting with loss of weight and muscle mass caused by disease
  • Camurati-Engelmann Disease: A very rare genetic disease thickening of areas of bone causing pain, weakness and wasting. Usually affects the legs during childhood. Also called diaphyseal dysplasia.
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Hand or wrist problems; often from repetitive motion.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, X-linked: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain results in symptoms such as ataxia. The rate of progression can vary.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 3, Juvenile: A progressive genetic disorder where defective lipid metabolism that causes blindness, neurological deterioration, dementia leading to total incapication within years and death within 10-15 years.
  • Cervical Spondylosis: Condition where bony changes within the cervical spine causes spinal cord compression with associated neck pain; usually seen in patients over 40 years of age.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in the axon of the peripheral nerve cells instead of the myelin sheath coating of the nerves. The condition manifests as muscle weakness and wasting that usually starts in the legs and spreads to the hands and other parts of the body. The severity, age of onset and rate of progression of the condition varies depending on the genetic origin of the defect.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 aplasia cutis congenital: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This form of the condition is inherited recessively and involves only mild muscle symptoms as well as a scalp defect.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexane: Hexane is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as glue, paint, shoes and furniture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chondroblastoma (benign): A rare benign bone tumor that usually forms in the ends of long bones such as the leg bones.
  • Chronic Illness: Any form of continuing chronic illness.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic diarrhoea: Diarrhoea lasting for more than 3 weeks
  • Chronic infections: Ongoing and often slow progressing infection; opposite to acute infections.
  • Cocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10), deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the deficiency of Coenzyme Q 10. The range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Complex 1 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation, Type 1o: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1O has a defect in the DPM3 gene which results in decreased activity of an enzyme called dolichol-phosphage-mannose (Dol-P-M).
  • Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: Muscle weakness and wasting that starts at birth or around the time of birth. The severity and extent of muscle involvement is greatly variable.
  • Congenital benign spinal muscular atrophy dominant: A very rare syndrome characterized by non-progressive muscle weakness that affects mainly the legs.
  • Congenital muscular dystrophy syringomyelia: A very rare disorder characterized by muscle weakness and wasting from birth, a severely deformed spine and syringomyelia (cyst in the spinal cord).
  • Corticotropin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Corticotropin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing's syndrome: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Cutler Syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by multisystem disorders including muscle wasting, ataxia, epilepsy, anemia and kidney disease. The kidney disease is most likely present at birth.
  • Cytoplasmic body myopathy: A rare group of muscle diseases caused by protein deposits inside the muscle cells. The severity, rate of progression and extent of muscle involvement is variable.
  • Deafness, vitiligo, achalasia: A rare disorder characterized by deafness, achalasia (difficulty swallowing) and patches of reduced pigmentation in the skin (vitiligo).
  • Degenerative motor system disease: Any of a number of condition characterized by destruction of nerves that carry signals to muscles (motor neurons) and results in various muscle problems. The nerve destruction is often progressive leading to increasingly severe muscle problems.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Desmin-related myopathy with Mallory body-like inclusions: A group of muscle disorder characterized by the build up of a protein called desmin in the muscle tissue. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Diabetes: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetic neuropathy: nerve damage which maybe motor, sensory and autonomic
  • Distal myopathy, Welander type: A very slowly progressing muscle fiber degeneration that starts as mild weakness in the small muscles of hands and feet and may eventually spread to neighboring muscles.
  • Drug abuse: Drug use as a symptom of other conditions
  • Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An inherited degenerative disease of the muscles which progresses rapidly compared to other muscle wasting diseases.
  • Dyskeratosis congenita of Zinsser-Cole-Engman: An inherited condition characterized by recurring painful mouth ulcers, skin pigmentation and nail abnormalities.
  • Dystrophia myotonica 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, muscle atrophy, cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy:
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 1: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart conduction defects. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq28. Because the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to be affected but female carriers may have only the potentially fatal heart conduction disorder without any muscle symptoms.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 2: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart conduction defects. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21.2. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner so males and females may be affected.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 3: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21.2. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner so males and females may be affected. Type 3 tends to not have any heart involvement.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 4: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart problems. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner so males and females may be affected.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 5: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart problems. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q23. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner so males and females may be affected.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Syndrome: An hereditary, slowly progressive muscular dystrophy which starts during childhood. The condition is marked by joint contractures and conduction disorders of the heart.
  • Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, X-linked: A muscle wasting disorder mainly involving the muscles in the arms, legs, face, neck, spine and heart. Symptoms generally only occur in males but female carriers may have some symptoms.
  • Endocrine disorders: Any disorder that affects the endocrine system
  • Erb's dystrophy: A slow progressing, muscle wasting disease. The muscles in the upper arms are affected first. Eventually muscles in the shoulders, trunk, thigh and pelvic girdle are involved. Eventually the facial muscles also become weak.
  • Erb-Goldflam: An inherited disorder characterized by a defect in the transmission of signals to the muscles which results in muscle weakness.
  • FACWA syndrome: A rare progressive neurological disorder involving degeneration of part of the brain (basal ganglia) and muscle wasting.
  • FOSMN syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disorder that starts in the face and spreads to the scalp and upper body. The condition progresses slowly.
  • Foix-Alajouanine syndrome: A rare type of spinal cord disease caused by malformations in blood vessels supplying the spinal cord. Insufficient blood flow to the spinal cord causes muscle problems.
  • Friedreich ataxia -- congenital glaucoma: A rare disorder characterized by glaucoma at birth and a progressive neuromuscular disorder.
  • Fukuyama type muscular dystrophy: A rare inherited muscle wasting disease occurring predominantly in Japan and characterized by mental retardation and muscle weakness from infancy.
  • Furukawa-Takagi-Nakao syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, ataxia, diabetes and eye problems.
  • Gamstorp-Wohlfart syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by muscle weakness, low muscle tone, increased sweating and muscle twitching (myokymia)
  • Gangliosidosis, generalized GM1 type 3: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type III involves a lesser degree of accumulation than type II or I.
  • Generalized Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease resulting from autoimmune dysfunction. In generalized myasthenia gravis weakness develops mainly in the limbs and trunk. The severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Most patients suffer increased severity of symptoms during the day with improvement after sleeping.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hepatoma: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver.
  • Hereditary inclusion body myopathy -- joint contractures -- ophthalmoplegia: A very rare, dominantly inherited genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures at birth and ophthalmoplegia. Muscle function problems usually don't start until the 4th or 5th decade of life.
  • Hereditary peripheral nervous disorder: A group of inherited disorders affecting the peripheral nerves (nerves other than the brain and spinal cord). The motor, sensory and/or autonomic nerves may be affected. Examples of such conditions includes Dejerine-Sottas disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
  • Herniated disk: A misaligned or "slipped" disc in the spine.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypertrophic neuropathy of Dejerine-Sottas: An inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Hypopigmented lesions in children: Hypopigmented lesions in children refers are sores or ulcers that are colorless or have lost color in a child.
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Idiopathic myopathy: A rare condition involving inflammation of the skeletal muscles which become weak and wasted.
  • Immobility: An inability to mobilise as normal
  • Inclusion Body Myositis: Progressive inflammatory muscle disease causing muscle weakness.
  • Inclusion body myopathy 3, autosomal dominant: A very rare, dominantly inherited genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures at birth and ophthalmoplegia. Muscle function problems usually don't start until the 4th or 5th decade of life.
  • Inclusion body myopathy, 2 autosomal recessive: A very rare, recessively inherited genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting in the arms and legs. The distinctive feature of this particular disorder is the fact that that the thigh muscles are usually spared.
  • Incontinentia Pigmenti: A rare genetic skin pigmentation disorder characterized by eye, teeth, bone, nail and hair malformations as well as central nervous abnormalities and mental deficiency.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Intercostal neuralgia: Nerve pain affecting the ribs
  • Intestinal capillariasis: Infection with a type of roundworm (Capillaria phillipinensis) found in the Phillipines and Thailand. Infection can occur by eating raw contaminated freshwater fish.
  • Jequier-Kozlowski-skeletal dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by various skeletal abnormalities and facial anomalies.
  • Joint injury: An injury to any joint in the body. The larger limb joints tend to be the most utilized and are hence more prone to injuries. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and location of injury and often the primary symptom is pain. A joint injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Chronic arthritis affecting children and teens
  • Kuskokwim disease: A rare syndrome where abnormal muscle attachment causes abnormalities such as muscle wasting or excessive growth and contractures.
  • Kwashiorkor: A malnutrition state that is produced by severe protein deficiency
  • Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome: A condition where a patient with a carcinoma suffers from progressive muscular weakness.
  • Landouzy-Dejerine muscular dystrophy: A rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized mainly by progressive weakness and wasting of facial and shoulder and upper arm muscles. A rare form of the condition is noticeable at infancy and progresses rapidly.
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes disease: Femur/hip bone disease mostly in children
  • Leiner Disease: A skin and immune system disorder occurring in newborns and characterized by a patch of thick red skin that usually starts on the buttocks and spreads to other parts of the body. Recurring infections, failure to thrive, wasting and nervous system deficiency are also symptomatic of the condition.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 1: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 2: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.2-q27.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 3: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q32 and 4p14.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 4: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Letterer-Siwe disease: A rare usually fatal condition characterized by skin lesions, bleeding tendency, enlarged liver and spleen, enlarged lymph nodes and progressive anemia. The condition is caused by excessive proliferation of histiocytes.
  • Levine-Critchley syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder mainly involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting, abnormal limb movement, progressive cognitive loss and red blood cell abnormalities.
  • Lightwood-Albright syndrome: A rare syndrome caused by kidney dysfunction.
  • Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C: An autosomal dominant form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy where muscle weakness and atrophy is caused by mutations of the Caveolin-3 gene.
  • Lipidosis with triglyceride storage disease: A very disorder involving abnormal storage of fat (triglycerides in parts of the body). The condition causes blood abnormalities as well as skin, eye and hearing problems.
  • Lumbar Spondylosis:
  • Lupine poisoning: A flowering herb which produced long clusters of flowers in various colors. It also produces flat, seed-filled pods. The seeds contain toxic chemicals (alkaloids such as lupinine, anagyrine, sparteine) which can cause poisoning if eaten in large quantities. Different species have different amounts of the toxin and some species are not toxic at all.
  • MADSAM: A rare sensory and motor nerve disease which causes progressive numbness and weakness that usually starts in the hands. The condition may progress for a while and then remit.
  • Malabsorption syndrome: is an alteration in the ability of the intestine to absorb nutrients adequately into the bloodstream
  • Malaria: A parasitic disease transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Malnutrition: Any disorder that relates to inadequate intake of nutrients.
  • Marasmus: A form of malnutrition caused by a severe deficiency of both protein and calories
  • Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome: A group of recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by incoordination due to a brain anomaly.
  • Mc Leod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by neuromuscular, blood and central nervous system symptoms. The disease is slowly progressive.
  • Mental retardation, X-linked, Cabezas type: A rare X-linked disorder characterized by mental retardation, muscle wasting, short stature and other problems. The disorder is inherited in a X-linked manner which means that only males display the full range of symptoms whereas female carriers may have mild or no symptoms.
  • Mental retardation, X-linked, Zorick type: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation and muscle disease. The disorder is inherited in a X-linked manner which means that only males display the full range of symptoms whereas female carriers may have mild or no symptoms.
  • Metachromatic Leukodystrophy: An inherited biochemical deficiency involving a deficiency of the enzyme called arylsulfatase A which leads to a harmful buildup of fatty material in the body.
  • Minicore disease: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The rate of progression and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Minicore myopathy with external ophthalmoplegia: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The ophthalmoplegic form is distinguished by the presence of eye muscle weakness. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Minicore myopathy, antenatal onset, with arthrogryposis: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The antenatal form with arthrogryposis is distinguished by the presence of contractures at birth due to reduced fetal movement as well as various physical anomalies. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Minicore myopathy, moderate, with hand involvement: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The progressive form with hand involvement is less severe than the classic form with breathing problems and scoliosis usually absent or mild. It is distinguished by the presence of hyperlaxity. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy -- aminoacidopathy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle and brain disease and an amino acid disorder.
  • Mitochondrial myopathy -- lactic acidosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle disease and a metabolic disorder. The severity and progression of the disease is variable with some dying early in their second decade and others living longer.
  • Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy syndrome: A rare genetic disorder which affects a number of body systems and manifests results in symptoms such as droopy eyelids, progressive eye muscle weakness, gastrointestinal dysmotility, brain disease, thin body, peripheral neuropathy and muscle disease.
  • Miyoshi myopathy: A rare genetic condition characterized by slow-progressing muscle weakness and atrophy that starts in the calves and progresses to the rest of the legs and arms. Occasionally the hips and shoulders may be affected but the heart and facial muscles are spared.
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Morse-Rawnsley-Sargent syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal brain development and reduced fetal movement.
  • Motor neuron diseases: Any of various disorders of the "motor neurons", nerves that control movement.
  • Motor neuropathy: A rare disorder involving progressive muscle weakness. The rate of progression, severity and age of onset is variable.
  • Motor neuropathy, peripheral with dysautonomia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting and abnormal function of the bodies automatically regulated processes resulting in excess sweating and other problems.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Multicentric osteolysis -- nodulosis -- arthropathy: A rare syndrome characterized by joint disease, loss of bone mineral density and nodulosis.
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy: Disorder of progressive muscle weakness.
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block: A very rare disorder involving progressive destruction of the protective sheath around nerves. Usually arms are affected first and occasionally the legs are involved. It is believed to be an immune mediated disorder.
  • Multiminicore disease (MmD): A rare congenital muscle disorder involving weakness and wasting of skeletal muscles. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The rate of progression and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple system atrophy: A rare disorder where nerve degeneration causes progressive neurological problems involving the central and autonomic nervous system. The rate of progression is variable.
  • Multiple system atrophy (MSA) with orthostatic hypotension: A progressive neurological disorder involving the central and autonomic nervous system.
  • Muscle atrophy: Decrease in size and bulk of muscle.
  • Muscle conditions: Any condition that affects the muscles of the body
  • Muscle pain: Aches or pains affecting the muscles
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Muscle wasting in children: Muscle wasting in children refers to a decrease in the size, strength, and mobility of a child's muscle.
  • Muscle weakness: Weakness of the muscles or loss of tone
  • Muscular Dystrophy -- Late Onset: Muscle weakness and wasting that occurs later in life. The severity is variable with severe cases involving wheelchair confinement and death can occur if the heart muscle becomes involved. Progression may be slow or rapid. Slow progressing cases can result in a normal life span.
  • Muscular dystrophy -- congenital infantile cataract -- hypogonadism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle wasting, infantile cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Muscular dystrophy -- white matter spongiosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems, seizures and mental retardation.
  • Muscular dystrophy congenital, with integrin deficiency: A congenital muscle wasting disease resulting from genetic mutation resulting in the deficiency of a compound called integrin.
  • Muscular dystrophy limb girdle type 2A, Erb type: A slow progressing, muscle wasting disease. The muscles in the upper arms are affected first. Eventually muscles in the shoulders, trunk, thigh and pelvic girdle are involved.
  • Muscular dystrophy limb-girdle (generic term): A group of disorders characterized by muscle weakness and wasting involving mainly the voluntary muscles around the hips and shoulders i.e. the limb-girdle muscles. The terms proximal and distal may be used and this refers to muscles closest to the center of the body and furthest from the centre of the body respectively. The condition may start at any age and the rate of progression and severity of symptoms varies depending on the subtype. Generally, early onset forms tend to be more severe and progress faster than late onset forms.
  • Muscular dystrophy, Duchenne and Becker type: An inherited l disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disorder is caused by a genetic anomaly and results in insufficient quantities of or ineffective dystrophin which is needed for normal muscle functioning. The disorder is expressed in males but females can be carriers.
  • Muscular dystrophy, congenital, infantile with cataract -- hypogonadism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle wasting, infantile cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle -- mental retardation: A rare disorder where muscle weakness and wasting starts in the proximal muscles (upper limbs, shoulders and hips). The condition is caused by a deficiency of alpha-dystroglycan in the muscles.
  • Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal dominant: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by progressive wasting and weakness of muscles in the shoulder and pelvic girdle (around the top of the arms and legs). Heart and breathing complications may also occur in some cases.
  • Muscular fibrosis, multifocal -- obstructed vessels: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems and immune system anomalies.
  • Muscular phosphorylase kinase deficiency: A very rare genetic defect which affects muscles and causes rapid fatigue on exertion and muscle cramping and weakness.
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myasthenia, Familial Infantile, 1: Illness, stress or fatigue may result in sudden severe episodes of apnea which can be fatal.
  • Myasthenia, Limb-Girdle, with Tubular Aggregates: A neuromuscular disease affecting the limb-girdle muscles primarily. The condition is distinguished by the presence of abnormal tubular aggregates in the muscle tissue and the absence of weakness in the eye and eyelid muscles which is a usually a symptom of myasthenia gravis.
  • Myasthenia, familial limb-girdle: A rare genetic condition characterized by weakness of the chest and pelvic girdle muscles.
  • Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, slow-channel: A rare disorder involving progressive muscle wasting and weakness of variable severity depending on the exact origin of the genetic defect. The problem arises from defective processes at the junction of nerve and muscle cells.
  • Mycobacterium kansasii: A form of mycobacterium
  • Myopathy and diabetes mellitus: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle disease and diabetes mellitus. The condition was highly variable with respect to the severity, range and onset of symptoms.
  • Myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia: A rare disorder of the bone marrow and skeletal muscles which manifests as muscle disease and anemia. Progressive intolerance to exercise usually starts during childhood with anemia occurring around adolescence.
  • Myopathy, Mitochonrdrial Progressive, with Congenital Cataract, Hearing Loss and Developmental Delay: A rare condition characterized by muscle disease, congenital cataracts, hearing loss and developmental delay.
  • Myopathy, Myofibrillar, BAG3-Related: An early-onset, progressive muscle disease.
  • Myopathy, Myosin storage: A rare form of genetic muscle disease which progresses slowly and causes generalized muscle weakness and wasting. The condition results from the abnormal presence of hyaline bodies in type 1 muscle fibres.
  • Myopathy, hyaline body, autosomal dominant: A rare form of genetic muscle disease which progresses slowly and causes generalized muscle weakness and wasting. The condition results from the abnormal presence of hyaline bodies in type 1 muscle fibres.
  • Myotonic Dystrophy: An inherited disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting as well as eye defects, heart abnormalities and other anomalies. The severity of the condition is greatly variable. There are two type of myotonic dystrophy with type 1 being more severe than type 2.
  • Myotonic dystrophy, type 2: An inherited disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting as well as eye defects, heart abnormalities and other anomalies. The severity of the condition is greatly variable. There are two type of myotonic dystrophy with type 1 being more severe than type 2. Type 2 also tends to affect muscle closer to the trunk e.g. upper leg and shoulders.
  • NADH CoQ reductase, deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders neurodegenerative disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Nemalin myopathy, late onset type: A very rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemalin rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. The muscle weakness may be severe but is generally not a progressive condition. The main muscles affected are the limbs, neck and face. The legs are generally more affected in the late onset type.
  • Nemaline myopathy 5: A very rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemaline rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. There are at least 7 different subtypes of nemaline myopathy, each with a different genetic defect. The severity of the symptoms may vary greatly even among patients within a particular subtype of the disorder. Type 5 is caused by a defect on the Troponin T1 gene on chromosome 19q13.4.
  • Nephrotic syndrome: A condition involving excess loss of protein in the urine, reduced albumin levels in the blood and swelling.
  • Nerve entrapment: Compression of a nerve that becomes trapped in a confined space due to any cause e.g. trauma, inflammation or a disease process. This usually occurs near joints. The resulting pressure on the nerve can be very painful and if left untreated can result in damage to the nerve and eventually muscle weakness and wasting. Conditions such as bone spurs, joint swelling due to injury, cysts and trauma can result in nerve entrapment. The exact symptoms will depend on which nerve is trapped and the duration and severity of the entrapment.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neu-Laxova Syndrome: A rare fatal genetic disorder characterized by microcephaly and multiple congenital abnormalities. Death occurs during the fetal or newborn stage.
  • Neurodegeneration With Brain Iron Accumulation 2: A rare, inherited, progressive neurological movement disorder where accumulation of iron in the brain causes degeneration of the nervous system. Type 2 is linked to a defect in the PLA2G6 gene on chromosome 22q13.1.
  • Neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the peripheral nervous system
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory, Type II: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations such as pain, temperature and touch. The sensation impairment starts in the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs with the trunk occasionally being affected. Injuries to the hands and feet are common as there is no pain associated with injury and the patient may be unaware that they even have an injury.
  • Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, LOM type: A severe form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which involves the loss of the protective covering around nerves resulting in various nerve problems. Muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is more severe in the ends of the arms and legs.
  • Neurosyphilis: Syphilis affecting the nervous system.
  • Nodulosis-arthropathy-osteolysis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by joint disease, loss of bone mineral density and nodulosis.
  • Obal syndrome: The association of eye problems with severe malnutrition. The condition occurred frequently in soldiers, prisoners of war and people in concentration camps.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy I: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain and spinal cord and results in symptoms such as muscle problems, chorea and speech disturbance.
  • Osteoarthritis: A form of degenerative arthritis due to chronic degeneration
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta: Weak bones ("brittle bone disease") and loose joints
  • Palmoplantar keratoderma -- amyotrophy: A rare disorder characterized by the association of thickened skin on the palms and soles with muscle wasting.
  • Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: A rare, inherited, progressive neurological movement disorder where accumulation of iron in the brain causes degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Paralysis: Paralysis refers to a loss of the ability of a muscle to contract and move.
  • Parasitic Conditions: A condition that is characterised by another organism living off another organism
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Parsonage Turner syndrome: Inflammation of the nerves that carry signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm and hands.
  • Passos-Bueno syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, reduced muscle tone, incontinence, muscle wasting and inability to walk or speak.
  • Penicillamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Penicillamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Peripheral neuritis: A condition characterized by inflammation of the peripheral nerves
  • Peripheral neuropathy: Any loss in the function of the peripheral nervous system
  • Polio: Dangerous virus now rare due to vaccination.
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Polyradiculoneuropathy: An inflammatory disorder that affects the peripheral nerves and the spinal nerve roots. The onset and progression of the disease is variable with severe cases resulting in premature death. The condition is chronic and progressive but periodic relapses can occur.
  • Pontocerebellar hypoplasia with infantile spinal muscular atrophy: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized by an abnormally small brain and brainstem which manifests as a small head and mental retardation. The disorder is lethal with death usually occurring within the first year. The brain progressively degenerates.
  • Poor appetite: Loss or reduction in appetite for food
  • Post-polio syndrome: A condition where patients who have a history of polio have a reoccurrence of muscle symptoms. The condition usually occurs at least ten years after partial or complete recovery from polio.
  • Posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive ataxia and eye degeneration resulting in blindness by the third decade as well as muscle problems.
  • Primary Biliary Cirrhosis 1: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic condition involving progressive destruction of the bile ducts in the liver. This results in an abnormal buildup of bile in the liver which eventually progresses to liver failure. Primary biliary cirrhosis 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p12-q13.2.
  • Primary Biliary Cirrhosis 2: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic condition involving progressive destruction of the bile ducts in the liver. This results in an abnormal buildup of bile in the liver which eventually progresses to liver failure. Primary biliary cirrhosis 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Primary Biliary Cirrhosis 3: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic condition involving progressive destruction of the bile ducts in the liver. This results in an abnormal buildup of bile in the liver which eventually progresses to liver failure. Primary biliary cirrhosis 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p31.2.
  • Primary Lateral Sclerosis: A neurological disorder involving the upper motor nerves and causing progressive muscle weakness in the extremities and facial area. This condition involves mutations in the same gene and overlapping symptoms with juvenile primary lateral sclerosis but the difference is that primary lateral sclerosis only involves degeneration of the upper motor neurons whereas infantile-onset spastic paralysis is more severe and involves degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons.
  • Primary biliary cirrhosis: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic and progressive cholestatic disease of the liver.
  • Progressive muscular atrophy: A condition which is characterized by painless, degenerative myopathies.
  • Progressive spinal muscular atrophy: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. The severity of symptoms and survival varies depending on the particular form of the condition. Death can occur as early as infancy whereas some forms allow survival into adulthood.
  • Protein deficiency:
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: A rare group of muscle disorders which mainly affects the muscles closest to the trunk of the body. Muscles become progressively weak and wasted due to damage to motor neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem.
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy, type 1: A type of spinal muscular atrophy which is a progressive genetic motor neuron disease involving the nerves and muscles. The condition is relatively rare and is characterized by muscle weakness which leads to structural deformities and loss or reduced capability of normal body movements. SMA type I is the most debilitating form as muscular weakness is evident at birth and diagnosis usually occurs within the first three months.
  • Radiculopathy: A condition characterized by disease of the nerve roots
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: A condition characterized by pain and reduced range of motion in the shoulder and hand of the affected arm.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune inflammatory condition which primarily affects the joints
  • Rib symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ribs
  • Richards-Rundle syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, ataxia, deafness and ketoaciduria.
  • Rud Syndrome: A condition characterized by ichthyosis, epilepsy, short stature, hypogonadism and severe mental retardation.
  • Salvioli syndrome: A rare inherited form of bone disease.
  • Sandhoff Disease: An inherited biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of the enzyme called hexosaminidase A&B which results in the harmful accumulation of chemicals in the central nervous system and other body tissues.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Schistosomiasis: Parasitic fluke infection in developing countries
  • Schwartz-Jampel Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, blepharophimosis and joint limitation.
  • Scleroatonic muscular dystrophy: An inherited disorder affecting muscles and resulting in muscle weakness and wasting that starts from birth. The joints closest to the body tend to have limited movement whereas those in the hands and feet tend to be hyperextensible.
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Short Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (SCAD): A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (short-chain fatty acids) into energy. Symptoms are exacerbated by fasting or acute illness. The severity of symptoms is variable with some patients remaining virtually asymptomatic their whole life while other suffer symptoms from infancy.
  • Singleton-Merten Syndrome: A very rare disorder involving calcium abnormalities which affect the teeth, bones and blood vessels.
  • Small syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized by deafness, muscle weakness and wasting, mental retardation and eye disorders.
  • Spinal Cord Tumor: Cancer of the spinal cord or central nervous system.
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A rare condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the spinal and brainstem motor neurons. During fetal development excess primary neurons are formed. The body automatically destroys the extra primary neurons so that only some survive and mature into neurons. In spinal muscular dystrophy, the process that destroys the excess primary neurons doesn't switch off and continues destroying the neurons resulting in progressive motor problems. Various types of the condition range from mild to severe enough to cause death within a couple of years of birth.
  • Spinal bulbar motor neuropathy: A rare inherited disease that affects the nerves in the spine and in the bulbous (bulbar) part of the brain stem. The main signs are muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Spinal cord injury: spinal cord injury causes myelopathy or damage to white matter or myelinated fiber tracts that carry sensation and motor signals to and from the brain
  • Spinal cord lesion: Spinal cord lesion is a condition in which there is an area of abnormal tissue on the spinal cord.
  • Spine symptoms: Symptoms affecting the spine
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia -- amyotrophy -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, ataxia and deafness.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 3: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by . Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types. The duration of the disease is 1-20 years.
  • Storm syndrome: A rare progressive genetic disorder characterized by premature aging and heart disease which results in premature death.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: Gradual spinal cord degeneration
  • Syringomyelia: Spinal cord cysts
  • Tay Sachs: Rare genetic disease leading to fatty deposits in the brain.
  • Testicular atrophy: Wasting of the testicles.
  • Thinness: Underweight and thin
  • Thoracic outlet syndrome TOS: A rare disorder involving compression or damage to the nerves and blood vessels that go from the neck to the arms or armpit. It may occur as a birth defect or through some sort of traumato the shoulder area. It can causes symptoms such as arm pain and weakness and can occur on one or both sides depending on the nature of the cause.
  • Thyrocerebral-retinal syndrome: A very rare syndrome observed in a brother and sister and characterized by thyroid, kidney and neurological disease.
  • Thyroid disease: Any medical condition which affects the thyroid
  • Thyrotoxicosis: hypermetabolic clinical syndrome resulting from serum elevations in thyroid hormone levels, specifically free thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or both.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Tropical sprue: A rare digestive disease where the small intestine can't absorb nutrients properly.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Type IV Glycogen Storage Disease: A condition which is characterized by a disease affecting glycogen storage
  • Ulerythema ophryogenesis: A rare genetic disorder involving a slowly spreading redness of the eyebrows and cheeks followed by damage to the skin and loss of eyebrows.
  • Vacuolar myopathy: A term used to describe a group of conditions involving degeneration of the spinal cord. It is most often seen in AIDS patients but also occurs in conditions such as inherited muscle diseases and other neuromuscular conditions.
  • Viral diseases: Any disease that is caused by a virus
  • Wasting Syndrome: AIDS related wasting syndrome is the involuntary loss of more than 10% of the body weight plus more than 30 days of either diarrhoea or weakness and fever. It is linked to disease progression and death.
  • Weakness: Symptoms causing weakness of the body
  • Weight loss: Loss of body weight.
  • Weight symptoms: Symptoms related to body weight.
  • Welander distal myopathy, Swedish type: A very slowly progressing muscle fiber degeneration that starts as mild weakness in the small muscles of hands and feet and may eventually spread to neighbouring muscles.
  • Wieacker syndrome: A rare disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting, foot deformities, mental retardation and face muscle anomalies.
  • Wieacker-Wolff Syndrome:
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.
  • Wohlwill-Andrade syndrome: A form of amyloidosis that is inherited from the parents
  • X-linked mental retardation -- hypotonia: A very rare inherited disorder characterized primarily by mental retardation. Initial symptoms of muscle weakness gives way to spasticity and contractures.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Muscle atrophy:

The following list of conditions have 'Muscle atrophy' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Muscle atrophy or choose View All.

View All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W X

Conditions listing medical complications: Muscle atrophy:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Muscle atrophy' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use. Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use.

Home | Symptoms | Diseases | Diagnosis | Videos | Tools | Forum | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Advertise