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Symptoms » Muscle spasm » Glossary
 

Glossary for Muscle spasm

Medical terms related to Muscle spasm or mentioned in this section include:

  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia, sideroblastic spinocerebellar ataxia: A rare inherited condition characterized by anemia at birth as well as spinocerebellar ataxia (impaired ability to control voluntary movements).
  • Back injuries: A term usually used to describe any musculoskeletal back injury - a common workplace occurrence.
  • Barakat syndrome: A rare condition characterized by deafness, kidney disease and insufficiency parathyroid hormone production.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brown-Sequard Syndrome: A disorder where spinal cord compression and lesions involve only half of the spinal cord.
  • Calf spasm: A sudden involuntary contraction of the muscles of the calf or calves.
  • Camurati Engelmann disease, type 2: A rare disorder (described in two patients) which has similar symptoms to the genetic condition called Camurati Engelmann disease but the genetic defect responsible for type 1 is not present in type 2. Type 2 has additional bone abnormalities which were noted on radiographs. Patients tend to suffer flare-ups of their condition which is accompanied by severe pain which may leave the patient incapacitated. Flare-ups can be triggered or made worse by stress, exhaustion, exercise, growth spurts, standing too long, walking too long, infection, illness, injury, surgery, cold weather and sudden changes in air pressure.
  • Cerebral Palsy: Any brain disorder causing movement disability
  • Chemical poisoning: Morbid condition caused by chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine: 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine is a chemical used as a designer drug for its hallucinogen and aphrodisiac effects. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Helium: Helium is a chemical used mainly in helium balloons, neon signs and diving gas. The gas is sometimes misused as an inhalant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Clonus: An involuntary muscular contraction and relaxation in rapid succession.
  • Dehydration: Loss and reduction in body water levels
  • Demyelinating disorder: Any condition that is characterised by the destruction of the myelin sheaths of the nerves
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome: A life-threatening condition caused by ingesting tryptophan.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Injury: Any damage inflicted in the body
  • Intermittent muscle spasm: Intermittent muscle spasm refers to involuntary small rapid muscle contractions that occur periodically.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle conditions: Any condition that affects the muscles of the body
  • Muscle pain: Aches or pains affecting the muscles
  • Muscle spasms: Involuntary movement or contraction of muscles without full control
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Osteomyelitis: An infection that occurs in bone
  • Paralysis: Paralysis refers to a loss of the ability of a muscle to contract and move.
  • Seizures: Uncontrolled physical movements
  • Shin spasm: A sudden involuntary contraction of the muscles of the shin.
  • Slowly Progressive Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. . Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Spasms: Involuntary muscle movements without full control.
  • Spastic disorders: Brain disorders leading to sustained spasms, stiffness and rigidity
  • Spinal cord injury: spinal cord injury causes myelopathy or damage to white matter or myelinated fiber tracts that carry sensation and motor signals to and from the brain
  • Spondylosis: Spinal degeneration of the discs or spinal joints
  • Sprains and strains: A joint injury in which some of the supporting tissues are damaged
  • Strain: Muscle or tendon injury; compare sprain
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Tetanus: A disease caused by chemicals which are produced by a bacterium (clostridium tetani) and are toxic to the nerves. The infection usually occurs when the bacteria enter the body through a deep wound - these bacteria are anaerobic and hence don't need oxygen to survive.
  • Upper arm spasm: A sudden involuntary contraction of a muscle or of muscles of the upper arm
  • Wolfram's disease: A condition that is inherited and consists of multiple symptoms
  • Wolman syndrome: A form of lipoidosis where acid cholesteryl ester hydrolase deficiency causes an accumulation of lipids (particularly cholesterol esters and triglycerides) in tissues and organs.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Muscle spasm:

The following list of conditions have 'Muscle spasm' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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