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Symptoms » Muscle stiffness » Glossary
 

Glossary for Muscle stiffness

Medical terms related to Muscle stiffness or mentioned in this section include:

  • 3q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 3 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Abdominal muscle strain: Damage to the abdominal muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma: collection of growths (-oma) of glandular origin.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Akesson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excessive skin folds and furrows on the scalp, mental retardation the failure of the thyroid to develop.
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase deficiency: A metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase which results in high levels of oxoglutaric acid in the urine as well as other severe symptoms.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 11: An inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 11 is differentiated by the origin of the genetic defect involved (6q21).
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 9: An inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is differentiated by the origin of the genetic defect involved (14q11).
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 1: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 1 is characterized by adult onset and relatively fast progression of symptoms. It usually occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 2: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is characterized by childhood or adolescent onset of symptoms which progress very slowly over decades. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 3: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is characterized late adulthood onset of symptoms which progress slowly over 5 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 4: A generally fatal progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is characterized by the onset of symptoms before the age of 25 and slow progression over the next few decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 5: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adolescent onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 6: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 7: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between less than 5 years to several decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 8: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 8 is characterized by adult onset and relatively slow progression of symptoms. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Arginase deficiency: A very rare urea cycle disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme (arginase) needed to convert ammonia to the urea which can then be removed in the urine. The condition leads to excess build-up of ammonia in the body which is toxic to the nervous system.
  • Arm strain: An arm strain is an injury or damage to a muscle or tendon in the arm.
  • Atherosclerosis, premature -- deafness -- diabetes mellitus -- photomyoclonus -- nephropathy -- degenerative neurologic disease: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Atherosclerosis- deafness -- diabetes -- epilepsy -- nephropathy: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Baraitser Brett Piesowicz syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by a small head and calcification in the brain.
  • Becker disease: A rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle stiffness when movement is initiated and difficulty relaxing muscles after movement had occurred. Becker disease is a recessively inherited form of myotonia congenita and usually occurs later in childhood than the dominantly inherited form and muscle stiffness is usually more severe.
  • Bicep muscle strain: Damage to the bicep muscle in the arm due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Calcification of basal ganglia with or without hypocalcemia: Calcification of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia. That calcification may be associated with conditions such as hypothyroidism, cytomegalovirus, and AIDS or may occur for no apparent reason. The severity of the condition may vary greatly from asymptomatic to neurological, psychiatric and movement disorders. The disorder may also progress at variable rates or remain stable depending on the underlying disease process.
  • Calf muscle strain: Damage to the calf muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase II Deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, infantile hepatocardiomuscular type: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The infantile form of this disease affects the muscles and the liver and heart.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, lethal neonatal form: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The lethal neonatal form affects various organs as well as the muscles and death usually occurs during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, myopathic: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. Prolonged exercise can cause an episode of muscle symptoms. The myopathic form of the condition is the least severe and tends to affect only the muscles.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 1: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 1 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the GAD1 gene on chromosome 2q31.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 2: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 2 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the ANKRD15 gene on chromosome 9p24.3.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 3: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 3 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the AP4M1 gene on chromosome 7q22.1.
  • Cerebrorenodigital syndrome: A rare group of syndromes characterized mainly by brain, kidney, finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with pyramidal features, autosomal dominant: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 5 has an autosomal dominant inheritance, progresses slowly and involves movement disorders.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Strychnine: Strychnine is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Childhood hypophosphatasia: An inherited bone disorder due to an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency of alkaline phosphate which results in loss of deciduous teeth before the age of 5 as well as muscle and bone problems - childhood onset.
  • Chromosome 1, monosomy 1q25 q32: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as digital defects, facial dysmorphism, retarded growth, mental retardation and spasticity.
  • Chromosome 12p deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 16p, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 16. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 16q, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 16. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material. Severe cases often result in spontaneous abortion or infant death.
  • Chromosome 17p, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 18, Tetrasomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of short arm of chromosome 18 instead of the normal two which results in various genital, kidney, digital, head and face abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 21 monosomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is only one copy of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two leading to various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 21q deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 21 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 22 Ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 22 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 4, trisomy 4q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 4 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 4q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 4 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 5q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 5 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 7, monosomy 7q3: A very rare chromosomal disorder involving a deletion of material from chromosome 7 at a location known as q3 which results in a wide range of abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 8 recombinant syndrome: A rare recombinant chromosomal disorder involving chromosome 8 which results in various abnormalities.
  • Congenital ichthyosis, microcephalus, quadriplegia: A rare birth disorder characterized by scaly skin, small head and paralysis of legs and arms.
  • Cutis verticis gyrata mental deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures and eye and movement problems.
  • Desmoplastic cerebral astrocytoma of infancy: A rare type of brain tumor that occurs in infants. The tumor consists of cancerous astrocytes.
  • Desmoplastic infantile ganglioma: A rare type of brain tumor that occurs in infants. The tumor may be slow-growing and benign or fast-growing and malignant.
  • Edinburgh malformation syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mental and physical retardation, infant death and various other abnormalities.
  • Encephalopathy due to sulphite oxidase deficiency: An inborn error of metabolism where an enzyme (sulphite oxidase) deficiency results in encephalopathy. Symptoms usually start at birth.
  • Epileptic encephalopathy, early infantile, 1: A genetic form of epilepsy which is severe and starts during infancy. This form of the condition is caused by a defect on the ARX gene.
  • Excessive muscle tone: also called hypertonia is the increase in the contractility of the muscle with decreased stretching
  • Fara-Chlupackova syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by ear, face and neck abnormalities.
  • Feigenbaum-Bergeron-Richardson syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Fetal brain disruption sequence: A very rare syndrome characterized by skull and brain abnormalities.
  • Fitzsimmons-McLachlan-Gilbert syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation paraplegia and thickened coarse skin on palms and soles.
  • Forearm muscle strain: Damage to the forearm muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Gaucher disease -- perinatal lethal form: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormally tight skin and Gaucher disease which is a lipid storage disease. This is the most severe form of Gaucher disease.
  • Gluteal muscle strain: Damage to the gluteal muscle (buttocks) due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Grand mal epilepsy: A condition characterize by sudden loss of consciousness with tonic-clonic seizures
  • Grand mal seizures: A condition which is characterized by the sudden onset of generalized muscle spasms and loss of consciousness
  • Groin muscle strain: Damage to the groin muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Hand muscle strain: Damage to the hand muscles due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: A slow-progressing degeneration of the tract that connects the brain to the spinal cord (corticospinal tract) resulting in muscle spasticity, weakness and paralysis. The severity of symptoms is determined by the nature and extent of the damage.
  • Hip Flexor strain: Damage to the hip flexor muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Hip muscle strain: Damage to the hip muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Howard-Young syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a small head, facial cleft and an extra big toe.
  • Hyperadrenalism: Excessive levels of adrenal hormones in the body. Symptoms depend on which hormone is involved and the degree of involvement. Adrenal hormones are aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Hyperandrogenism: Excessive levels of androgen (male sex hormones) that can occur in males and females.
  • Hyperekplexia and epilepsy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by progressively severe epilepsy and hyperekplexia. The condition is caused by a defect on chromosome Xq22.1.
  • Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: A rare inherited genetic condition characterized by temporary periods of severe muscle weakness. The condition tends to be more severe in males and can be triggered by stress, fasting, rest after exercise and eating foods high in potassium.
  • Hypokalemic periodic paralysis: A rare inherited muscle condition characterized by periods of severe muscle weakness or paralysis which can last from hours to days. Episodes can occur as often as daily or only rarely.
  • Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, childhood onset: A rare disorder involving the buildup of calcium deposits in various parts of the brain. It manifests as degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Isaacs syndrome: A rare disorder where muscles suffer from stiffness and cramping, particularly limb muscles.
  • Krabbe disease, atypical, due to saposin A deficiency: An inherited biochemical disorder which results in neurological regression within a few months of birth. Death usually occurs during the first few years of life. The disorder is similar to Krabbe disease but is differentiated by the genetic origin of the biochemical defect. Krabbe disease involves a defect in the galactocerebrosidase gene whereas atypical Krabbe disease involves a defect in the prosaposin gene which causes a deficiency of saposin A.
  • Krabbe leukodystrophy: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme called galactocerebrosidase. It is a leukodystrophy which refers to a group of genetic disorders that affect the growth of the protective coating around the brain nerves.
  • Leg muscle strain: Damage to the leg muscles due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Lhermitte-Cornil-Quesnel syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the slowly-progressive degeneration of a part of the brain (pyramidal tract and globus pallidus).
  • Lindsay-Burn syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, psychosis and enlarged testes.
  • Lower back muscle strain: Damage to the lower back muscles due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Lymphomatous thyroiditis: Progressive thyroid gland enlargement due to autoimmune disease.
  • Maternal hyperphenylalaninemia: A rare disorder where a mother suffering from phenylketonuria during pregnancy can result in various birth abnormalities.
  • Menkes Disease: Genetic disease of copper deficiency.
  • Mental retardation, Buenos Aires type: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, physical retardation, unusual facial appearance and heart and kidney defects.
  • Metabolic encephalopathy: disorder of the brain due to a metabolic etiology
  • Micrencephaly olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia: A rare fatal condition characterized by brain disease and a small underdeveloped brain.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle Hypertonia: Abnormally increased muscle tone. The condition can be caused by overactive reflexes (spasticity), constant muscle contractions or upper motor neuron damage.
  • Muscle conditions: Any condition that affects the muscles of the body
  • Muscle pain: Aches or pains affecting the muscles
  • Muscle phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency: An inherited genetic muscle disease where an enzyme deficiency (phosphoglycerate kinase) affects the normal processes that convert carbohydrates from food into energy.
  • Muscle spasms: Involuntary movement or contraction of muscles without full control
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myotonic Dystrophy: An inherited disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting as well as eye defects, heart abnormalities and other anomalies. The severity of the condition is greatly variable. There are two type of myotonic dystrophy with type 1 being more severe than type 2.
  • N syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental and physical retardation, eye abnormalities, retarded growth, hearing impairment and a high risk of developing cancers, particularly leukemia. It is an extremely rare condition originally described in two brothers.
  • Nemaline myopathy 6: A very rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemaline rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. There are at least 7 different subtypes of nemaline myopathy, each with a different genetic defect. The severity of the symptoms may vary greatly even among patients within a particular subtype of the disorder. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 15q. Type 4 was slowly progressive but wheelchair dependency does not eventuate.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Neuromyotonia: A condition which is characterized by myotonia caused by electrical activity of the peripheral nerve
  • Niemann-Pick disease, type C1: Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited metabolic disorder where lipids are not able to be metabolized adequately and hence build up and cause damage in various parts of the body such as the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow and brain. The different types of the disease are due to different genetic mutations. Type C is a juvenile or subacute form of the condition which usually starts during childhood and survival into adulthood is possible.
  • Niemann-Pick disease, type C2: Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited metabolic disorder where lipids are not able to be metabolized adequately and hence build up and cause damage in various parts of the body such as the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow and brain. The different types of the disease are due to different genetic mutations. Type C is a juvenile or subacute form of the condition which usually starts during childhood and survival into adulthood is possible.
  • Niemann-Pick disease, type D: Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited metabolic disorder where lipids are not able to be metabolized adequately and hence build up and cause damage in various parts of the body such as the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow and brain. Type D is no longer a relevant term as research has shown that it has the same genetic mutation as Type C and is therefore the same condition.
  • Night blindness -- skeletal anomalies -- unusual facies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by night blindness, a distinctive face and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy: A group of diseases progressive degeneration occurs in a particular area of the brain (olivopontocerebellar area) which results in various neurological symptoms.
  • Paramyotonia congenita: A rare inherited muscle condition where muscles are difficult to relax following contraction. The main muscles affected are in the face, neck, arms and hands. Repetition of movements makes the muscle stiffness become progressively worse. The condition is not progressive and exposure to cold can trigger symptoms.
  • Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease: A disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. The foetal form is one of several forms of Gaucher disease and is the rarest. The fetal form causes death before birth or soon after.
  • Pfeiffer-Palm-Teller syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by facial peculiarities, defective tooth enamel and progressive joint stiffness.
  • Phenothiazine antenatal infection: Maternal use of a drug called phenothiazine has not been proven to cause problems in offspring. Animal studies show there is a risk but no definitive studies have been done on humans. Phenothiazine is used to treat mental and emotional disorders such as schizophrenia. The biggest risks are likely to occur during the first trimester (malformations) and towards the end of the pregnancy (poor muscle tone, poor reflexes and jaundice).
  • Phenylketonuria: A metabolic disorder where there is a deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase which leads to a harmful buildup of the phenylalanine in the body. Normally the phenylalanine is converted into tyrosine. The severity of the symptoms can range from severe enough to cause mental retardation to mild enough not to require treatment. Severity is determined by the level of impairment of enzyme activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase.
  • Phosphoserine aminotransferase deficiency: A recessively inherited enzyme (phosphoserine aminotransferase) deficiency which manifests as uncontrollable seizures, psychomotor retardation, small head and increased muscle tone. Treatment from birth can prevent early death and allow a relatively normal life.
  • Pneumonia, Aspiration: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by breathing in liquids and solids (usually the stomach contents).
  • Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by bacteria.
  • Pneumonia, Staphylococcal: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by the Staphylococcal bacteria. The condition is not common and often occurs as a complication of influenza or other viral respiratory infections. This form of pneumonia is considered serious and up to a third of cases can result in death.
  • Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by a virus.
  • Polymicrogyria, Bilateral Frontoparietal: Polymicrogyria refers to abnormal brain development where the brain has abnormally smooth gyri (convolutions) on the surface of the brain. In the bilateral frontoparietal form, both sides of the portion of the brain called the frontoparietal region are affected.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Proximal myotonic dystrophy: A very rare genetic muscle disorder which is often associated with cataracts, abnormal heart rhythm and infertility. Muscle weakness tends to occur more in muscles closer to the trunk such as the neck, shoulders, hips and upper legs. Pregnancy can exacerbate or initiate symptoms.
  • Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency: A condition which is characterized by a deficiency of purine nucleoside phosphorylate
  • Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency: A very rare genetic disease involving an enzyme (purine nucleoside phosphorylase - PNP) deficiency which causes a buildup of toxic metabolic products which in turn impairs the development of T-cells (part of the body's immune system). The condition is characterized primarily by frequent infections and various neurological symptoms.
  • Rhizomelic pseudopolyarthritis: A rare condition which tends to cause muscle pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulder and hip area.
  • Riedel syndrome: A rare condition that occurs when fibrous tissue forms in the thyroid area and progressively destroys the thyroid gland.
  • Rippling muscle disease: A rare dominantly inherited disorder involving skeletal muscle contractions which produces a visible rippling affect.
  • Rippling muscle disease, 1: A rare dominantly inherited disorder involving skeletal muscle contractions which produces a visible rippling affect. Type 1 involves a defect on chromosome 1q41.
  • Rippling muscle disease, 2: A rare dominantly inherited disorder involving skeletal muscle contractions which produces a visible rippling affect. Type 2 involves a defect on chromosome 3p25.
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever: A bacterial disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and transmitted by ticks. The condition causes fever and a characteristic rash and may be fatal in severe or untreated cases.
  • SPG: A group of neurodegenerative disorders involving progressive spasticity and increased reflexes in the legs. The rate of progression and severity is variable depending on the subtype involved.
  • Saul-Wilkes-Stevenson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems, abnormal skin pigmentation, movement disorder, mental retardation and scoliosis.
  • Serine deficiency: A metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of serine which results in various abnormalities.
  • Shoulder muscle strain: Damage to the shoulder muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Spastic Paraplegia 42, Autosomal Dominant: A rare disorder characterized mainly by muscle wasting and weakness in the legs.
  • Spastic disorders: Brain disorders leading to sustained spasms, stiffness and rigidity
  • Spastic paraplegia -- neuropathy -- poikiloderma: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and weakness of the legs, peripheral nerve degeneration and a skin disorder called poikiloderma. The eyelashes and eyebrows are usually gone by the age of three.
  • Spasticity -- multiple exostoses: A very rare syndrome characterized by stiff legs and numerous bone outgrowths.
  • Startle epilepsy: A form of epilepsy which is triggered by hearing a sudden unexpected stimulus such as a sudden sound. The seizures usually last less than 30 seconds and can occur numerous times during the day. The seizure involves a startle response followed by stiffening of the muscles for a short period of time. Muscle jerking may also be involved and falls are common. These types of seizures are extremely difficult to treat and tend to occur in patients with damage to the brain and intellectual handicap. These seizures often occur in Downs syndrome patients.
  • Stiffness: Reduced mobility or movement
  • Thigh muscle strain: Damage to the thigh muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Tonic seizure: Abnormal electrical activity in a part of the brain which results mainly in muscle stiffness and rigidity. Tonic seizures are considered relatively uncommon. They can occur at any age but are more common in childhood. Patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or multiple sclerosis are particularly susceptible to this type of seizure. Episodes usually only last for a matter of minutes and recovery can vary from minutes to hours.
  • Tonic-clonic seizure: formerly known as grand mal seizures. It involves the entire body causing muscle contraction and loss of consciousness
  • Tricep muscle strain: Damage to the tricep muscle in the arm due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Upper arm muscle strain: Damage to the upper arm muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Upper back muscle strain: Damage to the upper back muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Upper motor neuron weakness: Muscle weakness caused by neurological problems.
  • Urban rogers meyer syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, short stature, hand contractures, genital anomalies and other abnormalities.
  • Weaver Syndrome: A syndrome that is considered a variant of the Marshall-Smith syndrome
  • Whistling face syndrome, recessive form: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized mainly by a characteristic "whistling" face and hand anomalies. The range of symptoms are variable.
  • Young McKeever Squier syndrome: A condition that affects the olivopontocerebellum and the cerebellar cortex of the brain

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Muscle stiffness:

The following list of conditions have 'Muscle stiffness' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Muscle stiffness or choose View All.

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