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Glossary for No symptoms

Medical terms related to No symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 3 alpha methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase 1 deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic. The condition differs from type 2 in that it originates as a defect in a different gene (MCC1 gene) but it causes the same enzyme deficiency.
  • 3 alpha methylcrotonyl-coa carboxylase 2 deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic. The condition differs from type 1 in that it originates as a defect in a different gene (MCC2 gene) but it causes the same enzyme deficiency.
  • 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • AAA: Anoutpouching at an area of weakness in the abdominal aorta involving all 3 layers of the artery wall.
  • ACAD8 deficiency: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Aarau dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Aarau type was discovered in Aarau.
  • Abdominal cystic lymphangioma: A rare form of benign tumor that occurs in infants. It is essentially a malformation of one of the abdominal lymph vessels where a portion is dilated and form a lymph fluid-filled cyst. Symptoms may vary depending on the exact location and size of the cyst.
  • Absent duct of Santorini: The pancreatic duct allows movement of pancreatic juices between the pancreas and common bile duct. Only some people have an additional accessory pancreatic duct called the Duct of Santorini. Generally the anomaly is asymptomatic but some patients may have an increased risk of developing pancreatitis due to other associated ductal anomalies.
  • Acanthoma: A rare benign or malignant epidermal tumor.
  • Acatalasemia: A rare genetic deficiency where little or no catalase is produced.
  • Accessory deep peroneal nerve: An extra nerve in the leg that some people have. The accessory peroneal nerve branches off from the peroneal nerve and provides additional innervations for the foot muscles. The anomaly poses no problems and is asymptomatic but may be noticed if nerve conduction tests are done on the leg nerves.
  • Accessory pancreas: A rare condition where small groups of pancreatic cells are separate from the pancreas and may occur on stomach or intestinal walls.
  • Acid phosphatase deficiency: A group of inherited metabolic bone disorders varying in degree of severity and characterized a deficiency of alkaline phosphate which affects bone mineralization.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Ackee Fruit Food poisoning: Unripe ackee fruit contains a chemical called hypoglycin A and B which affect the central nervous system and fatty acid oxidation. Eating the unripe fruit can cause symptoms can occur in as little as two hours but is generally 6 to 48 hours. The ackee fruit is found mainly in Jamaica, West Africa, Central America, Sought Florida, southern California and Hawaii.
  • Acral lentiginous melanoma: Acral lentigous melanoma is the most common variant of skin cancer seen in dark-skinned people. This form of melanoma appears on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet, or on nails. Lesions are usually brown, black, or multicolored with irregular borders, and flat or nodular.
  • Acute elemental mercury inhalation: Inhalation of elemental mercury can lead to breathing and lung symptoms of various degrees of severity depending on the level of exposure.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Adenocarcinoid tumor: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and tends to metastasize. The symptoms are determined by the location of the tumors.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: A type of cancer that occurs mainly in the genitourinary tract and the cells that make up the tumor are clear. It is very rare and most cases occur in females whose mothers used a drug called DES (synthetic estrogen) while pregnant.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: A type of cancer of the thyroid gland.
  • Adenosarcoma of the uterus: A tumor that develops from the glands that line the uterus.
  • Adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of adenosine monophosphate deaminase which affects muscle energy production. The condition is usually asymptomatic but some people suffer from muscle pain, cramps and fatigue following exercise.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Alba/Geneva I dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Alba/Geneva I type was discovered in Alba/Geneva I.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- Adult benign dominant form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The adult benign form is associated with a normal life expectancy and is often asymptomatic.
  • Albuminuria: The presence of albumin (a blood protein) in the urine.
  • Almeria I dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Alméria I type was discovered in Alméria I.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia -- silent carrier: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia silent carrier involves defects in one of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The patients will have no symptoms but if they have children with a partner who carries thalassemia genes then the condition may be passed on to the offspring.
  • Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency, Type III: A very rare enzyme deficiency (N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminidase) which can occur in three forms: type I (infantile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy), type II or Kanzaki disease (adult-onset) and type III (mild or moderate form).
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Alveolar soft part sarcoma: A rare malignant tumor that occurs in soft connective tissues with an unknown origin. It is a very slow growing tumor which tends to metastasize to the lung and brain years after it is first diagnosed.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Amiens I dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Amiens I type was discovered in Amiens I.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Amsterdam dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Amsterdam type was discovered in Amsterdam.
  • Amyloid angiopathy: A blood vessel disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the blood vessel walls of the brain. The deposits can cause the blood vessel to become weak and rupture resulting in intracranial bleeding. Despite the potentially serious consequences the disorder is often asymptomatic until old age.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and usually consists of white blood cells and null cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anaplastic small cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and consists mainly of small cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia of pregnancy: Anemia of pregnancy is anemia that occurs during pregnancy. Women's bodies have a greater demand for iron during pregnancy and if intake is not sufficient, anemia can result. Anemia in pregnant women can lead to infant problems such as premature birth, fetal death, retarded growth and other problems.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Aneurysm: Swelling or ballooning of part of an artery
  • Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva: A rare form of aortic aneurysm that occurs in the sinus of Valsalva. An aneurysm is a thinning and bulging of a blood vessel wall. The condition is generally asymptomatic unless it burst and causes life-threatening complications including heart failure. An unruptured aneurysm may affect the blood flow (causing palpitations and syncope) as the bulge pushes against surrounding structures.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- hyaline-vascular type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The hyaline-vascular type is usually asymptomatic but symptoms can be determined by the location and number of growths and the effect it can have on nearby tissue by pushing against it - e.g. squashing blood vessels.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Angiosarcoma of the breast: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the breast. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Angiosarcoma of the liver: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the liver. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Angiosarcoma of the scalp: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the scalp. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Anguillulosis: A infectious disease caused by an intestinal parasite called Strongyloides stercoralis (round worm). Infestation can occur directly through broken skin or through ingestion. Symptoms can take decades to develop in some cases. In rare cases, reinfection occurs and the parasites travel to other parts of the body such as the liver and lungs which can cause serious symptoms. The condition is highly deadly in immunocompromised patients.
  • Anthracosis: An often asymptomatic chronic lung disease caused by inhaling coal tust which then deposits in the lungs. Also called black lung disease, coal worker's pneumoconiosis or miner's pneumoconiosis.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Aortic stenosis: A condition which affects the aortic valve of the heart resulting in stenosis of the valve.
  • Aortic valve incompetence: A condition characterized by an inability of the aortic valve to function effectively
  • Aortic valves stenosis of the child: A birth defect where the aortic valve is abnormally narrow or unable to fully open. Depending on the degree of narrowing, the symptoms may range from severe to asymptomatic.
  • Aorto-ventricular tunnel: A rare heart defect where a tunnel from between the ascending aorta and the cavity of the left or sometimes right heart ventricle. The severity of the condition is highly variable from asymptomatic for many years to fetal death. Often other heart anomalies are also associated.
  • Appendiceal tumor: A tumor of the appendix. The condition is often misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appendix cancer: Cancer of the appendix. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Arachnoid Cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the spinal cord and brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation (Type 1): A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Arrhythmias: The occurrence of irregular heart beats
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 1: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 1 is linked to chromosome 14q23-q24 (TGFB3 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 10: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 10 is linked to chromosome 18q12.1-q12 (DSG2 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 11: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 11 is linked to chromosome 18q12.1 (DSC2 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 12: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 12 is linked to chromosome 17q21 (JUP gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 2: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 2 is linked to chromosome 1q42.1-q43 (RYR2 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 3: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 3 is linked to chromosome 14q12-q22.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 4: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 4 is linked to chromosome 2q32.1-q32.3.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 5: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 5 is linked to chromosome 3p23.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 6: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 6 is linked to chromosome 10p14-p12.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 7: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 7 is linked to chromosome 10q22-3.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 8: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 8 is linked to chromosome 6p24 (DSP gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 9: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 9 is linked to chromosome 12p11 (PKP2 gene).
  • Ascariasis: Large intestinal roundworm from 6 to 13 inches.
  • Asymmetric septal hypertrophy: A disease of the heart muscle characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function.
  • Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis: Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis is a symptomless microscopic condition of the prostate gland. It should be distinguished from other forms of prostatitis such as chronic bacterial prostatitis, acute bacterial prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS).
  • Atherosclerosis: A condition which is a form of arteriosclerosis where atheromas are caused by the aggregation of cholesterol and lipids
  • Atrial Septal Defect: An abnormal connection between the 2 atria, or upper chambers of the heart
  • Atrial Septal Defect 3: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 3 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 14q12. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 4: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 4 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 7p15-p14. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 5: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 5 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 15q14. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 6: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 6 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 4q32-q33.
  • Atrial arrhythmia: Arrhythmia arising in the atrium.
  • Atrial flutter: Heart arrhythmia where atria beat more often than ventricles
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Atrial septal defect 1: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 1 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Atrial septal defect 2: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 2 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 8p23.1-p22.
  • Attenuated familial polyposis: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The attenuated form of the condition is distinguished by the development of polyps in old age rather than during the first decades of life.
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A slow progressing disease involving cancerous B-cell lymphocytes which take over the healthy cells in the lymph nodes. B-cells help the body to fight infections so when the disease becomes more advanced, the body is less able to fight infection as there are fewer healthy, functioning B-cells.
  • BK virus infection: A type of polyomavirus that infects most people but generally causes no symptoms. However, that virus may be reactivated when a patient receives immunosuppressive therapy following an organ transplant.
  • Babesiosis: A protozoal infection which is transmitted to human via the bite of certain ticks.
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Bantu siderosis: An iron overload disorder initially observed in South African people. The disorder involves abnormal iron deposits in the liver. It is believed that some African people are predisposed to an increased ability to absorb iron.
  • Baritosis: A lung condition caused by breathing in barium dust or barium containing compounds. It is generally a benign condition that doesn't cause symptoms other than irritation.
  • Bartter's syndrome, type 3: A rare condition characterized by an electrolyte imbalance caused by mutations of the chloride channel gene (ClCNKb). It differs from Bartter's syndrome type I and type II in the absence of nephrocalcinosis. The severity of the condition is greatly variable.
  • Baylisascaris: Rare intestinal roundworm caught from animals.
  • Bednar's tumor: A rare aggressive skin tumor that develops in the skin. The tumor consists of melanin-producing cells which increases the skins pigmentation in the affected area. Metastasis is rare but it often regrows after being surgically removed. It occurs mostly on the trunk, shoulders and chest.
  • Benson disease: A degenerative eye disorder characterized by white opacities (deposits of fatty calcium globules) in the part of the eye called the vitreous humor. The condition is usually asymptomatic with vision impairment occurring only rarely.
  • Bertielliasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a nematode called Bertiella. The parasite commonly infects koalas, possums and primates but can occur in humans. Transmission usually occurs through accidental ingestion of infected fleas.
  • Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Vitelliform macular dystrophy is a rare inherited eye disorder that affects the retina and often results in progressive loss of central vision. The early-onset form of the condition is called Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy and usually appears during childhood. The severity of the symptoms of this form of the condition is quite variable. Peripheral and night vision are usually unaffected.
  • Bethesda II dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Bethesda II type was discovered in Bethesda.
  • Bicuspid aortic valve: A heart defect where the aortic valve has only two leaflets instead of the normal three. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Bidirectional tachycardia: A rare form of abnormal heart rhythm. Causes includes digitalis toxicity, certain heart malformations and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.
  • Bile duct cancer, extrahepatic: A rare cancer that develops in the part of the common bile duct that is outside the liver. The common bile duct channels bile from the gall bladder (which stores bile) and the liver (which makes bile) to the small intestine to assist digestion.
  • Biliary tract cancer: Cancer that develops in the gallbladder or bile ducts.
  • Bladder diverticulum: A defect where a part of the bladder lining forms a pouch in the muscle wall of the bladder. The defect may be congenital or acquired through conditions such as infection and urinary tract obstruction. The size of the diverticulum will determine the severity of the disorder with mild cases being asymptomatic.
  • Blastocystis hominis: Common parasitic condition often causing digestive symptoms.
  • Blastoma: A type of tumor that originates from precursor cells or blasts (immature or embryonic tissue). The symptoms can vary greatly and are determined by the part of the body that is affected. Blastomas can occur in parts of the body such as the brain, liver, kidneys, nervous system, bones and the retina.
  • Blastomycosis: A fungal infection caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis and resulting in lung, skin, bone and genitourinary involvement.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bone and cartilage tumors: Any tumors affecting the bones or cartilage, including both cancerous and benign tumors.
  • Bone infarct: A relatively uncommon condition where some bone tissue dies due to a lack of sufficient blood supply to the affected tissue for any reason. An interruption in the blood supply can result from such things as emboli, thrombi, infection, diabetes, kidney transplant, hemophilia, increased steroid levels, immunosuppressant use and bone trauma. Often there are no symptoms unless significant areas of bone are involved and usually there are no symptoms in the early stages. Radiological tests will not necessarily reveal a bone infarct.
  • Bone symptoms: Symptoms affecting the body's bones
  • Breast cancer: A condition which is characterized by the presence of malignant tissue within breast tissue
  • Breast carcinoma: Carcinoma occurring in breast tissue.
  • Brenner tumor: A benign ovarian tumor
  • Brenner tumor of the vagina: A Brenner tumour usually occurs in the ovaries but can sometimes occur in the vagina. The tumor is generally benign.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bundle Branch Block: An electrical fault in the heart where the electrical signals are blocked or slowed as they try to enter the bundle branches.
  • CIN: A premalignant condition of the cervix that can progress into cervical cancer.
  • Calcification of basal ganglia with or without hypocalcemia: Calcification of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia. That calcification may be associated with conditions such as hypothyroidism, cytomegalovirus, and AIDS or may occur for no apparent reason. The severity of the condition may vary greatly from asymptomatic to neurological, psychiatric and movement disorders. The disorder may also progress at variable rates or remain stable depending on the underlying disease process.
  • California encephalitis: An uncommon mosquito born virus (California encephalitis virus) which can cause brain inflammation in humans. The severity of symptoms is variable. The incubation period can last from a few days to a week. Infants and children tend to be more severely affected than adults who sometimes have no obvious symptoms.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Campylobacter hylointestinalis infection: Campylobacter hyloinstesinalis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis. Cattle, pigs, hamsters and deer are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Campylobacter laridis infection: Campylobacter laridis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis in healthy individuals and blood infection in immunocompromised patients.
  • Cardiac diverticulum: A rare congenital heart malformation involving the outpouching (diverticulum) of a ventricle which can affect heart function to varying degrees depending on the size and location of the defect.
  • Cardiac malformation: Any malformation or structural defect of the heart or it's structures. Some examples include atrioventricular septal defect, conotruncal malformations, transposition of great vessels and heart valve dysplasia. The symptoms vary in nature and severity depending on the type of malformation.
  • Cardiomyopathy due to anthracyclines: Damage to the heart muscle caused by anthracycline drugs which are used in chemotherapy. The damage occurs more frequently with higher cumulative doses. Often the patients have no symptoms of the heart damage for many year.
  • Carrier conditions: A condition where a person is symptom-free despite a genetic or infectious disease
  • Cartilaginous neoplasms: Tumors made up of cartilage tissue. The tumors may be benign or malignant and the symptoms will depend on the location and size of the tumors. The tumors can form on parts of the body such as the arm and leg bones or even in the pharynx. The tumors may cause no symptoms in some cases and are only discovered incidentally.
  • Cataracts: A condition which is characterized by opacities of the lens of the eyes
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac artery stenosis from compression by median arcuate ligament of diaphragm: A rare birth defect where a ligament (median arcuate) is located too low and compresses an artery (celiac artery). When the artery is compressed, blood flow is affected and abdominal pain and other symptoms may occur. The disorder is most common in thin females. Many people may have the anomaly but only in some cases is the compression severe enough to cause symptoms.
  • Cerebral astrocytoma, adult: A very rare tumor that occurs in adults and develops in brain cells called astrocytes. The part of the brain involved is the cerebrum at the top of the head which controls functions such as reading, writing, thinking, learning, speech, emotion and voluntary movement.
  • Cerebrovascular symptoms: Symptoms related to the brain's arteries
  • Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: Dysplasia of the cervical epithelium often premalignant.
  • Cervical cancer: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of malignancy on the cervix
  • Chiari-1 Malformation: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Chilaiditi syndrome: A rare disorder where a part of the colon, or sometimes intestine, is abnormally positioned between the liver and the diaphragm. The defect may occur in people who have chronic lung disease or abdominal ascites but may also occur in healthy individuals without causing symptoms.
  • Childhood liver cancer, primary: Cancer that develops in the tissue of the liver in children.
  • Chlamydia: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Chlamydial infection: Infection from Chlamydia genus.
  • Chloramphenicol-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Chloramphenicol-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called chloramphenicol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Chloroma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Chloromyeloma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Cholestasis: A condition where bile formation or flow is reduced.
  • Cholesterol and lipids: Levels of blood or urine cholesterol or lipids as a symptom
  • Chondrosarcoma (malignant): A form of bone cancer that originates from cartilage tissue. The most common areas affected are the pelvic bones, femur, humerus, arm, spine and ribs
  • Choroid plexus cyst: A rare disorder where a cyst forms in the choroids plexus. The choroids plexus in involved in producing cerebrospinal fluid and forms a lining inside the brain ventricles (space inside the brain). The cyst forms when fluid becomes trapped inside this layer and forms a blister. The cysts themselves tend to cause no symptoms but is often associated with chromosomal mutations and other defects. The cysts tend to be observed in the fetus after about 6 months and usually resolve on their own before birth.
  • Choroiditis, serpiginous: A rare eye disorder where irregularly shaped (serpiginous) lesions form on the eye surface and may damage vision of the macula is damaged.
  • Chromophil renal cell carcinoma: A type of kidney tumor where the cells that make up the tumor take up dye readily during pathology testing.
  • Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: A rare type of kidney tumor. The cells that make up the tumor tend to be clear and do not readily take up dye during pathology analysis. Metastasis often only occurs late in the course of the disease and surgical removal usually leads to a good prognosis.
  • Chromosome 10, uniparental disomy of: A rare chromosomal disorder where the offspring inherits a both copies of chromosome 10 from one parent rather than one chromosome from each parent. No clinical symptoms have been reported on this defect and is generally believed to be harmless on its own.
  • Chromosome 17 trisomy mosaicism: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of chromosome 17 in some of the body's cells. The type of symptoms and severity is determined by the number of cells that have the three copies. Some cases have no obvious symptoms.
  • Chromosome 21 Ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 21 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 7, trisomy mosaic: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 7 in some of the body's cells. Most cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Chromosome 8, mosaic trisomy: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 8 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Chronic benign neutropenia: A reduced level of neutrophils which is not serious and the risk of infection is generally low.
  • Chronic kidney failure: Gradual failure of the kidneys over a period of time
  • Chronic leukemia: Leukemia in which the cell line is well differentiated, usually B lymphocytes.
  • Chronic silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust. Chronic exposure involves inhalation of low levels of the silica.
  • Ciliary dyskinesia, due to transposition of ciliary microtubules: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy refers to heart problems associated with liver cirrhosis. Often the condition is asymptomatic but stresses on the body such as infection, surgery or organ transplant can exacerbate the condition.
  • Citrullinemia I, later-onset: A very rare urea cycle disorder where a lack of the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase prevents ammonia being turned into urea which can then be excreted in the urine. The build up of ammonia in the body can cause harmful effects. The later-onset form of citrullinemia type I is generally milder than the neonatal form and may sometimes be mild enough to produce no symptoms.
  • Clear cell renal cell carcinoma: A type of kidney tumor where the cells that make up the tumor are clear.
  • Cleveland dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Cleveland type was discovered in Cleveland.
  • Clotting symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood's ability to clot
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis: An often asymptomatic chronic lung disease caused by inhaling coal tust which then deposits in the lungs. Also called black lung disease, anthracosis or miner's pneumoconiosis.
  • Coarctation of aorta autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited heart defect called coarctation of the aorta. It involves an abnormal narrowing of part of the aorta which can cause symptoms such as hypertension. The severity of symptoms is variable depending on the exact location and degree of aortic narrowing.
  • Coats Disease: A rare condition where a small group of dilated blood vessels (telangiectasia) form in the retina of one eye and can result in retinal detachment. It is believed to be a more severe form of Leber military aneurysm.
  • Cobalamin R Binder Protein Deficiency: A rare inherited condition where the lack of a protein (R binder protein) results in a deficiency of cobalamin (vitamin B12). The condition is considered benign and no treatment is needed.
  • Cobalamin pseudodeficiency due to transcobalamin deficiency: A rare inherited condition where the lack of a protein (R binder protein) results in a deficiency of cobalamin (vitamin B12). The condition is considered benign and no treatment is needed.
  • Coccidioidomycosis: An infectious fungal disease caused by inhaling the spores of a particular bacteria. Also called desert fever, desert rheumatism, San Joaquin fever and valley fever.
  • Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition where the body's immune system triggers the production of antibodies against the body's own red blood cells. The red cells are destroyed at an abnormally rapid rate which leads to anemia. Cold haemolytic anemia is characterized by the fact that the abnormal destruction of red blood cells is more active when the patient is exposed to cold temperatures. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Cold sores: An acute viral disease marked by groups of vesicles on the skin that occur\ on the lips or nares
  • Collecting duct carcinoma: A rare, aggressive type of kidney cancer that arises from the kidney collecting ducts. The cancer cells can form irregular tubes.
  • Colloid cysts of third ventricle: A rare type of benign brain tumor. In rare cases the tumor can obstruct the flow of fluid in the brain and cause hydrocephalus (buildup of fluid in the brain). Untreated hydrocephalus can lead to death.
  • Coloboma of iris: A hole in the iris (colored part of the eye) of the eye. The defect may be inherited or caused by surgery or injury to the eye. The severity of symptoms is determined by the size of the defect.
  • Colonic diverticulosis: Diverticulosis, otherwise known as "diverticular disease", is the condition of having diverticula in the colon which are outpocketings of the colonic mucosa and submucosa through weaknesses of muscle layers in the colon wall.
  • Colonic malakoplakia: A rare form of inflammatory disease that occurs in the colon and occurs mainly in immunocompromised people. The severity of the disorder can vary from asymptomatic to intestinal obstruction and even death in rare cases.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 1: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 10: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 11: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 2: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8q24.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 3: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 4: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 5: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p14.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 6: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8q23.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 7: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 8: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q.
  • Colorectal Cancer, Susceptibility to, 9: Colorectal cancer refers to cancer of the colon (bowel) or cancer of the rectum, depending on the region affected. It is an under-diagnosed condition because it has no early symptoms. Even when symptoms occur, both the symptoms and the diagnostic tests required are considered embarrassing by many, leading to delayed diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is crucial as colon cancer is a leading cause of death. There are various genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Not all patients with the genetic defect will develop colorectal cancer but the presence of additional triggering factors such as alcohol may trigger the development in those genetically susceptible. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16q.
  • Colorectal Polyps: Polyp growths in the colon or rectum.
  • Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon (bowel) or rectum.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Congenital analbuminemia: A rare disorder where low or absent blood albumin levels are present at birth or soon after. Some cases are virtually asymptomatic as the liver compensates by making other proteins but other cases can result in symptoms such as osteoporosis and high blood lipid levels.
  • Congenital aneurysms of the great vessels: A bulge in one of the main blood vessels in the body - pulmonary artery, pulmonary veins, vena cava and aorta. The condition is generally asymptomatic unless the aneurysm becomes very large or bursts which can result in rapid death depending on the location of the aneurysm.
  • Congenital arteriovenous shunt: A rare birth defect involving the abnormal passage of blood between arteries and veins. The range and severity of symptoms is determined by the number, size and location of the arteries and veins involved.
  • Congenital bronchogenic cyst: A rare birth condition characterized by the formation of a cyst in the middle of the chest, usually near the area where the trachea branches off. The condition may be asymptomatic but if the cyst is large enough it may cause problems by compressing nearby structures such as the trachea.
  • Congenital cardiovascular malformations: The abnormal development of heart blood vessels. Specific examples of this condition includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome, coarctation and tricuspid atresia.
  • Congenital fiber type disproportion: A rare inherited disease involving abnormalities in the growth of type I muscle fibers.
  • Congenital heart block: A rare congenital heart disease where a slowed heart rate is caused by defects in the heart conduction system. The condition is usually asymptomatic and harmless but in severe cases (complete AV block) various symptoms and sudden death may occur.
  • Congenital heart septum defect: A heart defect involving the septum which is present at birth. The defect is a hole in the wall of the heart that separates the right and left chambers and allows blood to flow through the hole. An atrial septal defect is a hole between the two upper heart chambers and a ventricular septal defect is a hole between the two lower heart chambers. Symptoms are determined by the size and exact location of the defect.
  • Congenital mesoblastic nephroma: A benign congenital kidney tumor.
  • Congenital mitral malformation: Malformations of the mitral valve that are present at birth. The mitral valve allows blood to flow between the two chambers on the left side of the heart. Types of mitral malformation are atresia (absent mitral valve), stenosis (narrowed mitral valve) and parachute mitral valve.
  • Congenital mitral stenosis: A heart malformation that is present at birth. The mitral valve is narrower than normal which affects blood flow between the upper and lower chambers on the left side of the heart. It usually occurs in conjunction with other malformations
  • Congenital thrombotic disease due to protein C deficiency: A rare blood disorder where deficiency of protein C (anticoagulation agent) results in a predisposition for the formation of blood clots. The severity of the condition is variable. Homozygotes tend to have more severe symptoms while most heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Deficiency of protein C can be an inherited trait or may be acquired through liver disease and after surgery.
  • Copper deficiency-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Copper deficiency-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused insufficient quantities of copper. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells due to the lack of copper. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Corneal Graft Rejection: A corneal graft is the replacement of damaged corneal tissue with a health cornea. Sometimes the body's immune system may reject the new tissue. Figures vary but roughly a tenth of corneal transplant patients have problems with rejection in the short term and about a third suffer rejection symptoms within the first five years after surgery. Rejection can occur months or even years after the transplant. Transplants involving both eyes increase the risk of rejection. Old patients tend to have fewer problems with rejection.
  • Corneal Transplant Rejection: A corneal graft is the replacement of damaged corneal tissue with a health cornea. Sometimes the body's immune system may reject the new tissue. Figures vary but roughly a tenth of corneal transplant patients have problems with rejection in the short term and about a third suffer rejection symptoms within the first five years after surgery. Rejection can occur months or even years after the transplant. Transplants involving both eyes increase the risk of rejection. Old patients tend to have fewer problems with rejection.
  • Coronary arteries -- congenital malformation: Abnormal coronary arteries present at birth. The coronary artery may be misplaced or deformed and the severity of the defect will determine the type and seriousness of symptoms. Some malformations produce no clinical symptoms whereas others are life-threatening without prompt treatment.
  • Coronary artery aneurysm: Abnormal dilation or swelling of a heart artery. The dilated portion is weakened and can burst.
  • Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency: A genetic disorder causing a deficiency of corticosteroid-binding globulin which manifests as fatigue, muscle fatigue and blood pressure problems. Some patients are asymptomatic whereas others suffer muscle and generalized fatigue as well as blood pressure problems.
  • Cryofibrinogenemia: A rare condition where a blood protein precipitates when it cools and then redissolves once it is warmed again. The disorder can occur for no apparent reason or may be associated with conditions such as cancer, infections and blood clotting disorders. Some sufferers are asymptomatic whereas other develop thrombosis or skin symptoms in response to exposure to cold.
  • Cryptococcosis: A fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans which primarily affects the central nervous system and the lungs. People with weakened immune systems such as AIDS sufferers are generally more susceptible to this type of infection.
  • Cycloserine-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Cycloserine -induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called Cycloserine. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Cyclosporiasis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cyclosporiosis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cysticercosis: An infectious disease caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. If the larvae are ingested then a mild or asymptomatic tapeworm infection occurs. However, ingested eggs pass into the bloodstream where they can then enter various tissues and form the cysts that characterize cysticercosis.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • DIC: DIC s a syndrome triggered by a number of medical conditions including malignancy, infection and liver disease, and results in consumption of clotting factors in the blood.
  • Dandy-Walker variant: A less severe form of a brain malformation called Dandy-Walker. The brain malformation involves the development of a cyst which may interfere with the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid and lead to hydrocephalus. Many patients don't have symptoms until adulthood or remain asymptomatic but some may be severely affected.
  • Deafness -- thyroid hormone resistance: An inherited disorder where the body fails to respond to thyroid hormone even though there is sufficient quantities of the hormone.
  • Decreased mean cell haemoglobin: A decreased hemoglobin content of the average red blood cell, calculated from the hemoglobin therein and the red cell count in erythrocyte indices
  • Decreased mean cell haemoglobin concentration: A decreased average haemoglobin concentration in the a specified volume
  • Decreased mean cell volume: A decreased mean red cell volume
  • Decreased sugar tolerance in diabetics: A decrease in the bodies ability in diabetes to lower the blood sugar levels
  • Deep vein thrombosis: The formation of a thrombosis in the deep veins usually within the legs
  • Deficiency of Member 8 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenace Family: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Dehydratase deficiency: A very rare condition involving a deficiency of the enzyme called dehydratase. It is usually asymptomatic and often associated with high blood phenylalanine levels.
  • Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: A rare form of slow growing tumor that develops deep in the skin. Metastatis is rare but it often regrows after being surgically removed. It occurs mostly on the trunk, shoulders and chest.
  • Dermoid cyst: Benign cystic tumor often containing skin, hair, and other tissue
  • Desmoid disease, hereditary: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the development of benign growths called desmoid tumors or fibromatoses. The growth usually occurs in the abdomen but can occur in the neck, chest, arms and legs. Symptoms vary depending on the size and location of the growths. Even thought the growths are benign the can cause localized damage and obstruction. The condition can stabilize or become progressively worse and ultimately lead to death. The tumors often develop after some sort of trauma such as abdominal surgery or childbirth.
  • Desmoplastic small round cell tumor: A rare aggressive tumor that usually develops in soft tissue and tends to grow to a large size. It usually occurs in the abdomen but may also in other parts of the body such as abdominal organs, brain, testicles, ovaries, spinal cord and skull.
  • Developmental delay due to 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • Dextrocardia: A rare anomaly where the heart is located on the right side of the chest instead of the normal left side of the chest. The condition is generally asymptomatic but is often associated with other abnormalities such as inverted location of other abdominal organs.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.2.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q34-q35.2.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diaphragmatic hernia, congenital: A birth defect involving an abnormal opening in the diaphragm which is a structure that assists breathing and keeps the abdominal organs from moving into the chest. The abdominal organs can protrude through this abnormal opening and restrict the growth of chest organs such as the lung and heart. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the size of the defect - some cases aren't diagnosed until adulthood.
  • Dibasic aminoaciduria type 1: A rare disorder where the kidney excretes excessive amounts of certain amino acids (lysine, ornithine and arginine.
  • Dientamoeba fragilis: Parasite usually causing digestive symptoms
  • Digestive duplication: Duplication of a part of the digestive system. Duplication of the anal canal is the least common where as duplication of the Symptoms vary depending on what part of the digestive system is duplicated.
  • Digestive tract cancer:
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy: A rare chronic heart muscle condition where one or both heart ventricles are dilated or have impaired contractility.
  • Dimorphic anemia: Dimorphic refers to anemia that has two different causes acting together e.g. iron deficiency as well as a Vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Diphyllobothriasis: Tapeworm infection from eating undercooked fish.
  • Diphyllobothrium latum infection: A tapeworm infection with a tapeworm species called Diphyllobothrium latum. The infection is called diphyllobothriasis and usually results from eating undercooked contaminated fish. Infections are most common in countries where eating raw fish is common e.g. Japan, North America, Asia and parts of Europe. The severity of symptoms is variable but most infections are asymptomatic. The tapeworm infestation can continue for decades if untreated.
  • Dipylidiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a tapeworm called Dipylidium caninum. The parasite commonly infects dogs and cats but can occur in humans. Transmission usually occurs through accidental ingestion of infected cat or dog fleas. Children are more likely to become infected and are also more likely to have symptoms.
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Diverticular disease and diverticulitis:
  • Dowling-Degos disease: A rare condition characterized by progressive enlargement of pigmented areas that occur on areas of creased or folded skin such as armpits, groin, breasts and limbs.
  • Doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy: Heart disease caused by the use of a cancer drug called Doxorubicin.
  • Dracunculiasis: An infectious disease caused by the nematode Dracunculus medinensis which is usually transmitted by drinking water contaminated by infected crustaceans.
  • Drug-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Drug-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by drugs such as cycloserine, isoniazid and ethanol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Allopurinol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to allopurinol. Allopurinol is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Anabolic C-17: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Anabolic C-17 which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Anesthetic agent: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antianginal agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antianginal agents. Antianginal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antiarrhythmics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiarrhythmics. Antiarrhythmics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antibiotics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Anticoagulants: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticoagulants. Anticoagulants are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antifungals: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antihyperlipidemic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antihyperlipidemic agents. Antihyperlipidemic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antihypertensives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antihypertensives. Antihypertensives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antineoplastic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antineoplastic agents. Antineoplastic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antithyroid drugs: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called antithyroid drugs. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Benzodiazepine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called benzodiazepine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- British anti-Lewisite penicillamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to British anti-Lewisite penicillamine. British anti-Lewisite penicillamine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Butyrophenone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called butyrophenone. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cimetidine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cimetidine. Cimetidine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Colchicine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to colchicine. Colchicine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Dantrolene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dantrolene. Dantrolene is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Diflunisal: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to diflunisal. Diflunisal is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Disulfiram: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Disulfiram. Disulfiram is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Diuretic Agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to diuretic agents. Diuretic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called erythromycin estolate. Erythromycin estolate is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Erythromycin ethyl succinate. Erythromycin ethyl succinate is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Fenoprofen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to fenoprofen. Fenoprofen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Glucocorticoids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called glucocorticoids. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ibuprofen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Indomethacin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to indomethacin. Indomethacin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Iodide ion: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Iodide ion. Iodide ion is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Naproxen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to naproxen. Naproxen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Oral hypoglycemics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral hypoglycemics which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called penicillin. Penicillin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenothiazines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called phenothiazine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenylbutazone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to phenylbutazone. Phenylbutazone is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ranitidine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ranitidine. Ranitidine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Salicylate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to salicylates. Salicylates are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Steroids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to steroids which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Sulfonamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Sulfonamide antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Sulindac: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulindac. Sulindac is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Tamoxifen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tamoxifen which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Telithromycin. Telithromycin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Thioxanthene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called Thioxanthene. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Thorotrast: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Thorotrast. Thorotrast is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Vitamin A: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Vitamin A. Vitamin A is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Zoxazolamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Zoxazolamine. Zoxazolamine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- anticonvulsives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- antituberculous agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- antiviral medication: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- endocrine agent: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- monoamine oxidase inhibitors: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to psychotropic agents called monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- psychotropic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain psychotropic agents. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- tricyclic antidepressant: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called tricyclic antidepressant. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drugs-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Dysfibrinogenemia, familial: A rare familial disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen. There are various types of this order and they can vary in severity from asymptomatic to causing abnormal bleeding and blood clotting. Examples of subtypes includes Amsterdam, Detroit and Wiesbaden dysfibrinogenemia.
  • Dysgerminoma: Rare malignant tumor of the ovary. Also called embryoma of the ovary or ovarian seminoma.
  • Eagle's syndrome: A group of symptoms caused by calcification of the stylohyoid ligament and an abnormally long styloid process. The styloid process is a bone at the base of the skull which is attached to muscles and ligaments connected to the throat and tongue. If this bone is too long then actions such as swallowing and turning the head can cause pain and discomfort. The cause of the condition is unknown but trauma and inflammation may be the cause in some cases.
  • Ebstein's anomaly: A heart defect where the tricuspid valve is malformed
  • Emphysema, congenital lobar: A rare respiratory disorder where air can readily enter the lungs but has difficulty escaping. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Anabolic C-17: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Anabolic C-17 which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Antithyroid drugs: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called antithyroid drugs. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Glucocorticoids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called glucocorticoids. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Oral contraceptives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral contraceptives which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Oral hypoglycemics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral hypoglycemics which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Steroids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to steroids which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Tamoxifen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tamoxifen which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endodermal sinus tumor: A form of malignant germ cell tumor that occurs mainly in young children. They can occur in the testis, ovaries, uterus, abdomen, thorax, tailbone region, vagina, liver, retroperitoneum and pineal ventricle of the brain. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELST's) in Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease: A tumor that develops in the endolymph sacs which are structures inside the ear. These tumors occur predominantly in patients suffering from Von Hippel Landau disease. The tumors don't metastasize.
  • Endometrial stromal sarcoma: A rare type of cancer that develops from the endometrial layer of the uterus. The cancer may be slow-growing or aggressive and may metastasize.
  • Endometriosis: Misplaced uterus tissue causing scar tissue.
  • Epstein-Barr virus: Common virus causing mononucleosis
  • Erdheim disease I: A rare condition characterized by the cyst formation and degeneration of the middle layer of the aorta which can ultimately weaken that artery and may result in an aneurysm. A burst aortic aneurysm is a serious possible complication.
  • Escherichia coli O157:H7: A form of bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract
  • Esophageal carcinoma: A cancer of the esophagus.
  • Esophageal diverticulum: Stretched pocket area of esophagus tissue
  • Esophagus symptoms: Symptoms affecting the esophagus (digestive throat passage)
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Ethanol-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Ethanol-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by consuming ethanol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Ewing's family of tumors: A rare condition where tumors develop in bone or soft tissue. Usually teenagers are affected.
  • Exostoses: Development of non-cancerous bony growths on bones. Pain can result depending on the size and location of the growth.
  • Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor: A rare form of cancer that originates in germ cells that are found in areas such as the brain, chest, tailbone or abdomen rather than the ovaries or testicles. Germ cells are the precursors for male sperm and female eggs. The symptoms are determined by the location and size of the tumor.
  • Extramedullary Myeloid Tumor: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: A rare type of cancer where the B cells (a type of white blood cell) in lymph tissue associated with mucosa begin to proliferate. The cancer can affect any mucosal membrane tissue but is most common in the gastric mucosal membranes. Symptoms may vary considerable depending on the stage and location of the cancer.
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Factor VII deficiency: A rare inherited blood disorder caused by a deficiency of a blood protein called Factor VII and resulting in poor blood coagulation. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Factor XII Deficiency:
  • Fahr's Syndrome: A rare neurologic disorder where calcium is deposited in various parts of the brain resulting in progressive loss of motor and mental function.
  • Fallopian tube cancer: A cancer that originates in the fallopian tubes which form part of the female reproductive organs. This type of cancer is relatively uncommon.
  • Familial Colorectal Cancer: An inherited disorder in which affected individuals have a higher-than-normal chance of developing colorectal cancer and certain other types of cancer, often before the age of 50.
  • Familial Wilms tumor 2: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 2 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 19q13.4).
  • Familial chronic benign neutropenia: A harmless from of chronic neutropenia which tends to run in families. The infections are usually mild and patients are generally asymptomatic.
  • Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia: An inherited characteristic involving increased levels of thyroxine in the blood and abnormal serum blood despite normal thyroid gland functioning. The condition may be mistaken for hyperthyroidism.
  • Familial hypertension: An inherited from of high blood pressure that tends to run in families.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 1: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q12.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 10: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 10 is caused by a defect in the MYL2 gene on chromosome 12q23-q24.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 2: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 2 is caused by a defect in the troponin-T2 gene on chromosome 1q.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 3: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 3 is caused by a defect in the alpha-tropomyosin gene on chromosome 15q22.1.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 4: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 4 is caused by a defect in the cardiac myosin binding protein-C gene on chromosome 11p11.2.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 5:
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 6: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q31-qter.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 7: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 7 is caused by a defect in the TNNI3 gene on chromosome 19q13.4.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 8: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 8 is caused by a defect in the MYL3 gene on chromosome 3p.
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 9: An inherited condition characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function. Type 9 is caused by a defect in the TTN gene on chromosome 2q24.3.
  • Familial polyposis -- classical: An inherited condition where polyps develop in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The polyps are initially benign but may become malignant if untreated.
  • Familial polyposis, autosomal recessive: An inherited condition where polyps develop in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The polyps are initially benign but may become malignant if untreated. The autosomal recessive form of this condition is characterized by fewer polyps than in other forms (less than 100) and is due to mutations in a different gene.
  • Familial pulmonary arterial hypertension: Familial pulmonary arterial hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the arteries that carry blood to the lungs. Blood pressure in other parts of the body is normal or sometimes even low. The condition occurs in a familial pattern i.e. tends to run in families.
  • Familial visceral myopathy: A rare condition where the duodenum is dilated and the muscles don't function normally which affects the movement of digestive waste material through the intestines. The symptoms of the condition are similar to that caused by an intestinal obstruction.
  • Fasciolopsiasis: Infection with a type of intestinal fluke (Fasciola buski). Infection occurs by eating infected aquatic plants. The adult fluke attaches itself to the intestinal wall and causes ulcers which may be asymptomatic unless there is an extensive infestation.
  • Fetal left ventricular aneurysm: A rare disorder where the fetus has a dilated ventricle on the left side of the heart. Severity of the defect is variable with some cases being asymptomatic and in other heart failure occurs during the fetal stage.
  • Florid cystic endosalpingiosis of the uterus: Benign tumor-like uterine cysts.
  • Folate-deficiency anemia: Folate-deficiency anemia is a blood condition characterized by low levels of folate in the body which leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells. It is usually the result of a poor diet, malabsorption issues or the use of certain medications.
  • Follicular dendritic cell tumor: A rare form of malignant tumor. Follicular dendritic cells are immune system cells found in lymph follicles. The tumor tends to be low grade and tends to reoccur after removal and occasionally metastasizes. The symptoms are determined by the location and size of the tumor. The tumor can occur on various parts of the body such as lymph nodes, tonsils, armpits and mediastinum but is most common in the neck lymph nodes.
  • Fructose-1-phosphate aldolase deficiency, hereditary: An inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of the enzyme fructose-1-phsophate aldolase prevents fructose being metabolized resulting in fructose intolerance.
  • Fructosuria: A rare harmless asymptomatic condition caused by a lack of the liver enzyme called fructokinase which is needed to turn fructose into glycogen.
  • Galactosemia III: A rare inherited disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (UDP-Galactose-4-epimerase) prevents the metabolism of galactose which is a sugar component of milk. The condition may vary from mild to severe.
  • Gall Bladder Cancer: Cancer of the gall bladder.
  • Gallstones: A condition where biliary calculi form in the gallbladder
  • Gamma-cystathionase deficiency: A rare metabolic defect where a buildup of cystathionine in the body is due to an enzyme deficiency (cystathionine gamma-lyase) which normally converts methionine into cysteine. The condition is usually asymptomatic.
  • Gastric cancer, borrmann 4: A form of malignant gastric tumor which results in the stomach tissue becoming thick and rigid.
  • Gastric lymphoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the lining of the stomach. The tumor may be primary or have spread there from other parts of the body. This type of tumor is more common in old people.
  • Gastro-enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor: A rare form of gastrointestinal tumor. It includes two main groups of cancer called carcinoid and endocrine pancreatic tumors. Some of the tumors consist of hormone secreting cells which results in excessive secretion of certain hormones.
  • Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Cancer that develops from stroma cells in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The primary locations are the small intestine, esophagus and esophagus with symptoms being determined by the location, stage and size of the tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal neoplasm: A growth or excessive proliferation of cells in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract which includes the esophagus, intestine, pharynx and stomach. The growth may be benign or malignant. The symptoms are determined by the size, location and stage of the tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal tumors: Any tumor of the gastrointestinal (digestive) system, including cancers and benign tumors.
  • Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone: An inherited disorder where the body fails to respond to thyroid hormone even though there is sufficient quantities of the hormone.
  • Genital herpes: Sexually transmitted infection of the genital region.
  • Genochondromatosis: A rare condition characterized by the formation of multiple bone lesions called chondromas in long tubular bones. A chondroma is a benign cartilage growth. The lesions tend to develop in bones such as the upper arm bone (upper end), thigh bone (lower end) and the collar bone.
  • Genochondromatosis II: A rare condition characterized by the formation of multiple bone lesions called chondromas. A chondroma is a benign cartilage growth. In type II, the lesions tend to occur in the short tubular bones and the collarbones aren't involved. The condition is usually benign and the anomaly is only detected incidentally.
  • Geographic tongue: Geographic tongue is a tongue that resembles a map because of patches of tissue on the surface.
  • Gestational diabetes: The occurrence of diabetes that's onset occurs during pregnancy
  • Gestational hypertension: Hypertension that occurs to a mother during pregnancy
  • Gestational trophoblastic tumor: A rare tumor that develops in the uterus from cells formed after an abnormal conception (abnormal union of sperm and egg cell). Gestational trophoblastic tumors can also develop from a normal placenta. There are two type of gestational trophoblastic tumors: choriocarcinoma and hydatidiform mole.
  • Ghost cell glaucoma: Ghost cell glaucoma can occur after vitreous hemorrhage when the residual deformed red blood cells gain access to the anterior chamber and clog the trabecular meshwork resulting in increased intraocular pressure.
  • Giardia: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Gilbert's Syndrome: An inherited enzyme deficiency (UDP glucoronyl transferase) which causes periodic mild jaundice, abdominal pain, weakness and fatigue.
  • Glaucoma: A condition which affects the eye and characterized by an increase in the intraocular pressure
  • Glaucoma acquired secondary to intraocular neoplasm: It is characterised by elevated intraocular pressure.
  • Glaucoma, hereditary: An inherited form of glaucoma - includes congenital glaucoma, juvenile glaucoma and adult open-angle glaucoma.
  • Glioma: A rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor.
  • Glioma Susceptibility: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. There have been at least 8 genetic defects linked to an increased glioma susceptibility.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 1: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p25.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 2: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q23.31.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: No symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'No symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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