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Symptoms » Numbness » Glossary
 

Glossary for Numbness

Medical terms related to Numbness or mentioned in this section include:

  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidic dry cell batteries inhalation poisoning: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals which can cause symptoms if inhaled. The smoke emitted from burning batteries can also cause poisoning symptoms if sufficient quantities are inhaled. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved.
  • Acoustic Neurinoma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Acoustic neuroma: A rare benign tumor that forms in the hearing canal. Can cause tinnitus, progressive hearing loss, headaches, facial numbness, papilledema, dizziness and an unsteady walk. Speaking and swallowing difficulty can occur in advanced stages. Also called acoustic neurilemoma, acoustic neurinoma and acoustic neurofibroma.
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Acroparesthesia syndrome: A condition involving episodes of paresthesia (tingling, numbness and stiffness) mainly in the lower arms and hands. It most often occurs in middle-aged women.
  • Acute fulminant multiple sclerosis: Malignant Multiple Sclerosis, is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Thankfully very rare, this highly aggressive form is defined by its swift and relentless decline to significant disability or even death, often within a few weeks or months after the onset of the initial attack. It is characterized by widespread and progressive cerebral white matter destruction or by severe pathological involvement of clinically strategic regions such as brainstem, resulting in bulbar paralysis.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute peripheral arterial occlusion: A sudden blockage of a peripheral artery. The blockage may result from a blood clot, embolism, dissection or trauma. Symptoms usually start suddenly.
  • Alcoholic polyneuropathy: A condition where damage to many peripheral nerves throughout the body results from excessive alcohol consumption. The sensory nerves tend to be affected more than the motor nerves and the legs are usually more affected than the arms.
  • Amiodarone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiodarone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amyloid Neuropathies: A peripheral nerve disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the nerves. Sensory, autonomic or motor nerves may be affected. The degree of nerve involvement, and hence symptoms, are variable.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Analgesia: The relief of the sensation of pain without a loss of ones conscious state
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Anencephaly: A birth defect where large parts of the brain is missing and the brainstem is malformed.
  • Angina: Angina is a particular type of pain related to heart conditions
  • Ankle fracture: Ankle fracture refers to a broken bone in the ankle.
  • Ankle numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the ankle region of the foot.
  • Anterior spinal artery stroke: An interruption to the blood supply in the anterior spinal artery which affects sensation, motor control and bowel control. The symptoms may improve to varying degrees once the blood supply returns to normal. The severity of the disorder depends on the exact location of the defect and how long it persists for.
  • Arachnoid Cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the spinal cord and brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Arm fracture: Arm fracture is a break in any of the bones in the arm.
  • Arm numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Arteriosclerosis Obliterans: Arteriosclerosis that results in the narrowing and gradual blockage of the artery. Arteriosclerosis involves the deposition of cholesterol plaques and other material on the inside of the artery walls. The symptoms will depend on the location of the arteries affected and how severe the blockage is.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Autism: Childhood mental condition with social and communication difficulties.
  • Autism, Susceptibility to, 15: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 15 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q35-q36.
  • Autism, X-linked, susceptibility to, 1: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. X-Linked type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xq13.
  • Autism, X-linked, susceptibility to, 2: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. X-Linked type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp22.3.
  • Autism, X-linked, susceptibility to, 3: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. X-Linked type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp22.3.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 1: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q22.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 10: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 10 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q36.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 11: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 11 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q24.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 12: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 12 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 21p13-q11.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 13: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 13 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 12q14.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 14: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 14 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16p11.2.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 3: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 4: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 5: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 6: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q11.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 7: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q21.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 8: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q27.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 9: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 9 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q31.
  • Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System: A group of diseases where the body's immune system attacks it's own nervous system. Examples includes opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome and multiple sclerosis. Symptoms vary depending on which nerves are involved.
  • Autoimmune neuropathies: Nerve diseases from autoimmune damage.
  • Autoimmune peripheral neuropathy: Damage to peripheral nerves that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks it.
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Autosomal Dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth with hearing loss: A dominantly inherited form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which also involves hearing loss. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a progressive nerve disease that affects the peripheral nerves and hence the muscles primarily in the limbs.
  • Back numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the back
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Basilar artery insufficiency: refers to a temporary set of symptoms due to decreased blood flow in the posterior circulation of the brain
  • Benign astrocytoma: Benign tumors that occur in the brain or spinal cord. Symptoms and severity depends on the location and size of the tumors.
  • Black nightshade poisoning: The Black Nightshade is a herb which bears small white or purple flowers and dull black berries. The plant originated in South America. The berries contain solanine alkaloid which can be toxic if eaten in large quantities. The leaves and unripe berries are considered toxic whereas the ripe fruit is possibly edible.
  • Blue-ringed octopus poisoning: The blue-ringed octopus is found in shallow Australian ocean water and can deliver venomous, potentially fatal bite. The poison is present in the saliva of the octopus. The venom affects the neuromuscular system.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Box thorn poisoning: The leaves of the Box thorn plant contain a toxic chemical called atropine and possibly other toxic compounds. The box thorn plant is a spiny-stemmed shrub which originated in Europe. Symptoms can be quite serious depending on the quantity of the plant ingested.
  • Brachial Neuritis: Condition where there is a sudden onset of shoulder weakness and pain, thought to be due to a viral infection of the nerve roots in the cervical spine
  • Brachial Plexus Injury: Damage to the nerves controlling the shoulder and arm (often from childbirth).
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Broken elbow: Fracture at the elbow joint
  • Broken finger: Fracture of a finger bone
  • Broken foot: Fracture of one or more foot bones
  • Broken hand: Fracture of one or more bones in the hand
  • Broken leg: Fracture of a bone in the upper or lower leg
  • Broken nose: Fracture of the nose
  • Broken shoulder blade: Fracture of the shoulder blade bone (scapula)
  • Broken toe: Fracture of a bone in a toe
  • Brown-Sequard Syndrome: A disorder where spinal cord compression and lesions involve only half of the spinal cord.
  • Buerger's disease: Buergers's disease is a recurring inflammation and thrombosis (clotting) of small and medium arteries and veins of the hands and feet
  • Burning symptoms: Any burning or burn-like sensations.
  • Buttock numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the buttocks
  • CANOMAD syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities caused by immune-mediated nerve demyelination. There is usually no loss of limb function associated with the disorder. The face, throat, mouth and eye symptoms (weakness of the muscles) usually come and go.
  • Calf numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the calf or calves
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Hand or wrist problems; often from repetitive motion.
  • Catamenial seizure: A type of seizure that is associated with the female menstrual cycle. It appears that flucutations in hormone levels leads to increased seizure activity in some women just before or during their menstrual cycle. Simple or complex partial seizures or generalized tonic-clonic seizures may be involved.
  • Celandine poisoning: A biennial herb which bears small yellow flowers and a fruit capsule. The plant has a yellow-orange sap. Parts of the plant (mainly the roots) contain a highly toxic chemical called isoquinoline alkaloid which is toxic. Death can result if sufficient quantities of the root are consumed.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Central Pain Syndrome: Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition caused by damage to or dysfunction of the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord.
  • Central nervous system lymphoma, primary: A type of lymphoma that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). A lymphoma consists of cancerous lymphocytes which are a type of white blood cell. Symptoms vary according to the location of the lymphoma.
  • Cerebral contusion: Injury of the cerebrum often causing bruising when the skin is not broken.
  • Cerebrovascular Conditions: Conditions of the brain's blood vessels including stroke.
  • Cerebrovascular accident: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorder: Degeneration of limb muscles.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease -- deafness: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and deafness involves the usual CMT symptoms as well as deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease deafness recessive type: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4D is inherited recessively and is caused by a defected in a gene in chromosome 8 and is a severe form of the disease that also involves deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1C is inherited as an autosomal dominant pattern and involves a defect in the LITAF/SIMPLE gene on chromosome 16.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1D: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1D is caused by a defect of the ERG2 gene on chromosome 10 and usually results in a severe form of the disease.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1E: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1E involves the usual CMT symptoms as well as deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1F: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1F is caused by a defect of a gene in chromosome 8 and involves the neurofilament light chain protein.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2A: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2AI: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2A1 has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the KIF1B gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2AII: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2A2 has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the MFN2 gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2B has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the gene for the protein RAB 7 located on chromosome 3.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2C has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in chromosome 12 and involves diaphragm and vocal cord weakness as well as hand and foot problems.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2D: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2D has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the glycyl RNA synthetase gene on chromosome 7p15. The hands tend to be more severely affected than the feet.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2E: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2C has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the neurofilament light gene on chromosome 8p21.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2F: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2F has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the HSPB1 gene on chromosome 7.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4A: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4A has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the GDAP 1 protein gene on chromosome 8. The recessive forms of CMT tend to be more severe than the dominant form and often involve hand and foot problems as well as additional systemic symptoms.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4B1: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B1 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in MTMR2 gene on chromosome 11.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B2 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the KIAA1985 gene on chromosome 5. It involves motor and sensory problems as well as scoliosis.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4F: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4F has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and is a severe form of the disease. It involves a defect in the PRX gene on Chromosome 19q13.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4G: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4G has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and is a severe form of the disease. It involves a defect on Chromosome 10.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4H: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4H has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and involves a defect on Chromosome 11.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X2 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked recessive, 4: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4X is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females and also involves mental retardation and deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked, 1: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X1 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome (defect in GJB1 gene) and affects males to a greater degree than females. Transient central nervous system symptoms are also sometimes involved.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 1: A slow-progressing muscle disease characterized by muscle weakness and wasting that starts in the hands and feet. Very few patients become wheelchair dependent and life span is not affected. The disorder is inherited in an dominant pattern an involves demyelination of the nerves.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in the axon of the peripheral nerve cells instead of the myelin sheath coating of the nerves. The condition manifests as muscle weakness and wasting that usually starts in the legs and spreads to the hands and other parts of the body. The severity, age of onset and rate of progression of the condition varies depending on the genetic origin of the defect.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 aplasia cutis congenital: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This form of the condition is inherited recessively and involves only mild muscle symptoms as well as a scalp defect.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth, demyelinating, autosomal recessive: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4 has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and is a severe form of the disease.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine: 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine is a chemical used mainly in jet fuel and rocket fuel, plant growth agent, photography and various other industrial uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyl chloride: Allyl chloride is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of epichlorohydrin and glycerin but is also used in the production of products such as polyester, varnish plastic adhesive, insecticides, perfumes and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Biphenyl: Biphenyl is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide for fruit packaging and in textile dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromethalin: Bromethalin is a chemical used mainly in rodenticides. The chemical is toxic to the human nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzene: Chlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a solvent and in the production of various other chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethyl Phthalate: Diethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly in cosmetic and as a plasticizer in the production of various plastic products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Polychlorinated Biphenyls are a group of chemicals which had a variety of applications but are now banned due to the fact that they don't degrade in the environment and tend to build up in the food chain where they can cause harmful effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Rotenone: Rotenone is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chest numbness: A loss of sensation located on the chest
  • Chin numbness: A loss of sensation located on the chin
  • Chordoma: Chordomas are tumors originating from embryonic remnants of the primitive notochord
  • Chromosome 17p, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: A rare disorder involving swelling of nerve roots and destruction of the protective layer around nerves. Severe symptoms can take up to a year or more to develop.
  • Chronic necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and destruction of blood vessel walls which leads to death of associated tissue. Symptoms are determined by the extent and location of the blood vessel inflammation. The inflammation possibly has autoimmune origins. It can occur in condition such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma.
  • Ciguatera poisoning: Rare toxic food poisoning from eating contaminated fish
  • Circulatory disorder: Disease affecting circulation of blood
  • Clavicle fracture: clavicle fractures or broken collarbones are one of the most common orthopaedic injuries
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Compartment Syndrome: compartment syndrome involves the compression of nerves and blood vessels within an enclosed space. This leads to impaired blood flow and muscle and nerve damage
  • Compartment syndrome: compartment syndrome involves the compression of nerves and blood vessels within an enclosed space. This leads to impaired blood flow and muscle and nerve damage
  • Cone shell poisoning: A number of species of cone shells are capable of envenomating humans. The toxin is a neurotoxin and thus primarily affects the nervous system. Cone shells are found mainly in shallow waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. The toxicity varies amongst species with some delivering a benign stink whereas others are capable of causing death. The cone snails a proboscis on the end of which is a poison-filled barb.
  • Congenital ichthyosis, microcephalus, quadriplegia: A rare birth disorder characterized by scaly skin, small head and paralysis of legs and arms.
  • Congenital stenosis of cervical medullary canal: A rare birth anomaly where the spinal canal in the upper part of the back is narrower than normal. The narrowing may be inherited or acquired (e.g. trauma). The narrowing of the canal can result in spinal cord compression and associated symptoms.
  • Cranial neuralgia: Pain occurring along the root of the cranial nerves
  • Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis: A rare inherited disorder involving a skin birthmark as well as a blood vessel malformation in the spinal cord (angioma). The severity of the spinal involvement is variable with neurological problems occurring as a result of compression of the spinal cord or bleeding. Other cases may be undiagnosed as the cause no symptoms.
  • Dana syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the gradual degeneration of the white matter of the spinal cord and pernicious anemia. Various neurological symptoms can result.
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Delphinium poisoning: Delphinium is a member of the Buttercup family and contains toxic alkaloids. It's seeds are very toxic but other parts of the plant are also poisonous. As the plant ages, it becomes less poisonous. Toxicity varies amongst species.
  • Demyelinating disorder: Any condition that is characterised by the destruction of the myelin sheaths of the nerves
  • Dentatorubral pallidoluysian disorder: Pain occurring along the root of the cranial nerves
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Desmoplastic cerebral astrocytoma of infancy: A rare type of brain tumor that occurs in infants. The tumor consists of cancerous astrocytes.
  • Desmoplastic infantile ganglioma: A rare type of brain tumor that occurs in infants. The tumor may be slow-growing and benign or fast-growing and malignant.
  • Diabetes: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes-like neuropathy symptoms: also known as peripheral neuropathy is a typical presentation of diabetes but can be a presentation of other diseases too
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetic neuropathy: nerve damage which maybe motor, sensory and autonomic
  • Digoxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digoxin (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dysbarism: A reaction caused by exposure to a sudden change in environmental pressure.
  • Ear numbness: A loss of sensation located on the ear
  • Elbow numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the elbow
  • Electrical burns: Burns caused when an electric current pass through the body or part of it. The symptoms and severity of the burn depends on the strength of the electrical current, the duration of the exposure and the part of the body involved. Prompt treatment in more severe cases can improve the prognosis.
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Ependymoma: A tumor that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Symptoms vary according to the aggressiveness, size and exact location of the tumor.
  • Erb's Palsy: Paralysis of the arm or hand often related to childbirth injury (also Brachial plexus palsy).
  • Excessive dieting: Excessive limitation of food intake can lead to problems and effects such as dizziness, depression, intestinal problems, edema and impaired growth.
  • Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: A rare type of cancer where the B cells (a type of white blood cell) in lymph tissue associated with mucosa begin to proliferate. The cancer can affect any mucosal membrane tissue but is most common in the gastric mucosal membranes. Symptoms may vary considerable depending on the stage and location of the cancer.
  • Eye numbness: A loss of sensation located at the eye
  • Eyelid numbness: A loss of sensation located on the eyelid
  • FOSMN syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disorder that starts in the face and spreads to the scalp and upper body. The condition progresses slowly.
  • Facial fracture: Fracture of a bone in the face
  • Facial numbness: A loss of sensation located on the face
  • Facial paresthesia: Facial paresthesia is any type of abnormal or unusual sensations of the face, such as burning, numbness, or tingling.
  • False jessamine poisoning: False jessamine is a shrubby plant with small white to purple flowers and red, purple or yellow berries. The plant originated in Europe. The leaves contain chemicals (atropine, scopolamine, hyoscyamine) which can cause symptoms if large amounts are eaten.
  • Finger numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Focal seizure: Focal seizure is a convulsion that only affects a limited area of the brain and can result in convulsing and other symptoms that only affect a portion of the body.
  • Focal seizures: A deficiency of folate in the body
  • Foix-Alajouanine syndrome: A rare type of spinal cord disease caused by malformations in blood vessels supplying the spinal cord. Insufficient blood flow to the spinal cord causes muscle problems.
  • Food Additive Allergy: A food additive allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive or a food or drink containing to food additive. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Annatto: Annatto allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called annatto which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Carmine: A carmine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carmine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (red yoghurt, red popsicles, red drinks) as well as in some cosmetics The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- amaranth: An amaranth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called amaranth which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- benzoate: A benzoate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called benzoate which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- carageenan gum: A carageenan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called carageenan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- erythrosine: An erythrosine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called erythrosine which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- guar gum: A guar gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called guar gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum: A gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum acacia: A gum acacia allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum acacia which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum tragacanth: A gum tragacanth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum traganth (type of gum) which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- lecithin: A lecithin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called lecithin which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- locust bean gum: A locust bean gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called locust bean gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- quinoline yellow: A quinoline yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called quinoline yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- saffron: A saffron allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called saffron which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- salicytes: A salicylate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called salicylate which is used in a number of foods. Salicylates also occur naturally in a wide range of plant foods especially fruits. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite: A sulphite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite derivative: A sulphite derivative allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite derivative which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sunset yellow: A sunset yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called sunset yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- tartrazine: A tartrazine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tartrazine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (some breakfast cereals, cake mixes, chocolate chips etc.) The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- xanthan gum: A xanthan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called xanthan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Foot numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Fractures: Breakage of bones
  • Friedreich ataxia -- congenital glaucoma: A rare disorder characterized by glaucoma at birth and a progressive neuromuscular disorder.
  • Friedreich's ataxia: Progressive muscle weakness from nerve damage.
  • Frostbite: damage to skin, soft tissues and blood vessels due to extreme cold
  • Ganglion cyst: Cyst affecting the sheath of tendons
  • Gangrene: Death (necrosis) of a portion of tissue or entire organ due to decreased perfusion with blood or infectious destruction of tissue.
  • Gila Lizard poisoning: Gila lizards are one of the few venomous species of lizard. They are found in parts of America such as Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Glioma: A rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor.
  • Glioma Susceptibility: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. There have been at least 8 genetic defects linked to an increased glioma susceptibility.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 1: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p25.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 2: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 3: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 13q12.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 4: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q23-q26.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 5: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 6: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20q13.33.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 7: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q24.21.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 8: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5p15.33.
  • Groin numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the groin
  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome: An acute condition which is characterized by polyradiculoneuropathy that affects the peripheral nervous system
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome: An acute condition which is characterized by polyradiculoneuropathy that affects the peripheral nervous system
  • Gum numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the gums
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Haim-Munk syndrome: A rare inherited disorder involving red, thickened patches of skin on the palms and soles, skin infections and nail and teeth abnormalities.
  • Hand numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Hand symptoms: Symptoms affecting the hand
  • Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome: The episodic whiting of fingers in response to the cold
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart disease: Any disease that affects that heart but particularly relating to its own blood supply
  • Heel numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the heel
  • Hemipariesis: Slight or partial paralysis of one side of the body.
  • Hereditary amyloidosis: An inherited form of amyloidosis which is characterized by a build up of the protein amyloid in tissues and organs. This form of amyloidosis tends to affect mainly the nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the amyloid deposits.
  • Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: A rare disorder where the peripheral nerves are more sensitive to pressure than normal which results in recurring periods of numbness, tingling and sometimes loss of muscle function. The condition can affect one or more nerves such as the carpal tunnel nerve. Permanent damage to peripheral nerves can result from recurring episodes. The severity of symptoms are greatly variable from virtually asymptomatic to disability.
  • Hereditary peripheral nervous disorder: A group of inherited disorders affecting the peripheral nerves (nerves other than the brain and spinal cord). The motor, sensory and/or autonomic nerves may be affected. Examples of such conditions includes Dejerine-Sottas disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
  • Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 3: A very rare inherited disorder affecting the peripheral and autonomic nervous system and characterized by reduced tear production, excessive sweating, poor body temperature control, blood pressure problems, impaired sensation and poor muscle control.
  • Herniated disc: A misaligned or "slipped" disc in the spine.
  • Herring poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some herrings contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the herring does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The herrings are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Hip symptoms: Symptoms affecting the hip joint.
  • Horse nettle poisoning: Horse nettle is a herbaceous plant which has prickles and bears yellow berries. The berries contain solanin alkaloids which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. It is often found growing in the wild in many parts of the world. Death is considered possible if large amounts are eaten, especially in children.
  • Hyperkalaemia: Increased concentration of potassium in the blood.
  • Hyperkalemia: Abnormally high levels of potassium in the blood
  • Hypersensitive: Excessive sensitivity to sensations or stimuli
  • Hyperventilation: Abnormally fast and deep breathing.
  • Hypocalcaemia: Decreased concentration of calcium in the blood.
  • Hypocalcemia, autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited disorder of phosphate and calcium metabolism which results in low blood calcium levels. The severity of the condition is highly variable with some patients being asymptomatic.
  • Hypomelanosis of Ito: A rare genetic neurocutaneous disorder characterized by unusual patterns of depigmented skin and associated disorders such as seizures, psychomotor retardation and eye abnormalities.
  • Hypopigmented lesions in children: Hypopigmented lesions in children refers are sores or ulcers that are colorless or have lost color in a child.
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Idiopathic facial palsy: Weakness or paralysis of the facial muscles that occurs for no apparent reason. The condition is usually temporary and tends to resolve itself with the majority recovering fully within three weeks and the rest within a year. Usually only one side of the face is affected.
  • Immunoglobulinic amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the abnormal deposit of amyloid in various parts of the body, especially organs such as the kidneys, heart, liver, gastrointestinal tract and peripheral nerves. It occurs when plasma cells in the bone marrow produce too much of a protein portion of an antibody called the light chain. The exact symptoms are determined by the extent of the organ involvement.
  • Insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis: A rare disorder primarily involving insensitivity to pain with a lack of sweating.
  • Insensitivity to pain with anhydrosis:
  • Intercostal neuralgia: Nerve pain affecting the ribs
  • Intervertebral disc disease: Degenerative changes in the discs located between vertebrae. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Intracranial hemorrhage: Intracranial hemorrhage is a condition in which there is bleeding within the cranium of the skull.
  • Irish potato poisoning: The common potato is an edible root. However, the potato sprouts and green skin in old potatoes contain chemicals such as solanine which can cause symptoms if eaten. Severe cases can result in death but this is relatively rare.
  • Itching skin: Itching feeling of the skin.
  • Joint injury -- ankle: An injury to the ankle which is the joint between the foot and lower leg. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. An ankle injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint injury -- elbow: An injury to the elbow which is the joint between the upper and lower arm. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. An elbow injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint injury -- shoulder: An injury to the shoulder which is the joint at the top of the arm. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and severity of the injury and often the primary symptom is pain. A shoulder injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Keratosis palmoplantaris -- periodontopathia -- onychogryposis: A rare syndrome characterized by gum disease, nail and skin problems and various other anomalies.
  • Leg numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 1: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 2: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.2-q27.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 3: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q32 and 4p14.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 4: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Lidocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lidocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis: A rare disorder that primarily affects the skin and blood vessels. It is characterized by calcified skin deposits (C), Raynaud syndrome (R), esophageal dysfunction (E), scleroderma of the fingers and toes(S) and telengiectasia - dilated blood vessels (T).
  • Lionfish poisoning: The Lionfish is a venomous bottom-dwelling fish which is found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Symptoms tend to abate after 8 to 12 hours.
  • Liposarcoma: A rare malignant tumor of fat cells. Usually affects thighs in women over 30 years of age.
  • Lizard poisoning: A few lizard species are venomous e.g. Gila monster and Mexican beaded lizard. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Loss of pain sensation: Loss of pain sensation refers to a loss in the ability to feel pain.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • MN1: A rare genetic defect that can cause meningiomas to develop. A meningioma is a tumor of the meninges which is a membrane that encloses the brain and spinal cord The genetic defect occurs on chromosome 22. The tumor is usually slow-growing and benign.
  • Malignant hypertension: Malignant hypertension is a condition characterized by very high blood pressure and swelling of the optic nerve. This type of hypertension is more common in people with kidney problems such as narrowed kidney blood vessels. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Malnutrition: Any disorder that relates to inadequate intake of nutrients.
  • Marburg multiple sclerosis: Malignant Multiple Sclerosis, is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Thankfully very rare, this highly aggressive form is defined by its swift and relentless decline to significant disability or even death, often within a few weeks or months after the onset of the initial attack. It is characterized by widespread and progressive cerebral white matter destruction or by severe pathological involvement of clinically strategic regions such as brainstem, resulting in bulbar paralysis.
  • Marfan syndrome: A genetic connective tissue disorder involving a defect of chromosome 15q21.1 which affects the production of the fibrillin needed to make connective tissue.
  • Mefloquine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mefenamic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Meralgia paresthetica: A rare disorder where compression or injury of a nerve that connects the thigh to the spine results in abnormal, painful sensations in the outer part of the thigh. The condition is most common in middle-aged, overweight males.
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the pleura (chest lining) or peritoneum (abdominal lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibres. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant -- pleural: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the pleura (chest lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibers. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Methylmalonicacidemia with homocystinuria, cbl D: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (cblD) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects.
  • Mexican Beaded Lizard poisoning: Gila lizards are one of the few venomous species of lizard. They are found in parts of America such as Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Mononeuritis multiplex: A rare neurological condition where nerve damage occurs at more than one site. Nerve damage can result from conditions such as diabetes mellitus, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and blood vessel diseases.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Mucoepidermoid: A mucoepidermoid is a type of cancer which is found primarily in the salivary glands (major and minor) but can be found in other glands such as the tear glands, breast gland and thyroid. The cancer develops from squamous, mucus-secreting and intermediate cells.
  • Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma: A mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a type of cancer which is found primarily in the salivary glands (major and minor) but can be found in other glands such as the tear glands, breast gland and thyroid. The cancer develops from squamous, mucus-secreting and intermediate cells.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 1: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 2: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 3: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.2.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 4: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Multiple myeloma: A rare malignant cancer that occurs in the bone marrow. More common in skull, spine, rib cage, pelvis and legs.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Muscle weakness: Weakness of the muscles or loss of tone
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myelinopathies: Disorders where the protective myelin sheath around nerves is destroyed which affects the transmission of nerve signals. The severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of myelin destruction and the nerves affected. Multiple sclerosis is an example of a myelin sheath disease.
  • Myelitis: Spinal cord inflammation.
  • Myelopathy: Myelopathy is any disease process that effects the spinal cord.
  • Myxedema: The most severe form of hypothyroidism characterized by swelling of extremities and face.
  • Nalidixic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nalidixic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Navajo neurohepatopathy: A rare genetic disease found in Navajo populations. It involves peripheral nerve degeneration, liver disease and corneal ulcers. The genetic disease is believed to be caused by maternal exposure to uranium from waters contaminated by old mines.
  • Neck Numbness: Numb sensation or loss of feeling in the neck
  • Nerve conditions: Any condition that affects the nerves
  • Nerve entrapment: Compression of a nerve that becomes trapped in a confined space due to any cause e.g. trauma, inflammation or a disease process. This usually occurs near joints. The resulting pressure on the nerve can be very painful and if left untreated can result in damage to the nerve and eventually muscle weakness and wasting. Conditions such as bone spurs, joint swelling due to injury, cysts and trauma can result in nerve entrapment. The exact symptoms will depend on which nerve is trapped and the duration and severity of the entrapment.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurofibromatosis-2: Genetic disorder often leading to tumors on nerves.
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Neuropathic pain: Pain that is caused by the nerves
  • Neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the peripheral nervous system
  • Neuropathy -- ataxia -- retinitis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy ataxia and retinis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy hereditary with liability to pressure palsies:
  • Neuropathy motor sensory type 2 deafness mental retardation: An inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Deafness and mental retardation are also involved.
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory, Type IV: A rare disorder characterized mainly by insensitivity to pain and inability to sweat.
  • Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, LOM type: A severe form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which involves the loss of the protective covering around nerves resulting in various nerve problems. Muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is more severe in the ends of the arms and legs.
  • Neurosarcoidosis: A rare disorder involving sarcoidosis of the nervous system. Sarcoidosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect virtually any part of the body. Neurosarcoidosis involves inflammation and abnormal deposits in parts of the nervous system including the brain and spinal cord which affects their functioning. Symptoms may be sudden and severe or may be mild and progress slowly. Symptoms are determined by the degree of nerve involvement.
  • Neurotoxicity syndromes: Altered nervous system functioning caused by exposure to certain chemicals (manmade or natural) that affect the nervous system - essentially it is the poisoning of the nervous system. Examples of toxic compounds that may cause neurotoxicity include lead, certain solvents and pesticides. Symptoms may occur immediately or gradually over a period of time.
  • Numb thigh: Numbness, or decreased sensations of the thigh
  • Numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Numbness in Both Feet: Loss of normal sensation occurring in both feet
  • Numbness in both arms: Numbness in both arms is the loss or reduction of sensation in the arms.
  • Numbness in one arm: Numbness in one arm is the loss or reduction of sensation in one arm.
  • Numbness in one foot: Loss of normal sensation occurring in one foot
  • Numbness in one leg: Numbness in one leg refers to the loss or reduction of sensation in one leg.
  • Numbness of both elbows: Numbness of both elbows refers to the loss or reduction of sensation in the elbows.
  • Numbness of both eyes: Numbness of both eyes is the loss or reduction of sensation of the eyelids.
  • Numbness of both legs: Numbness of both legs is the loss or reduction of sensation in the legs.
  • Numbness of one eye: Numbness of one eye is the loss or reduction of sensation in one eye.
  • Octopus poisoning: Octopus bites are quite rare but octopus such as the blue-ringed octopus can deliver quite a venomous bite.
  • Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy: A group of diseases progressive degeneration occurs in a particular area of the brain (olivopontocerebellar area) which results in various neurological symptoms.
  • Osteomalacia: Softening of bones caused by a vitamin D deficiency.
  • POEMS: A very rare disorder that has widespread effects on the body: P -- polyneuropathy, O -- organopathy, E -- endocrinopathy, M -- monoclonal gammopathy and S -- skin changes.
  • POEMS syndrome: A very rare disorder that has widespread effects on the body: P - polyneuropathy, O - organopathy, E - endocrinopathy, M - monoclonal gammopathy, S - skin changes.
  • Pain: Any type of pain sensation symptoms.
  • Panic attack: A condition which is characterized by an acute episode of intense anxiety
  • Panic disorder: is a severe medical condition characterized by extremely elevated mood
  • Paralysis: Paralysis refers to a loss of the ability of a muscle to contract and move.
  • Paralytic shellfish poisoning: Rare food poisoning from eating contaminated shellfish
  • Paresthesia: Tingling, prickling, or pins-and-needles sensations
  • Paresthesias: Tingling, prickling, numbness or burning sensations
  • Partial seizure: A partial seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. During a partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. Partial seizures may spread to other parts of the brain and are then called generalized seizures. Partial seizures where the patient stays conscious are called simple partial seizures. If the patient loses consciousness then the seizure is called a complex partial seizure. Epilepsy is usually a partial seizure.
  • Partial sensory seizure: A partial sensory seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in a part of the brain involved with the senses. The resulting symptoms involve unusual sensations that affect andy of the senses - touch, taste, hearing, vision and smell.
  • Pathological fracture: The occurrence of a fracture a bone of the body caused by a disease state
  • Peripheral neuropathy: Any loss in the function of the peripheral nervous system
  • Peripheral vascular disease: Disease of arteries supplying the legs or sometimes arms
  • Pernicious anemia: A megaloblastic anaemia due to malabsorption of the vitamin B12
  • Pinched Nerve: Nerve paralysis from nerve pressure or entrapment.
  • Poisonous snakebite: A snakebite which is poisonous to humans
  • Poisonous snakebites: Multiple snakebites which are poisonous
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Polyneuritis: Widespared inflammation of nerves
  • Polyneuropathy -- Ophthalmoplegia -- Leukoencehalopathy -- Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: A rare genetic disorder which affects a number of body systems and manifests results in symptoms such as droopy eyelids, progressive eye muscle weakness, gastrointestinal dysmotility, brain disease, thin body, peripheral neuropathy and muscle disease.
  • Polyneuropathy, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cataract: A very rare, recessively inherited condition characterized by the association of vision, hearing and neurological problems. The condition generally starts during the second decade of life and progresses slowly.
  • Porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria: An inherited disorder that affects the nervous system and sometimes the skin. It occurs when a metabolic disorder results in excessive production of coproporphyrins which accumulate in body tissues and is excreted in large amounts.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder: Stress following a traumatic event.
  • Pudendal nerve entrapment: A condition where a nerve in the pelvis (pudendal nerve) becomes trapped or compressed. The problem can arise due to such things as pregnancy, postsurgical scarring and trauma but may also occur due to a birth malformation. Bicycle riding can also result in the condition.
  • Puss caterpillar poisoning: The puss caterpillar has hollow, poison-filled spines amongst the hairs along its body. It is found mainly in the southern states of the United states. It is often found feeding on trees such as elm, oak and sycamore. Contact with the poisonous spines can result in various symptoms. The puss caterpillar is one of the more poisonous stinging caterpillars. Children tend to be more severely affected than adults.
  • Pyridoxine deficiency: Deficiency of vitamin B6 which has many uses in the body.
  • Quadriplegia: Paralysis of all four limbs and usually the entire trunk from the neck down; due to spinal cord damage at level of cervical spine (neck).
  • Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy: A nerve injury that occurs as a complication of radiation treatment to the upper chest area.
  • Raynaud's phenomenon: A condition where the body extremities sweat and turn blue and cold. Exposure to cold, emotional stress and smoking may trigger the condition. Also known as acrocyanosis.
  • Red Whelk poisoning: Red Whelk are colorful, carnivorous snail found mainly in Britain and Japan. The salivary gland of some whelks contains tetramine which can cause symptoms in humans if eaten. Raw, cooked or canned whelk can cause poisoning. Red whelk have the highest concentration of toxins in the summer. Whelk is often used as fish bait.
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: A condition characterized by pain and reduced range of motion in the shoulder and hand of the affected arm.
  • Repetitive Motion Disorders: Any of various injuries caused by repetitive motion.
  • Repetitive Strain Injury: Various conditions with inflammation from repetitive movements.
  • Respiratory alkalosis: A condition caused by excessive loss of carbon dioxide from the body.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune inflammatory condition which primarily affects the joints
  • Rheumatoid vasculitis: A rare disorder where sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis with joint inflammation develop inflammation of small and medium sized blood vessels. It tends to mostly affect the blood vessels in the skin. The symptoms are determined by which part of the body is affected.
  • Rib symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ribs
  • Robinson syndrome: A very rare condition observed in a West Coast Indian family. The condition is characterized by scoliosis, hearing impairment, ataxia and sensory loss. The severity, rate of progression and age of onset of the neuropathic symptoms was highly variable. Sensory symptoms tend to be most prominent in the hands and feet.
  • Sacral plexopathy: Nerve disorder involving the sacral plexus which is a group of nerves that start in the lower tailbone area and supply the lower legs. The sciatic nerve is involved in the group of nerves. The nerve damage can occur through trauma disease or tumors.
  • Salivary gland cancer: Salivary gland cancer is a rare form of cancer in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat
  • Salivary gland cancer, adult: Cancer of the salivary glands in adults. Salivary glands are glands that produce saliva to facilitate the process of chewing, swallowing and digesting food.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Sardine poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some sardines contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the sardines does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The sardines are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Scalp Numbness: Numb sensation or loss of feeling on the scalp
  • Schwannoma, malignant: A malignant tumor that develops from nerve sheath cells. Any nerve can be affected but it is most common on the sciatic, brachial and sacral plexus (leg, upper arm and lower back nerves). Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the tumor.
  • Schwannomatosis: A type of tumor that develops from cells in nerve sheaths. Nerves in the head, spin and peripheral nerves may be affected.
  • Sea wasp poisoning: The sea wasp can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning (Chiropsalmus quadrigatus): The Chiropsalmus quadrigatus jellyfish can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning -- Chironex fleckeri: The Chironex fleckeri jellyfish is one of the deadliest jellyfish in the world. It can deliver a serious sting and can be found mainly in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Secondarily generalized seizure: A partial seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. During a partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. When the partial spreads to both sides of the brain it is then called generalized seizures. These seizures usually only last a few minutes.
  • Seizures -- intellectual deficit due to hydroxylysinuria: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, seizures and high levels of hydroxylysine in the urine.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Sensory conditions: Medical conditions affecting the sensory system, especially the sense of touch.
  • Sensory nerve trauma: Injury or damage to a sensory nerve. Sensory nerves are nerves associated with delivering information from the body to the brain and spinal cord relating to the five senses - vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell. Damage to these nerves can result in heightened, reduced or abnormal sensations. Severity of symptoms vary depending on the location and extent of damage to the affected nerves.
  • Sensory seizure: A sensory seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in a part of the brain involved with the senses. The resulting symptoms involve unusual sensations that affect any of the senses - touch, taste, hearing, vision and smell.
  • Sensory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sensory systems.
  • Shoulder dislocation: Dislocation of the shoulder joint.
  • Simple partial seizure: A partial seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. Partial seizures where the patient stays conscious are called simple partial seizures. During a simple partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. Partial seizures may spread to other parts of the brain and are then called generalized seizures. These seizures usually only last a couple of minutes.
  • Sjogren's Syndrome: Autoimmune disease damaging the eye tear ducts and other glands.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Slickhead poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some slickhead contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the slickhead does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The slickhead are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Snake bite: When a person is bitten by a snake
  • Sole numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the sole region of the foot.
  • Southwestern Athabaskan genetic diseases: A group of four genetic diseases that are unique to the Navajo and Apache (Southwestern Athabaskan) populations. The disease are Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency, Navajo neurohepatopathy, Navajo poikiloderma and Athabaskan brainstem dysgenesis.
  • Spinal AVM: Spinal AVM's refers to a group of abnormal blood vessels (arteries and veins) in the spinal canal. The severity of symptoms depends on the size and growth of the blood vessel malformation. Severe complications such as paralysis can result if the malformed blood vessels rupture and bleed.
  • Spinal Cord Disorders: Any condition that affects the spinal cord
  • Spinal Cord Tumor: Cancer of the spinal cord or central nervous system.
  • Spinal conditions: Any condition that affects the spine
  • Spinal cord injury: spinal cord injury causes myelopathy or damage to white matter or myelinated fiber tracts that carry sensation and motor signals to and from the brain
  • Spinal fracture: A fracture of one or multiple bony vertebrae
  • Spinal intradural arachnoid cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the spinal cord. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Spinal shock: A state of spinal shock accompanied by temporary paralysis of the lower extremities often associated with spinal injury.
  • Spinal stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal cavity around the spinal cord.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 18: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 7q22-31 defect) characterized by muscle atrophy and sensory loss. The severity of symptoms is variable. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph type IV: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by late onset of symptoms - muscle twitching and Parkinsonism. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spondylitis: Inflammation of the synovial joints of the backbone.
  • Sports Injuries: Any condition that has resulted from injury to a part of the body due to participation in a sporting activity
  • Stroke: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: Gradual spinal cord degeneration
  • Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system: A rare disorder where hemosiderin (free iron) is deposited in parts of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord tissue). It is often caused by repeated periods of bleeding in the brain (subarachnoid space).
  • Syncope: Loss or interruption of consciousness.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Syringomyelia: Spinal cord cysts
  • Syringomyelia, cervical lesion: A slowly-progressing neurological disorder characterized by a fulid-filled cavity in the spinal cord in the neck region.
  • Syringomyelia, lumbar lesion: A slowly-progressing neurological disorder characterized by a fluid-filled cavity in the spinal cord in the region between the lower ribs and pelvis.
  • Syringomyelia, medulla oblongata lesion: A slowly-progressing neurological disorder characterized by a fluid-filled cavity in the spinal cord at base of the brain.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Tangier disease: A rare disorder characterized by a very low level of HDL (high-density lipoprotein or "good cholesterol") in the blood. The condition occurs because the body lacks the gene to make a certain protein (Apolipoprotein A1) which normally transports fats from tissues to where it is needed.
  • Tarpon poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some tarpon contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the tarpon does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The tarpon are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome: A pinched nerve in the lower ankle area (posterior tibial nerve) which results in foot pain.
  • Tetraodon Poisoning: Food poisoning from Tetradons.
  • Thallium poisoning: The poisoning of a person with the element thallium
  • Thoracic outlet syndrome: Pinched shoulder/arm nerve.
  • Thromboembolism: Lodgement of a blood clot causing blockage
  • Tingling: Tingling, prickling, or pins-and-needles sensations
  • Tingling skin: The occurrence of the sensation of tingling which occurs in the skin
  • Tobacco amblyopia: Amblyopia is an uncorrectable decrease in vision in one or both eyes with no apparent structural abnormality seen to explain it. Tobacco amblyopia is a condition in which the vision is lost because of the use of tobacco.
  • Toe numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Tomato leaf poisoning: Tomatoes are an edible fruit but the leaves and stems contain chemicals (solanine and demissine) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Agenerase: Use of an HIV drug called Agenerase may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amiodarone: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Amiodarone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amiodarone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amitriptyline: Use of drug called Amitriptyline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amitriptyline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amphotericin: Use of drug called Amphotericin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amphotericin tends to primarily affect muscle movement (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amprenavir: Use of an HIV drug called Amprenavir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Arsenic: Exposure to Arsenic can cause neuropathy as Arsenic is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Calcium Carbimide: Use of a drug called Calcium Carbimide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Calcium Carbimide tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Carbon disulfide: Exposure to Carbon disulfide can cause neuropathy as Carbon disulfide is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Carbutamide: Use of drug called Carbutamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Carbutamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorambucil: Use of a cancer drug called Chlorambucil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorambucil tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chloramphenicol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Chloramphenicol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chloramphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chloroquine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Chloroquine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chloroquine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorpropamide: Use of drug called Chlorpropamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorpropamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Cisplatin: Use of a cancer drug called Cisplatin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clioquinol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Clioquinol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clioquinol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clofibrate: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Clofibrate may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clofibrate tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Colchicine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Colchicine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Colchicine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Colistin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Colistin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Colistin tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Cytarabine: Use of a cancer drug called Cytarabine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Cytarabine tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Dapsone: Use of Dapsone, a drug used to tread skin conditions, may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Diamines: Use of a type of antimicrobial drug called Diamines may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thiamphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Didanosine: Use of an HIV drug called Didanosine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disopyramide: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Disopyramide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disopyramide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disulfiram: Use of drug called Disulfiram may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disulfiram tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ergotamine: Use of a drug called Ergotamine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ergotamine tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethambutol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Ethambutol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethambutol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethionamide: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Ethionamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethionamide tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethoglucid: Use of a drug called Ethoglucid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethoglucid tends to cause mainly localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethylene oxide: Exposure to ethylene oxide can cause neuropathy as ethylene oxide is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Gemfibrozil: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Gemfibrozil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Glutethimide: Use of drug called Glutethimide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Glutethimide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Gold: Therapeutic use of gold to treat rheumatism may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). The nerve toxicity of the substance may vary amongst people - tolerance level to the drug varies amongst people. Gold tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Hivid: Use of an HIV drug called Hivid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Hydralazine: Use of a blood pressure drug called Hydralazine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Indapamid: Use of a diuretic and antihypertensive agent called Indapamid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Indomethacin: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Indomethacin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Indomethacin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Isoniazid: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Isoniazid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Isoniazid tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy). B6 supplements may help prevent the neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lead: Exposure to lead can cause neuropathy as lead is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lopid: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lopid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lovastatin: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lovastatin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lozol: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lozol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mercury: Exposure to Mercury can cause neuropathy as Mercury is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methaqualone: Use of drug called Methaqualone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methaqualone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methimazole: Use of drug called Methimazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methimazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methyl Bromide: Exposure to Methyl Bromide can cause neuropathy as Methyl Bromide is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methysergide: Use of a drug called Methysergide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methysergide tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Metronidazole: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Metronidazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Metronidazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mevacor: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Mevacor may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mustine: Use of a drug called mustine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Mustine tends to mainly cause localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nalidixic Acid: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Nalidixic Acid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nalidixic Acid tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nitrofurantoin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Nitrofurantoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nitrofurantoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nitrofurazone: Use of a cancer drug called Nitrofurazone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nitrofurazone tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Norvir: Use of an HIV drug called Norvir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Perhexiline: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Perhexiline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Perhexiline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenelzine: Use of a drug called Phenelzine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenelzine tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenylbutazone: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Phenylbutazone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenylbutazone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenytoin: Use of drug called Phenytoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenytoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Podophyllum: Use of a cancer drug called Podophyllum may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Podophyllum tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): Exposure to Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can cause neuropathy as Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Procarbazine: Use of a cancer drug called Procarbazine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Procarbazine tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Propranolol: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Propranolol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Propranolol tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Propylthiouracil: Use of a drug called Propylthiouracil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Propylthiouracil tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Retrovir: Use of an HIV drug called Retrovir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ritonavir: Use of an HIV drug called Ritonavir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Stavudine: Use of an HIV drug called Stavudine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Streptomycin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Streptomycin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Streptomycin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulfoxone: Use of a drug called Sulfoxone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulfoxone tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Numbness:

The following list of conditions have 'Numbness' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Numbness or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Numbness:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Numbness' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: Nov 3, 2003

 

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