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Symptoms » Pancreas symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Pancreas symptoms

Medical terms related to Pancreas symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • Abdominal obesity metabolic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by a group of conditions that are considered major risk factors for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Acanthosis nigricans muscle cramps acral enlargement: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle cramps, dark velvety patches of skin and large hands and feet.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidemia, methylmalonic: An inborn error of metabolism where amino acids in the body aren't metabolized properly resulting in high levels of the acid throughout the body.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Acquired total lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue through the body. The disorder is very similar to the congenital form but the liver involvement is more severe.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis: Acute inflammation of the pancreas accompanied by the formation of necrotic areas on the surface of the pancreas and in the omentum and, frequently, also accompanied by hemorrhages into the substance of the gland.
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome: The association of a sudden kidney disorder with eye inflammation. Autoimmune processes are believed to be involved.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Amlodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Annular pancreas: An abnormality where a ring of pancreatic tissue forms around the duodenum and can block the flow of food through the digestive system. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of constriction. Partial obstruction may not be detected until adulthood.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypyothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia -- short stature -- obesity: A very rare syndrome characterized by absent eyes, short stature and obesity.
  • Apolipoprotein C 2I deficiency: A rare inherited condition where a deficiency of apolipoprotein C-II impairs lipoprotein metabolism and results in a build up of chylomicrons and VLDL.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Aromatase deficiency: A congenital deficiency of the enzyme called aromatase which is needed to convert androgens to estrogens.
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia: A rare inherited childhood disorder involving progressive degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Autoimmune Diabetes Insipidus: Autoimmune disorder leading to diabetes insipidus.
  • Autoimmune Hypophysitis: Inflammation of part of the pituitary gland due to an autoimmune process resulting in impaired pituitary hormone production. The range and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the degree of damage to the pituitary gland.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Genetic kidney disease causing kidney cysts.
  • Back pain: Pain in the back region.
  • Bard-Pic syndrome: A complication of advanced pancreatic cancer marked by jaundice and enlarged gallbladder.
  • Bile duct cysts: The formation of a cyst (dilation or swelling) in the bile duct which can obstruct the flow of bile and result in jaundice.
  • Biliary cirrhosis: Biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions. The cause of primary biliary cirrhosis is not fully understood.
  • Bobble-head doll syndrome: A rare condition where a child's head bobs up and down continuously due to either fluid on the brain or a large cyst in the third ventricle of the brain.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bowel sounds, hypoactive: The presence of hypoactive bowel sounds in the abdomen
  • Bruns-Garland syndrome: Spinal cord damage that occurs in some diabetics and results in weakness and wasting in the arms and legs.
  • Brunzell syndrome: A rare recessively inherited syndrome characterized by a lack of skin fat (Seip syndrome), cystic angiomatosis of the long bones which can lead to fractures.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Cardiomyopathy diabetes deafness: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of heart muscle disease, diabetes and deafness.
  • Cataract, juvenile, with microcornea and glucosuria: A rare disorder characterized by the association of juvenile cataracts, small corneas and excessive glucose in the urine.
  • Cephalothoracic progressive lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue mainly in the trunk and arms.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,3-Dichloropropene: 1,3-Dichloropropene is a chemical used in solvents and soil fumigants for nematode control. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amitraz: Amitraz is a chemical used mainly as a topical parasitic preventative in livestock and fruit trees. It is also used as an insect repellant and a prevention of mite infestation. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cadmium: Cadmium is a chemical used mainly in batteries, solder, amalgams, cigarettes, PVC pigments and phosphate fertilizer production. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Manganese: Manganese is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, welding rods, matches, electrical coils, ceramics and animal food additives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cholesterol and lipids: Levels of blood or urine cholesterol or lipids as a symptom
  • Christian-Demyer-Franken syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 15q, deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15.
  • Chromosome 18, Monosomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • Chromosome 18p minus syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the short arm of chromosome18 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Clonorchiasis: Infection with the Chinese liver fluke called Clonchorchis sinensis. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated fish and crayfish. The infection primarily affects the liver as the flukes tend to occupy the biliary ducts of the liver. Recurring infections can cause more severe symptoms. Infection with this fluke is endemic in Asia but can occur occasionally in countries such as the US though the source of contamination is food from Asia.
  • Congenital partial lipodystrophy: A rare congenital disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue mainly in the trunk and limbs.
  • Cortisone reductase deficiency: An inborn error of steroid metabolism due to a deficiency of an enzyme called cortisone reductase (11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). This enzyme is needed to convert cortisone to cortisol.
  • Cushing syndrome, familial: A hormonal disorder caused by high levels of the cortisol hormone due to the abnormal development of the adrenal gland.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Cystic fibrosis -- gastritis -- megaloblastic anaemia: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by cystic fibrosis, metaloblastic anemia, mental retardation and gastritis due to helicobacter pylori.
  • Cytosine arabinose syndrome: Symptoms following the use of a chemotherapy drug called cytosine arabinose.
  • D-plus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS): A rare condition where gastroenteritis involving bloody diarrhea is caused by a bacteria (usually E.Coli) which leads to toxins being present in the blood. These circulating toxins affect red blood cells, kidneys and occasionally even the brain.
  • DEND syndrome: An inherited disorder characterized by developmental delay, epilepsy and diabetes.
  • DIDMOAD Syndrome, Mitochondrial form: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness which results in mitochondrial defects.
  • Decreased sugar tolerance in diabetics: A decrease in the bodies ability in diabetes to lower the blood sugar levels
  • Dehydration: Loss and reduction in body water levels
  • Delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare metabolic abnormality involving a deficiency of a particular enzyme (Delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase) which affects amino acid metabolism and causes mental retardation and convulsions.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 10: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 11: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 12: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 13: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q34.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 15: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 15 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 17: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 17 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 18: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 18 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31.1-q33.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 19: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 19 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q24.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11p15.5.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 20: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 20 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 21: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 21 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 22: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 22 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 23: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 23 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q27.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 24: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 24 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q26.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 5: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 6: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 7: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 8: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 81 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25-q27.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.2.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q34-q35.2.
  • Diabetes insipidus: A condition which is characterized by polyuria causing dehydration and resulting in great thirst
  • Diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness.
  • Diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, mitochondrial form: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness which results in mitochondrial defects.
  • Diabetes mellitus, permanent neonatal -- pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis: A rare syndrome characterized by the abnormal development of the cerebellum and pancreas which results in diabetes mellitus.
  • Diabetes mellitus, transient neonatal: A form of infant diabetes that starts usually in the month of life but then usually disappears within a year. The condition predisposes the infant to diabetes later in life.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes-related symptoms: Symptoms similar to diabetes or closely related.
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis: A metabolic acidosis that results from the accumulation of ketones when diabetes mellitus is poorly controlled
  • Diabetic neuropathy: nerve damage which maybe motor, sensory and autonomic
  • Diabetic retinopathy: A complication of diabetes where the microvasculature of the eye is effected resulting in sight loss
  • Didanosine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: A type of degenerative joint disease where spinal column ligaments lose their flexibility due to calcification.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Diseases associated with senile cataract: It is a vision impairing disease characterised by gradual , progressive thickening of the lens.
  • Dup (2) (q11.2-q21.1): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in two reported cases. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Ectopic ACTH Syndrome: A tumour arising in the body which releases excess quantities of ACTH
  • Epigastric pain: Pain located in the upper and middle region of the abdomen
  • Erdheim-Chester Disease: A condition which is defined as a non langerhans cell histiocytosis
  • Erdheim-Chester syndrome: A very rare lipid storage disorder involving lipid deposits in various organs and hardening of the ends of long bones which affects the growth of the bone. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Familial hyperlipoproteinemia type 3: A genetic disorder characterized by abnormal lipid (cholesterol and triglyceride) breakdown which causes it to accumulate in the blood. The disorder tends to run in families (familial).
  • Familial hypopituitarism: Impaired pituitary gland hormone-producing activity that tends to run in families. The failure of the pituitary gland in turn affects other hormone-producing glands which rely on the hormones from the pituitary gland for their activity. Symptoms are determined by the degree and type of hormone deficiency involved.
  • Familial isolated deficiency of vitamin E: A rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by an inherited condition where the body is unable to absorb vitamin E from the food consumed.
  • Felodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Friedreich ataxia: A progressive inherited neuromuscular disorder involving slow degeneration of the spinal cord and brain.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Gall bladder symptoms: Symptoms affecting the gall bladder
  • Gallstones: A condition where biliary calculi form in the gallbladder
  • Gastrocutaneous syndrome: A arare inherited disorder characterized by peptic ulcers, hiatus hernia, eye abnormalities and skin pigmentation.
  • Gastroparesis: A condition characterized by the paralysis of the stomach
  • Gestational diabetes: The occurrence of diabetes that's onset occurs during pregnancy
  • Gigantism: Gigantism refers to abnormally high linear growth due to excessive action of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) while the epiphyseal growth plates are open during childhood.
  • Glucagonoma: Rare cancer of the glucagon-producing pancreas cells.
  • Glucagonoma syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a tumor which secretes glucagon and a characteristic spreading rash, diabetes mellitus and various other symptoms.
  • Glucosuria: The abnormal presence of glucose in the urine
  • Glutaric aciduria 2: A metabolic disorder involving an enzyme deficiency - electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxydoreductase. The severity of symptoms depends on the level of deficiency. The infant onset form is the most severe and often results in death. Severe cases usually develop during childhood or infancy and usually involve metabolic acidosis and its associated symptoms. Milder cases may simply present with muscle weakness initially that develops in adulthood. Some cases may involve additional symptoms such as heart, liver and kidney problems, facial anomalies and genital abnormalities.
  • Glycogen Storage Disease Type I: An inherited metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase prevents glycogen being turned into glucose leading to a buildup of glycogen in the liver and kidneys. Most problems tend to develop during adulthood.
  • Glycosuria: High levels of sugars in the urine
  • Gradual onset of pancreatitis:
  • HAIR-AN Syndrome: A very rare syndrome that affects females only and is characterized mainly by insulin resistance, dark velvety patches of skin and increased male hormone production in females.
  • Hand-Schuller-Christian Syndrome: A group of blood disorder involving excess production of histiocytes (type of immune cell) throughout the body. Accumulation of histiocytes results in non-cancerous growths which can damage organs and other body tissues such as bones. Symptom vary hugely and depend on location and size of tumor growths.
  • Havlikova syndrome: A rare familial disorder involving liver, spleen and pancreatic problems.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hemochromatosis: Excess of iron leading to problems with joints, liver, heart and pancreas.
  • Hemochromatosis type 1: A genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 1 is the most common form of the disorder, has an adult onset and is inherited recessively.
  • Hemochromatosis type 2: A rare genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 2 is a more severe type, has a juvenile onset and is inherited recessively.
  • Hemochromatosis type 3: A rare genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 3 has an onset that is between type 1 and type 2 and is inherited recessively.
  • Hemochromatosis type 4: A rare genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 4 has an adult onset but is inherited dominantly.
  • Hereditary Hemochromatosis: A genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. There are 4 types of hemochromatosis and they are distinguished by age of onset, genetic cause and type of inheritance. Some sufferers may be asymptomatic.
  • Hereditary pancreatitis: A rare inherited condition involving recurring bouts of pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) often leading to chronic pancreatitis due to scarring of the pancreas.
  • High blood pressure: Excessive blood pressure.
  • High blood sugar: An increase in the glucose levels of the blood above normal
  • High sphincter of oddi manometry: The use of a water perfused pressure catheter which calculates that the sphincter of oddi pressures are raised
  • Homocystinuria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving the amino acid methionine and resulting in a harmful accumulation of homocysteine in the body.
  • Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency: A rare genetic biochemical disorder where a deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthase results in high levels of methionine and homocysteine in the blood and reduced levels of cyteine in the blood. There are two subtypes of the disorder with varying manifestations. One type responds to Vitmain B6 supplementation and the other doesn't. Those who do respond to Vitamin B6 tend to have milder manifestations.
  • Homocystinuria due to defect in methylation cbl e: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (methionine synthase reductase) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects. It is a form of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Hyperadrenalism: Excessive levels of adrenal hormones in the body. Symptoms depend on which hormone is involved and the degree of involvement. Adrenal hormones are aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Hyperchylomicronemia: A term used to describe the presence of too many chylomicrons in the blood.
  • Hyperdibasic aminoaciduria type 2: A rare inborn urea cycle disorder characterized by an enzyme defect in the amino acid transporter gene SLC7A7 (positive amino acid transporter).
  • Hyperglycemia: Where there is an increase above normal of the blood sugar levels
  • Hyperlipidaemia: An elevated amount of lipids in the blood of the body
  • Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome: A form of diabetic coma seen in type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hyperparathyroidism, familial, primary: A rare genetic disorder where excessive activity of the parathyroid gland causes increased blood calcium levels which can cause various problems.
  • Hyperparathyroidism, primary: A rare genetic disorder where excessive activity of the parathyroid gland causes increased blood calcium levels which can cause various problems.
  • Hyperprolactinemia: High levels of prolactin in the blood.
  • Hyperprolinemia type 2: A rare metabolic abnormality involving a deficiency of a particular enzyme (Delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase) which affects amino acid metabolism and causes mental retardation and convulsions.
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypertriglyceridemia: An excess of triglycerides in the body
  • Hypopituitarism -- micropenis -- cleft lip palate: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by low pituitary hormone level, small penis and a cleft lip and palate.
  • IDDM: Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus
  • Ichthyosis and male hypogonadism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by scaly skin and insufficient hormone production by the male gonads.
  • Ichthyosis male hypogonadism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by scaly skin and insufficient hormone production by the male gonads.
  • Impaired glucose tolerance- like symptoms as in case of hemochromatosis: The diagnosis of glucose intolerance is based on the circumstance at the time of diagnosis.
  • Insulin resistance, short fifth metacarpals: A rare syndrome characterized by short fifth fingers and fifth hand bones as well as insulin resistance.
  • Insulin-resistance syndrome, type A: A syndrome characterized by insulin resistance resulting in distinctive skin lesions called acanthosis nigricans. It is the least severe form of insulin resistance.
  • Insulin-resistance type B: A very rare syndrome where insulin resistance is associated with autoimmune disease. The disorder is caused by antibodies which attack the bodies insulin receptors.
  • Internal bleeding: The loss of blood internally from the circulation
  • Isoniazid toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Isradipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Ivemark II: A lethal syndrome characterized by lack of spleen function as well as kidney, liver, pancreatic and heart abnormalities. The condition generally results in death within days of birth.
  • Johanson-Blizzard Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder involving a range of abnormalities including a characteristic beak-like small nose, hypothyroidism and deafness.
  • Juvenile tropical pancreatitis syndrome: A disease that tends occurs in tropical developing countries. It involves calcification and chronic inflammation of the pancreas. The condition tends to affect mainly young people.
  • Kearns-Sayre Syndrome: A rare neuromuscular disorder characterized by pigmented deposits on the retina, heart disease and progressive paralysis of some eye muscles.
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Leprechaunism: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by insulin resistance which leads to growth delay and endocrine system abnormalities.
  • Leschke syndrome: A condition involving weakness, high blood sugar and brown skin spots which may be the early symptoms of conditions such as bronze diabetes or xanthoma diabeticorum.
  • Lipoatrophic diabetes:
  • Lipoatrophy with diabetes, hepatic steatosis, cardiomyopathy, and leukomelanodermic papules: A rare inherited disorder characterized by loss of fat under the skin, diabetes, heart muscle disease, fatty liver
  • Lipodystrophy: A rare group of disorders that can be acquired or inherited and involves adipose tissue abnormalities. The disorder is characterized by varying degrees of loss of body fat. The three forms of the condition are: total lipodystrophy, partial lipodystrophy and localized lipodystrophy.
  • Lipodystrophy, familial partial, due to AKT2 mutations: An inherited disorder characterized by the loss of fatty tissue from the extremities while fatty tissue on the face, neck and trunk is normal or increased.
  • Lipodystrophy, familial partial, type 1 (FPLD1): An inherited disorder characterized by the loss of fatty tissue from the extremities while fatty tissue on the face, neck and trunk is normal or increased.
  • Lipodystrophy, familial partial, type 3 (FPLD3): A rare metabolic disorder involving abnormal fat gradually disappears from the limbs, trunk and buttocks but stays the same or accumulates on areas such as the face, shoulders, neck and genitals.
  • Lipodystrophy-HIV related: The loss of subcutaneous fat tissue in a patient infected with the HIV virus. The fat loss usually affects the face, extremities and trunk but fat accumulation occurs on the chin, back of neck and in the abdomen.
  • Liver failure: When the liver fails to function
  • MODY diabetes: Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young affects approximately one or two per cent of people who have diabetes, and may often go unrecognised in its early stages. It is a form of diabetes that develops before the patient reaches 25. It also runs in families, and can pass from one generation to the next. MODY does not always require insulin treatment.
  • MODY syndrome: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. The diabetes results due to genetic mutations which leads to dysfunctional insulin-producing pancreatic cells. There are 6 different genetic mutations that can cause this type of diabetes.
  • MODY syndrome, type 1: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 1 is due to a mutation of the HNF4A gene on chromosome 20.
  • MODY syndrome, type 2: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 2 is due to a mutation of the glucokinase gene on chromosome 7. This particular type is quite mild and usually only discovered incidentally or may become evident during pregnancy.
  • MODY syndrome, type III: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 3 is due to a mutation of the hepatic transcriptor factor-1 gene on chromosome 12q24.2. The hyperglycemia in this form of the condition tends to increase with time and hence eventually requires treatment in the form of medication in many patients.
  • MODY syndrome, type IV: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 4 is due to a mutation of the insulin promoter factor-1 gene on chromosome 13q12.1.
  • Mandibuloacral dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prematurely aged appearance and bone abnormalities. There are two subtypes with type B involving loss of fat layers under the skin mainly in the extremities, face and trunk whereas type A involves mainly the extremities. The severity of the symptoms is variable.
  • Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type A lipodystrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prematurely aged appearance and bone abnormalities. Loss of fat layers under the skin occurs mainly in the extremities in type B. The severity of the symptoms is variable.
  • Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type B lipodystrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prematurely aged appearance and bone abnormalities. Loss of fat layers under the skin occurs mainly in the extremities, face and trunk in type B. The severity of the symptoms is variable.
  • Marburg virus: Serious virus related to Ebola.
  • Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness: A rare disorder characterized by deafness associated with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
  • Mental retardation -- epileptic seizures -- hypogonadism -- hypogenitalism -microcephaly -- obesity: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental deficiency, epilepsy, small head, small genitals and obesity. Death occurs within the first two years of life.
  • Mental retardation -- skeletal dysplasia -- abducens palsy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities and weakness of an eye muscle.
  • Mental retardation, epileptic seizures, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental deficiency, epilepsy, small head, small genitals and obesity. Death occurs within the first two years of life.
  • Metabolic disorder: occurs when abnormal chemical reactions occur in the body
  • Methylmalonic acidemia:
  • Microgastria short stature diabetes: A rare syndrome characterized by a very small stomach, diabetes and a growth hormone deficiency.
  • Multiple endocrine abnormalities -- adenylyl cyclase dysfunction: A rare syndrome characterized by an enzyme defect (adenylyl cyclase) and a number of endocrine abnormalities.
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Mumps: An acute viral disease that causes the salivary glands to become swollen, sore and inflamed. Immunization had greatly reduced the incidence of this disease.
  • NIDDM: Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Niacin overdose: Excessive vitamin B3 (niacin) supplement or medication
  • Nifedipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Nimodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: Gradual onset of metabolic disturbance of the blood sugars that can be controlled without insulin
  • Norrie Disease: A rare form of blindness that occurs at birth or soon after due to eye defects. The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Norrie syndrome: A rare form of blindness that occurs at birth or soon after due to eye defects. The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency: A form of monogenic obesity caused by a genetic mutation which results in a deficiency of leptin. Monogenic obesity is obesity caused by a mutation in a single gene.
  • Organ rupture: damage to internal organs
  • POEMS: A very rare disorder that has widespread effects on the body: P -- polyneuropathy, O -- organopathy, E -- endocrinopathy, M -- monoclonal gammopathy and S -- skin changes.
  • Pancreas agenesis, dorsal: A very rare disorder where the back portion of the pancreas fails to develop.
  • Pancreas conditions: Any condition that affects the pancreas
  • Pancreas symptoms: Symptoms affecting the pancreas gland
  • Pancreatic beta cell agenesis with neonatal diabetes mellitus: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the pancreas resulting in infant diabetes mellitus. The insulin-producing beta cells are absent from birth.
  • Pancreatic inflammation: Pancreatic inflammation refers to swelling, tenderness, and irritation of the pancreas.
  • Pancreatic islet cell tumors (functioning tumor): A tumor that arises from the pancreatic islet cells and produces too many hormones.
  • Pancreatitis: Any inflammation that occurs in the pancreas
  • Panhypopituitarism: A rare condition where all pituitary hormones are absent or reduced. The condition may be congenital or acquired through such things as pituitary tumors. The pituitary gland regulates the activity of other endocrine glands as well as controlling growth. Other endocrine glands include adrenal, parathyroid, thyroid, pancreas, ovaries and testes. Symptoms can vary greatly depending on the degree of deficiency of the various hormones.
  • Parathyroid Cancer: A condition that is characterised by malignancy that affects the parathyroid
  • Phenytoin toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Pheochromocytoma: pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor that usually starts in the cells of the adrenal glands
  • Physical inactivity: When an individual is physically inactive
  • Pituitary Cancer: Cancer of the pituitary gland.
  • Pituitary cancer, childhood: Cancer (malignant) of the pituitary gland in children. The pituitary gland produces various hormones and some pituitary tumors (functioning tumors) can affect the secretion of one or more of these hormones resulting in a range of symptoms depending on the exact location of the tumor. Some pituitary tumors do not affect hormone production (nonfunctioning tumors).
  • Pituitary tumors, adult: A benign or cancer tumor that develops in the tissue of the pituitary gland in adults. The pituitary gland produces various hormones and some pituitary tumors (functioning tumors) can affect the secretion of one or more of these hormones resulting in a range of symptoms depending on the exact location of the tumor. Some pituitary tumors do not affect hormone production (nonfunctioning tumors).
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder that affects approximately 5% of all women.
  • Polyendocrine deficiency: The deficiency in the body of multiple endocrine hormones
  • Polyendocrine deficiency syndrome: A condition where more than one endocrine gland fails to function normally in terms of production of hormones. Symptoms can vary depending on the glands involved and the severity of the gland dysfunction.
  • Polyendocrine deficiency syndrome type 2: Multi-endocrine syndrome usually affecting young adults.
  • Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome: A group of rare genetic disorders characterized by the malfunction of more than one endocrine gland resulting in impaired hormone production. The gland malfunction results from autoimmune damage to the tissue. There are four subtypes of the disorder.
  • Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the malfunction of more than one endocrine gland resulting in impaired hormone production. The gland malfunction results from autoimmune damage to the tissue. There are four subtypes of the disorder with type 3 occurring mainly in female adults. Type 3 usually starts with thyroid gland problems and then other autoimmune conditions such as diabetes.
  • Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the malfunction of more than one endocrine gland resulting in impaired hormone production. The gland malfunction results from autoimmune damage to the tissue. Type 4 tends to have a different pattern to the other types with adrenal and thyroid problems often not occurring whereas other autoimmune conditions such as diabetes tend to predominate the initial stages of the condition.
  • Positive Chymotrypsin: A proteinase that is present in the faeces if an individual has a malabsorptive condition
  • Primary Hyperaldosteronism: An adrenal gland disorder where excess aldosterone hormone is produced resulting in symptoms such as headache, fatigue, nocturia and increased urine production. Also called Conn's syndrome.
  • Primary lipodystrophies: A group of rare diseases which involve loss of body fat. The body fat loss may be localized to certain parts of the body or may be generalized depending on the particular subtype.
  • Prolactinoma: Benign cancer of the pituitary gland producing prolactin.
  • Pyogenic arthritis -- pyoderma gangrenosum -- acne: A very rare autoinflammatory disorder involving the joints and skin. Sufferers develop arthritis, skin lesions and severe acne during adolescence. Usually only one joint is affected during episodes and various joints can be affected - especially the elbows, knees and ankles.
  • Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne: A very rare autoinflammatory disorder involving the joints and skin. Sufferers develop arthritis, skin lesions and severe acne during adolescence. Usually only one joint is affected during episodes and various joints can be affected - especially the elbows, knees and ankles.
  • Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome: A very rare genetic disorder involving severe insulin resistance which is where the body fails to be able to use insulin which is needed to control blood sugar levels.
  • Radio digito -- facial dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormalities of the arm bones and facial anomalies.
  • Retinohepatoendocrinologic syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by eye, liver and endocrine function abnormalities.
  • Reye's syndrome: is a potentially fatal disease that causes numerous detrimental effects to many organs, especially the brain and liver
  • Rieger anomaly -- partial lipodystrophy: A very rare disorder characterized by short stature, low birth weight and loss of skin fat. SHORT is an acronym for short stature, hyperextensible joints and/or hernia, ocular depression, Reiger anomaly and teething delay. Additional symptoms are also variably present.
  • Schofer beetz bohl syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by brain calcification, mental retardation, short stature, diabetes insipidus and unusual facial appearance.
  • Secondary Biliary Cirrhosis: Secondary biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to a secondary cause which results in blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions.
  • Septo-Optic Dysplasia: A rare birth defect characterized by impaired vision and pituitary deficiency.
  • Short stature cranial hyperostosis hepatomegaly diabetes: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by enlarged liver, diabetes, short stature and a thickened skull.
  • Short stature, cranial hyperostosis, hepatomegaly and diabetes: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by enlarged liver, diabetes, short stature and a thickened skull.
  • Shwachman syndrome: A rare disorder where a pancreatic defect impairs digestive enzyme production and malfunction of the bone marrow produces blood abnormalities, particularly blood cells involved with fighting infection. These defects produce a range of symptoms as a result of malabsorption and poor ability to fight infections. Characterized by a lack of digestive enzymes and low immunity due to low leukocyte level.
  • Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome:
  • Situs inversus totalis with cystic dysplasia of kidneys and pancreas: A rare syndrome where the position of the internal organs of the chest and abdomen is transposed. In addition there are kidney and pancreatic abnormalities.
  • Sjogren's Syndrome: Autoimmune disease damaging the eye tear ducts and other glands.
  • Smoking: The smoking of cigarettes
  • Sohval-Soffer syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, hypogonadism and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Somatostatinoma: A very rare disorder where tumors in glands that produce somatostatin affect the secretion of the hormone. The tumor mainly occurs in the pancreas but can also occur in the intestinal tract.
  • Sphincter of oddi manometry: A water perfused catheter is used during ERCP to measure sphincter of oddi pressures
  • Steatorrhea: A condition which occurs when there is an excess of fat in the faeces
  • Stomach cancer: Stomach or gastric cancer can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs
  • Subacute granulomatous thyroiditis: Subacute thyroiditis is a self-limited thyroid condition associated with a triphasic clinical course of hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and return to normal thyroid function.
  • Sudden onset of pancreatitis:
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • The Methylmalonic Acidemias: A condition which is characterized by an excess of methylmalonic acid in the blood
  • Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by megaloblastic anemia, hearing loss and diabetes. The condition is caused by a deficiency of a thiamine (vitamin B1) transporter protein which means that the body is unable to effectively utilize thiamine from the diet.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- cyclopeptides: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called cyclopeptide which can cause primarily gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested. Most cases of mushroom poisoning in North America involve cyclopeptide-containing mushrooms. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Amanita (bisporigera, ocreata, phalloides, suballiacea, tenufolia, verna, virosa), Galerina and Lepiota. One Amanita mushroom cap may result in death in an adult. Poisoning occurs in three phases: gastrointestinal symptoms (within 24 hours of ingestion); remission (up to 72 hours after ingestion); and liver and kidney symptoms (3 to 6 days after ingestion). Poisoning symptoms are more severe in children due to their smaller body size.
  • Type I Hyperlipoproteinemia: Type I Hyperlipoproteinemia is a rare inherited condition characterized by high levels of chylomicrons (a type of lipoprotein) in the blood. This condition is the result of low levels of lipoprotein lipase which is responsible for lowering lipoprotein levels. Cholesterol levels are usually normal and the risk of heart disease is low.
  • Type Ia Hyperlipoproteinemia: Type Ia Hyperlipoproteinemia is a rare inherited condition characterized by high levels of chylomicrons (a type of lipoprotein) in the blood. This condition is the result of low levels of lipoprotein lipase which is responsible for lowering lipoprotein levels. Cholesterol levels are usually normal and the risk of heart disease is low.
  • Type Ib Hyperlipoproteinemia: Type Ib Hyperlipoproteinemia is a rare inherited condition characterized by high levels of chylomicrons (a type of lipoprotein) in the blood. This condition is the result of low levels of apolipoprotein C-II which is responsible for lowering lipoprotein levels. Cholesterol levels are usually normal and the risk of heart disease is low.
  • Type Ic Hyperlipoproteinemia: Type Ic Hyperlipoproteinemia is a rare inherited condition characterized by high levels of chylomicrons (a type of lipoprotein) in the blood. This condition is the result of inhibited lipoprotein lipase activity. Lipoprotein lipase is responsible for lowering lipoprotein levels. Cholesterol levels are usually normal and the risk of heart disease is low.
  • Type V Hyperlipoproteinemia: Type V Hyperlipoproteinemia is a rare condition characterized by increased synthesis of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and reduced levels of lipoprotein lipase (an enzyme). Lipoproteins are responsible for transporting cholesterol in the bloodstream and high levels of them in the bloodstream means that there are high levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream.
  • Upper abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the upper abdominal region.
  • Vomiting: Vomiting or retching symptoms.
  • Von Gierke disease IA: A genetic metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase which results in the accumulation of glycogen in various tissues. G6P is stored as glycogen until the body needs to convert it to a sugar and use it to create energy. The enzyme deficiency prevents the conversion and hence low blood sugar levels result.
  • Von Hippel-Lindau Disease: Genetic disease causing multiple benign tumors
  • WAGR Syndrome: A syndrome that is due to the deletion of chromosome 11.
  • Weight loss: Loss of body weight.
  • Werner syndrome: A form of premature aging where sufferers start aging during adolescence or soon after and appear old by the time they reach their 30's or 40's. Milder forms of the condition may also occur.
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • Wilms tumor -- aniridia -- genitourinary anomalies -- mental retardation: A syndrome resulting from deletion of genetic material from chromosome the short arm of chromosome 11 (11p13). The characteristic symptoms are partial or complete absence of iris, genitourinary anomalies, mental retardation and Wilms' tumor. The specific range and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the size and exact location of the genetic material that is missing.
  • Wolfram Syndrome, Mitochondrial form: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness which results in mitochondrial defects.
  • Wolfram's disease: A condition that is inherited and consists of multiple symptoms
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: A rare disorder where excessive levels of the hormone gastrin are released into the stomach which increases stomach acidity which results in peptic ulcer development. A hormone secreting pancreatic or duodenal tumor is usually the cause.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Pancreas symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Pancreas symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Pancreas symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Pancreas symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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