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Symptoms » Persistent cough » Glossary
 

Glossary for Persistent cough

Medical terms related to Persistent cough or mentioned in this section include:

  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Adenoviruses: Common viruses causing common cold and various other ailments.
  • Asbestosis: Lung condition from asbestos exposure
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Balloon cell metastatic melanoma: Balloon cell melanoma, a variant of malignant melanoma, has been reported on rare occasions in animals and is uncommon in man. Such tumours have variable numbers of large, round to polygonal cells with abundant, clear, often vacuolated cytoplasm containing fine melanin granules and variable amounts of lipid.
  • Barrett Esophagus: Pre-malignant syndrome of the lower oesophagus characteries by columnar epithelium with areas of metaplasia.
  • Benign lung Tumor: Benign lung tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplastic lesions originating from pulmonary structures.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Breath symptoms: Breath-related symptoms including breath odor
  • Breathing symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Bronchial adenomata syndrome: A type of bronchial tumor that causes various respiratory symptoms.
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Bronchitis: Inflammation of the bronchi as a symptom
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Cancer of Unknown Primary Site: Metastatic cancer whose original source is unknown.
  • Carcinoma of the vocal tract: Cancer of the vocal cords in the larynx.
  • Centriacinar Emphysema: The abnormal permanent enlargement of air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles, accompanied by the destruction of the walls and without obvious fibrosis. It begins in the respiratory bronchioles and spreads peripherally
  • Chemical addiction: Addiction to and abuse of various substances.
  • Chronic Bronchitis: A condition which is characterized by the chronic inflammation of ones or more of the bronchi
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic bronchitis: A condition which is characterized by the chronic inflammation of ones or more of the bronchi
  • Chronic cough: The chronic noisy sudden expulsion of air from the respiratory tract
  • Chronic respiratory conditions: Chronic disorders of the respiratory (breathing) systems, such as COPD, emphysema, and others.
  • Chronic sinusitis: Chronic inflammation of the sinuses
  • Ciliary dyskinesia, due to transposition of ciliary microtubules: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Ciliary dyskinesia-bronchiectasis: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. The lack of ciliary movement can cause a lung disease called bronchiectasis where a build up of mucus causes infections and airway damage. The airways then become enlarged. The condition can become progressively worse with time and can result in serious breathing problems.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Cough: Any type of coughing symptom.
  • Coughing blood: Blood in coughed up material.
  • Coughing spasms: Spasms of coughing attacks
  • Croup: A condition characterized by an acute partial obstruction of the upper airway on young children
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Dry cough: Dry non-productive cough without producing sputum
  • Emphysema: Emphysema is a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is defined as an abnormal, permanent enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles accompanied by destruction of their walls and without obvious fibrosis.
  • Epidermoid carcinoma: A non-small-cell type of lung cancer. The cancer develops from cells that line the inside of the lungs.
  • Esophageal carcinoma: A cancer of the esophagus.
  • Esophagus symptoms: Symptoms affecting the esophagus (digestive throat passage)
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Flu-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to flu including fever
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart failure: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently and effectively
  • Hemosiderosis: A rare lung condition where bleeding into the lungs causes lung damage due to the accumulation of iron. The severity of the condition is determined by the amount of bleeding.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome: A rare blood disorder where the bone marrow produces too many eosinophils over a long period of time which can cause organ or tissue damage. The disorder can affect and part of the body but most often affects the skin, heart and nervous system. The increased eosinophil production continues for a long period of time (at least 6 months) and there is no apparent cause.
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to defective radial spokes: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility.
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to excessively long cilia: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormally long cilia. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Kaolin pneumoconiosis: A lung disease caused by breathing in air contaminated with kaolin (component of china clay). It is generally an occupation disease where people are exposed to the contaminated air for prolonged periods of time. Kaolin is used to make ceramics, paper, medicines, cosmetics and toothpaste. Generally symptoms stop once the exposure ceases.
  • Kartagener syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by enlarged bronchial tubes, sinusitis and cross-positioning of body organs.
  • Laryngeal carcinoma: Cancer of the laryngeal area. Smoking and alcohol increase the risk of this cancer.
  • Larynx symptoms: Symptoms affecting the larynx (voice box) in the neck
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 1: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q23-q25.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 2: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q25.1.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 3: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15p15.33.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 4: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.33.
  • Lung cancer: Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. Most lung tumors are malignant.
  • Lung conditions: Various conditions affecting the lungs or related airways.
  • Lung damage: When there is any damage to the structure or function of the lung
  • Lung symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both lungs.
  • Malignant mesothelioma: Malignant mesothelioma affects the lining or membranes of certain large cavities in the body. These cavities, called the serous cavities, house certain major organs in the body including the heart, lungs, abdomen and others
  • Mesothelioma: Type of lung cancer associated with asbestos.
  • Mild cough: Cough symptoms that are not severe
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Mycobacterium xenopi: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Bacterial respiratory infection
  • Nicotine addiction: Nicotine addiction is the uncontrollable desire to continue smoking. Smoking products contain nicotine which is a chemical that can lead to addiction if used over a period of time. Cessation causes withdrawal symptoms which can vary in nature and severity.
  • Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: It is any type of lung cancer other than small cell carcinoma (SCLC). As a class, NSCLCs are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy, compared to small cell carcinoma
  • Occupational Cancer -- Laryngeal cancer: Occupational exposure to organic solvents can increase the risk of developing laryngeal cancer.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Larynx cancer: Occupational exposure to mustard gas can increase the risk of developing larynx cancer.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Lung cancer: Occupational exposure to arsenic can increase the risk of developing lung cancer.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Mesothelioma: Occupational exposure to asbestos can increase the risk of developing mesothelioma.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Respiratory tract cancer: People employed in occupations which involves chronic exposure to arsenic, asbestos, cadmium, beryllium, chromium, diesel exhaust, silica and nickel can lead to an increased risk of developed respiratory tract cancers such as bronchial cancer, lung cancer and tracheal cancer.
  • Opioid addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opioids on a regular basis. Opioids may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opioid addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling. Examples of opioids includes morphine, heroin, oxycodone and fentanyl.
  • Opium addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opium on a regular basis. Opium may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opium addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Oxycontin addiction: Oxycontin is a commonly prescribed pain killer which is recognized as carrying a high risk of addiction. Initial use of the drug may be to control chronic pain but patients may find themselves increasingly dependent on the drug and unable to stop its use. Other cases of addiction may occur when people deliberately and illegally misuse Oxycontin as a recreational drug.
  • Pain killer addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use pain-relieving medication on a regular basis. Pain killers are often prescribed for the treatment of sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Parainfluenza: Milder influenza-like infection
  • Parainfluenza virus type 1: Parainfluenza is an influenza-like viral disease that can cause croup, upper respiratory tract infection, pneumonia or bronchiolitis. Type 1 virus occurs during autumn every second year and tends to primarily cause croup as well as respiratory tract infection.
  • Parainfluenza virus type 2: Parainfluenza is an influenza-like viral disease that can cause croup, upper respiratory tract infection, pneumonia or bronchiolitis. Type 2 virus occurs during autumn every second year and tends to primarily cause respiratory tract illness but is milder and less frequent than type 1.
  • Parainfluenza virus type 3: Parainfluenza is an influenza-like viral disease that can cause croup, upper respiratory tract infection, pneumonia or bronchiolitis. Type 3 virus occurs during spring and summer in temperate climates but can continue into autumn.
  • Parainfluenza virus type 4: Parainfluenza is an influenza-like viral disease that can cause croup, upper respiratory tract infection, pneumonia or bronchiolitis. Type 4 virus causes mild sporadic illness.
  • Partial atrioventricular canal: A type of congenital heart defect involving and abnormal opening between the heart chambers and defective valves that control blood flow in the heart. The partial form of the condition involves only the two upper heart chambers. Symptoms are determined by the severity of the defect. Often symptoms do not become apparent until later in life.
  • Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Gastroesophageal reflux is defined as the retrograde movement of gastric contents into the esophagus; it is a physiologic process that occurs in everyone, young and old, particularly after meals. Researchers have found that 10 percent of infants (younger than 12 months) with GER develop significant complications. The diseases associated with reflux are known collectively as Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).
  • Persistent cough: Persistent cough refers to a cough that is constant or unrelenting.
  • Persistent cough in children: Persistent cough in children refers to a child's cough that is continual or constant.
  • Pneumoconiosis: A group of lung diseases caused by inhaling dust.
  • Pneumonia: Lung infection or inflammation (as a symptom)
  • Prescribed medication addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use prescribed medication in a manner or frequency not prescribed. Drugs such as painkillers are prescribed to treat such things as pain but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Primary Emphysema: It includes Panacinar and Centriacinar emphysema. It is related to the destruction of alveoli, because of an inflammation or deficiency of alpha 1-antitrypsin
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 10: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 10 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (14q21.3). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 11: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 11 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (6q22). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 12: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 12 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (6p21.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 2: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 2 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (19q13.3qter). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 3: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 3 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (5p). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 4: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 4 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (15q13.1-q15.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 5: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 5 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (16p12.2-p12.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 6: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 6 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (7p14-p13). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 7: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 7 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (7p21). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 8: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 8 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (15q24-q25). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 9: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 9 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (17q25). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Pulmonary haemosiderosis, primary: A rare condition characterized by anemia, coughing up blood and iron deposits in the lungs. The disorder is the result of recurring bleeding in the lungs which leads to a buildup of iron in the lungs. Symptoms may develop slowly or quickly and may become evident at any age.
  • Respiratory acidosis: respiratory acidosis is acidosis (abnormally increased acidity of the blood) due to decreased ventilation of the pulmonary alveoli, leading to elevated arterial carbon dioxide concentration
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Sarcoidosis, pulmonary: A rare disease involving inflammation of the lungs which leads to the development of nodules, fibrosis and scarring of lung tissue.
  • Secondary Emphysema:
  • Severe cough: Acute or persistent cough
  • Sleeping pill addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use sleeping pills on a regular basis. Sleeping pills are often prescribed for the treatment of sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Small Cell Lung Cancer: Small cell lung cancer is a cancer of the small cells which make up some of the lung tissue. It tends to be a more aggressive cancer than large cell lung cancer and can metastasize to other parts of the body. This type of cancer nearly always occurs in a people with a history of smoking.
  • Small cell lung cancer, adult: Small cell lung cancer is a cancer of the lung tissue which is made up of small cells. It tends to be a more aggressive cancer than large cell lung cancer and can metastasize to other parts of the body.
  • Smokers cough: cough without sputum
  • Smoking: The smoking of cigarettes
  • Throat symptoms: Symptoms affecting the throat
  • Tranquilizer addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use tranquilizers on a regular basis. Tranquilizers are often prescribed for the treatment of anxiety and sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Vocal cord dysfunction familial: A rare inherited disorder where the vocal cord closes while breathing in which causes breathing difficulty which can be severe in some cases. Mental retardation is also associated.
  • Wet cough: Wet productive cough producing sputum
  • Whooping Cough: An infectious condition caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Persistent cough:

The following list of conditions have 'Persistent cough' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Persistent cough:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Persistent cough' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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