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Symptoms » Poor appetite » Glossary
 

Glossary for Poor appetite

Medical terms related to Poor appetite or mentioned in this section include:

  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal swelling: Swelling or bloating of the abdomen
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia: A rare disorder where iron is transported into a developing blood cells but because it is unable to be used, it builds up within the cell and tends to stop it from developing into a fully functioning red blood cell. Thus anemia can occur despite adequate or even high iron levels. Acquired cases can occur on exposure to excess alcohol, lead and drugs or can occur to nutritional problems involving a deficiency of folic acid or copper or an excess of zinc. The condition can also be caused by conditions such as kidney problems, endocrine dysfunction, metabolic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Acute Appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute biphenotypic leukemia: A rare form of leukemia that has myeloid and lymphoid features.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenophorea Infections: A parasitic roundworm infection. Roundworms can be found in water and soil environments as well as on plants and in animals.
  • Adenovirus-related Cold: An Adenovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Adenovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcoholism: High dependence on excessive amounts of alcohol.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and usually consists of white blood cells and null cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anaplastic small cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and consists mainly of small cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, hypochromic microcytic: A blood disorder where red blood cells are too small and lack sufficient iron. It can be inherited or caused by insufficient iron in the diet or from a genetic disorder.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- plasma cell type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The plasma-cell type tends to involve systemic symptoms such as fever and weight loss due to the destruction of red blood cells.
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Ankylosing spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints. The spine becomes progressively painful and stiff and the spine joints may eventually fuse and cause disability. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Inflammation can affect other joints and tissues.
  • Anorexia: This is known as a lack of or loss of appetite for food
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anxiety: Excessive worry, anxiety, or fear.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Anxiety disorders: Anxiety disorders are persistent and excessive feelings of fear, worry or uneasiness that are significant enough to have an impact on day-to-day life. Excessive anxiety can have repercussions on physical and mental health. There are a number of different subtypes of anxiety disorders such as General anxiety, Social anxiety, Phobias, Hypochondria and Obsessive compulsive disorder.
  • Appendicitis/acute appendicitis/chronic appendicitis:
  • Appetite changes: Inappropriately reduced or increased appetite.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arginase deficiency: A very rare urea cycle disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme (arginase) needed to convert ammonia to the urea which can then be removed in the urine. The condition leads to excess build-up of ammonia in the body which is toxic to the nervous system.
  • Argininosuccinase lyase deficiency, neonatal: A rare inherited urea cycle disorder caused by lack of enzymes (argininosuccinase lyase) needed to turn ammonia into urea resulting in excess ammonia in the body. The neonatal form of the condition can result in death or severe complications if not treated early enough.
  • Astrocytoma: A malignant tumour of the nervous system composed of astrocytes.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A slow progressing disease involving cancerous B-cell lymphocytes which take over the healthy cells in the lymph nodes. B-cells help the body to fight infections so when the disease becomes more advanced, the body is less able to fight infection as there are fewer healthy, functioning B-cells.
  • B-cell lymphomas: A group cancers involving the proliferation of lymphocytic B-cells. Examples include small lymphocytic lymphoma, immunoblastic lymphoma and lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Baber's syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital liver cirrhosis with Fanconi syndrome.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bard-Pic syndrome: A complication of advanced pancreatic cancer marked by jaundice and enlarged gallbladder.
  • Beriberi: Disease due to vitamin B1 deficiency (thiamine)
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Biliary tract cancer: Cancer that develops in the gallbladder or bile ducts.
  • Bint Al Zahab-induced lead poisoning: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used by various ethnic groups (e.g. Indians, Saudi Arabians) to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bipolar disorder: Cycles of mania and depression; commonly called "manic-depression".
  • Bird flu (avian influenza): Bird flu refers to influenza A invection. Influenza A is a viral respiratory infection that can usually occurs in birds (especially poultry) but can be transmitted to humans and cause serious illness. The virus is contagious and can cause severe illness especially in patients who are very young or old or have some other medical condition as well. The severity of symptoms can vary but usually involves respiratory and constitutional (e.g. headache, aching muscles) symptoms. The influenza virus can mutate and produce different strains though the symptoms are the same. This frequent mutation means that people need regular vaccinations to ensure they are protected against new strains as they arise.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bokhoor-induced lead poisoning: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Boron overuse: Consumption of high doses of the mineral boron can cause various symptoms.
  • Bothriocephalosis: Infection with an intestinal parasite. The parasite is a fish tapeworm called Diphyllobothrium latum. Human infection is caused by eating undercooked contaminated fish.
  • Bouillaud's syndrome: Heart inflammation caused by rheumatism. The inner lining of the heart (endocardium) as well as the membrane surrounding the heart (pericardium) become inflamed.
  • Bowel inflammation: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bowel portion of the gastrointestinal tract
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumor, adult: A growth or tumor that develops in the tissues of the brain in adults. The tumor can be benign or malignant.
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bronchogenic carcinoma: When cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner, the condition is called lung cancer .
  • Brown-Symmers disease: A rare form of brain inflammation that occurs in children and can quickly lead to death. Symptoms usually start suddenly.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Burnett's syndrome: Burnett's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited urea cycle disorder where the lack of the enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase prevents ammonia from being turned into urea and being excreted in the urine. Excess ammonia builds up in the body which can cause serious complications or even death if left untreated.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hypogonadism -- metabolic anomalies: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart muscle disease, hypogonadism, blindness, deafness and metabolic anomalies. Puberty was normal despite the hypogonadism.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- spherocytosis: A rare disorder characterized by the association of spherocytosis with heart muscle disease. Spherocytosis is a red blood cell disorder where the red blood cells have abnormal membranes which gives them a spherical shape and makes them weak resulting in their premature death.
  • Cardiomyopathy due to anthracyclines: Damage to the heart muscle caused by anthracycline drugs which are used in chemotherapy. The damage occurs more frequently with higher cumulative doses. Often the patients have no symptoms of the heart damage for many year.
  • Cardiomyopathy, Alcoholic: A weakened heart mucle due to excessive alcohol consumption. Symptoms are usually not evident until the heart becomes severely damaged.
  • Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally.
  • Cebagin-induced lead poisoning: Cebagin is a folk remedy used mainly by Middle Eastern people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Cerebral ventricle neoplasm: A tumor that occurs in the fluid-filled spaces of the brain called the ventricles. Symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the tumor and whether it is cancerous or not.
  • Cervical cancer: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of malignancy on the cervix
  • Chemical addiction: Addiction to and abuse of various substances.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aluminum: Aluminum is a chemical used mainly for metallurgical purposes and can be found in packaging, electrical parts, vehicles, cooking utensils, construction materials and building components. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorphenamide: Dichlorphenamide is a chemical used mainly as a treatment for glaucoma. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glaze: Glazes are used to put a shiny finish on various surfaces such as pottery. Glazes contain chemicals such as lead and zinc oxide which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Solder: Solder contains various chemicals and heavy metals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Childhood liver cancer, primary: Cancer that develops in the tissue of the liver in children.
  • Chloramphenicol-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Chloramphenicol-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called chloramphenicol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Cholestasis disease of pregnancy: A liver condition that can occur usually in the last stage of pregnancy. The flow of bile in the gallbladder or liver is impaired by the high levels of pregnancy hormones. The bile acids build up in the organs and then enter the bloodstream. The main symptom is usually itching. Symptoms usually resolve after delivering the baby. Risk factors includes existing liver condition, multiple pregnancy and a family history of the condition.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.3
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 3: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q34.1.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 4: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p25.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 5: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q24.1.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic depression: Chronic depression is a mental disorder characterized by an all-encompassing low mood accompanied by low self-esteem, and loss of interest or pleasure in normally enjoyable activities and this maybe present for months together.
  • Chronic lower respiratory diseases: General term for various chronic respiratory diseases including COPD, emphysema and chronic bronchitis
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body.
  • Chronic renal insufficiency: Chronic lack of function of the renal system. Kidneys.
  • Chuifong tokuwan-induced lead poisoning: Chuifong tokuwan is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian people to arthritis and other pain. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Cirrhosis of liver: diffuse hepatic process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules
  • Cirrhosis, familial: Liver cirrhosis that is inherited in a familial pattern. The liver scarring (cirrhosis) is not caused by any discernable disease process. The liver becomes progressively scarred and its function is impaired.
  • Citrullinemia: Citrullinemia is an inherited urea cycle disorder which causes toxic substances including ammonia to build up in the blood. There are two main subtypes of Citrullinemia (I and II) which are caused by different genetic abnormalities and result in different symptoms. Milder forms may present in childhood and rare late-onset forms (adult-onset) may not cause symptoms until adulthood.
  • Citrullinemia I: A very rare urea cycle disorder where a lack of the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase prevents ammonia being turned into urea which can then be excreted in the urine. The build up of ammonia in the body can cause harmful effects. The neonatal form of citrullinemia type I is generally more serious than the later onset form which may sometimes be mild enough to produce no symptoms.
  • Citrullinemia II: A very rare urea cycle disorder involving a deficiency of the transport compound called Citrin. Citrin transports aspartate to where the enzyme argininosuccinic acid synthase can combine it with citrulline to make argininosuccinic acid. The deficiency prevents ammonia being turned into urea which can then be excreted in the urine. The build up of ammonia in the body can cause harmful effects.
  • Cleft lip palate pituitary deficiency: A very rare disorder characterized by a cleft lip and palate as well as deficient pituitary gland activity which affects hormone levels. The clefts and the pituitary abnormality are considered to be midline defects.
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cold & Flu:
  • Cold-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to the common cold.
  • Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon (bowel) or rectum.
  • Combat stress reaction: A term used in the military which refers to behaviors that result from the stress of fighting in a war.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Complete atrioventricular canal: A rare form of congenital heart disease where the there is a hole in the heart wall that separates the upper heart chambers, a hole the heart wall that separates the lower heart chambers and heart valve abnormalities (tricuspid and mitral valves). This results in excessive blood circulation in the lungs leading to congestive heart failure in untreated cases.
  • Congenital heart septum defect: A heart defect involving the septum which is present at birth. The defect is a hole in the wall of the heart that separates the right and left chambers and allows blood to flow through the hole. An atrial septal defect is a hole between the two upper heart chambers and a ventricular septal defect is a hole between the two lower heart chambers. Symptoms are determined by the size and exact location of the defect.
  • Congestive cardiac failure: A condition characterized by breathlessness and abnormal sodium and water retention.
  • Congestive heart failure: A condition which is characterized by breathlessness due to oedema and congestion of the lungs
  • Conotruncal heart malformations: A rare group of heart defect involving the outflow tracts. Examples include truncus arteriosus, transposition of great arteries and tetralogy of Fallot. Obviously the symptoms will be determined by which specific defect is involved.
  • Constipation: Hardness of stool or difficulty or inability to pass feces.
  • Copper deficiency-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Copper deficiency-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused insufficient quantities of copper. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells due to the lack of copper. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Cordyceps-induced lead poisoning: Cordyceps is a folk remedy by Chinese people to treat high blood pressure, bleeding problems and diabetes. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Cornelia de Lange syndrome 2: A very rare disorder involving delayed physical development and various malformations involving the head, face and limbs. Type 2 is not as severe as type 1 with some of the abnormalities not presenting until later in life or absent altogether. The range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Coronavirus-related Cold: A Coronavirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Coronavirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition. Coronaviruses are a significant cause of common colds in adults.
  • Coxsackievirus-related Cold: A Coxsackievirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Coxsackievirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Cryptosporiosis: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Crystal meth addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crystal meth on a regular basis. Crystal meth is a powerful stimulant used illegally for its effects. It is highly addictive and known by street names such as ice, speed, glass, crank and chalk. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cyclic vomiting syndrome: recurrent attacks of intense nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain with or without headache/ migraine
  • Cycloserine-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Cycloserine -induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called Cycloserine. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Cyclosporiasis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cyclosporine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Cyclosporiosis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cytochrome c oxydase deficiency, French-Canadian type: A rare, progressive, inherited metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme cytochrome C oxidase affects skeletal muscles, connective tissue, brain and liver.
  • Daffodil poisoning: Daffodils contain a toxic chemical which can cause poisoning symptoms if ingested. The plant also has the potential to cause skin reactions in susceptible people. The daffodil bulb contains the highest concentration of toxins and accidental ingestion has occurred when the bulb has been mistaken for an onion bulb.
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Darvocet withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Darcovet use is discontinued or reduced. Darcovet is a pain-killer. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Decreased appetite and poor growth in children: Decreased appetite and poor growth in children is an abnormal condition in which a child has a poor appetite coupled with deficient growth.
  • Decreased appetite and poor growth in infants: Decreased appetite and poor growth in infants occurs when an infant has a poor appetite coupled with deficient growth.
  • Decreased folate: Decrease in one of the B vitamins required for red blood cell production
  • Decreased gastrointestinal motility: Decreased gastrointestinal motility is a lowered functioning of the gastrointestinal tract in which food is not digested and moved normally through the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Decreased intestinal motility: slowed peristalsis
  • Decreased mean cell haemoglobin: A decreased hemoglobin content of the average red blood cell, calculated from the hemoglobin therein and the red cell count in erythrocyte indices
  • Decreased mean cell haemoglobin concentration: A decreased average haemoglobin concentration in the a specified volume
  • Decreased mean cell volume: A decreased mean red cell volume
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Depression: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Depressive disorders: Depression or its various related conditions.
  • Depressive episode: Mood disorder where depression is not associated with a manic episode
  • Depressive symptoms: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Deshi Dewa-induced lead poisoning: Deshi Dewa is a folk remedy by Indian people as a fertility medicine. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Desmoplastic small round cell tumor: A rare aggressive tumor that usually develops in soft tissue and tends to grow to a large size. It usually occurs in the abdomen but may also in other parts of the body such as abdominal organs, brain, testicles, ovaries, spinal cord and skull.
  • DiGeorge syndrome: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder which can result in a vast array of symptoms. Various names have been used to describe different manifestations of the syndrome. Di George Syndrome primarily involves an underdeveloped thymus and parathyroid glands which results in lowered immunity low blood calcium levels respectively. Another primary feature is heart defects. Various other variable features are also present. It is not uncommon for patients to have more than one of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome subtypes which can make diagnosis confusing - other subtypes include Sphrintzen syndrome, Caylor cardiofacial syndrome and CATCH 22.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Dientamoeba fragilis: Parasite usually causing digestive symptoms
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Dilutional hyponatremia: Low sodium levels due to excessive fluids.
  • Dimorphic anemia: Dimorphic refers to anemia that has two different causes acting together e.g. iron deficiency as well as a Vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Dipylidiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a tapeworm called Dipylidium caninum. The parasite commonly infects dogs and cats but can occur in humans. Transmission usually occurs through accidental ingestion of infected cat or dog fleas. Children are more likely to become infected and are also more likely to have symptoms.
  • Double Depression: Double depression occurs when someone with dysthymia experiences an episode of major depression.
  • Drug-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Drug-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by drugs such as cycloserine, isoniazid and ethanol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Allopurinol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to allopurinol. Allopurinol is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Anabolic C-17: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Anabolic C-17 which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Anesthetic agent: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antianginal agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antianginal agents. Antianginal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antiarrhythmics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiarrhythmics. Antiarrhythmics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antibiotics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Anticoagulants: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticoagulants. Anticoagulants are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antifungals: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antihyperlipidemic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antihyperlipidemic agents. Antihyperlipidemic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antihypertensives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antihypertensives. Antihypertensives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antineoplastic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antineoplastic agents. Antineoplastic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Antithyroid drugs: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called antithyroid drugs. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Benzodiazepine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called benzodiazepine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- British anti-Lewisite penicillamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to British anti-Lewisite penicillamine. British anti-Lewisite penicillamine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Butyrophenone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called butyrophenone. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cimetidine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cimetidine. Cimetidine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Colchicine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to colchicine. Colchicine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Dantrolene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dantrolene. Dantrolene is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Diflunisal: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to diflunisal. Diflunisal is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Disulfiram: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Disulfiram. Disulfiram is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Diuretic Agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to diuretic agents. Diuretic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called erythromycin estolate. Erythromycin estolate is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Erythromycin ethyl succinate. Erythromycin ethyl succinate is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Fenoprofen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to fenoprofen. Fenoprofen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Glucocorticoids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called glucocorticoids. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ibuprofen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Indomethacin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to indomethacin. Indomethacin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Iodide ion: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Iodide ion. Iodide ion is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Naproxen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to naproxen. Naproxen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Oral hypoglycemics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral hypoglycemics which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called penicillin. Penicillin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenothiazines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called phenothiazine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenylbutazone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to phenylbutazone. Phenylbutazone is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Ranitidine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ranitidine. Ranitidine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Salicylate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to salicylates. Salicylates are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Steroids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to steroids which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Sulfonamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Sulfonamide antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Sulindac: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulindac. Sulindac is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Tamoxifen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tamoxifen which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Telithromycin. Telithromycin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Thioxanthene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called Thioxanthene. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Thorotrast: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Thorotrast. Thorotrast is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Vitamin A: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Vitamin A. Vitamin A is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- Zoxazolamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Zoxazolamine. Zoxazolamine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- anticonvulsives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- antituberculous agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- antiviral medication: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- endocrine agent: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- monoamine oxidase inhibitors: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to psychotropic agents called monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- psychotropic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain psychotropic agents. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- tricyclic antidepressant: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called tricyclic antidepressant. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drugs-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Duodenal ulcer: A peptic ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). The word "peptic" refers to pepsin, a stomach enzyme that breaks down proteins. If a peptic ulcer is located in the stomach it is called a gastric ulcer.
  • Dysthymia: Chronic depression usually associated with elderly people suffering stress from a variety of causes.
  • Eating symptoms: Symptoms related to eating.
  • Echovirus-related Cold: An Echovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Echovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Eijkman's syndrome: A group of nervous symptoms that is associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency. The deficiency leads to a condition called Beri-Beri. Severe cases result in progressive paralysis leading to convulsions and death as the nerves become increasingly inflamed and wasted.
  • Emotional stress: A condition which occurs when a person is under stress affecting their emotions
  • Emotional symptoms: Symptoms affecting the emotions.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Anabolic C-17: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Anabolic C-17 which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Antithyroid drugs: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called antithyroid drugs. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Glucocorticoids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called glucocorticoids. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Oral contraceptives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral contraceptives which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Oral hypoglycemics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral hypoglycemics which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Steroids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to steroids which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage -- Tamoxifen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tamoxifen which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endogenous depression: Endogenous depression is a mood disorder that affects some people from birth and is believed to be a genetic condition. A sufferer is prone to become depressed on the advent of traumatic events, exhaustion or when under high levels of stress and may not be aware of the disorder until confronted by symptoms of depression for the first time.
  • Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Bacterial infection of the digestive system
  • Enterovirus-related Cold: Enterovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Enterovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Epidermoid carcinoma: A non-small-cell type of lung cancer. The cancer develops from cells that line the inside of the lungs.
  • Esophagitis: Inflammation of the esophagus
  • Ethanol-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Ethanol-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by consuming ethanol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Failure to thrive: Inadequate or interrupted physical growth.
  • Familial Colorectal Cancer: An inherited disorder in which affected individuals have a higher-than-normal chance of developing colorectal cancer and certain other types of cancer, often before the age of 50.
  • Familial Wilms tumor 2: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 2 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 19q13.4).
  • Familial hypopituitarism: Impaired pituitary gland hormone-producing activity that tends to run in families. The failure of the pituitary gland in turn affects other hormone-producing glands which rely on the hormones from the pituitary gland for their activity. Symptoms are determined by the degree and type of hormone deficiency involved.
  • Farouk-induced lead poisoning: Farouk is a folk remedy by Saudi Arabian people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Fascioliasis: A rare parastitic infectious disease caused by liver fluke Fasciola hepatica which can cause blockage of the bile ducts in the liver.
  • Fever: Raised body temperature usually with other symptoms.
  • Fibrosing alveolitis: A condition characterized by abnormalities in the fibrous tissues between lung alveoli which results in inflammation.
  • Flu-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to flu, or exhibition flu-like symptoms.
  • Flu-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to flu including fever
  • Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: A rare kidney disorder involving scarring of parts of the kidney filtering system which affects kidney function. It usually occurs for no apparent reason but can result from kidney damage caused by illicit drug use, certain viral infections and HIV.
  • Folate-deficiency anemia: Folate-deficiency anemia is a blood condition characterized by low levels of folate in the body which leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells. It is usually the result of a poor diet, malabsorption issues or the use of certain medications.
  • Food symptoms: Symptoms related to food.
  • Fowl Paralysis: A viral disease that affects poultry - it is very contagious and is a herpes virus. The virus tends to affect the nerves and cause tumors in internal organs. Poultry may be unable to lay eggs or may even die. Young birds are more susceptible than older birds with death most common between the ages of 8 and 20 weeks. The virus may attack the nervous system and result in paralysis or it may attack the visceral system and cause tumors in the internal organs. Some birds may die without any obvious symptoms.
  • Fowl paralyses: A viral disease that affects poultry - it is very contagious and is a herpes virus. The virus tends to affect the nerves and cause tumors in internal organs. Poultry may be unable to lay eggs or may even die. Young birds are more susceptible than older birds with death most common between the ages of 8 and 20 weeks. The virus may attack the nervous system and result in paralysis or it may attack the visceral system and cause tumors in the internal organs. Some birds may die without any obvious symptoms.
  • Foxglove poisoning: The foxglove is a herb which produces fruit in a capsule and colored, tubular flowers. The leaves, flowers and seeds of the plant contain a very toxic chemical called digitalis glycoside which can cause serious symptoms or even death if eaten. Skin irritation can occur if contact with the skin occurs. NOTE: Patients who are taking certain medications (digoxin, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers) are more susceptible to foxglove poisoning.
  • Fullness: Early feeling of fullness from eating
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gall Bladder Cancer: Cancer of the gall bladder.
  • Gall bladder conditions: Any condition that affects the gallbladder
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gastric Ulcer: A gastric ulcer is a break in the normal tissue that lines the stomach.
  • Gastritis: gastritis is inflammation of the gastric mucosa of the stomach
  • Gastroenteritis: An infection of the bowel
  • Gastrointestinal Anthrax: Anthrax of the digestive system.
  • Gastrointestinal infections related to AIDS: It usually occurs due to decreased immunity.
  • Gastroparesis: A condition characterized by the paralysis of the stomach
  • Ghasard-induced lead poisoning: Ghasard is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Asian and Indian people as a tonic (usually for indigestion). This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Giardia: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Glomerulonephritis: A condition which affects the kidneys and is characterized by inflammatory changes that occur in the glomeruli
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • Greta-induced lead poisoning: Greta is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Grief or loss: The normal emotional response that occurs to an external loss
  • H1N1 Flu:
  • HADH deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hai Ge Fen-induced lead poisoning: Hai Ge Fen is clamshell powder used mainly by Chinese people to make traditional Chinese herbal medicines. This product has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease: Common contagious viral infant or child condition
  • Hand-Foot-Mouth Syndrome: An infectious viral disease caused by the coxsackievirus A. The disease is characterized by the development of blisters in the mouth and on hands and feet. The disease is spread by contact with body fluids from an infected person and the incubation period is 3 - 7 days. The infection is most common in children under the age of ten but can occur in teenagers and sometimes in adults.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart conditions: Any condition that affects the heart
  • Heart disease: Any disease that affects that heart but particularly relating to its own blood supply
  • Heart failure: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently and effectively
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Hemolytic anemia: A condition which is characterized by anaemia due to the destruction of red blood cells
  • Henna-induced lead poisoning: Henna is used mainly by Middle Eastern people as a hair and skin dye. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Hepadnaviral infection: There are a number of viruses in the Hepadnavirdae family of viruses but only type B can cause infection in the human. It causes hepatitis B infection in humans. The other types of the virus can cause infection in other animals.
  • Hepadnaviruses: There are a number of viruses in the Hepadnavirdae family of viruses but only type B can cause infection in the human. It causes hepatitis B infection in humans. The other types of the virus can cause infection in other animals.
  • Hepadnoavirus infection: There are a number of viruses in the Hepadnavirdae family of viruses but only type B can cause infection in the human. It causes hepatitis B infection in humans. The other types of the virus can cause infection in other animals.
  • Hepatic encephalopathy syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the association of advanced liver disease and neurological problems.
  • Hepatitis: Any inflammation of the liver
  • Hepatitis A: Contagious viral infection of the liver
  • Hepatitis B: Viral liver infection spread by sex or body fluids.
  • Hepatitis C: Viral liver infection spread by blood.
  • Hepatitis D: Viral liver infection occurring in association with HepB.
  • Hepatitis E: Viral liver infection.
  • Hepatitis X: Hepatitis infection by an unknown virus not classified as HepA/B/C/D/E.
  • Hepatitis X (non-A,-B,-C,-D,-E): Viral liver inflammation that cannot be determined to be one of the existing types of viral hepatitis - A,B,C,D and E.
  • Hepatoma: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver.
  • Hepatotoxicity: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a drug, chemical or other agent. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Chaparral: Chaparral can be used as a herbal agent to treat abdominal cramps, pain and acne. The herbal agent contains a chemical called NDGA which can cause an adverse reaction in some people. Skin contact can also result in dermatitis. Patients with preexisting liver or kidney conditions are particularly susceptible to an adverse reaction to the herbal agent.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Kombucha: Kombucha can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, arthritis, aches, high blood pressure and to improve the immune system. Kombucha can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Cottonseed: Cottonseed can be used as a herbal agent used to reduce male fertility in China. The herbal agent contains a chemical called gossyphol which can cause various overdose symptoms if ingested in excessive quantities.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Germanium: Germanium is used as a health food supplement mainly in Japan but it can cause various problems if too much is taken. Chronic use and the ingestion of a large amount at one time can result in overdose symptoms.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Kombucha: Kombucha can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, arthritis, aches, high blood pressure and to improve the immune system. The ingestion of excessive amounts of Kombucha can result in overdose symptoms.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Sabah vegetable: Sabah vegetable can be used as a herbal agent to treat obesity and prevent vision problems. The herbal agent contains a chemical (papvarine alkaloids) which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer: A rare disorder characterized by the inherited predisposition to develop colorectal cancer as well as cancers in other locations, particularly near the bowel. Even though sufferers face an increased risk of various cancers it does not mean that they will actually develop the cancer.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • Heroin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when heroin use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Herpes stomatitis: Mouth infection with ulcers/blisters due to the herpes virus
  • Hiatal hernia: Hernia of the stomach through the diaphragm muscle.
  • Hiatus hernia: is a protrusion of the upper part of the stomach into the thoracic cavity through a tear or weakness in the diaphragm, the most common type being sliding hiatus hernia
  • Hochenegg ulcer: A rare, firm type of rectal tumor which is ulcerated in the middle.
  • Hodgkin lymphoma, childhood: A type of cancer that originates from lymphocytes (white blood cells). It is more common during adolescence but can occur during childhood.
  • Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Anaplasma phagocytophilia) which attack granulocytes (a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the deer and American dog tick.
  • Human monocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Ehrlichia chaffeensis) which attack monocytes(a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the Lone Star and American dog tick.
  • Hymenolepiasis: A rare parasitic disease caused by a tapeworm called Hymenolepis nana or Hymenlepis dimunita. Infestation occurs through fecal contamination or by accidentally consuming insects that have eaten the parasitic eggs.
  • Hypercalcemia: Raised blood calcium levels
  • Hyperchromic Anemia: Hyperchromic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which contain abnormally high amounts of haemoglobin as well as a reduced number of red blood cells. This anomaly is often caused by such things as Vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anemia.
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hypersomnia: increased need of sleep
  • Hypervitaminoses A and D: The excessive physiological effect of vitamin A or D cause by excessive intake of the vitamins
  • Hypomagnesemia primary: Low blood magnesium levels which is caused by the abnormal absorption and excretion of the mineral and can be caused by such things as kidney problems and intestinal malabsorption.
  • Hypopituitarism: A condition characterized by diminished hormonal section by the pituitary gland
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Immunoglobulinic amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the abnormal deposit of amyloid in various parts of the body, especially organs such as the kidneys, heart, liver, gastrointestinal tract and peripheral nerves. It occurs when plasma cells in the bone marrow produce too much of a protein portion of an antibody called the light chain. The exact symptoms are determined by the extent of the organ involvement.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Influenza A: A type of virus affecting the respiratory tract
  • Influenza B: A type of virus affecting the respiratory tract
  • Inhalant abuse: Inhalant abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Inhalants include gasoline, adhesives, solvents, and aerosols. These inhalants can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Inhalant addiction: Inhalant addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse inhalants (e.g. inhaling them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Inhalants are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Inhalants includes glues, shoe polish, household cleaners, room deodorizers and nail polish removers.
  • Inherited spherocytic anemia: Inherited Spherocytic anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells that are shaped like a sphere (spherocytes) rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormal cells are broken down prematurely resulting in a shortage of red blood cells (anemia).
  • Intercostal neuralgia: Nerve pain affecting the ribs
  • Intrinsic factor, congenital deficiency of: A very rare disorder where a deficiency of a protein called intrinsic factor prevents vitamin B12 from being absorbed from the stomach. Thus, vitamin B12 deficiency occurs which leads to anemia.
  • Iron deficiency anemia: Iron-deficiency anemia is a blood condition characterized by low levels of iron in the body which leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells.
  • Isolation: Social withdrawal or isolation
  • Isoniazid-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Drug-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called isoniazid. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Jaundice: yellowish discoloration of the skin and mucous membrane
  • Jin Bu Huan-induced lead poisoning: Jin Bu Huan is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat pain. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Jirasek-Zuelzer-Wilson syndrome: A rare abnormality that can occur in newborn infants and involves a complete lack of nerve tissue in the entire colon. The colon is unable to move digesting material through it and leads to a blockage of the digestive system.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Kandu-induced lead poisoning: Kandu (red powder) is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian and Indian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Ketoacidosis: A condition which is characterized by acidosis and the accumulation of ketone bodies in the body
  • Kidney failure: The inability of the kidney to function correctly in its function of excreting metabolites from the blood
  • Kidney symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both kidneys.
  • Kohl-induced lead poisoning: Kohl is a folk remedy used mainly by various ethnic groups (e.g. Africans, Asians, Indians and Pakistanis) to treat skin infections and to manage the umbilical stump. It is also used as a cosmetic in Arab communities. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Kushta-induced lead poisoning: Kushta is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Pakistani people as an aphrodisiac and to treat diseases involving organs such as the liver, brain, heart and stomach. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • L-3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • LADHSC deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • LSD addiction: LSD addiction is the uncontrollable craving for LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) which is a hallucinogenic drug which is derived from a type of fungus. Although the drug is not technically classified as addictive as it doesn't cause drug-seeking behaviours but increasing tolerance to the drug means that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the desired effects. It causes a psychological addiction rather than a physical addiction.
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Lassa fever: Infectious rat-borne West African disease.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Lead poisoning -- African Folk Remedies -- Kohl: Kohl is a folk remedy used mainly by African people to treat skin infections and to manage the umbilical stump. It is also used as a cosmetic in Arab communities. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- African Folk Remedies -- Surma: Surma is a black powder used as a cosmetic as well as a folk remedy by African people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Aisan Folk Remedies -- Chuifong tokuwan: Chuifong tokuwan is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian people to arthritis and other pain. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Asian Folk Remedies -- Bali goli: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Asian Folk Remedies -- Deshi Dewa: Deshi Dewa is a folk remedy by Asian people as a fertility medicine. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Asian Folk Remedies -- Ghasard: Ghasard is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Asian and Indian people as a tonic (usually for indigestion). This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Asian Folk Remedies -- Kandu: Kandu (red powder) is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Asian Folk Remedies -- Kohl: Kohl is a folk remedy used mainly by Asian people to treat skin infections and to manage the umbilical stump. It is also used as a cosmetic in Arab communities. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Asian Folk Remedies -- Pay-loo-ah: Pay-loo-ah is a folk remedy used mainly by Vietnamese people to treat fever and rash. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Asian Folk Remedies -- Surma: Surma is a black powder used as a cosmetic as well as a folk remedy by Asian people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Chinese Folk Remedies -- Ba Bow Sen: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Chinese Folk Remedies -- Cordyceps: Cordyceps is a folk remedy by Chinese people to treat high blood pressure, bleeding problems and diabetes. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Chinese Folk Remedies -- Hai Ge Fen: Hai Ge Fen is clamshell powder used mainly by Chinese people to make traditional Chinese herbal medicines. This product has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Chinese Folk Remedies -- Jin Bu Huan: Jin Bu Huan is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat pain. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Chinese Folk Remedies -- Po Ying Tan: Po Ying Tan is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat minor childhood complaints. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Chinese Folk Remedies -- Rueda: Rueda is a lead-containing folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat infant colic or to calm young children. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Folk Remedies: A number of folk remedies have the potential to cause lead poisoning due to their relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. The high content of lead in some folk remedies can cause symptoms of lead poisoning which can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Hispanic Folk Remedies -- Alarcon: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Hispanic people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Hispanic Folk Remedies -- Azarcon: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Hispanic people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Hispanic Folk Remedies -- Coral: Coral is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Hispanic people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Hispanic Folk Remedies -- Greta: Greta is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Hispanic people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Hispanic Folk Remedies -- Liga: Liga is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Hispanic people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Hispanic Folk Remedies -- Luiga: Luiga is a folk remedy used mainly by Hispanic people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Hispanic Folk Remedies -- Maria Luisa: Maria Luisa is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Hispanic people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Indian Folk Remedies -- Deshi Dewa: Deshi Dewa is a folk remedy by Indian people as a fertility medicine. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Indian Folk Remedies -- Kandu: Kandu (red powder) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Indian Folk Remedies -- Kohl: Kohl is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian people to treat skin infections and to manage the umbilical stump. It is also used as a cosmetic in Arab communities. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Indian Folk Remedies -- Kushta: Kushta is a folk remedy used mainly by the Indian people as an aphrodisiac and to treat diseases involving organs such as the liver, brain, heart and stomach. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Indian Folk Remedies -- Surma: Surma is a black powder used as a cosmetic as well as a folk remedy by Indian people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Iranian Folk Remedies -- Bint Al Zahab: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used mainly by Iranian people to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Kuwait Folk Remedies -- Bokhoor: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Kuwait people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Loas Folk Remedies -- Pay-loo-ah: Pay-loo-ah is a folk remedy used mainly by the Hmong people from Loas to treat fever and rash. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Mexican Folk Remedies -- Alarcon: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Mexican Folk Remedies -- Albayaidle: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Mexican Folk Remedies -- Albayalde: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Mexican Folk Remedies -- Azarcon: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Lead poisoning -- Mexican Folk Remedies -- Coral: Coral is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Poor appetite:

The following list of conditions have 'Poor appetite' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Poor appetite:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Poor appetite' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: Nov 10, 2003

 

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