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Symptoms » Rash » Glossary
 

Glossary for Rash

Medical terms related to Rash or mentioned in this section include:

  • 5-Azacytidine -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on mice and rats indicate that the use of 5-Azacytidine during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • ADULT syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by nail abnormalities, abnormal teeth development, tear duct obstruction, pigmentation anomalies and hand and foot abnormalities.
  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • ATRUS syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by fusion of the forearm bones near the elbow and a blood disorder.
  • Abalone poisoning: Abalone are a shellfish that are commonly eaten by humans. The internal organs of the abalone sometimes contain toxins which can cause various symptoms. The toxins are believed to originate from toxic components in the abalones diet.
  • Abdomen rash: An abdominal rash is an abnormal condition of the skin of the abdomen.
  • Abdominal wall rash: An abdominal rash which could be in the form of a macule, papule, blister, vesicles etc.
  • Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced: Conditions arising from the use of radiation therapy to treat various cancers. Radiation therapy can result in minor abnormalities such as dry, flaky skin or serious abnormalities such as cancer.
  • Absidia species poisoning: Absidia species is a type of fungus found in plant debris but is also common in the environment. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Ackerman Dermatitis Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of skin and joint symptoms. It is characterized by arthritis preceded by a skin rash (interstitial granulomatous dermatitis) which can vary in appearance from person to person. The condition tends to go through periods of flares and remission.
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the skin
  • Acne-like rash: A rash that is similar in appearance to that experienced with acne
  • Acne-like rash in pregnancy: Acne-like rash in pregnancy is the appearance of a rash with raised red pimples and inflamed skin.
  • Acneiform rashes in children: Acneiform rashes are abnormal skin conditions that produce rashes that look like or resemble acne.
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acrodermatitis: Skin disorder which occurs on the hands and feet and is caused by parasitic mites of the Acarina order.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Actinic keratosis: Gradual thickening of outer skin layers caused by excessive exposure to sunlight. Also called senile keratosis, senile wart or solar keratosis.
  • Actinic prurigo: An inherited tendency to develop an itchy, bumpy rash on exposure to the sun. Generally only the face and lips are affected. Symptoms tend to occur seasonally.
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute biphenotypic leukemia: A rare form of leukemia that has myeloid and lymphoid features.
  • Acute diabetes-like skin rash: some of the diabetic skin changes include necrobiosis lipoidica, acanthosis nigricans, Candidiasis, mucormycosis etc
  • Acute headache: Headache, or cephalgia, is defined as diffuse pain in various parts of the head, with the pain not confined to the area of distribution of a nerve.
  • Acute herpes-like genital rash: formation of vesicles similar to the presentation in herpes
  • Acute ichthyosis-like skin rash: Icthyosis refers to a relatively uncommon group of skin disorders characterised by the presence of excessive amounts of dry surface scales
  • Acute infections: An infection that occurs acutely
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute psoriasis-like arm rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis
  • Acute psoriasis-like back rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the back may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like behind-knee rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like calf rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the calf may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like chest rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like elbow rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the elbow may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like facial rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the face may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like foot rash: Psoriasis like lesions on the foot may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like forearm rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like hand rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the hand may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like knee rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the knee may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like leg rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the leg may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like neck rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the neck may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like skin rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis
  • Acute psoriasis-like stomach rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis . Psoriasis like plaques on the abdominal wall may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Adenoids rash: Adenoids or nasopharyngeal tonsils are a mass of lymphoid tissue situated at the back of the nose, in the roof of the nasopharynx. A raised lesion can appear on the adenoids in the following conditions.
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adult onset Still's disease: A form of Still's disease that has a later onset and involves arthralgia or arthritis and a characteristic rash that often appears during periods of temperature increase.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • African hemp exposure: The African hemp is a shrubby flowering plant which bears fruit and originated in South Africa. The hairs on the leaves of the plant can irritate the skin but it is usually only minor and short-lived.
  • African milk bush poisoning: The African milk bush originated from African and is a shrubby plant with small flowers. The milky sap contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if it is eaten or if the sap comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It can cause severe skin irritation and the high toxicity of the sap can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Agapanthus poisoning: The agapanthus is a flowering herb with long leaves, long thick stems and a cluster of blue or white flowers. The plant originated in South Africa. Skin and eye exposure to sap from the plant can cause irritation and eating the plant can cause severe mouth pain. The skin irritation tends to be short-lived.
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Albendazole -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that the use of Albendazole during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Albright like syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, short stature and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Allergenic cross-reactivity: Studies have indicated that a significant number of people with certain allergies will also have allergic responses to other allergens which have a similar protein. For example patients allergic to birch pollen will often have allergies to plant foods such as apples and peaches. Symptoms can range from mild response to severe allergic reactions. Cross-reactivity tends to have mainly oral allergy symptoms with breathing problems and anaphylactic reactions being extremely rare. Food allergies related to cross-reactivity tend to be less severe than those not related to cross-reactivity.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: An allergic contact dermatitis is where the body's immune system causes a skin reaction in response to direct contact with an allergen. Symptoms usually only affect the skin directly in contact with the allergen but in severe cases, symptoms may spread around the contact site or even become widespread across the body.
  • Allergic dermatitis: A dermatitis that is caused by an allergic response
  • Allergic rash: A rash caused by an allergic response
  • Allergic reaction: A hypersensitivity reaction produced by the body, which results in an exaggerated or inappropriate immune reaction to a particular substance.
  • Allergic skin rash: An allergic skin rash is an abnormal reaction of the skin to a particular substance or allergen.
  • Allergic skin reaction: An allergic skin reaction is a condition in which there is an abnormal reaction of the skin in response to exposure to a particular allergen or substance.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Allergy-like conditions: Medical conditions with similar effects to those of allergies.
  • Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome: An immune reaction to the ingestion of a drug called allopurinol. It is a potentially fatal disorder.
  • Altamira syndrome: A disease that occurs in Altamira (Brazil) and is caused by the black fly bite (Simulium). The pathological agent has not yet been determined.
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Amiloride -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiloride during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amiodarone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiodarone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ampicillin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Ampicillin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amyopathic dermatomyositis: A rare disorder involving a skin rash that normally occurs with inflammation of skeletal muscles (dermatomyositis) but there is no muscle involvement. It is important to monitor patients in case muscle involvement develops.
  • Anal itching: Itching near or around the anus
  • Anal rash: An eruption on the skin of the anus.
  • Anal triangle rash: Raised erythematous lesion seen in the anal area.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- plasma cell type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The plasma-cell type tends to involve systemic symptoms such as fever and weight loss due to the destruction of red blood cells.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia lymphadenopathy: A rare immune system disorder which is similar to lymphoma. The condition is progressive but the course varies with some patients surviving a long time without treatment and others surviving only a short period of time.
  • Animal allergy: An animal allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to animals such as cats. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of the animal. Animals frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to animals will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the animal. Frequent washing of the animal may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Ankle rash: An eruption on the skin of the ankle.
  • Annular eruption: Annular eruption is an outbreak or rash on the anus.
  • Annular rash: A rash that is ring shaped
  • Annular rashes in children: Annular rashes in children refers to ring-shaped eruptions or rashes in a child.
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Anthurium poisoning: Anthuriums have dark, glossy, heart-shaped leaves with glossy, heart-shaped flowers which can be red, white or other colors. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which an cause severe mouth pain if eaten. Large amounts would need to be eaten to cause poisoning. Eye and skin irritation can also occur on exposure to the plant.
  • Antihypertensive drug allergy: Taking antihypertensive drugs (blood pressure-lowering drugs) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Antisynthetase syndrome: A rare autoimmune disease that affects the muscles. It involves the development of antibodies to an enzyme (aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase) which is involved in making proteins.
  • Appian-Plutarch syndrome: Symptoms caused by excessive doses of a drug called atropine.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Aquagenous Urticaria: An allergy to water. The condition is extremely rare with sufferers developing hives within 15 minutes of contact with water. Patients may even react to their own sweat and tears on their skin. A special foam may be rubbed regularly into the skin to previde a barrier to water contact and thus allow the person to do things like showering.
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arm rash: An eruption on the skin of the arm.
  • Armpit rash in children: Armpit rash in children is an abnormal condition or eruption of the skin of the armpit or axilla in a child.
  • Arthritis: A condition which is characterized by the inflammation of a joint
  • Asian Dendorlimus pini caterpillar poisoning: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain a poisonous caterpillar called Dendorlimus pini. Contact with the cocoon can also cause symptoms. These caterpillars can be found in Asia, north Africa and eastern Europe.
  • Asparagus berry overdose: The asparagus plant has bright red berries which can cause skin and gastrointestinal problems which are relatively minor and short-lived. The young shoots of the asparagus plant can also cause problems.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 1: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 14q22.1.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 2: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 7p15-p14.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 3: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 2p16.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 4: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 1p31.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 5: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 12q14.3.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 6: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 17q21.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 7: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 1q32.1.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Athlete's foot: A condition which is characterized by a chronic superificial infection of the foot caused by a fungi
  • Atlantic Poison oak poisoning: Atlantic Poison oak is a tall shrub which has a distinctive leaf shape. It is often found growing in the wild. The leaves have small clumps of hairs on the underside. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Atopic dermatitis related allergy refers to allergies that: Atopic dermatitis related allergy refers to allergies that are related to atopic dermatitis. These allergies are allergic rhinitis (hay fever) and asthma. Atopic dermatitis is a skin condition caused by an allergic reaction - it is often called eczema. A significant number of patients who have atopic dermatitis go on to develop asthma or hay fever.
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Aureobasidium exposure: Aureobasidium is a type of fungus which is capable of causing a variety of diseases in humans. The fungus is most often found in damp places either inside the home or in the environment. It is often pinkish or blackish. It is a rare cause of disease and is more likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients. It can cause infection in just about any part of the body depending on the nature of the exposure (inhalation, wound, ingestion etc.) and as such the type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably.
  • Aureobasidium pullulans exposure: Aureobasidium pullulans is a species of fungus which is capable of causing a variety of diseases in humans. The fungus is most often found in damp places either inside the home or in the environment. It is often pinkish or blackish. It is a rare cause of disease and is more likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients. It can cause infection in just about any part of the body depending on the nature of the exposure (inhalation, wound, ingestion etc.) and as such the type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably.
  • Auricle rash: Rash in the external part of the ear.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune enteropathy, type 1: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: A skin rash that appears to be a result of the body's immune reaction to progesterone. As progesterone production is linked to menstrual cycles, the rash occurs usually in the week before menstruation until a few days after menstruation starts.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Azalea poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Babesiosis: A protozoal infection which is transmitted to human via the bite of certain ticks.
  • Baby bottle nipples induced allergies: Baby bottle nipples induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in Baby bottle nipples . Symptoms usually involve the mouth.
  • Back rash: An eruption on the skin of the back.
  • Back rash in children: Back rash in children is an abnormal condition of the skin or eruption of the skin on the back of a child.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Bamboo hair syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by abnormally formed hair shafts and a skin condition involving scaling and redness of the skin. Patients are also predisposed to developing allergic conditions such as asthma and eczema and food allergies. The severity of the condition can vary with some infants having a poor prognosis due to severe allergies, infections and skin problems whereas others have milder symptoms and fewer allergic manifestations.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Bannayan-Zonana syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal polyposis, pigmentation of penis and benign tumor-like growths.
  • Barber's rash: Skin infection in facial hair areas
  • Bartonella: A class of bacteria that can infect humans at a range of different sites. The most well known is Cat Scratch Disease, caused by B.henselae.
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Bartonellosis due to Bartonella quintana infection: A disease caused by infection with Bartonella quintana which are transmitted by the body louse. It causes trench fever but may also result in septicemia and endocarditis in patients with a weakened immune system.
  • Behind knee rash: An eruption on the skin behind the knee.
  • Bejel: An infectious disease related to syphilis but is transmitted through nonsexual skin contact. Often starts with a sore in the mouth and then progresses to affect the skin and bones.
  • Benign mucosal pemphigoid: A rare chronic disease involving blistering and scarring of the mucous membranes especially in the mouth and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Berylliosis: Beryllium poisoning which causes granulomas and pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Biotin deficiency: Vitamin H deficiency
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Biotinidase deficiency, late onset: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes. The severity of symptoms may vary depending on the degree of deficiency. Severe cases can result in metabolic acidosis which can lead to death if treatment isn't given.
  • Bird allergy: A bird allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to birds. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement of the bird. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Birth control pill poisoning: Birth control pill contain hormones such as estrogen and progestin and excessive ingestion of the pills can result in relatively minor symptoms - usually there are no serious problems associated with the ingested of many birth control pills at one time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blisters: Blistering of the skin.
  • Blue Cohosh poisoning: Blue Cohosh is a small flowering herb which has clusters of greenish-yellow flowers and fruit with a couple of blue seeds. The plant originated in the US and is often found in forests or wooded areas. Eating the raw seeds or roots can cause poisoning symptoms and skin contact can also result in skin irritation. The roasted seeds are sometimes used as a safe coffee substitute. The toxic compounds in the plant are alkaloids and saponins. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Boron overuse: Consumption of high doses of the mineral boron can cause various symptoms.
  • Borreliosis: An infectious bacterial disorder that is transmitted by ticks and causes skin rashes joint swelling and other symptoms similar to the flu.
  • Bortonneuse fever: A mild infectious disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia Conorrii. The disease is transmitted by a dog tick (Riphicephalus sanguineus) and is most common in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Incubation usually takes about one week.
  • Boston Ivy poisoning: The leaves of the Boston Ivy plant oxalates which is toxic to humans. The severity of symptoms depends on the quantity of leaves consumed. Skin symptoms can also occur if the skin comes into contact with the leaves.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Boxwood poisoning: The boxwood is an evergreen, woody, flowering shrub often used as a hedge. The leaves contain steroidal alkaloids which can cause skin irritation upon skin contact with the sap or various other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Breast rash: An eruption on the skin of the back.
  • Brill disease: A form of recurring typhus caused by a bacterium called Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by lice. The illness may occur years after the initial sickness and tends to be not as severe.
  • Brill-Zinsser disease: Reoccuring mild form of typhus.
  • Browntail moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Bubble bath allergy: An immune-mediated reaction to exposure to bubble bath solutions. Bubble bath allergy tends to be more common in children and symptoms can vary in nature and severity.
  • Bullous pemphigoid: An autoimmune disease characterized by chronic itchy blistering of the skin. Also called pemphigoid.
  • Burns: Injury from burns and scalds.
  • Butterfly rash: A rash appearing on the cheeks and bridge of the nose creating a characteristic butterfly pattern.
  • Butterfly rash due to SLE: Butterfly rash due to SLE is a butterfly shaped rash that appears on the face across the nose as a result of lupus.
  • Butterfly rash in children: Butterfly rash in children is a butterfly shaped rash that generally occurs on the face over the bridge of the nose of a child.
  • Buttock rash: An eruption on the skin of the buttocks.
  • Buttock rash in children: A buttock rash in children is any type of abnormal skin eruption or condition on the buttocks.
  • Caffeine Allergy: A caffeine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to caffeine or caffeine-containing products. The type and severity of symptoms can vary amongst patients.
  • Calciphylaxis: A rare fatal condition characterized by calcification of skin blood vessels and destruction of skin tissue. The condition is often associated with end-stage kidney disease.
  • Calf rash: An eruption on the skin of the ankle.
  • California encephalitis: An uncommon mosquito born virus (California encephalitis virus) which can cause brain inflammation in humans. The severity of symptoms is variable. The incubation period can last from a few days to a week. Infants and children tend to be more severely affected than adults who sometimes have no obvious symptoms.
  • Calla poisoning: All parts of the Calla plant are poisonous, particularly the sap. It contains a compound called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries on sensitive eyes or mucosal tissues of the digestive tract.
  • Canary allergy: A canary allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to canaries. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement from the canary. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Candelabra cactus poisoning: The Candelabra cactus is a spiny cactus with a milky sap. The sap contains a chemical called diterpene ester which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation upon skin contact.
  • Candidiasis: Fungal infection of moist areas such as mouth or vagina
  • Caper spruge poisoning: The caper spruge is a herb which has a milky sap and bears flowers and fruit. The plant originated in Europe and tends to grow in mountainous areas. The plant sap contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation if skin contact occurs.
  • Carbimazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbimazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Cardiofaciocutaneous Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart defects skin anomalies and frontal bossing.
  • Cat allergy: A cat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cats. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of cats. Cats frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to cats will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the animal. Frequent washing of the cat may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Cataract and congenital ichthyosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the presence of cataracts and a dry, scaly skin condition (ichthyosis) at birth or soon after.
  • Caterpillar complication poisoning: The spines on certain caterpillars can cause a skin reaction as well as systemic symptoms if ingested. The nature of the symptoms vary depending on the species of caterpillar involved. Some only produce skin reactions whereas others can produce systemic symptoms.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Cellulitis: inflammation of the subcutaneous fat
  • Cercarial dermatitis: A short-lived rash that occurs as an allergic reaction to larval (cercariae) infection of the skin. These particular parasites use birds and animals as their first hosts. Larval eggs are excreted in the faeces and when they land in water, they hatch into larvae which then infect certain aquatic snails. The infected snails release another form of the larvae called cercariae which then search for a bird, mammal host. When they enter the skin of a human they die as humans are unsuitable hosts but the skin can produce an allergic reaction.
  • Cervix rash: Inflammatory conditions which cause cervical rash and erythema
  • Chafing: Skin chafing from friction or rubbing
  • Cheek erythema: Cheek erythema is redness of the cheek generally due to inflammation.
  • Cheek rash: An eruption on the skin of the cheek.
  • Cheek rash in children: A cheek rash in children includes abnormal skin conditions or eruptions on the cheek of a child.
  • Chemical allergy: A chemical allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients depending on the type and duration of the exposure and individual response.
  • Chemical burn -- skin: Burns to the skin caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dinitrotoluene: 2,4-Dinitrotoluene is a chemical used the production of explosives, vehicle air bags and polyurethane polymers. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine: 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of pigments for various items such as paint, ink, textiles and plastics. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetaldehyde: Acetaldehyde is a chemical used in the production of various products - mirrors, disinfectants, plastics, explosives, varnish and food flavoring. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetone: Acetone is a chemical used as a solvent in products such as glues, rubber cement and fingernail polish remover. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetophenone: Acetophenone is a chemical used mainly as a fragrance, food flavoring agent and as a solvent for plastics and resins. It is also found naturally in small quantities in foods such as bananas, apples and beef. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylic acid: Acrylic acid is a chemical used mainly in the production of resins and acrylic acids which are usually used in adhesives and coatings. It is also used in water treatment and in the production of plastics and detergents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Alicyclic hydrocarbons: Alicyclic hydrocarbons is a chemical used in a variety of applications such as a chemical intermediate in the production of oils, waxes, fats and resins as well as in the production of fungicides, nylon, paint removers, rubber, varnish and other chemical s such as cellulose ether, benzene and adipic acid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Then type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyl Glycidyl Ether: Allyl Glycidyl Ether is a chemical used mainly in the production of epoxies, thermoplastics, polyester resins, adhesives and elastomers. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzidine: Benzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of azo dyes for such products as leather, paper and textiles. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzo (a) Pyrene: Benzo (a) Pyrene is a chemical emitted in vehicle exhaust and during burning of wood and coal. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzyl Chloride: Benzyl Chloride is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as dyes, plastics, tannins, perfumes,. Fuel additives, resins, germicides, rubbers, perfumes photographic developers, wetting agents, drugs and pharmaceuticals. It is also used to produce other chemicals such as benzaldehyde and benzyl alcohol. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Borates: Borate is a chemical used in a wide variety of products - herbicides, paints, insecticides, rodenticides and various personal products such as skin creams, toothpastes and powders. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butylamines: Butylamines are chemicals used in a variety of manufacturing processes such as in the production of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plastics, dyes, textiles and in leather tanning and photography. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Captafol: Captafol is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Captan: Captan is a chemical used as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical is considered to carry a low risk of poisoning through ingestion.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorinated naphthalene: Chlorinated naphthalene is a chemical used in a wide range of applications: plasticizers, rubber industries, manufacture of electrical equipment and the petroleum industry. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Deoderant: Deoderants contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Depilatories: Depilatories are used to remove hair from parts of the body. They contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dibenzoyl Peroxide: Dibenzoyl Peroxide is a chemical used mainly in as a topical treatment for skin conditions such as ulcers and acne. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethylamine: Dimethylamine is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as detergent, pharmaceuticals and in leather tanning. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfiram: Disulfiram is a drug used mainly to manage alcoholism. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Oxide: Ethylene oxide is a chemical used mainly in detergents, plasticizers, fumigants, inks, cosmetics and brake fluid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylenediamine: Ethylenediamine is a chemical used mainly as a solvent in the manufacturing process for the production of things such as fungicides, waxes, gasoline additives and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Formaldehyde: Formaldehyde is a chemical used mainly in blues, lacquers, fireproofing, electrical insulation, leather tanning products and embalming. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furfural: Furfural is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in the manufacture of fuels, foods and ant poisons. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glutaraldehyde: Glutaraldehyde is a chemical used mainly in sterilizing agents, herbicides, pesticides and disinfectants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical used mainly in photography developing solution, pharmaceuticals, fur processing, paints, fuel, organic chemicals, plastics, stone coatings and styrene monomers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-5: Jet Fuel-5 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methacrylate: Methacrylate is a chemical used mainly in plastics, adhesives and bone cements. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methanol: Methanol is a chemical used mainly in fuel, paint removers, solvent, antifreeze and in the production process of many other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mineral-Based Crankcase Oil: Mineral-Based Crankcase Oil is a chemical used mainly as a fuel . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mirex: Mirex is a chemical used mainly to control fire ants but also other insecticides such as mealy bugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Osmium: Osmium is a chemical used mainly in alloys to produce very strong metals for such items as fountain pen tips and electrical contacts. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Palladium: Palladium is a chemical which is very widely used in manufactured goods: jewelry, electronics, dentistry, medicine, groundwater treatment and fuel cells . Palladium carries a high risk of sensitization. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Paraffin wax: Paraffin wax is a chemical used mainly in the production of candles, paraffin papers, varnishes, floor polishes, food packaging, lubricants, cosmetics, wood waterproofing, cork and perfume extraction. The fumes from burning paraffin wax can be quite harmful if excessive inhalation occurs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Petroleum Distillates -- Naphtha: Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenol: Phenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of fertilizer, explosives, rubber, paint, paint remover, perfumes, asbestos products, wood preservatives, resins, textiles, pharmaceuticals and drugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Platinum: Platinum is a metal used mainly in jewelry, electrical contacts, dentistry, laboratory equipment and vehicle emission control devices. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Rotenone: Rotenone is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Selenium: Selenium is a chemical element used mainly as an industrial catalyst, in glass and ceramic manufacturing, as an animal feed additive, in photography and in the electronics industry. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Stoddard Solvent: Stoddard Solvent is a solvent used in dry cleaning, ink printing, adhesives, paint thinners, liquid photocopier toners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfuric Acid: Sulfuric Acid is a chemical used mainly in car batteries and in the fur and leather industries. It is a significant component of air pollution and results in the production of "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene: Toluene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides, degreasers, glues and pain removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene Diisocyanate: Toluene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of elastomers and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in adhesives, lacquer, fire retardants and house cleaning solvents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Uranium: Uranium is an element used mainly in commercial nuclear power plants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vanadium: Vanadium is an element used mainly in steel alloys but is also used in glass coatings, electric fuel cells and other applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical-related eczema: Chemical-related eczema is a form of eczema that results from exposure to a chemical. Eczema is a type of skin inflammation or irritation that manifests as a skin rash. The amount of skin involved may vary considerable from a single small patch to widespread large areas of the body. The eczema may result from irritation due to the chemical or from an allergic response to the chemical.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Chest rash: An eruption on the skin of the chest.
  • Chest rash in children: A chest rash in children includes eruptions or a reaction of the skin in a child.
  • Chicken allergy: A chicken allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chickens. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement from the chicken. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Chickenpox: Common viral infection.
  • Chikungunya: A rare viral disease usually transmitted by mosquitoes and characterized by fever, rash and severe arthritis.
  • Chilblain: Skin inflammation usually in cold weather
  • Chin rash: An eruption on the skin of the chin.
  • Chlorpheniramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpheniramine (an antihistamine medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chlorpropamide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpropamide (an antidiabetic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Christmas Rose poisoning: The Christmas Rose plant contains proteoanemonin which can cause blisters and saponins which can cause irritation. The plant is found mainly in Europe. All parts of the plant are poisonous.
  • Chrome contact allergy: Chrome contact allergy usually refers to an allergic response to chromium salts which are found in a wide range of products such as leather, paint and cement. Sensitization usually occurs in a workplace settings.
  • Chromosome 2, monosomy 2q37: A very rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm of chromosome 2 is missing which results in various birth defects and abnormalities. The features of the disorder are determined by the exact size and location of the deletion.
  • Chromosome 6p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic Idiopathic Myelofibrosis: The bone marrow is consists of tissues which make blood cells and fibrous tissue supports these tissues that make the blood cells. In chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis, abnormal cells and fibres build up inside the bone marrow resulting in the production of fewer normal blood cells.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders: A group of blood cancers where excessive numbers of blood cells are made by overactive or cancerous bone marrow. The number of excess blood cells tends to grow slowly. Examples of such disorders includes chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. The symptoms are determined by which particular blood cancer is involved.
  • Chronic Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Chronic diabetes-like skin rash: some of the diabetic skin changes include necrobiosis lipoidica, acanthosis nigricans, Candidiasis, mucormycosis etc
  • Chronic herpes-like genital rash: formation of vesicles similar to the presentation in herpes
  • Chronic ichthyosis-like skin rash: Icthyosis refers to a relatively uncommon group of skin disorders characterised by the presence of excessive amounts of dry surface scales
  • Chronic psoriasis-like arm rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis
  • Chronic psoriasis-like back rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the back may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like behind-knee rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like calf rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the calf may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like chest rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like elbow rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the elbow may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like facial rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the face may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like foot rash: Psoriasis like lesions on the foot may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like forearm rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like hand rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the hand may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like knee rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the knee may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like leg rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the leg may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like neck rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the neck may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like skin rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis
  • Chronic psoriasis-like stomach rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis . Psoriasis like plaques on the abdominal wall may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic vitamin A toxicity: Chronic excessive ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms.
  • Chrysanthemum poisoning: Contact with Chrysanthemum plants can cause a variety of skin symptoms in susceptible people. Repeated exposure increases the risk of developing symptoms.
  • Clitoris rash: An eruption on the skin of the clitoris.
  • Cobalt allergy: Cobalt chloride allergy usually refers to an allergic response to cobalt which is found in things such as belt buckles, buttons, zips and wet cement. Symptoms usually occur when the article comes into contact with the skin and hence usually results in skin symptoms. Exposure to cobalt can also occur in an occupational setting.
  • Coccidioidomycosis: An infectious fungal disease caused by inhaling the spores of a particular bacteria. Also called desert fever, desert rheumatism, San Joaquin fever and valley fever.
  • Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Cold contact urticaria: A chronic condition where the skin develops hives and becomes very red and itchy after exposure to cold.
  • Colestyramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Colestyramine (cholesterol-lowering drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Colorado tick encephalitis: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Colorado tick fever: A tickborne condition caused by an arenavirus
  • Comel-Netherton Syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by abnormally formed hair shafts and a skin condition involving scaling and redness of the skin. Patients are also predisposed to developing allergic conditions such as asthma and eczema and food allergies. The severity of the condition can vary with some infants having a poor prognosis due to severe allergies, infections and skin problems whereas others have milder symptoms and fewer allergic manifestations.
  • Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Condoms and diaphragms induced allergies: Condoms and diaphragms induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in condoms and diaphragms.
  • Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Fetal infection with toxoplasmosis.
  • Congenital cytomegalovirus: Fetal infection with cytomegalovirus.
  • Congenital herpes simplex: An infant born with a herpes simplex infection transmitted through the mother. The infection may be localized or involve various internal organs and even the central nervous system in which case death can occur.
  • Congenital sucrose-isomaltose malabsorption: A rare disorder where a congenital deficiency of an enzyme (sucrase-isomaltase) prevents the absorption of sucrase and isomaltose consumed in the diet.
  • Congenital tuberculosis: Fetal infection with tuberculosis
  • Connective tissue rash: Rash involving connective tissue of the body.
  • Conor's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Contact dermatitis: Skin reaction to an irritant
  • Cornea rash: Rash in the cornea of the eye.
  • Cradle Cap: Common scalp condition in babies
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Croton poisoning: The croton is a shrub which bears white flowers and leaves with white, red or yellow coloration through them. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause skin irritation.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Cutaneous Candidiasis: A condition which is characterized by a candida infection which occurs on the cutaneous surface
  • Cutaneous diphtheria: Skin infection from Diphtheria
  • Cutaneous vascularitis: Inflammation of blood vessels in the skin which can have any of a variety of causes such as infections or drugs.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Cytosine arabinose syndrome: Symptoms following the use of a chemotherapy drug called cytosine arabinose.
  • Daffodil poisoning: Daffodils contain a toxic chemical which can cause poisoning symptoms if ingested. The plant also has the potential to cause skin reactions in susceptible people. The daffodil bulb contains the highest concentration of toxins and accidental ingestion has occurred when the bulb has been mistaken for an onion bulb.
  • De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by sunlight sensitivity, skin atrophy and pigmentation and skin tumors as well neurologic involvement.
  • Deafness peripheral -- neuropathy -- arterial disease: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by artery disease, deafness and peripheral neuropathy.
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Dendrolimiasis: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Dengue fever: An acute viral disease characterized by fever, rash and myalgia and caused by a flavivirus which is transmitted by mosquitoes.
  • Dengue hemorrhagic fever: Severe complication of dengue
  • Dermatitis: Inflammation of the skin.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis: A condition which is characterized by a chronic pruritic dermatitis
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy: Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy refers to the body's immune system response to gluten. IgA antibodies drive the allergic response to gluten exposure and manifests as a distinctive skin rash. The rash usually affects the knees, elbows, back, scalp and buttocks and can come and go sporadically.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Dermatophilosis: A form of bacterial skin infection caused by Dermatophilus congolensis. Infection usually occurs in animals such as cattle and sheep but can cause skin lesions in humans.
  • Dermatostomatitis, Stevens Johnson type: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Desquamative erythema: A redness, swelling and shedding of the skin
  • Desquamative rash: A shedding rash of epithelial elements
  • Developmental delay -- hypotonia extremities hypertrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by poor muscle tone, developmental delay.
  • Devergie syndrome: A chronic skin disorder involving the development of raised spots on the skin that grow and merge into each other to produce large red scaling plaques.
  • Diabetes mellitus, congenital insulin-dependent, with fatal secretory diarrhea: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Diabetes-like skin rash: some of the diabetic skin changes include necrobiosis lipoidica, acanthosis nigricans, Candidiasis, mucormycosis etc
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diaper rash: Red rash in diaper area of infants
  • Diaper rash in children:
  • Diarrhea -- polyendocrinopathy -- infections, X-linked: A rare X-linked disorder characterized by diarrhea and severe, fatal infections during infancy. The body's immune system attacks it's own endocrine glands and various other organs. Females are carriers and can have mild symptoms whereas males suffer the fatal course of the disease.
  • Diarrhea, polyendocrinopathy, fatal infection syndrome, X-linked: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Dieffenbachia poisoning: Dieffenbachia is a common houseplant which has large leaves. The plant contains poisonous chemicals (oxalic acid and asparagine) which can cause various symptoms if large amounts of the plant is ingested.
  • Diethylstilbestrol: A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen
  • Digit rash: Change in the skin of the fingers or toes which affects the color, appearance or texture.
  • Diphenhydramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diphenhydramine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diphtheria: Infectious bacterial respiratory disease
  • Discoid lupus erythematosus: Form of lupus affecting the skin.
  • Diseases contagious contagious mother-to-fetus: Diseases contagious from mother to a fetus during pregnancy
  • Diseases contagious during childbirth: Diseases that are contagious during childbirth
  • Distomatosis: Infection by parasitic flat worms. Infection can involve liver, lungs or intestines. Symptoms are determined by the location of the infection. Contamination usually occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water.
  • Disulfiram -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Disulfiram during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dog allergy: A dog allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to dogs. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of dogs. Dogs frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to dogs will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the dog. Frequent washing of the dog may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Dressler (D.)syndrome: A rare autoimmune blood disorder where erythrocytes are destroyed suddenly after exposure to cold (usually 15°C or lower).
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Dry cracked skin similar to psoriasis: dry, lusterless skin
  • Duck allergy: A duck allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to ducks. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement from the duck. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Duhring disease: A rare chronic skin disorder involving rashes of small skin bumps and blisters that are extremely itchy.
  • Duhring-Brocq disease: A very itchy skin rash consisting of red bumps and blisters which is often associated with intestinal sensitivity to gluten that is consumed.
  • Dysbarism: A reaction caused by exposure to a sudden change in environmental pressure.
  • Dyshidrotic dermatitis: A skin disorder (eczema) that affects the soles of the feet, the palms of the hands and the sides of the fingers. There is no known cause but contributing factors include stress, hot or cold weather, pre-existing atopic condition, metal implants, smoking, and aspirin and oral contraceptive use.
  • Dyskeratosis congenita of Zinsser-Cole-Engman: An inherited condition characterized by recurring painful mouth ulcers, skin pigmentation and nail abnormalities.
  • Ear canal rash: Maybe present either in the external or middle ear.
  • Ear rash: May be present either in the external or middle ear.
  • Ear rash in children: An ear rash in children is an eruption or abnormal reaction of the skin on the ear.
  • Earlobe rash: Skin rash on the fleshy earlobe of the ear.
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Ebola: Dangerous virus mostly found in Africa.
  • Ecchymosis: A small haemorrhagic spot in the skin or mucous membrane.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia anhidrotic: A rare inherited condition involving skin, hair, teeth and nail abnormalities. The condition is characterized by the absence of sweat and sebaceous glands, underdeveloped hair and teeth, characteristic face and other physical deformities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, Margarita type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, webbed digits, cleft lip, cleft palate, sparse hair, reduced sweating and teeth abnormalities. Progressive loss of scalp hair usually results in baldness by adulthood.
  • Eczema: Skin rash usually from allergic causes.
  • Eczema in pregnancy: Eczema in pregnancy is inflammation of the skin, which can occur anywhere on the body. The distribution of the rash and presence or absence of a rash can provide a clue as to the diagnosis.
  • Eczematous rash: A rash that is a superficial inflammatory process involving primarily epidermis
  • Eczematous rash in pregnancy: Eczematous rash in pregnancy is inflammation of the skin, which can occur anywhere on the body. The distribution of the rash and presence or absence of a rash can provide a clue as to the diagnosis.
  • Edematous rash: skin infection typically caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci, although other streptococcal groups are occasionally causative agents.
  • Egg Hypersensitivity: An allergic reaction to eggs that is caused by a hypersensitive immune system.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility - a combination of ED types I and II.
  • Ehrlichiosis: Bacterial tick-borne disease
  • Elastosis perforans serpiginosa: A rare skin condition characterized by the development of small, usually red, bumps on the skin. Abnormal skin fibre tissue forms from the inner skin layer to the outer skin layer which in turn causes the top skin layer to respond to it as if it were a foreign particle i.e. inflammation. The skin bumps that develop are small and often form a circular, linear or snake-like pattern. The back of the neck is the most commonly affected part of the body with the arms, face and legs affected to a lesser degree. Rarely, the trunk may be affected. It may occur for no apparent reason (idiopathic), as a response to certain drugs such as Penicillamine (drug-induced) or it may be associated with inherited conditions such as Ehlers Danlos syndrome, Marfan Syndrome and Down Syndrome.
  • Elbow rash: An eruption on the skin of the elbow.
  • Elbow rash in children: An elbow rash in children is an eruption or reaction of the skin of the elbow of a child.
  • English Ivy poisoning: English Ivy is a poisonous vine fund in Europe, US and Canada. The leaves and berries are the most toxic part of the plant but all parts of the plant are toxic. Falcarinol and polyacetylene are the toxic chemicals found in the plant.
  • Enteropathy, autoimmune, with hemolytic anemia and polyendocrinopathy: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Enterovirus antenatal infection: Fetal infection with enterovirus. The condition is extremely rare but infection around the time of birth often results in death or paralysis in survivors. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the exact type of virus involved and at what stage of development the infection occurs.
  • Enteroviruses: Viruses affecting the digestive tract.
  • Environmental allergen related eczema: Environmental allergen related eczema is a form of eczema that results from exposure to an environmental allergen such as moulds, pollens or dust mite. Environmental allergens are more likely to cause allergic conditions such as hay fever and asthma but can cause eczema in some cases or exacerbate pre-existing cases. Eczema is a type of skin inflammation or irritation that manifests as a skin rash. The amount of skin involved may vary considerable from a single small patch to widespread across large areas of the body.
  • Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome: A life-threatening condition caused by ingesting tryptophan.
  • Epidemic typhus: An infectious disease caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by body lice. The severity of the illness may range from moderate to fatal.
  • Ermine phenotype: A very rare syndrome characterized by pigmentation abnormalities as well as deafness.
  • Erucism: Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar spines. The reaction can be cause by contact with the spines or hairs of the caterpillar. Even airborne caterpillar hair can cause symptoms as can spines or hair on dead caterpillars.
  • Erysipelas: An infectious skin disease with symptoms such as redness, swelling, fever, large blisters and pain.
  • Erysipeloid: A dermatitis or cellulitis of the hand and fingers
  • Erythema dyschromicum perstans:
  • Erythema marginatum: A condition which is characterized by reddened areas of the skin which are disk shaped with elevated edges
  • Erythema multiforme: An allergic inflammatory skin disorder which has a variety of causes and results in skin and mucous membrane lesions that affect mainly the hands, forearms, feet, mouth nose and genitals.
  • Erythrasma: A condition where there is a bacterial skin infection that is located in the armpits or the groin
  • Erythroderma lethal congenital: A rare disorder which results in death within a year of birth and involves skin and growth problems.
  • Erythrodermic eczema: Erythrodermic eczema is a severe condition that results from worsening eczema.
  • Erythromelalgia: A rare disorder characterized by periods of burning pain, redness and warmth in the feet and hands.
  • Escharonodulaire: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Esophagus rash: Raised reddish lesions in the lining mucosa of the esophagus.
  • Ethosuximide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethosuximide (antiseizure medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride mix allergy: A Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride which is often found in medicinal preparations such as skin creams and nose drops. It also has various industrial uses. Exposure is usually through skin contact and hence results mainly in skin symptoms. Exposure can occur in an occupational setting especially where the chemical is used in industrial applications.
  • Ethylmalonic aciduria: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by neurological and vascular symptoms caused by an excessive buildup of ethylmalonic aciduria.
  • Excess skin pigmentation: A condition which is characterized by an abnormal excess of skin pigmentation
  • Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: Exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a syndrome in which patients experience the symptoms of anaphylaxis, which occur only after increased physical activity. The symptoms include pruritus and urticaria (typically with giant hives), and, without emergency intervention, the patient may develop hypotension and collapse.
  • External os rash: Inflammatory conditions which cause cervical rash and erythema.
  • Eye rash: An eruption on the skin of the eye.
  • Eyebrow rash: An eruption on the skin of the eyebrow.
  • Eyelash rash: Raised erythematous area along the eyelash.
  • Eyelid rash: Raised erythematous area along the eyelid area.
  • Eyelid rash in children: Eyelid rash in children is the appearance of an eruption or reaction on the skin of the eyelid of a child.
  • Fabry disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Face rash: A rash of the skin that occurs on the face
  • Facial rash: A rash anatomically located on the face
  • Facial rash in children: A facial rash in children refers to any type of eruption or reaction of the skin on the face of a child.
  • Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS): An inherited inflammatory disorder which causes periods of fever, rash and pain in joints after being exposed to cold conditions. Symptoms last less than a day and start within hours of exposure to the cold.
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial Mediterranean fever: A rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent fever and inflammation. The inflammation usually involves the stomach, lungs or joints.
  • Familial dermographism: A rare inherited form of hives. Even a single stroke applied with moderate pressure on the skin produces a red welt. The response usually occurs within minutes of the stimulus and may last for a few hours.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Femur rash: Rash in the thigh area.
  • Fenton-Wilkinson-Toselano syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by ataxia, light sensitivity and short stature.
  • Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: A rare, potentially life-threatening disorder where the mother's blood platelets are incompatible with that of the fetus and the mother's antibodies cross the placenta and destroy fetal platelets.
  • Finger pulp rash: Finger rash is change of the skin which affects its color, appearance or texture.
  • Finger rash: Finger rash is change of the skin which affects its color, appearance or texture.
  • Fingernail rash: Finger rash is change of the skin which affects its color, appearance or texture.
  • Fingers rash: Change in the skin of the fingers which affects the color, appearance or texture.
  • Fire coral larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of fire coral can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The condition most often occurs in places such as Japan and Eastern Russia.
  • Fire-Bellied Toad poisoning: The Fire-Bellied toads are often kept as aquarium pets. These toads contain a poisonous chemical called bombesin and bominine which can various symptoms if accidentally ingested or comes into contact with the eyes, mouth or skin. Eye symptoms usually resolve within a day. The toads are native to Eastern Europe and Western Asia.
  • Fistula: The abnormal passage between two internal organs
  • Flavivirus Infections: Infection with a virus from the Flaviviridae family of viruses. Infections by these pathogens include Dengue fever, Rocio encephalitis, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis. Transmission usually occurs through the bite of a mosquito.
  • Flexural rashes in children: Flexural rashes in children refers to a child who has a skin reaction or eruption in the areas of the body that rub together, such as the armpits and the insides of the elbows and knees.
  • Flowering Maple exposure: The flowering maple is a flowering shrub found in tropical areas. Contact with the leaves of the plant can cause dermatitis or allergic skin reactions.
  • Fluke infections: An infection caused by flukes
  • Fluorouracil -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Fluorouracil (a chemotherapy drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Folliculitis: An inflammatory reaction which occurs in the follicles
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- MSG: An intolerance to MSG is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to a food additive called MSG which is used in a number of foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- amines: An intolerance to amines is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to amines which are found naturally in foods such as bananas, pineapples, vegetables, red wine, citrus fruit and many other foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the substance. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- citric acid intolerance: An intolerance to citric acid is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to citric acid or foods containing citric acid. Citric acid can be found naturally in foods but is also frequently used as an additive to various foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of citric acid required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- food additives: An intolerance to food additives is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to food additives. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- salicylate: An intolerance to salicylates is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to salicylates which is an ingredient in aspirin but is also found naturally in various fruit, vegetables, herbs and spices. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the salicylate. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulfite: An intolerance to sulfites is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulfites which is often used as a preservative in a variety of foods and medications including meats, salads and dried fruits. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the sulfite. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Allergy: A food additive allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive or a food or drink containing to food additive. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Annatto: Annatto allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called annatto which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- BHA antioxidants: A BHA antioxidant allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called BHA antioxidant which is used primarily in fats and oils to prevent them spoiling. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- BHT antioxidants: A BHT antioxidant allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called BHT antioxidant which is used primarily in fats and oils to prevent them spoiling. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Carmine: A carmine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carmine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (red yoghurt, red popsicles, red drinks) as well as in some cosmetics The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- amaranth: An amaranth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called amaranth which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- antioxidants: An antioxidant allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called antioxidants which is used primarily in fats and oils to prevent them spoiling. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- benzoate: A benzoate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called benzoate which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- carageenan gum: A carageenan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called carageenan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- erythrosine: An erythrosine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called erythrosine which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- guar gum: A guar gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called guar gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum: A gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum acacia: A gum acacia allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum acacia which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum tragacanth: A gum tragacanth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum traganth (type of gum) which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- lecithin: A lecithin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called lecithin which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- locust bean gum: A locust bean gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called locust bean gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- quinoline yellow: A quinoline yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called quinoline yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- saffron: A saffron allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called saffron which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- salicytes: A salicylate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called salicylate which is used in a number of foods. Salicylates also occur naturally in a wide range of plant foods especially fruits. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite: A sulphite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite derivative: A sulphite derivative allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite derivative which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sunset yellow: A sunset yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called sunset yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- tartrazine: A tartrazine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tartrazine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (some breakfast cereals, cake mixes, chocolate chips etc.) The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- xanthan gum: A xanthan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called xanthan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Allergy -- Coriander: A coriander allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to coriander or food containing coriander. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- Linden tea: A linden tea allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to linden tea or food containing linden tea. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- MSG: An MSG allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to MSG or food containing MSG. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- Quorn: A quorn allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to quorn or food containing quorn. Quorn is a type of protein made from a fungus. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- abalone: An abalone allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to abalone or food containing abalone. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- almond: An almond allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to almonds or food containing almonds. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- aniseed: An aniseed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to aniseed or food containing aniseed. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- apple: An apple allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to apples or food containing apples. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- apricot: An apricot allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to apricots or food containing apricots. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- avocado: An avocado allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to avocados or food containing avocados. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- banana: A banana allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to bananas or food containing bananas. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- barley: A barley allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to barley or food containing barley. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- bean: A bean allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beans or food containing beans. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- beef: A beef allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beef. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- beer: A beer allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beer or food containing beer. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- bell pepper: A bell pepper allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to bell peppers or food containing bell pepper. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- brazil nut: A brazil nut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to brazil nuts or food containing brazil nuts. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- buckwheat: A buckwheat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to buckwheat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- cabbage: A cabbage allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cabbage or food containing cabbage. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- carp: A carp (type of fish) allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carp or food containing carp. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- carrot: A carrot allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carrots or food containing carrots. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Rash:

The following list of conditions have 'Rash' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Rash or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Rash:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Rash' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: Nov 3, 2003

 

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