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Symptoms » Skin blistering » Glossary
 

Glossary for Skin blistering

Medical terms related to Skin blistering or mentioned in this section include:

  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: An allergic contact dermatitis is where the body's immune system causes a skin reaction in response to direct contact with an allergen. Symptoms usually only affect the skin directly in contact with the allergen but in severe cases, symptoms may spread around the contact site or even become widespread across the body.
  • Asparagus Fern poisoning: The asparagus fern is a slightly woody plant with a fern-like foliage. It has yellow-green fruit and bright red berries. The plant originated in South Arica. Skin contact with the plant sap can result in skin irritation and eating the berries can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Atlantic Poison oak poisoning: Atlantic Poison oak is a tall shrub which has a distinctive leaf shape. It is often found growing in the wild. The leaves have small clumps of hairs on the underside. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Blisters: Blistering of the skin.
  • Burns: Injury from burns and scalds.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dichlorophenol: 2,4-Dichlorophenol is a chemical used in the production of antiseptics, bactericides, disinfectants and fungicides. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butylamines: Butylamines are chemicals used in a variety of manufacturing processes such as in the production of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plastics, dyes, textiles and in leather tanning and photography. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile: Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile is a chemical used mainly in tear gas. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethyleneamine: Ethyleneamine is a chemical which is widely used in the manufacture of products such as adhesive, paper, textiles, fuels, lubricants, varnishes, lacquers, coating resins, cosmetics, photographic chemicals and agricultural chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexamethylene Diisocyanate: Hexamethylene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the production of various products: lacquer, paint, varnish, synthetic rubber, wire insulation, plastic, foams and glue. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- acetic acid: Acetic acid is a chemical used for medicinal purposes such as superficial ear infections, jellyfish stings and bladder irrigation. Acetic acid is a also a component of vinegar which is used as a cooking ingredient. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chickenpox: Common viral infection.
  • Chrome contact allergy: Chrome contact allergy usually refers to an allergic response to chromium salts which are found in a wide range of products such as leather, paint and cement. Sensitization usually occurs in a workplace settings.
  • Creeping Spurge poisoning: The creeping surge is a small flowering plant with bluish-gray leaves. The plant originated in Europe and Asia and is often used as an ornamental indoor and outdoor plant. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause minor skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Crown of Thorns poisoning: The Crown of Thorns is a spiny, spreading shrub which can grow to a couple of metres in height. Some species of the plant are poisonous if ingested, can cause a skin reaction in susceptible people and can also cause severe symptoms if eye exposure occurs. Toxicity varies among species.
  • Diabetes-like pressure ulcer: Pressure ulcer is an area of skin that breaks down when one stays in one position for too long without shifting their weight.
  • English Ivy poisoning: English Ivy is a poisonous vine fund in Europe, US and Canada. The leaves and berries are the most toxic part of the plant but all parts of the plant are toxic. Falcarinol and polyacetylene are the toxic chemicals found in the plant.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa: A group of rare inherited skin diseases characterized by fragile skin which forms blisters with even minor injuries. The blisters can be painful and can occur anywhere on the skin and even inside the digestive tract.
  • Erucism: Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar spines. The reaction can be cause by contact with the spines or hairs of the caterpillar. Even airborne caterpillar hair can cause symptoms as can spines or hair on dead caterpillars.
  • Euphorbium poisoning: Euphorbium is a spiny, cactus-like shrub with green succulent stems and tiny yellow flowers. The plant contains diterpene esters in its sap which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin exposure can result in skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • False cactus poisoning: False cactus is a spiny, cactus-like plant found mainly in gardens in India. The plant contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten. Skin irritation can also occur on skin exposure.
  • Fishtail palm poisoning: The fishtail palm is a type of palm with unusual fishtail-shaped leaves. It bears a fruit that contains calcium oxalate crystals which causes severe mouth irritation if eaten. The seed kernels inside the fruit are actually edible but the fleshy portion causes mouth irritation.
  • Garden chrysanthemum poisoning: Garden chrysanthemums are ornamental flowering plants with pretty flowers of varying color and size. The leaves and flowers contain alantolactone which can cause severe skin irritation on skin exposure.
  • Ginger lily poisoning: The ginger lily is a perennial herb with reed-like stems. The plant originated in Australia and Asia and is often used as an ornamental garden plant. The leaves, roots and stems of the plant contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin exposure can also result in minor skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • Herpes: Virus with one subtype causing cold sores and another causing genital herpes.
  • Hops poisoning: The hop plant is a herbaceous flowering vine which grows in the wild but is also cultivated as a food source. The leaves, flowers and pollen of the plant can cause skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Hot pepper poisoning: Hot pepper is a plant which bears small, elongated fruit which can be red, green or yellow. The fruit and leaves contain chemicals such as capsaicin and can cause severe skin, eye and mouth irritation. Eating large amounts can also cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Jones-Hersh-Yusk syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by missing toes, cleft palate, blistered skin and absent patches of skin at birth.
  • Leatherwood poisoning: Leatherwood is a shrubby plant which bears elongated clusters of flowers. The plant is usually found growing in the wild. The plant contains resin which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Lepidopterism: A systemic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Lion's mane jellyfish poisoning: The Lion's mane jellyfish is a large stinging jellyfish found in the colder waters of the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The jellyfish can deliver a painful sting with skin burning and blistering. Prolonged skin exposure can result in breathing problems, muscle cramps and even death.
  • Maidenhair tree poisoning: Maidenhair tree is a deciduous tree which bear fan-shaped leaves and green to yellow-brown fruit. The ripe fruit has a revolting smell. The fruit and the raw seed kernels contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can result form skin exposure in sensitive people. The seeds are edible if properly prepared - washed and boiled or roasted.
  • Moynahan syndrome III: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, defective tooth enamel, clubfoot, skin problems and a variety of other anomalies. Blisters tend to occur during the warmer months of the year.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Peruvian lily poisoning: Peruvian lily is a herbaceous flowering plant often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant contains tuliposide which can cause severe skin and eye irritation upon exposure.
  • Pimples: Pimples or pustules on the skin.
  • Plant poisoning -- Euphorbiaceae: Euphorbiaceae is a family of flowering plants called spurges. They contain various chemicals (alkaloids, glycosides and diterpene ester) which can cause symptoms if ingested.
  • Plumbago poisoning: Plumbago is a shrubby plant which bears white, pink or blue flowers. It is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant. The plant contains plumbagin which can cause severe skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Poison sumac poisoning: Poison sumac is a large shrub or tree which has large leaves with reddish stems and a white fruit. It is usually found growing in the wild. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Popcorn tree poisoning: Popcorn tree is a deciduous tree which bears elongated clusters of yellowish fruit and seed capsules containing large whitish seeds. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The sap from the plant and the unripe fruit contain chemicals which can cause gastrointestinal symptom if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Sea wasp poisoning: The sea wasp can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning (Chiropsalmus quadrigatus): The Chiropsalmus quadrigatus jellyfish can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning -- Chironex fleckeri: The Chironex fleckeri jellyfish is one of the deadliest jellyfish in the world. It can deliver a serious sting and can be found mainly in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Skin color changes: Skin changes such as redness, blueness, or whitening.
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin pain: Pain affecting the skin.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin rash: Change in the skin which affects the color, appearance or texture.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Sores: Sores affecting the skin.
  • Spurge poisoning: Spurge is a plant which has purplish discoloration along the stem and in a spot near the base of the leaves. It bears small flowers where the leaf joins the stem. The plant contains dieterpene esters in its sap and can cause skin irritation on exposure to the skin or symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Thimbleweed poisoning: Thimbleweed is a herbaceous plant which has a variety of flower colors depending on the species. It is most often used as an ornamental garden plant. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause various symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure.
  • Tulip poisoning: Tulips are an ornamental bulbous plant which contain a toxin called tulipalin. The chemical can cause symptoms if eaten but the plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. The plant may also cause skin irritation.
  • Wells syndrome: A rare disorder affecting the skin and characterized by a flame-shaped patch of raised red skin which eventually undergoes changes such as blistering and altered color.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Skin blistering:

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