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Symptoms » Skin cancer » Glossary
 

Glossary for Skin cancer

Medical terms related to Skin cancer or mentioned in this section include:

  • Actinic keratosis: Gradual thickening of outer skin layers caused by excessive exposure to sunlight. Also called senile keratosis, senile wart or solar keratosis.
  • Antimony poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to antimony.
  • Asbestosis: Lung condition from asbestos exposure
  • Basal cell carcinoma: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer.
  • Basal cell carcinomas with milia and coarse, sparse hair: A rare disorder characterized mainly by skin cancer, milia and coarse, sparse hair. The milia tend to disappear without treatment by adolescence.
  • Blisters: Blistering of the skin.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Cancer pain: Having cancer does not always mean having pain. For those with pain, there are many different kinds of medicines, ways to receive the medicine, and nonmedicine methods that can relieve the pain they may have. Pain must not be accepted as a normal part of having cancer.
  • Cancer-related symptoms: Symptoms related to cancer.
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Ichthyosiform Erythroderma, Corneal Involvement and Deafness Syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by keratitis, skin lesions and sensorineural deafness. The deafness and skin redness are usually present at birth and the corneas of the eye are gradually destroyed by keratitis which can result in loss of vision.
  • Keratitis Ichthyosis Deafness Syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by keratitis, skin lesions and sensorineural deafness. The deafness and skin redness are usually present at birth and the corneas of the eye are gradually destroyed by keratitis which can result in loss of vision.
  • Keratosis: A localized thickening or overgrowth of the upper skin layer such as in a callus or wart.
  • Lewandowsky-Lutz dysplasia: A very rare skin disease involving a genetic susceptibility to the human papillomaviru. Scaly macules (flat pigmented skin lesion) and skin bumps develop on the skin, especially on the back of the hands. The condition carries an increased risk of skin cancer, especially in sun-exposed parts of the body such as the back of the hands. The warty growths can become very extensive and surgery may be needed to remove them.
  • Linear porokeratosis: The linear development of multiple pigmented skin bumps. The skin bumps merge into each. They can occur along an arm or leg or on the side of the trunk, head or neck. The linear distribution tends to follow along the path of a sensory nerve.
  • Lutz-Lewandowsky: A very rare skin disease where scaly macules (flat pigmented skin lesion) and skin bumps develop on the skin, especially on the back of the hands.
  • Lutz-Lewandowsky epidermodysplasia verruciformis: A very rare skin disease where scaly macules (flat pigmented skin lesion) and skin bumps develop on the skin, especially on the back of the hands. Patients tend to be prone to skin cancers.
  • Melanoma: Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It is the leading cause of death from skin disease. It involves cells called melanocytes, which produce a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is responsible for skin and hair color.
  • Mole symptoms: Skin moles or growths on the skin.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Nodular melanoma: Nodular melanoma is the most aggressive form of melanoma. It grows in vertical direction from the outset and grows very fast (months). Nodular melanoma has no known precursor. It is a small black, or if amelanotic, pink nodule that simply enlarges. The lesions tend to bleed.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Skin cancer: Occupational exposure to mineral oils can increase the risk of developing skin cancer.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Animal dips: People whose employment involves animal dips may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to arsenic. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Briquette making: People employed as briquette makers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Chimney Sweeps: People employed as chimney sweeps may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Coal Gas Manufacture: People employed as coal gas manufacturers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Coke Oven Workers: People employed as coke oven workers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Construction Workers: People employed as construction workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Farmers: People employed as farmers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Fisherfolk: People employed as fisherfolk may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Germicidal Lamps: People exposed to germicidal lamps during their employment may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to industrial UV. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Insecticide applicators: People employed as insecticide applicators in the agricultural industry may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to arsenic. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Lathe Operators: People employed as tool setters may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to oils. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Mule Spinners: People employed as mule spinners in the cotton industry may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to oils. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Open-Cut mines: People employed as workers in open-cut mines may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ultraviolet light. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Reactor Workers: People employed as radiologists may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to ionizing radiation. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Rubber Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the rubber manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Tar Distillers: People employed as tar distillers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- TileWorkers: People employed as tile workers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Timber Proofers: People employed as timber proofers may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to pitches and tars (polyaromatic hydrocarbons). The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Tool Setters: People employed as tool setters may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to oils. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- UV Curing Processes: People employed in the UV curing process may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to industrial UV. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Skin Cancer -- Welders: People employed as welders may face an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to exposure to industrial UV. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Rash: Rash of any type affecting the skin.
  • Rodent ulcer: Facial ulcer not actually related to rodents
  • Sclerotylosis: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a skin disorder (atrophic skin fibrosis and keratoderma of the palms and soles), underdeveloped nails and bowel cancer.
  • Seborrheic keratosis: Thickening of the skin condition usually from age
  • Senter syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by ichthyosiform erythroderma and sensorineural deafness.
  • Skin color changes: Skin changes such as redness, blueness, or whitening.
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin pain: Pain affecting the skin.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin rash: Change in the skin which affects the color, appearance or texture.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Sores: Sores affecting the skin.
  • Squamous Cell Skin Cancer: Aggressive skin cancer arising due to sun exposure; lesions are locally invasive to surrounding tissues and may metastasise
  • Sun spots: Wart-like lumps from sun exposure
  • Superficial spreading melanoma: Superficial spreading melanoma is usually characterized as the most common form of cutaneous melanoma in Caucasians.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum: A rare pigmentary disease that is caused by an enzyme deficiency
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 1: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation - type 1 has the lowest level of repair and the most neurological complications.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 2: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type B is often associated with signs of Cockayne syndrome.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 3: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Neurological symptoms are rarely experienced in type 3.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 5: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type E is a very rare form of the condition and involves mild skin symptoms with no neurological symptoms.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 6: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. The skin and neurological symptoms in Type 6 tend to be mild.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 7: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type G usually involves severe neurological symptoms.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, variant type: A rare pigmentary disease that is caused by an enzyme deficiency

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Skin cancer:

The following list of conditions have 'Skin cancer' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Skin cancer:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Skin cancer' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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