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Symptoms » Slurred speech » Glossary
 

Glossary for Slurred speech

Medical terms related to Slurred speech or mentioned in this section include:

  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Acidic dry cell batteries inhalation poisoning: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals which can cause symptoms if inhaled. The smoke emitted from burning batteries can also cause poisoning symptoms if sufficient quantities are inhaled. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol intoxication: excess intake of alcohol can lead to serious consequences
  • Alcohol use: Use of alcohol (as a symptom)
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alopecia -- hypogonadism -- extrapyramidal disorder: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia, progressive movement problems and a lack of gonadal function which affects puberty.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amyloidosis, oculoleptomeningeal: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In this particular type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages and vision impairment.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 3: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 7: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20p13.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q13.3 and is a dominantly inherited, late-onset form.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 1: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 1 is characterized by adult onset and relatively fast progression of symptoms. It usually occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 2: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is characterized by childhood or adolescent onset of symptoms which progress very slowly over decades. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 3: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is characterized late adulthood onset of symptoms which progress slowly over 5 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 4: A generally fatal progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is characterized by the onset of symptoms before the age of 25 and slow progression over the next few decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 5: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adolescent onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 6: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 7: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between less than 5 years to several decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 8: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 8 is characterized by adult onset and relatively slow progression of symptoms. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Anton-Vogt syndrome: A congenital disorder where a brain anomaly results in involuntary purposeless movements (choreathetosis). Excitement and activity can make symptoms worse.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia: A rare inherited childhood disorder involving progressive degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Ataxia spastic congenital miosis: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized mainly by ataxia, spasticity and small pupils that respond poorly to light.
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Ataxia, spastic with congenital miosis: A rare disorder characterized by movement problems of the limbs as well as an impaired pupil reaction to light (miosis).
  • Ataxia, spastic, 3, autosomal recessive: A recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by spasticity and ataxia.
  • Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome: A nerve disorder which affects the motor nerves and results in movement problems which includes the eyes. Gait problems are usually the first symptom and this is followed by speaking difficulty, intention tremor and then eye movement problems.
  • Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, type 11:
  • Babinski-Nageotte syndrome: A rare disorder caused by damage to a part of the brain (medullobulbar transitional area) which causes a variety of neurological symptoms, some of which affect only one side of the body.
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic 1: Abnormal calcium deposits in the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. Type 1 results in psychiatric, cognitive or neurological problems associated with the calcification. The symptoms experienced are variable.
  • Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive: A neurological disease that affects the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. The disease responds well to biotin administration but relapses within a month if the biotin is stopped. If the condition is diagnosed late or there are recurring episodes, the patient may suffer ongoing symptoms such as paraparesis, mild mental retardation or dystonia.
  • Basilar artery migraine: Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness.
  • Bell's Palsy: A one sided muscle paralysis of sudden onset due to a problem with the facial nerve
  • Bell's palsy: A one sided muscle paralysis of sudden onset due to a problem with the facial nerve
  • Blue-ringed octopus poisoning: The blue-ringed octopus is found in shallow Australian ocean water and can deliver venomous, potentially fatal bite. The poison is present in the saliva of the octopus. The venom affects the neuromuscular system.
  • Brain Concussion: Trauma resulting in minor injury to the brain which causes a period of interrupted brain function. Simple concussions resolve themselves in about a week whereas more serious ones have persisting symptoms. The onset of symptoms may be delayed.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • CACH syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by childhood ataxia and reduced myelination of the cerebral nerves. Motor and mental development in the first few years of life is normal with progressive neurodegeneration occurring between 2 and 5 years of age. Fever and trauma to the head can speed up disease progression.
  • CANOMAD syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities caused by immune-mediated nerve demyelination. There is usually no loss of limb function associated with the disorder. The face, throat, mouth and eye symptoms (weakness of the muscles) usually come and go.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hearing loss, type t RNA lysine gene mutation: A rare inherited disorder characterized by heart muscle disease and deafness. The deafness is inherited from the mother and is caused by a genetic defect. Patients may be asymptomatic for a number of years. The rate of progression of the disorder is variable with some patients being asymptomatic until adulthood.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hearing loss, type tRNA-LYS gene mutation: A rare inherited condition characterized by the association of cardiomyopathy and deafness.
  • Cerebellar ataxia type 1, autosomal recessive: A slow progressing brain disorder characterized by ataxia and dysarthria.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, X-linked: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain results in symptoms such as ataxia. The rate of progression can vary.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive: A group of rare, recessively inherited neurological disorders caused by abnormalities in the cerebellum and spinal cord. In some cases other parts of the body may be affected.
  • Cerebellar degeneration, subacute: A rare disorder involving degeneration of the cerebellum and sometimes involves nearby spinal cord or brain tissue.
  • Cerebellar parenchymal degeneration: Progressive deterioration of brain tissue. Symptoms can vary depending on the rate of progression, location and extent of the degeneration.
  • Cerebrovascular Conditions: Conditions of the brain's blood vessels including stroke.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acidic dry cell batteries: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals and eating the batteries can cause various symptoms if the chemical is released from the battery. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylamide: Acrylamide is a chemical used mainly in the treatment of waste water, grout agent, paper strengthening agent and adhesive agents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aftershave: Aftershave contains chemicals (ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol) which can cause symptoms if ingested in sufficient quantities. Death from ingesting aftershave is considered unlikely. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aluminum: Aluminum is a chemical used mainly for metallurgical purposes and can be found in packaging, electrical parts, vehicles, cooking utensils, construction materials and building components. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cologne: Colognes contain chemicals such as ethanol and isopropanol which can cause symptoms if ingested or inhaled in excessive quantities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Deoderant: Deoderants contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Depilatories: Depilatories are used to remove hair from parts of the body. They contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ether: Ether is a chemical used mainly as an anesthetic and industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Bleach: Hair bleach contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair bleach can continue to cause gastrointestinal damage for weeks after ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Dye: Hair dyes contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair dye can continue to cause damage for weeks after ingestion. Some dyes contain lead or mercury which can cause neurological problems even if low level exposure occurs over an extended period of time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-4: Jet Fuel-4 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Manganese: Manganese is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, welding rods, matches, electrical coils, ceramics and animal food additives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Para-Dichlorobenzene: Para-Dichlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide, mold and mildew preventer, moth repellent and toilet deodorant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in adhesives, lacquer, fire retardants and house cleaning solvents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Choreoathetosis-spasticity, episodic: A dominantly inherited movement disorder characterized by episodes of involuntary movments. Symptom episodes are often triggered by fatigue, alcohol, physical exertion and stress.
  • Classic childhood ALD: Classic severe form of ALD in boys.
  • Cognitive impairment: General loss of mental or cognitive ability
  • Communication disorders: refers to problems of speech, language and oral motor function
  • Communication symptoms: Symptoms related to problems with communication.
  • Cone shell poisoning: A number of species of cone shells are capable of envenomating humans. The toxin is a neurotoxin and thus primarily affects the nervous system. Cone shells are found mainly in shallow waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. The toxicity varies amongst species with some delivering a benign stink whereas others are capable of causing death. The cone snails a proboscis on the end of which is a poison-filled barb.
  • Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of disorders involving abnormally synthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides. There is a long chain of events involved in the synthesis and defects may occur with any of the compounds or enzymes involved in the process. Progressive impairment and regression of skills often occurs after a period of normal development following birth.
  • Cyclosporine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Delirium: Severe mental deterioration
  • Demyelinating disorder: Any condition that is characterised by the destruction of the myelin sheaths of the nerves
  • Deviated Septum: A septum in the nose that is deviated from the normal position
  • Diabetic hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar attack from insulin or diabetes medications
  • Dialysis encephalopathy syndrome: A progressive brain disease that occurs in some patients who undergo chronic hemodialysis. Aluminium intoxication is believed to play a role in the disease.
  • Drug abuse: Drug use as a symptom of other conditions
  • Dykes-Markes-Harper syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by dry, scaly skin, enlarged liver and spleen and a incoordination.
  • Dysarthria: Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder characterized by difficulty forming and expressing words that is the result of injury to or pathology of the nervous system.
  • Dystonia 12: A very rare syndrome involving the early start of symptoms of dystonia and parkinsonism. The onset of the symptoms usually occurs suddenly over weeks or even hours and then progresses slowly.
  • Dystonia with cerebellar atrophy: A recessively inherited movement disorder (dystonia) which responds poorly to Levodopa treatment and involves wasting of part of the brain.
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Elephant's-ear poisoning: The Elephant's ear is a common garden plant which has large, heart-shaped leaves on long stalks. The plant contains calcium oxalate and saphotoxin which can cause poisoning if eaten and irritation upon contact with skin or eyes. The toxins are quite poisonous and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Epilepsy with myoclonic-astatic crisis: A form of childhood epilepsy which is associated with a sudden loss of muscle tone which often results in the sufferer falling over and possibly injuring themselves.
  • Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 3: A genetic disorder involving the early onset of progressive myoclonic epilepsy. The infant develops normally for the first year or so of life and the seizures start usually before the age of two. Once the seizures start, neurological degeneration begins.
  • Episodic ataxia syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness and continuous muscle movement (myokymia). Stress and exertion may trigger the ataxic episodes which usually last for only a few minutes and can occur several times a day. Type 1 is caused by a defect in the potassium channel gene on chromosome 12p13.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movements). Stress, exertion, alcohol and coffee may trigger the episodes which can last from hours to days. Type 2 is caused by a defect in the calcium ion gene on chromosome 19p13.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 5: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination, unsteadiness and seizures. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q22-q23.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes which tend to last for about half an hour. Type 6 is extremely rare and is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p13.
  • Erythrokeratodermia with ataxia: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of a skin disorder with slowly progressive neurological symptoms.
  • Eucalyptus Oil poisoning: Eucalyptus oil can be used for medicinal purposes but excessive ingestion can cause problems. Likewise, eating the leaves of the eucalyptus plant (very unlikely) can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • FACWA syndrome: A rare progressive neurological disorder involving degeneration of part of the brain (basal ganglia) and muscle wasting.
  • FOSMN syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disorder that starts in the face and spreads to the scalp and upper body. The condition progresses slowly.
  • Facial paralysis: Paralysis of one or both sides of the face
  • Fahr's Syndrome: A rare neurologic disorder where calcium is deposited in various parts of the brain resulting in progressive loss of motor and mental function.
  • Familial isolated deficiency of vitamin E: A rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by an inherited condition where the body is unable to absorb vitamin E from the food consumed.
  • Fir Club Moss poisoning: Fir Club Moss is a creeping evergreen plant that grows close to the ground and contains a toxic substance called huperzine A. The plant is found in warmer climates. The severity of symptoms depends on the amount ingested.
  • Fitzsimmons-Guilbert syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by paraplegia, short fingers and bone abnormalities. The paraplegia progresses slowly.
  • Friedreich ataxia -- congenital glaucoma: A rare disorder characterized by glaucoma at birth and a progressive neuromuscular disorder.
  • Friedreich's ataxia: Progressive muscle weakness from nerve damage.
  • Frostbite: damage to skin, soft tissues and blood vessels due to extreme cold
  • Gangliosidosis GM1 type 3: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type III involves a lesser degree of accumulation than type II or I.
  • Gangliosidosis, generalized GM1 type 3: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type III involves a lesser degree of accumulation than type II or I.
  • Generalized Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease resulting from autoimmune dysfunction. In generalized myasthenia gravis weakness develops mainly in the limbs and trunk. The severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Most patients suffer increased severity of symptoms during the day with improvement after sleeping.
  • Gluten ataxia: Ataxia that apparently results from a sensitivity to gluten which is found in grains such as wheat and barley.
  • HERNS syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by blood vessel disease which causes eye and kidney disease and strokes. Neurological manifestations tend to occur around the 2nd and 3rd decade of life due to the blood vessels in the brain being affected.
  • Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disease occurring in children and involving iron accumulation in the brain. It is characterized by dementia, rigidity and athetosis.
  • Hallervorden-Spatz disease: Nerve disorder causing movement problems.
  • Heidenhain syndrome: A form of premature dementia caused by degeneration of the brain. It is considered a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Heidenhain syndrome is characterized mainly by eye problems whereas Creutzfeldt-Jakob predominantly involves ataxia.
  • Hereditary paroxysmal cerebral ataxia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movements). Stress, exertion, alcohol and coffee may trigger the episodes which can last from minutes to days.
  • Huntington's disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase, type 2, deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Some cases simply involve developmental delay.
  • Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar levels
  • Hypoglycemic attack: Hypoglycemic attack is a sudden episode of low blood sugar.
  • Hypomagnesemia primary: Low blood magnesium levels which is caused by the abnormal absorption and excretion of the mineral and can be caused by such things as kidney problems and intestinal malabsorption.
  • Hypomyelination -- congenital cataract: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital cataract with progressive neurological impairment due to progressive demyelination.
  • Hypomyelination -- hypogonadotropic hypogonadism -- hypodontia: A rare syndrome characterized by delayed puberty, missing teeth and reduced myelination which causes progressive ataxia.
  • Hypomyelination and congenital cataract: An inherited disorder characterized by congenital cataract and progressive neurological impairment due to reduced myelination of nerves.
  • Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome: A rare blood disorder where the bone marrow produces too many eosinophils over a long period of time which can cause organ or tissue damage. The disorder can affect and part of the body but most often affects the skin, heart and nervous system. The increased eosinophil production continues for a long period of time (at least 6 months) and there is no apparent cause.
  • Inability to speak: Inability to speak (mutism)
  • Inborn errors of thyroid hormone synthesis related to hypothyroidism: Congenital hypothyroidism is inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. This can occur because of an anatomic defect in the gland, an inborn error of thyroid metabolism, or iodine deficiency.
  • Inhalant abuse: Inhalant abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Inhalants include gasoline, adhesives, solvents, and aerosols. These inhalants can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Inhalant addiction: Inhalant addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse inhalants (e.g. inhaling them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Inhalants are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Inhalants includes glues, shoe polish, household cleaners, room deodorizers and nail polish removers.
  • Isoniazid toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by increasing weakness and stiffness of the muscles in the arms, legs and face due to damage to nerve cells that control motor movement.
  • King Cobra poisoning: The King Cobra is a large venomous snake usually found in southeast Asia and India. Most bites from this snake results in envenomation due to the ferocity of their bite. The poison primarily affects the neuromuscular system but can also affect blood clotting.
  • Kuru syndrome: A rare fatal disease that has been noted in a Eastern New Guinean tribe. It is believed to be prevalent in this tribe due to their history of cannibalism.
  • Lhermitte-Cornil-Quesnel syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the slowly-progressive degeneration of a part of the brain (pyramidal tract and globus pallidus).
  • Lhermitte-McAlpine syndrome: A type of neurodegenerative disorder that involves pyramidal and extrapyramidal symptoms. It can occur in middle-aged or old people and usually results in death within a year of onset.
  • Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome: A group of recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by incoordination due to a brain anomaly.
  • Mental retardation, X-linked -- acromegaly -- hyperactivity: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, hyperactivity and enlarged hands, feet and testes.
  • Mental retardation, X-linked -- dystonia -- dysarthria: A very rare X-linked disorder characterized by the association of mental retardation with dystonia (movement disorder) and dysarthria (speech disorder).
  • Migraine: Severe complex headaches that occur periodically
  • Mixed Cerebral Palsy: Cerebral palsy is movement disorder originating from some sort of damage to the brain. There are a few different types of cerebral palsy (e.g. spastic, athetoid, ataxic) and a combination of two or more types is known as mixed cerebral palsy. The symptoms of mixed cerebral palsy usually involves spasticity and athetoid movements but other variations such as ataxia can occur.
  • Motor neuron diseases: Any of various disorders of the "motor neurons", nerves that control movement.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 1: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 2: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 3: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.2.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 4: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Multiple system atrophy: A rare disorder where nerve degeneration causes progressive neurological problems involving the central and autonomic nervous system. The rate of progression is variable.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Muscular dystrophy, Duchenne and Becker type: An inherited l disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disorder is caused by a genetic anomaly and results in insufficient quantities of or ineffective dystrophin which is needed for normal muscle functioning. The disorder is expressed in males but females can be carriers.
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myasthenia Gravis: An autoimmune disorder which interferes with nerve impulses to muscles and hence results in weak, easily fatigued muscles.
  • Myasthenia Gravis with Thymus Hyperplasia: Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease which is often associated with an abnormal thymus. The relationship between the thymus and myasthenia is not fully understood but as the thymus is involved in the body's immune system, it may trigger the immune system abnormality underlying some cases of myasthenia gravis.
  • Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, associated with acetylcholine receptor deficiency: A genetic, nonprogressive neuromuscular disorder causing muscle weakness. The severity of symptoms is variable and stress and illness can exacerbate symptoms.
  • Myopathy and diabetes mellitus: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle disease and diabetes mellitus. The condition was highly variable with respect to the severity, range and onset of symptoms.
  • Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy is characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis.
  • Nasal voice: Nasal quality of the voice in speech
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurosyphilis: Syphilis affecting the nervous system.
  • Niemann-Pick disease, type D: Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited metabolic disorder where lipids are not able to be metabolized adequately and hence build up and cause damage in various parts of the body such as the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow and brain. Type D is no longer a relevant term as research has shown that it has the same genetic mutation as Type C and is therefore the same condition.
  • Octopus poisoning: Octopus bites are quite rare but octopus such as the blue-ringed octopus can deliver quite a venomous bite.
  • Oculodentoosseous dysplasia dominant: A very rare dominantly inherited syndrome characterized mainly by eye, tooth and finger abnormalities.
  • Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy: A group of diseases progressive degeneration occurs in a particular area of the brain (olivopontocerebellar area) which results in various neurological symptoms.
  • Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy, Hereditary: A group of rare, inherited, neurodegenerative conditions characterized by progressive problems with balance, coordination of voluntary movements and speech. The rate of progression varies amongst patients.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy I: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain and spinal cord and results in symptoms such as muscle problems, chorea and speech disturbance.
  • Opsoclonus Myoclonus: Condition with involuntary muscle and eye movement.
  • Optic atrophy 2: An early onset form of progressive optic nerve dysfunction which results in impaired vision. Neurological symptoms are usually present and vision loss progresses very slowly. The disorder is caused by a genetic defect (Xp11.4-p11.21).
  • Orofaciodigital syndrome type I:
  • Orofaciodigital syndrome type1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by variable malformations of the face, digits and inside the mouth. Type 1 is distinguished from the other types of this condition by the presence of polycystic kidneys and a X-linked dominant inheritance.
  • Pallidopyramidal syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by pyramidal signs and parkinsonism caused by a degeneration of the pyramidal tract and the part of the brain called the pallidum.
  • Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration: Disorders of the cerebellum associated with tumors. The cerebellum is the part of the brain that controls coordination. It is believed that the body's immune system's attempt to destroy the tumor results in damage to the cerebellum. The main tumors associated with this condition include lung and breast cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma and reproductive organ tumors.
  • Parenchymatous cortical degeneration of cerebellum: Progressive deterioration of the superficial layer of the cerebellum in the brain resulting in various neurological symptoms. The condition may be inherited or be associated with conditions such as cancer and alcoholism.
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Pellagra-like syndrome: A rare disorder where the body is unable to metabolise tryptophan which causes a distinctive skin rash and neurological symptoms.
  • Phenytoin toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Primary Lateral Sclerosis: A neurological disorder involving the upper motor nerves and causing progressive muscle weakness in the extremities and facial area. This condition involves mutations in the same gene and overlapping symptoms with juvenile primary lateral sclerosis but the difference is that primary lateral sclerosis only involves degeneration of the upper motor neurons whereas infantile-onset spastic paralysis is more severe and involves degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons.
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A disorder characterized by reduced motor control, dementia and eye movement problems.
  • Progressive supranuclear palsy, atypical: A rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder which starts involves features of parkinsonism and dementia.
  • Sea snake poisoning: The Sea snake is a poisonous snake found in the warmer western parts of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Sea snakes have scales but not gills or fins so they still need to go to the surface of the water to breathe. Sea snake venom is particularly poisonous but their bite fails to achieve any significant envenomation. The venom is toxic to the nervous system and muscles.
  • Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis: A very rare syndrome characterized by progressive ataxia, eye muscle problems and a speech disorder (dysarthria).
  • Sialuria, Finnish type: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of sialic acid in the tissues and excretion of sialic acid in the urine. This condition is an adult form of sialuria.
  • Solvent abuse: Solvent abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Solvents include nail polish removers, paint thinners, gasoline, typing correction fluid and toxic markers. These solvents can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Solvent addiction: Solvent addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse solvents (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Solvents are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Solvents includes paint thinner, toxic markers, gasoline, cigarette lighter fluid, typing correction fluid and nail polish removers.
  • Spastic ataxia, Charlevoix-Saguenay type: A rare disorder characterized mainly by spasticity of the legs, uncoordinated leg movements and eye anomalies.
  • Spastic paraplegia 11, autosomal recessive: A rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower legs as well as mental retardation.
  • Spastic paraplegia 15, autosomal recessive: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles as well as vision problems.
  • Spastic paraplegia 2, X-linked: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by lower leg spasticity and weakness. It has an early onset, progresses slowly and eventually the brain becomes involved as well which produces sensory, speech and eye problems.
  • Spastic paraplegia 20, autosomal recessive: A rare disorder characterized mainly by progressive stiffness, weakness and wasting of the lower leg muscles. The thumb muscle and speech is also affected.
  • Spastic paraplegia 7, autosomal recessive: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles.
  • Spastic paraplegia type 5A, recessive: A rare disorder characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and weakness of lower leg muscles. Bladder and speech problems are also usually present.
  • Spastic paraplegia with precocious puberty: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by early onset of progressive weakness of the lower legs as well as premature onset of signs of puberty.
  • Speech disorders: Any disorder which affects ones speech
  • Speech impairment: Any impairment to ones ability to speek
  • Speech symptoms: Problems with speech or voice.
  • Spinal bulbar motor neuropathy: A rare inherited disease that affects the nerves in the spine and in the bulbous (bulbar) part of the brain stem. The main signs are muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia -- dysmorphism: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by ataxia and unusual facial appearance.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 10: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 22q13 defect) characterized by gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder). The severity of the condition is variable with some patients becoming wheelchair dependent.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 11: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 15q14-21.3 defect) characterized by gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder). This form of the condition progresses slowly and doesn't affect life expectancy.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 12: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 5q31-q33 defect) characterized by variable symptoms such as arm tremors, gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) with other.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 13: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 19 defect) characterized by progressive mental retardation. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 14: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 19q13.4qter defect) characterized by gait ataxia, tremors and dysarthria (speech disorder). The condition progresses slowly.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 15: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 3p26-p25 defect) characterized by gait ataxia, eye movement problems and dysarthria (speech disorder). The condition tends to progress slowly over decades with most patients retaining the ability to walk.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 16: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 3p26.2-pter defect) characterized by gait ataxia, eye movement problems, tremor and dysarthria (speech disorder). The progression of the condition is variable (1-40 years).
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 17: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 6q27 defect) characterized by . Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 18: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 7q22-31 defect) characterized by muscle atrophy and sensory loss. The severity of symptoms is variable. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 22: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome defect) characterized by ataxia, eye movement problems and dysarthria (speech disorder). The condition progresses slowly over decades.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 26: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 19p13.3 defect) characterized by slowly progressive ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder).
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 27: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome FGF14; 13q34 defect) characterized by tremors, dyskinesia and psychiatric episodes. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 28: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 18p11 defect) characterized by eye muscle paralysis (ophthalmoplegia) and increased reflexes. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 29: A form of ataxia which starts from birth but is nonprogressive. The severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 3: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by . Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types. The duration of the disease is 1-20 years.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 8: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 13q21 defect) characterized by horizontal nystagmus and mild sensory neuropathy. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, type 2: A neurological disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, tremor and muscle weakness and wasting. The rate of progression and severity is variable with some needing wheelchairs in their second decade and others still capable of some walking in their 4th decade.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph type I: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by early onset of symptoms - ataxia, bulging eyes and extrapyramidal symptoms. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph type II: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by intermediate onset of symptoms. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph type III: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by later onset of symptoms such as weak eye muscles and peripheral neuropathy. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph type IV: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by late onset of symptoms - muscle twitching and Parkinsonism. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph type V: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by spastic paraparesis. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, X-linked, 5: A rare, X-linked neurological disorder which is not progressive and mainly involves ataxia, nystagmus and dysarthria.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 1: A neurological disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, tremor and muscle weakness and wasting. The rate of progression and severity is variable with some needing wheelchairs in their second decade and others still capable of some walking in their 4th decade.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 2: A rare, recessively inherited brain disorder characterized by ataxia and mental retardation. The severity of the disorder is variable and the condition is nonprogressive.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 4: A rare neurological disorder caused by a genetic defect (chromosome 1p36, recessive) and resulting in ataxia and eye movement problems.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 7: A rare, recessively inherited neurological disorder caused by abnormalities in the cerebellum and spinal cord. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy: A rare neurological disorder caused by a genetic defect (chromosome 114q31-q32, recessive) and resulting in ataxia and dysarthria.
  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, X linked with mental deterioration: A rare skeletal disorder where the spine and long bones grow and develop abnormally as well as mental deterioration.
  • Stroke: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Stuttering: also known as stammering wherein the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetations and prolongation of sounds
  • Thyrocerebral-retinal syndrome: A very rare syndrome observed in a brother and sister and characterized by thyroid, kidney and neurological disease.
  • Transient Ischemic Attack: temporary disturbance of blood supply to a restricted area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours.
  • Transient ischemic attack: temporary disturbance of blood supply to a restricted area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury: Brain injury from trauma or accident.
  • Tremor hereditary essential, 1: An inherited movement disorder involving tremors which occurs mainly in the arms but other parts of the body are often involved. Any kind of stress on the body such as hunger and tiredness can aggravate the condition.
  • Tremor hereditary essential, 2: An inherited movement disorder involving tremors. Any kind of stress on the body such as hunger and tiredness can aggravate the condition.
  • Trihydroxycholestanoylcoa oxidase isolated deficiency: A rare metabolic disorder where an enzyme (Trihydroxycholestanoyl-CoA oxidase) deficiency disturbs the formation of bile acids.
  • Trypanosomiasis:
  • Uremic encephalopathy: occurs due to build up of toxins which are normally cleared by the kidneys
  • Water Intoxication: Excessive water intake can lead to water intoxication and ultimately death.
  • Weaver Syndrome: A syndrome that is considered a variant of the Marshall-Smith syndrome
  • West African Trypanosomiasis: West African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.
  • Wolfram's disease: A condition that is inherited and consists of multiple symptoms

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Slurred speech:

The following list of conditions have 'Slurred speech' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Slurred speech:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Slurred speech' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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