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Symptoms » Speech symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Speech symptoms

Medical terms related to Speech symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 1q terminal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the terminal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase II Deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1: A recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by methylglutaconic acid in the urine.
  • 3C syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by cardiac malformations, cerebellar hypoplasia and cranial dysmorphism which gives the disease it's name.
  • 3q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 3 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 8p-Syndrome, partial: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • ACAD8 deficiency: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Aarskog-Ose-Pande syndrome: A rare disorder involving lipodystrophy mainly in the face and buttocks as well as sparse hair, retarded bone age and minor face and eye anomalies. It is considered a variant of SHORT syndrome which tends to also include increased range of joint motion and more extensive lipodystrophy.
  • Aberrant subclavian artery abnormality: A rare defect where one the subclavian artery arises from an abnormal location on the aortic arch. The defect may cause compression of organs such as the airway and the voice box.
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Achard-Thiers Syndrome: A rare hormonal disorder that occurs in diabetic postmenopausal women where body hair grows in a masculine manner. Hormonal therapy is used to correct the endocrine imbalance.
  • Acidic dry cell batteries inhalation poisoning: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals which can cause symptoms if inhaled. The smoke emitted from burning batteries can also cause poisoning symptoms if sufficient quantities are inhaled. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly, type 2 (ACPS 2): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Nager type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped thumbs, forearm and cheekbones as well as ear defects.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia Hunter Thompson type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones.
  • Acromicric dysplasia: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute cry: a brief, sharp, piercing vocal sound produced by a neonate or infant.
  • Acute epiglottitis:
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: A type of cancer of the thyroid gland.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: A malignant cancer in the form of cysts which may occur in the salivary glands, breast, mucous glands of the respiratory tract and sometimes in vulval vestibular glands. Also called adeoncystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma, cribriform carcinoma or cylindroma.
  • Adenoiditis: Infection of the adenoids in the nasal-throat region
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Adult SMA: Form of Spinal Muscular Atrophy in adults.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Aggressive fibromatosis -- parapharyngeal space: A type of tumor that occur near in the space around the pharynx and is locally invasive but not malignant. They tend to occur mainly in the head and neck region and symptoms depend on the exact location and aggressiveness of the tumor. Tumors often reoccur after surgical removal which then requires further treatment with radiation and chemotherapy.
  • Aglossia: A congenital condition where the tongue is absent.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Albinism deafness syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of deafness with partial albinism involving patches of absent pigmentation in the skin and hair. The disorder is inherited in a X-linked manner.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alexander Syndrome: Brain myelin disorder causing mental degeneration.
  • Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized primarilty by mental retardation.
  • Alopecia -- hypogonadism -- extrapyramidal disorder: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia, progressive movement problems and a lack of gonadal function which affects puberty.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alzheimer disease 10: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 10 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 12: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 12 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 8p12-q22.
  • Alzheimer disease 13: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 14: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q25. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 15: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q22-q24. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 16: Alzheimer disease 16 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq21.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 2, late-onset: Alzheimer disease 2 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q13.2. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 3, (early-onset Alzheimer disease): Alzheimer disease 3 is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 5: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 5 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12p11.
  • Alzheimer disease 6: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 6 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10q24.
  • Alzheimer disease 7: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 7 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 8: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 8 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Alzheimer disease 9: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 9 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Alzheimer disease type 1: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 1 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the APP gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease type 2: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 2 has a late onset - starts after the age of 65. It is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic mutations and environmental and lifestyle factors. The condition occurs when there is excessive production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease type 4: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 4 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the PSEN2 gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease, early-onset, with cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. The familial form is very rare and is completely inherited and has an early onset (usually in the 4th decade). It occurs when there is excessive production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 1: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 11: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 9p22.1. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and apraxia: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and apraxia. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and unusual plaques: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and unusual plaques in the brain. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 4: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q31-q42. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, type 3: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 3 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the PSEN1 gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer's disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Alzheimer's disease without Neurofibrillary tangles: A form of Alzheimer's that involves only plaques and no neurofibrillary tangles. This form tends to have an older age of onset and death and a shorter disease duration.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis, oculoleptomeningeal: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In this particular type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages and vision impairment.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 3: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 7: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20p13.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q13.3 and is a dominantly inherited, late-onset form.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 1: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 1 is characterized by adult onset and relatively fast progression of symptoms. It usually occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 2: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is characterized by childhood or adolescent onset of symptoms which progress very slowly over decades. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 3: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is characterized late adulthood onset of symptoms which progress slowly over 5 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 4: A generally fatal progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is characterized by the onset of symptoms before the age of 25 and slow progression over the next few decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 5: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adolescent onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 6: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 7: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between less than 5 years to several decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 8: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 8 is characterized by adult onset and relatively slow progression of symptoms. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Females with male XY genetics but inability to respond to testosterone.
  • Androgen insensitivity syndrome, partial: A rare inherited condition where males are partially insensitive to the male hormones which results in varying degrees of feminization. The effect of the condition can range from the presence of normal female sexual characteristics to normal male sexual characteristics or a combination of both.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 10: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 10 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8q12.1.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 9: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.1.
  • Angelman syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a puppet-like gait, fits of laughter and characteristic facial features.
  • Angelman-Like Syndrome, X-linked: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation. Patients do eventually walk but then often lose this ability by the age of 10 years. Female carriers tend to have mild symptoms and males have severe symptoms - symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Angioneurotic Edema: Involves swelling of deep skin layers and fatty tissues under the skin as well as the mucous membrane. The condition involves recurrent swelling of tissues, abdominal pain and swelling of the voice box. It is often caused by an allergic reaction to drugs or food. It is also called Quincke's disease, giant urticaria, Quincke's edema or angioedema.
  • Aniridia cerebellar ataxia mental deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a partial absence of the iris, mental retardation and impaired coordination of voluntary movements.
  • Ankyloglossia: An oral condition where the there is extensive adhesion of the tongue to the floor of the mouth which restricts tongue movement and hence may affect speech. Also called tongue-tie.
  • Anton-Vogt syndrome: A congenital disorder where a brain anomaly results in involuntary purposeless movements (choreathetosis). Excitement and activity can make symptoms worse.
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Aphasia: inability to produce and comprehend language
  • Aphasia-epilepsy, acquired: A rare childhood neurological disorder characterized by aphasia, epileptic seizures and inability to recognize sounds. The symptoms may develop quickly or gradually.
  • Arginine-glycine amidinotransferase deficiency: A rare enzyme deficiency which manifests as mental retardation, developmental delay and speech problemss
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arnold Stickler Bourne syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle problems in hands, mouth and pharynx, kidney anomalies and corneal crystals.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 2: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. The extent of the deformity is greater in type 2 than type 1 and hence the symptoms are more severe and are often associated with a myelomeningocele (opening of the spine and spinal cord).
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 3: An extremely rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 3 involves the herniation of brain or brain stem tissue out of the back of the neck or head. The condition generally has a poor prognosis.
  • Arteriovenous Malformation: Birth defect of a tangle of veins and arteries.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Asperger Syndrome, Susceptibility to, 1: Asperger Syndrome is considered to be a mild form of autism and manifests in symptoms such as problems with social interactions and repetitive behavior patterns and interests. Language and cognition skills are considerable less affected than in autism. Researchers have discovered that there are a number genetic anomalies linked to an increased risk of developing Asperger Syndrome. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q25-q27.
  • Asperger Syndrome, Susceptibility to, 2: Asperger Syndrome is considered to be a mild form of autism and manifests in symptoms such as problems with social interactions and repetitive behavior patterns and interests. Language and cognition skills are considerable less affected than in autism. Researchers have discovered that there are a number genetic anomalies linked to an increased risk of developing Asperger Syndrome. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17p13.
  • Asperger Syndrome, Susceptibility to, 3: Asperger Syndrome is considered to be a mild form of autism and manifests in symptoms such as problems with social interactions and repetitive behavior patterns and interests. Language and cognition skills are considerable less affected than in autism. Researchers have discovered that there are a number genetic anomalies linked to an increased risk of developing Asperger Syndrome. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21-q22.
  • Asperger Syndrome, X-linked, Susceptibility to, 1: Asperger Syndrome is considered to be a mild form of autism and manifests in symptoms such as problems with social interactions and repetitive behavior patterns and interests. Language and cognition skills are considerable less affected than in autism. Researchers have discovered that there are a number genetic anomalies linked to an increased risk of developing Asperger Syndrome. X-linked type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq13.
  • Asperger Syndrome, X-linked, Susceptibility to, 2: Asperger Syndrome is considered to be a mild form of autism and manifests in symptoms such as problems with social interactions and repetitive behavior patterns and interests. Language and cognition skills are considerable less affected than in autism. Researchers have discovered that there are a number genetic anomalies linked to an increased risk of developing Asperger Syndrome. X-linked type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome Xp22.3.
  • Asperger syndrome: A neuropsychiatric disorder mainly involving the inability to understand and becoming involved in social interaction.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Ataxia: Failure of muscular coordination
  • Ataxia -- hypogonadism -- choroidal dystrophy: A very rare disorder characterized by spinocerebellar ataxia, eye abnormalities and a failure of the pituitary to stimulate gonadal development during puberty.
  • Ataxia -- oculomotor apraxia, type 1: A nerve disorder which affects the motor nerves and results in movement problems which includes the eyes. Gait problems are usually the first symptom and this is followed by speaking difficulty, intention tremor and then eye movement problems.
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia: A rare inherited childhood disorder involving progressive degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Ataxia spastic congenital miosis: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized mainly by ataxia, spasticity and small pupils that respond poorly to light.
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Ataxia, spastic with congenital miosis: A rare disorder characterized by movement problems of the limbs as well as an impaired pupil reaction to light (miosis).
  • Ataxia, spastic, 3, autosomal recessive: A recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by spasticity and ataxia.
  • Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome: A nerve disorder which affects the motor nerves and results in movement problems which includes the eyes. Gait problems are usually the first symptom and this is followed by speaking difficulty, intention tremor and then eye movement problems.
  • Athabaskan brainstem dysgenesis: A rare neurological disorder caused by abnormal brainstem development and function.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Athetoid Cerebral Palsy: Cerebral palsy is movement disorder originating from some sort of damage to the brain. There are a few different types of cerebral palsy e.g. spastic, athetoid and ataxic. Athetoid cerebral palsy is characterized by athetoid movements which are slow, writhing involuntary muscle movements.
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Behavioral disorder with hyperactivity and/or inattention.
  • Atypical pyridoxine-dependent seizures: A form of epilepsy which responds to anticonvulsant therapy for only a period of time but are able to be managed by pyridoxine supplementation after a few months. Seizures may disappear for a few months even after pyridoxine supplementation is ceased.
  • Auriculo-condylar syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by variable ear and jaw abnormalities.
  • Autism: Childhood mental condition with social and communication difficulties.
  • Autism, Susceptibility to, 15: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 15 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q35-q36.
  • Autism, X-linked, susceptibility to, 1: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. X-Linked type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xq13.
  • Autism, X-linked, susceptibility to, 2: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. X-Linked type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp22.3.
  • Autism, X-linked, susceptibility to, 3: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. X-Linked type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp22.3.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 1: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q22.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 10: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 10 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q36.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 11: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 11 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q24.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 12: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 12 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 21p13-q11.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 13: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 13 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 12q14.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 14: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 14 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16p11.2.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 3: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 4: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 5: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 6: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q11.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 7: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q21.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 8: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q27.
  • Autism, susceptibility to, 9: A developmental disorder characterized by an impaired ability to communicate with or relate to people or the environment around them and repetitive behavior. The severity of the disorder is variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic abnormalities linked to an increased susceptibility of developing autism. Type 9 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q31.
  • Autistic conditions: Medical conditions related to autism or autism spectrum disorders.
  • Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, type 11:
  • Babinski-Nageotte syndrome: A rare disorder caused by damage to a part of the brain (medullobulbar transitional area) which causes a variety of neurological symptoms, some of which affect only one side of the body.
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Bannayan-Zonana syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal polyposis, pigmentation of penis and benign tumor-like growths.
  • Barbiturate abuse: Abuse of barbiturate medications
  • Basal Ganglia Disease, Adult-Onset: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation results in a neurological disease resulting from abnormal iron and ferritin deposits in the brain.
  • Basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic 1: Abnormal calcium deposits in the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. Type 1 results in psychiatric, cognitive or neurological problems associated with the calcification. The symptoms experienced are variable.
  • Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive: A neurological disease that affects the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. The disease responds well to biotin administration but relapses within a month if the biotin is stopped. If the condition is diagnosed late or there are recurring episodes, the patient may suffer ongoing symptoms such as paraparesis, mild mental retardation or dystonia.
  • Basilar artery insufficiency: refers to a temporary set of symptoms due to decreased blood flow in the posterior circulation of the brain
  • Basilar artery migraine: Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bell's palsy: A one sided muscle paralysis of sudden onset due to a problem with the facial nerve
  • Ben-Ari-Shuper-Mimouni syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the structure separating the two halves of the brain as well as duplicated ureters that collect the urine from the kidney and deliver it to the bladder.
  • Benign astrocytoma: Benign tumors that occur in the brain or spinal cord. Symptoms and severity depends on the location and size of the tumors.
  • Benign essential tremor syndrome: A condition characterized mainly by tremor affecting usually then hands and head and the tremors may then slowly progress to other parts of the body.
  • Bentham-Driessen-Hanveld syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of undescended testes, long thin fingers and mental retardation.
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Bipolar disorder: Cycles of mania and depression; commonly called "manic-depression".
  • Blepharophimosis telecanthus microstomia: A rare syndrome characterized by a flat face, small mouth and ear anomaly as well as a range of other abnormalities.
  • Blue-ringed octopus poisoning: The blue-ringed octopus is found in shallow Australian ocean water and can deliver venomous, potentially fatal bite. The poison is present in the saliva of the octopus. The venom affects the neuromuscular system.
  • Bogart-Bacall syndrome: A voice disorder caused by vocal cord abuse or overuse. It most often occurs in singers or people who regularly speak outside their normal vocal range.
  • Boltshauser Syndrome: Boltshauser Syndrome is a rare condition reported in a few generations in one family. The condition is characterized by paralysis of the vocal cords, deafness and movement problems.
  • Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by severe mental deficiency, large ears, hypogonadism and other abnormalities.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Brailsford: A rare inherited skeletal disorder characterized by short hand and foot bones which may also be deformed. Other anomalies are also present.
  • Brain -- bone -- fat: A rare inherited disease characterized by bone cysts and progressive presenile dementia.
  • Brain Concussion: Trauma resulting in minor injury to the brain which causes a period of interrupted brain function. Simple concussions resolve themselves in about a week whereas more serious ones have persisting symptoms. The onset of symptoms may be delayed.
  • Brain abscess: abscess in the brain may involve any of the lobes of the brain
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumor, adult: A growth or tumor that develops in the tissues of the brain in adults. The tumor can be benign or malignant.
  • Branchial arch syndrome X-linked: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities such as facial anomalies, impaired hearing, short stature, learning disability and branchial arch defects.
  • Branchial clefts with characteristic facies, growth retardation, imperforate nasolacrimal duct: A rare genetic disorder characterized by branchial defects, tear duct obstruction and pseudocleft of the upper lip.
  • Branchial clefts with characteristic facies, growth retardation, imperforate nasolacrimal duct, and: A rare genetic disorder characterized by branchial defects, tear duct obstruction and pseudocleft of upper lip.
  • Branchio-Oculo-Facial Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by branchial defects, lacrimal duct obstruction and pseudocleft of upper lip.
  • Brief, sharp, piercing vocal sound: Brief, sharp, piercing vocal sound is any noise that occurs quickly and is sharp and piercing.
  • Bristowe's syndrome: Symptoms caused by a brain tumor that develops in the corpus callosum which connects the two brain hemispheres.
  • Bronchogenic carcinoma: When cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner, the condition is called lung cancer .
  • Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome: A very rare progressive disorder characterized by nerve deafness and cranial (and sometimes spinal) nerve paralysis.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • C1esterase deficiency: C1esterase deficiency is a condition characterized by swelling under the skin or mucosal tissue - the skin, respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract may be affected. The condition may be inherited or acquired. Symptoms tend to develop over a few days and then abate after two to five days. Swelling attacks may occur fairly regularly e.g. weekly or sporadically e.g. once or twice a year.
  • CACH syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by childhood ataxia and reduced myelination of the cerebral nerves. Motor and mental development in the first few years of life is normal with progressive neurodegeneration occurring between 2 and 5 years of age. Fever and trauma to the head can speed up disease progression.
  • CANOMAD syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities caused by immune-mediated nerve demyelination. There is usually no loss of limb function associated with the disorder. The face, throat, mouth and eye symptoms (weakness of the muscles) usually come and go.
  • Caffeine Allergy: A caffeine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to caffeine or caffeine-containing products. The type and severity of symptoms can vary amongst patients.
  • Calcification of basal ganglia with or without hypocalcemia: Calcification of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia. That calcification may be associated with conditions such as hypothyroidism, cytomegalovirus, and AIDS or may occur for no apparent reason. The severity of the condition may vary greatly from asymptomatic to neurological, psychiatric and movement disorders. The disorder may also progress at variable rates or remain stable depending on the underlying disease process.
  • California encephalitis: An uncommon mosquito born virus (California encephalitis virus) which can cause brain inflammation in humans. The severity of symptoms is variable. The incubation period can last from a few days to a week. Infants and children tend to be more severely affected than adults who sometimes have no obvious symptoms.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Carcinoma of the vocal tract: Cancer of the vocal cords in the larynx.
  • Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck: A type of cancer that occurs in the mucosal lining of parts of the head and neck e.g. esophagus, sinuses, nasal cavity, pharynx, mouth and lips. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the cancer.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hearing loss, type t RNA lysine gene mutation: A rare inherited disorder characterized by heart muscle disease and deafness. The deafness is inherited from the mother and is caused by a genetic defect. Patients may be asymptomatic for a number of years. The rate of progression of the disorder is variable with some patients being asymptomatic until adulthood.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hearing loss, type tRNA-LYS gene mutation: A rare inherited condition characterized by the association of cardiomyopathy and deafness.
  • Carotid Paraganglioma: A rare, usually benign tumor found in the carotid artery in the neck. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow.
  • Carpenter syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Cat's cry: A chromosomal disorder marked by microcephaly, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, strabismus, mental and physical retardation, and a characteristic catlike whine
  • Catamenial seizure: A type of seizure that is associated with the female menstrual cycle. It appears that flucutations in hormone levels leads to increased seizure activity in some women just before or during their menstrual cycle. Simple or complex partial seizures or generalized tonic-clonic seizures may be involved.
  • Catatonic syndrome: A rare syndrome often seen in schizophrenics or associated with central nervous system disturbances or brain trauma. The symptoms tend to occur in episodes with periods of remission in between.
  • Central pontine myelinolysis: A rare condition where the protective layer around brainstem nerve cells is destroyed which prevents nerve signals being transmitted properly. It generally occurs in response to a rapid change in sodium levels in the body which can be caused by treatment of various conditions or by various conditions that cause rapid sodium level changes.
  • Cerebellar ataxia -- intellectual deficit -- optic atrophy -- skin abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, mental retardation, optic atrophy and skin abnormalities.
  • Cerebellar ataxia syndrome: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain results in symptoms such as ataxia.
  • Cerebellar ataxia type 1, autosomal recessive: A slow progressing brain disorder characterized by ataxia and dysarthria.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, X-linked: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain results in symptoms such as ataxia. The rate of progression can vary.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive: A group of rare, recessively inherited neurological disorders caused by abnormalities in the cerebellum and spinal cord. In some cases other parts of the body may be affected.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, infantile with progressive external ophthalmoplegia: A rare disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia during infancy and progressive paralysis of eye muscles.
  • Cerebellar degeneration, subacute: A rare disorder involving degeneration of the cerebellum and sometimes involves nearby spinal cord or brain tissue.
  • Cerebellar parenchymal degeneration: Progressive deterioration of brain tissue. Symptoms can vary depending on the rate of progression, location and extent of the degeneration.
  • Cerebelloparenchymal autosomal recessive disorder 3: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by albinism, incoordination, low muscle tone and eye problems.
  • Cerebral Atrophy: Wasting away of the brain.
  • Cerebral Autosomal Recessive Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy: A rare inherited condition characterized primarily by progressive degeneration of the brain white matter and disease of the brain blood vessels as well as additional symptoms not involving the brain e.g. thin skin, alopecia and spinal disc disease.
  • Cerebral Palsy: Any brain disorder causing movement disability
  • Cerebral Palsy, Ataxic, Autosomal Recessive: Ataxic cerebral palsy refers to an injury to the brain that results primarily in low muscle tone and poor coordination of movements. The ataxic autosomal recessive form is an inherited abnormality in the development of the brain which is linked to chromosome 9p12-q12
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 1: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 1 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the GAD1 gene on chromosome 2q31.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 2: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 2 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the ANKRD15 gene on chromosome 9p24.3.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 3: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 3 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the AP4M1 gene on chromosome 7q22.1.
  • Cerebral contusion: Injury of the cerebrum often causing bruising when the skin is not broken.
  • Cerebral hemorrhage: Bleeding in the brain
  • Cerebrocostomandibular Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a very small jaw, abnormal rib development and a small thorax as well as other abnormalities.
  • Cerebrorenodigital syndrome: A rare group of syndromes characterized mainly by brain, kidney, finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Cerebrovascular Conditions: Conditions of the brain's blood vessels including stroke.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 10: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 10 involves a deficiency of cathepsin D and involves an initial period of normal development with neurodegenerative symptoms starting during the early school years.
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 8: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 8 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect.
  • Change in volume of cry: feeble cry of the baby.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2A: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2C has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in chromosome 12 and involves diaphragm and vocal cord weakness as well as hand and foot problems.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4A: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4A has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the GDAP 1 protein gene on chromosome 8. The recessive forms of CMT tend to be more severe than the dominant form and often involve hand and foot problems as well as additional systemic symptoms.
  • Chemical allergy: A chemical allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients depending on the type and duration of the exposure and individual response.
  • Chemical burn -- airways: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical - usually through inhalation but can also occur through aspiration if the chemical is swallowed. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- eyes: Burns to the eye caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the eyes are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- ingestion: Burns to the mouth and gastrointestinal system caused by swallowing a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the gastrointestinal system are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- inhalation: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical through inhalation. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acidic dry cell batteries: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals and eating the batteries can cause various symptoms if the chemical is released from the battery. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylamide: Acrylamide is a chemical used mainly in the treatment of waste water, grout agent, paper strengthening agent and adhesive agents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aftershave: Aftershave contains chemicals (ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol) which can cause symptoms if ingested in sufficient quantities. Death from ingesting aftershave is considered unlikely. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aluminum: Aluminum is a chemical used mainly for metallurgical purposes and can be found in packaging, electrical parts, vehicles, cooking utensils, construction materials and building components. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Button batteries: Button batteries are small round, button-shaped batteries used in various products such as watches and calculators. Generally, swallowing the batteries will cause no problems unless it becomes stuck in the gastrointestinal tract. The batteries may also be shoved up the nose by children which can cause respiratory problems depending on how far the battery is pushed and how long it remains undetected. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorfenvinphos: Chlorfenvinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorpyrifos: Chlorpyrifos is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cologne: Colognes contain chemicals such as ethanol and isopropanol which can cause symptoms if ingested or inhaled in excessive quantities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Coumaphos: Coumaphos is used as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Deoderant: Deoderants contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Depilatories: Depilatories are used to remove hair from parts of the body. They contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ether: Ether is a chemical used mainly as an anesthetic and industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glufosinate: Glufosinate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Bleach: Hair bleach contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair bleach can continue to cause gastrointestinal damage for weeks after ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Dye: Hair dyes contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair dye can continue to cause damage for weeks after ingestion. Some dyes contain lead or mercury which can cause neurological problems even if low level exposure occurs over an extended period of time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-4: Jet Fuel-4 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Manganese: Manganese is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, welding rods, matches, electrical coils, ceramics and animal food additives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl Bromide: Methyl Bromide is a chemical used mainly in insecticides, fire extinguishers, wool degreasers and oil extraction. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Para-Dichlorobenzene: Para-Dichlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide, mold and mildew preventer, moth repellent and toilet deodorant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propoxur: Propoxur is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in adhesives, lacquer, fire retardants and house cleaning solvents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vinyl Acetate: Vinyl Acetate is a chemical used in the manufacturing process of a wide range of products such as adhesives, paints, textiles, wood glue and vehicle glass . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chiari-1 Malformation: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: A rare early-onset form of the mental disorder called schizophrenia. Symptoms start before the age of thirteen. Symptoms usually start gradually and are often preceded by slow motor, speech and language development.
  • Childhood-onset cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of the protective sheath around nerves resulting in increasing difficulty. The childhood cerebral form of the condition is the most severe.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Choreoathetosis-spasticity, episodic: A dominantly inherited movement disorder characterized by episodes of involuntary movments. Symptom episodes are often triggered by fatigue, alcohol, physical exertion and stress.
  • Chromosome 1, monosomy 1q4: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as facial dysmorphism, retarded fetal growth, seizures, mental retardation, testicular problems and kidney defects.
  • Chromosome 1, uniparental disomy 1q12 q21: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 10, Monosomy 10p:
  • Chromosome 10p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 resulting in variable abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12, 12p trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 13 ring syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 13 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 15 Ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 15 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 15 inverted duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an duplicated section of chromosome 15 which is reversed end-to-end resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 15q triplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of a part of the long arm of chromosome 15 resulting in various anomalies.
  • Chromosome 16p, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 16. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 16q, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 16. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material. Severe cases often result in spontaneous abortion or infant death.
  • Chromosome 17p, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 18 Ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 18 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 18q, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 18. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 19p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the short arm of chromosome 19 is duplicated resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 1p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 1q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 2, monosomy 2p22: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 2 causes various abnormalities such as deafness, intestinal problems, mental retardation and speech defects.
  • Chromosome 20 ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 20 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm of chromosome 22 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 22q11 Deletion Spectrum: A rare chromosomal disorder where a small piece of genetic material is missing from chromosome 22 at the q11 location.
  • Chromosome 22q13 deletion: A very rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 22 is missing at the q13 location which results in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 22q13.3 deletion syndrome: A very rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 22 is missing at the q13.3 location which results in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 2p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 2p16.1-p15 Deletion Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a range of manifestations including mental retardation and skull and facial anomalies.
  • Chromosome 3, monosomy 3p25: A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by mental retardation, short stature, deafness, extra digits, facial anomalies and various other abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 3, trisomy 3p: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 3 is duplicated so there is three copies of it rather than the normal two.
  • Chromosome 4 Ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where the ends of chromosome 4 have been deleted and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring shape resulting in a range of symptoms determined by the size and location of the genetic deletion.
  • Chromosome 4 ring syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the ends of chromosome 4 have been deleted and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring shape resulting in a range of symptoms determined by the size and location of the genetic deletion.
  • Chromosome 6p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 7, Partial Deletion of Short Arm: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size and location of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 7, partial monosomy 7p: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size and location of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 7, trisomy 7p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of all or part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 7p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 7p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of all or part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 8 trisomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two which results in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 8, Monosomy 8p2: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 8, Monosomy 8p21-pter: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 8, monosomy 8p: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 8, mosaic trisomy: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 8 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Chromosome 8, trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is duplicated.
  • Chromosome 8p mosaic tetrasomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the short arm of chromosome 8 is repeated four times in some of the body's cells instead of the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 8q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 8 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Chromosome 9, trisomy 9q: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome Xp11.23-p11.22 Duplication syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of a large head, lack of hair, scoliosis and a skin anomaly. The reported patients tend to involve parents who were related.
  • Chromosome partial trisomy 22q11q13: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 22 at the location q11-q13 is triplicated instead of resulting in various anomalies.
  • Chronic Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephaliti: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic cry: bouts of crying
  • Chronic dysarthria due to lesion in the bulbar nuclei: Chronic dysarthria due to lesion in the bulbar nuclei refers to an specific area of abnormal tissue in the brain that causes a certain type of motor speech disorder.
  • Chronic progressive dysarthria: difficulty in articulation of words
  • Chronic tonsillitis: Chronic infection/inflammation of the tonsils.
  • Cigarette smoke allergy: Cigarette smoke allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body to cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke allergy is not considered a true allergy but a sensitivity as the smoke is an irritant rather than an allergen. People with other allergies tend to be more sensitive to cigarette smoke.
  • Classic childhood ALD: Classic severe form of ALD in boys.
  • Classic migraine: Migraine is a neurological disorder that generally involves repeated headaches. Some people also have nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms. Most people with migraines do not have any warning before it occurs. However, some people have a visual disturbance called an aura before the headache starts.
  • Classical pyridoxine-dependent seizures: A form of epilepsy which responds to pyridoxine hydrochloride administration and not to standard anticonvulsant medication.
  • Cleft palate: This when there is a congenital fissure of the median line of the palate.
  • Clipped speech with some pauses between syllables: staccato speech or clipped speech is that in which each syllable is uttered separately
  • Coarse voice: A coarseness in the tone noticed in the voice expressed by a person.
  • Cockayne syndrome type 1: A rare inherited condition characterized by short stature, light sensitivity and a prematurely aged appearance. Type 1 is an early-onset form and involves progressive symptoms that usually start after 1 year of age.
  • Coffin-Lowry syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by down slanting space between eyelids, bulbous nose, soft hands and tapering fingers.
  • Combarros Calleja Leno syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the association of glaucoma at birth with a form of ataxia.
  • Communication conditions: Medical conditions affecting the communication systems, such as speech.
  • Communication disorders: refers to problems of speech, language and oral motor function
  • Communication symptoms: Symptoms related to problems with communication.
  • Complex partial seizure: A complex seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. Partial seizures where the patient has altered consciousness are called complex partial seizures. During a simple partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. Partial seizures may spread to other parts of the brain and are then called generalized seizures. These seizures usually only last a few minutes.
  • Complex partial seizure disorder: Complex partial seizure disorder is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. Partial seizures where the patient has altered consciousness are called complex partial seizures. During a simple partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. Partial seizures may spread to other parts of the brain and are then called generalized seizures. These seizures usually only last a few minutes.
  • Cone shell poisoning: A number of species of cone shells are capable of envenomating humans. The toxin is a neurotoxin and thus primarily affects the nervous system. Cone shells are found mainly in shallow waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. The toxicity varies amongst species with some delivering a benign stink whereas others are capable of causing death. The cone snails a proboscis on the end of which is a poison-filled barb.
  • Congenital Bilateral Perisylvian Syndrome: A condition apparent at birth which causes partial paralysis, pseudobulbar palsy, dysarthria and dysohagia
  • Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of disorders involving abnormally synthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides. There is a long chain of events involved in the synthesis and defects may occur with any of the compounds or enzymes involved in the process. Progressive impairment and regression of skills often occurs after a period of normal development following birth.
  • Congenital Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease which usually results from autoimmune dysfunction. Congenital myasthenia gravis however results from a genetic defect. Symptoms tend to become worse during the day with activity and improve after rest or after sleeping. The severity of symptoms may vary.
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia -- simple virilizing form in males: A group of disorder that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The simple virilizing form involves a moderate deficiency of 21-hydroxylase and differs in its effects on males and females.
  • Congenital myasthenic syndromes: A group of genetic condition characterized by abnormal neuromuscular signals. Symptoms tend to become worse with exertion.
  • Continuous spike-wave during slow sleep syndrome: A rare form of epilepsy that occurs between the ages of 3 and 7 and is diagnosed by the observation through an EEG of continuous spike and wave discharges during the slow sleep phase which is detected. The seizures often occur during sleep. Children outgrow the condition before adulthood but some of the effects of the disorder may continue longer.
  • Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: A very rare disorder involving delayed physical development and various malformations involving the head, face and limbs. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Corpus callosum agenesis double urinary collecting: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the structure separating the two halves of the brain as well as duplicated ureters that collect the urine from the kidney and deliver it to the bladder.
  • Corpus callosum agenesis double urinary collecting system and trigonocephaly: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the structure separating the two halves of the brain as well as duplicated ureters that collect the urine from the kidney and deliver it to the bladder.
  • Corticobasal Degeneration: A rare progressive neurological disorder where parts of the brain deteriorate.
  • Craniosynostosis exostoses nevus epibulbar dermoid: A rare syndrome characterized by the premature fusion of skull bones, excessive bone growth (hyperostosis), epibulbar dermoids (benign eye tumor) and a skin disorder (linear verrucous epidermal nevus). Patients with this condition need to avoid using aminoglycosides as they can have a negative impact on hearing.
  • Creatine deficiency, X-linked: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation, seizures, short stature and facial anomalies. The disorder is caused by the absence of a compound needed to transport creatine and thus creatine levels may be normal or high, but the body is unable to utilize it.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Cri-du-chat syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a small portion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 5 is missing. The condition is characterized by a high-pitched cry which is similar to a cat's cry.
  • Croup: A condition characterized by an acute partial obstruction of the upper airway on young children
  • Cry of a duck voice tone:
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Cyclosporine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Davenport-Donlan syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, white hair, contractures and papillomas.
  • Davis-Lafer syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation and unusual facial features.
  • De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by sunlight sensitivity, skin atrophy and pigmentation and skin tumors as well neurologic involvement.
  • Deafness -- lymphoedema -- leukemia: A rare syndrome characterized by deafness, early-onset leukemia and lymphoedema in the lower legs.
  • Decreased salivary function: xerostomia o rdry mouth
  • Decreased salivation: also known as sialoschesis, is a condition characterised by reduced secretion of saliva by the salivary glands
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Decreased tactile fremitus: sign of respiratory disease
  • Decreased vocal fremitus: is a vibration felt on the patient's chest during low frequency vocalization
  • Deep voice: Deep or deepening voice as a symptom
  • Deepening voice: A condition characterized by the deepening of the sound of ones voice
  • Deepening voice in children: Deepening voice in children occurs when a child's voice becomes deeper than usual.
  • Deficiency of Member 8 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenace Family: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Dejerine-Roussy syndrome: A rare neurological condition where damage to the part of the brain that controls sensation (thalamus) is damaged causing excessive pain in response to mild stimulation or reduced sensation.
  • Delay in Talking: A delay in the ability of a child to speak beyond what is normal
  • Delayed speech -- facial asymmetry -- strabismus -- ear lobe creases: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by speech delay, crease in the ear lobe, asymmetrical face and cross-eyed.
  • Delayed talking in children: Delayed talking in children refers to a child who experiences a slow or late development in speech skills.
  • Deletion 22q11: A rare chromosomal disorder where a small piece of genetic material is missing from chromosome 22 at the q11 location.
  • Deletion 22q13: A very rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 22 is missing at the q13 location which results in various abnormalities.
  • Deletion 5p: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of the genetic material from the short arm (p) of chromosome 5 which results in various abnormalities. The resulting condition is often called Cri-du-Chat Syndrome and features may vary somewhat depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Deletion 8p: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Deletion of the Short Arm of Chromosome 1: A condition characterized by deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1
  • Delirium: Severe mental deterioration
  • Demyelinating disorder: Any condition that is characterised by the destruction of the myelin sheaths of the nerves
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Developmental dysphasia, familial: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a speech defect where a child has difficulty developing their expressive language skills. The problem is not associated or caused by any other abnormality.
  • Dextrocardia-bronchiectasis-sinusitis: A genetic disorder characterized by sinusitis, bronchiectasis and situs inversus.
  • DiGeorge syndrome: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder which can result in a vast array of symptoms. Various names have been used to describe different manifestations of the syndrome. Di George Syndrome primarily involves an underdeveloped thymus and parathyroid glands which results in lowered immunity low blood calcium levels respectively. Another primary feature is heart defects. Various other variable features are also present. It is not uncommon for patients to have more than one of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome subtypes which can make diagnosis confusing - other subtypes include Sphrintzen syndrome, Caylor cardiofacial syndrome and CATCH 22.
  • Diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy: A rare association of diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness.
  • Diabetic hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar attack from insulin or diabetes medications
  • Dialysis encephalopathy syndrome: A progressive brain disease that occurs in some patients who undergo chronic hemodialysis. Aluminium intoxication is believed to play a role in the disease.
  • Dieffenbachia poisoning: Dieffenbachia is a common houseplant which has large leaves. The plant contains poisonous chemicals (oxalic acid and asparagine) which can cause various symptoms if large amounts of the plant is ingested.
  • Difficulty speaking: Where one has a problem with communicating through speech
  • Difficulty talking: Where ones has a problem with communicating through speech
  • Dinno-Shearer-Weisskopf syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by long limbs, tall stature, large head, ataxia and facial anomalies.
  • Distal myopathy with vocal cord weakness: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle weakness in the end portion of the arms and legs as well as the vocal cord and pharynx.
  • Down's Syndrome associated Alzheimer's disease: Early-onset Alzheimer's is more prevalent in Down's Syndrome sufferers than in the general population. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Down's syndrome-like hypotonia: Hypotonia is not a specific medical disorder, but a potential manifestation of many different diseases and disorders that affect motor nerve control by the brain or muscle strength.
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Dry mouth: When the mouth is not as moist as usual.
  • Duplication 12p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material deleted.
  • Duplication 7p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of all or part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material duplicated.
  • Dykes-Markes-Harper syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by dry, scaly skin, enlarged liver and spleen and a incoordination.
  • Dysarthria: Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder characterized by difficulty forming and expressing words that is the result of injury to or pathology of the nervous system.
  • Dysarthria due to lesion in the bulbar nuclei: Dysarthria due to lesion in the bulbar nuclei refers to a motor speech disorder characterized by difficulty forming and expressing words that is the result of an area of abnormal tissue in the bulbar nuclei in the brainstem.
  • Dysarthria in children: Dysarthria in children refers to a child who has a motor speech disorder characterized by difficulty forming and expressing words that is the result of injury to or pathology of the nervous system.
  • Dysarthria of the bulbar nuclei: dysrthria due to lesion of in the bulbar nuclei
  • Dyslexia: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 1: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q21.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 2: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p22.2.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 3: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2p16-p15.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 4: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q11.2-q12.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 5: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p12-q13.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 6: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18p11.2.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 7: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11p15.5.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 8: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36-p34.
  • Dyslexia, Susceptibility to, 9: Dyslexia is a name for a condition where people have difficulty with reading and writing. People with dyslexia have normal intelligence and are not in any way mentally retarded or intellectually challenged. The difficulty with certain tasks is believed to be related to problems with perception capability in certain parts of the brain. Researchers have discovered that there are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to dyslexia. Genetic forms of dyslexia are considered to be primary dyslexia and patients tend to have problems with reading, writing and spelling even as adults. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq27.3.
  • Dysmorphism -- abnormal vocalization -- mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, facial abnormalities and an abnormal voice.
  • Dysphasic dementia, hereditary: An inherited form of dementia caused by nerve degeneration.
  • Dysphonia, chronic spasmodic: A speech disorder which sounds like stuttering and is caused by abnormal vocal cord movement.
  • Dystonia: Dystonia is a neurological disorder that causes involuntary contractions of muscles in a repetitive, twisting manner.
  • Dystonia 1, Torsion, Autosomal Dominant: A rare movement disorder where the patients suffers uncontrollable muscle contractions and distortion of body position. The limbs are usually involved first and then the condition spreads to other parts of the body.
  • Dystonia 12: A very rare syndrome involving the early start of symptoms of dystonia and parkinsonism. The onset of the symptoms usually occurs suddenly over weeks or even hours and then progresses slowly.
  • Dystonia Musculorum Deformans 1: A rare movement disorder where the patients suffers uncontrollable muscle contractions and distortion of body position. The limbs are usually involved first and then the condition spreads to other parts of the body.
  • Dystonia musculorum deformans type 1: A rare movement disorder where the patient suffers involuntary muscle contractions and distortion of body position. The trunk, neck and limbs are usually involved first.
  • Dystonia musculorum deforms 4: A rare dominantly inherited movement disorder. The muscles contract involuntarily causing involuntary movements.
  • Dystonia with cerebellar atrophy: A recessively inherited movement disorder (dystonia) which responds poorly to Levodopa treatment and involves wasting of part of the brain.
  • Dystonia-Parkinsonism, Adult-Onset: A rare condition characterized by the association of parkinsonism and dystonia due to a neurodegenerative disorder which progresses quickly.
  • EEC syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by absence of fingers and toes, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip or cleft palate.
  • Eagle's syndrome: A group of symptoms caused by calcification of the stylohyoid ligament and an abnormally long styloid process. The styloid process is a bone at the base of the skull which is attached to muscles and ligaments connected to the throat and tongue. If this bone is too long then actions such as swallowing and turning the head can cause pain and discomfort. The cause of the condition is unknown but trauma and inflammation may be the cause in some cases.
  • Early-onset Alzheimer's: Early-onset Alzheimer's is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to genetic defects or occurs in a familial pattern. It is not as common as the non-inherited form of Alzheimer's - occurs in up to 90% of Alzheimer sufferers. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • East Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, deafness, ataxia and electrolyte imbalance.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- alopecia -- preaxial polydactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by facial abnormalities, extra toes and sparse or absent hair.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- blindness: A rare syndrome characterized mainly be mental retardation, vision loss, short stature and teeth and hair abnormalities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia anhidrotic: A rare inherited condition involving skin, hair, teeth and nail abnormalities. The condition is characterized by the absence of sweat and sebaceous glands, underdeveloped hair and teeth, characteristic face and other physical deformities.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, anhidrotic with T-cell immunodeficiency, autosomal dominant: An inherited disorder characterized by dry, rough skin, sparse scalp hair, cone-shaped teeth and an immune system disorder.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Speech symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Speech symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Speech symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Speech symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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