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Symptoms » Stiff joints » Glossary
 

Glossary for Stiff joints

Medical terms related to Stiff joints or mentioned in this section include:

  • 7p2 Monosomy Syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of the end of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia Brahimi Bacha type: A very rare genetic malformation syndrome characterized primarily by developmental abnormalities of the face and skeletal bones.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia Hunter Thompson type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acromicric dysplasia: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Akesson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excessive skin folds and furrows on the scalp, mental retardation the failure of the thyroid to develop.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by homogentisic aciduria, arthritis and ochronosis. Symptoms include darkening of urine, alkinization due to overproduction of homogentisic acid, arthritis in the large joints and black ochronotic pigmentation of cartilage and collagen tissue. However, many of these symptoms may not occur until middle age. The condition may also be caused by chronic phenol poisoning.
  • Allain Babin Demarquez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by premature fusion of skullbones, abnormal development of skeletal bones and hypertension.
  • Amyoplasia: A rare condition characterized by congenital joint stiffness.
  • Angiokeratoma -- mental retardation -- coarse face: A rare inherited genetic syndrome characterized by mental retardation, coarse facial features and capillary hemangiomas.
  • Ankle Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the ankle joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Ankylosis: Stiffness or fusion of a joint leading to loss of mobility.
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Arthritis: A condition which is characterized by the inflammation of a joint
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthritis-like conditions: Medical conditions highly related to or similar to arthritis.
  • Arthritis-like symptoms: A condition which is characterized by symptoms which mimic that of arthritis
  • Arthrogryposis: A condition which is characterized by the persistent flexure of a joint
  • Arthrogryposis -- ophthalmoplegia -- retinopathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the hands and feet as well as eye problems.
  • Arthrogryposis -- renal dysfunction -- cholestasis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, kidney dysfunction and liver problems.
  • Arthrogryposis IUGR thoracic dystrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital joint contractures, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and ribcage abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita neurogenic type: A rare non-progressive syndrome characterized by congenital contractures that originates from a nerve problem (spinal motor neuron depletion).
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, distal, X-linked: A rare condition characterized by the presence of contractures at birth as well as various other anomalies. The condition is X-linked.
  • Arthrogryposis, congenital -- myopathic seizures: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation and muscle problems.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2A: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that involves additional symptoms such as facial and spinal anomalies.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis-like disorder: A rare disorder characterized by joint contractures of the knees and ankles resulting in wasting or overgrowth of nearby muscles.
  • Arthropathy, progressive pseudorheumatoid, of childhood: A form of progressive rheumatoid arthritis that affects children.
  • Avascular necrosis: Bone death from lack of circulation.
  • Baraitser burn fixen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, a skin disorder and an expressionless face.
  • Barmah Forest virus: Mosquito-borne virus in parts of Australia
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bentham-Driessen-Hanveld syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of undescended testes, long thin fingers and mental retardation.
  • Bethlem myopathy: A rare, slow-progressing, genetic muscle disorder where the muscle gradually weaken and become wasted.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Brachydactyly -- tibial hypoplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by short digits and an underdeveloped or absent shin bone.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Bursitis: inflammation of one or more bursae (small sacs) of synovial fluid in the body.
  • Chondrocalcinosis: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where the chemical calcium pyrophosphate dihyrdate is deposited in one or more joints in the body - usually the knee is affected.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 1: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 2: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis familial articular: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Christian's syndrome 1: A rare recessively inherited syndrome characterized by premature skull fusion, cleft palate, permanently flexed fingers and various other anomalies.
  • Chromosome 1, monosomy 1q4: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as facial dysmorphism, retarded fetal growth, seizures, mental retardation, testicular problems and kidney defects.
  • Chromosome 12, Isochromosome 12p Mosaic: A very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 21 monosomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is only one copy of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two leading to various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 21q deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 21 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 3, monosomy 3p25: A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by mental retardation, short stature, deafness, extra digits, facial anomalies and various other abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 3, monosomy 3q13: A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by a range of abnormalities including facial anomalies, kidney dysfunction, large head, small penis and impaired joint mobility.
  • Chromosome 6, monosomy 6q: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Chromosome 6q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Chromosome 7, Monosomy 7p2: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of the end of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 7, terminal 7p deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of the end of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 7, trisomy 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 7q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 9, Tetrasomy 9p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is four copies of the short arm of chromosome 9 instead of the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 9, trisomy 9q: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is four copies of the short arm of chromosome 9 instead of the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: Muscle weakness and wasting that starts at birth or around the time of birth. The severity and extent of muscle involvement is greatly variable.
  • Connective tissue disorders: Any condition affecting connective tissues.
  • Connective tissue dysplasia, Spellacy type: A very rare syndrome caused by an inherited collagen disorder and characterized by skin abnormalities, skeletal and eye anomalies and joint problems.
  • Cranio osteoarthropathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by large fontanelles, joint problems and finger clubbing.
  • Craniosynostosis cleft lip palate arthrogryposis: A rare condition characterized mainly by the association of premature fusion of skull bones (craniosynostosis), cleft lip and/or palate and arthrogryposis.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Cutis verticis gyrata mental deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures and eye and movement problems.
  • Davenport-Donlan syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, white hair, contractures and papillomas.
  • Deletion 6q: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Desbuquois dysplasia-like syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by various anomalies similar to Desbuquois syndrome but there is no mental retardation, hand abnormalities or facial anomalies involved.
  • Dialysis-related amyloidosis: Amyloidosis (protein deposits) from kidney dialysis treatment.
  • Dislocation: Bone dislocated from a joint
  • Duplication 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Dwarfism -- stiff joint -- ocular abnormalities: A very rare form of dwarfism characterized by short stature as well as stiff joints and eye abnormalities.
  • Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen Syndrome: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by short stature and other skeletal deformities.
  • Dysostosis: Defective bone formation.
  • Ectopia lentis, isolated: A rare syndrome characterized by dislocation of eye lenses which often occurred at birth.
  • Elbow Arthritis: Inflammation of the elbow joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Elbow Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the elbow joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. There are 6 different subtypes of the disease, with each caused by a mutation in a different gene.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 3: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. The knees and ankles are usually the most affected joints. Mild weakness of muscles in the upper arms and legs was also sometimes present. It is believed to be caused by a defect in the COL9A3 gene.
  • Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 5: Abnormalities in the ends of a number of bones resulting in the early onset of osteoarthrosis and joint pain. The hips and knees were the main joints involved. It is caused by defects in the gene for matrilin-3 (MATN3).
  • Facial dysmorphism -- intellectual deficit -- short stature -- hearing loss: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by retarded growth, mental retardation, bone abnormalities and distinctive facial features.
  • Facies unusual arthrogryposis advanced skeletal malformations: A very rare fatal malformation characterized by an unusual facial appearance, arthrogryposis, advanced bone age of the hips and abnormal X-rays of the skeleton.
  • Familial Articular Chondrocalcinosis: An hereditary condition affecting the joints with the formation of calcium pyrophosphate
  • Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS): An inherited inflammatory disorder which causes periods of fever, rash and pain in joints after being exposed to cold conditions. Symptoms last less than a day and start within hours of exposure to the cold.
  • Familial hypopituitarism: Impaired pituitary gland hormone-producing activity that tends to run in families. The failure of the pituitary gland in turn affects other hormone-producing glands which rely on the hormones from the pituitary gland for their activity. Symptoms are determined by the degree and type of hormone deficiency involved.
  • Finger osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the finger joints as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Finger symptoms: Symptoms affecting any fingers
  • Flynn-Aird syndrome: A rare inherited disorder where neurological degeneration causes symptoms such as dementia, ataxia, eye problems, skin disorders and muscle wasting.
  • Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, skeletal abnormalities, hearing problems and wasting of arm and leg muscles.
  • GEMSS syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by stiff joints, short stature, glaucoma and a dislocated eye lens.
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gaucher disease -- perinatal lethal form: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormally tight skin and Gaucher disease which is a lipid storage disease. This is the most severe form of Gaucher disease.
  • Gout: Painful joints, most commonly the big toe.
  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heberden's nodes: Small hard nodules that form at the interphalangeal joints due to osteoarthritis
  • Hemochromatosis: Excess of iron leading to problems with joints, liver, heart and pancreas.
  • Hemophilic arthropathy: Joint destruction associated with hemophilia. The knees, ankles, elbows, hip and shoulders are the most common joints involved. Symptoms are progressive and often surgical intervention is required to prevent total loss of joint function.
  • Herrmann Opitz arthrogryposis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by contractures, skeletal abnormalities and short stature.
  • Hip osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the hip joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Homocystinuria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving the amino acid methionine and resulting in a harmful accumulation of homocysteine in the body.
  • Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency: A rare genetic biochemical disorder where a deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthase results in high levels of methionine and homocysteine in the blood and reduced levels of cyteine in the blood. There are two subtypes of the disorder with varying manifestations. One type responds to Vitmain B6 supplementation and the other doesn't. Those who do respond to Vitamin B6 tend to have milder manifestations.
  • Homocystinuria due to defect in methylation cbl e: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (methionine synthase reductase) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects. It is a form of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Hunter-Carpenter-Macdonald syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by various abnormalities including small head, facial anomalies, mental retardation and hair, skin and nail anomalies. Fetal exposure to alcohol is believed to be a factor in the syndrome.
  • Hurler syndrome:
  • Hutchinson Gilford Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by alopecia and senile-like appearance.
  • Inflammatory symptoms: Symptoms related to inflammation.
  • Isotretinoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Isotretinoin (an acne treatment drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Jacobs syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart inflammation (pericardium), joint disease and permanent finger flexion. The number of joints affected is variable.
  • Jaffe-Lichtenstein-Sutro syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by pain and limited movement in one or more large joints such as the knee.
  • Jequier-Kozlowski-skeletal dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by various skeletal abnormalities and facial anomalies.
  • Johnston Aarons Schelley syndrome: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by contractures and thickened skin.
  • Joint Pain: Pain affecting the joints
  • Joint injury: An injury to any joint in the body. The larger limb joints tend to be the most utilized and are hence more prone to injuries. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the type and location of injury and often the primary symptom is pain. A joint injury can involve damage to the bones, ligaments or other tissues of the joint. The injury may be acute (e.g. trauma) or chronic (e.g. overuse).
  • Joint pain: Pain affecting the joints
  • Joint symptoms: Symptoms affecting the joints.
  • Jorgenson-Lenz syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by joint problems, mental retardation and various eye and other anomalies.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Chronic arthritis affecting children and teens
  • Juvenile Scleroderma: Scleroderma that occurs in children. Scleroderma is a connective tissue disease that can affect the skin, blood vessels, the immune system and sometimes even the organs may be involved. The disorder may be localized or affect large areas of the body.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, unclassified: A chronic inflammatory joint condition affecting children. This particular subtype is defined as unclassified as it doesn't fit into any of the other classifications.
  • Kleeblattschaedel syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a head the is somewhat cloverleaf shaped.
  • Knee osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the knee joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Kniest dysplasia: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by dwarfism, enlarged joints and facial deformities.
  • Koussef nichols syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems, a high body temperature and various other physical abnormalities.
  • Kousseff-Nichols syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems, a high body temperature and various other physical abnormalities.
  • Lissencephaly type III -- metacarpal bone dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by an abnormally smooth brain as well as abnormal bone development in the hands.
  • Lumbar malsegmentation -- short stature: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature and abnormal segmentation of the vertebrae in the abdominal segment of the spine.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphomatous thyroiditis: Progressive thyroid gland enlargement due to autoimmune disease.
  • Macleod-Fraser syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by long thin fingers and contractures involving the knees, elbows, fingers and sometimes other joints.
  • Mandibuloacral dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prematurely aged appearance and bone abnormalities. There are two subtypes with type B involving loss of fat layers under the skin mainly in the extremities, face and trunk whereas type A involves mainly the extremities. The severity of the symptoms is variable.
  • Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type A lipodystrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prematurely aged appearance and bone abnormalities. Loss of fat layers under the skin occurs mainly in the extremities in type B. The severity of the symptoms is variable.
  • Matsoukas syndrome: An extremely rare condition characterized by mental retardation, eye problems, facial anomalies and joint problems.
  • Mental mixed retardation -- deafness -- clubbed digits: A rare disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation, deafness and clubbed fingers.
  • Mental mixed retardation deafnes clubbed digits: A rare disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation, deafness and clubbed fingers.
  • Mental retardation -- arachnodactyly -- hypotonia -- telangiectasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, short fingers, reduced muscle tone and spider veins (telangiectasia).
  • Mental retardation -- short stature -- deafness -- genital: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, short stature, deafness and genital abnormalities.
  • Mental retardation -- short stature -- heart and skeletal anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, short stature and heart and skeletal anomalies.
  • Mephenytoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mephenytoin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, recessive type: A recessively inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormal development of the bone metaphyses which results in short stature from birth.
  • Metatrophic dysplasia: A very rare form of dwarfism involving short limbs and a long trunk. Less than 100 cases of the condition have been reported.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Mucolipidosis III: A rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme leads to the buildup of mucopolysaccharides and mucolipids in the body which is harmful to the body and leads to premature death.
  • Mucolipidosis type 3 A: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the progressive accumulation of certain chemicals (glycoproteins and glycolipids) in body tissues due to deficiency of an enzyme (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-I-phosphotransferase) needed to process it.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis II: Disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism in juveniles.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis type 2 Hunter syndrome- severe form: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of the enzyme (iduronidate 2-sulfatase) needed to break it down.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis type 6: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of the enzyme (Arylsulfatase ?) needed to break it down.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis type I Hurler syndrome: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of the enzyme (?-L-diuronidase) needed to break it down. There are three main sub-types of the disorder: Hurler - severe form, Scheie - mild form and Hurler/Scheie form which is intermediate.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis type I Hurler-Scheie syndrome: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of the enzyme (?-L-diuronidase) needed to break it down.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis type I Scheie syndrome: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of the enzyme (?-L-iduronidase) needed to break it down.
  • Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature and limb, joint and hip abnormalities which become evident from two to 10 years.
  • Muscle spasm: The occurrence of a sudden prolonged and uncontrolled contraction of a muscle
  • Muscle spasms: Involuntary movement or contraction of muscles without full control
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myhre Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by retarded growth, mental retardation, bone abnormalities and distinctive facial features.
  • Myhre-Ruvalcaba-Graham syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, retarded growth before and after birth, early-onset deafness and facial anomalies as well as other problems.
  • Nail-Patella Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by small or absent kneecap and ridged and/or absent nails as well as other abnormalities
  • Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome: A rare disorder involving muscle degeneration, loss of skin fat and impaired immune functioning.
  • Negative rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Oculo cerebro acral syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, brain, ear and limb abnormalities.
  • Oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome, type Preus: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, brain and pigmentation abnormalities.
  • Osteitis: Inflammation of bone.
  • Osteoarthritis: A form of degenerative arthritis due to chronic degeneration
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 1: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21-q33 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 2: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2p24-p23 and tends to primarily affect the hand joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 3: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q21.3-q22 and tends to primarily affect the knee and hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 4: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.3.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 5: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q11.2 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 6: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p24.3 and tends to primarily affect the knee joints.
  • Osteochondrodysplatic dwarfism -- deafness -- retinitis pigmentosa: A rare syndrome characterized by extreme dwarfism, deafness, progressive scoliosis and retinal pigment anomalies.
  • Overgrowth radial ray defect arthrogryposis: A rare condition characterized mainly by the association of arthrogryposis, excessive growth and arm and hand defects.
  • Pain: Any type of pain sensation symptoms.
  • Palindromic rheumatism: A rare disorder involving periodic inflammation in and around joints. Eventually, rheumatoid arthritis may develop if the condition persists.
  • Pallister Killian Mosaic Syndrome: Pallister Killian Mosaic Syndrome is a very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Pallister Mosaic Syndrome Tetrasomy 12p: A very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Pallister-Killian Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder due to tetrasomy of the 12th chromosome
  • Pelvic dysplasia arthrogryposis of lower limbs: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by pelvic anomalies and joint contractures involving the legs.
  • Penicillamine, D -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Penicillamine, D during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Peptidic growth factors deficiency: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by diabetes, skin abnormalities, small jaw and muscle contractures.
  • Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease: A disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. The foetal form is one of several forms of Gaucher disease and is the rarest. The fetal form causes death before birth or soon after.
  • Perisylvian syndrome: A very rare nerve disorder characterized by weakness or paralysis of face, jaw tongue and throat muscles. Other symptoms include seizures, delayed development and mental retardation.
  • Phenytoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenytoin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Phocomelia -- contractures -- absent thumb: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by absent thumbs, contractures and missing arm and leg bones.
  • Physical inactivity: When an individual is physically inactive
  • Pneumonia, Aspiration: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by breathing in liquids and solids (usually the stomach contents).
  • Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by bacteria.
  • Pneumonia, Staphylococcal: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by the Staphylococcal bacteria. The condition is not common and often occurs as a complication of influenza or other viral respiratory infections. This form of pneumonia is considered serious and up to a third of cases can result in death.
  • Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by a virus.
  • Podder-Tolmie syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by arthrogryposis, underdeveloped thumbs and meningoencephalocele.
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Polyarthritis, rheumatic factor-negative: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Polychondritis: A serious, progressive, episodic condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage in the body. The duration and severity of the episodes can vary.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Positive rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Powell-Chandra-Saal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by webbed joints and heart, vertebral, ear and radial defects.
  • Progeria: A rare fatal genetic disorder characterized by extremely premature aging.
  • Progeria short stature pigmented nevi: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by premature aging, short stature, and immune system deficiency. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Propoxyphene -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Propoxyphene during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: A rare group of muscle disorders which mainly affects the muscles closest to the trunk of the body. Muscles become progressively weak and wasted due to damage to motor neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem.
  • Pseudogout: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate crystals
  • Pseudogout, Familial: Pseudogout is a condition characterised by painful joint swelling which can affect one or more joints. It tends to affect mainly adults and usually occurs in the knees. Familial pseudogout tends to occur with a high frequency within family groups.
  • Psoriasis: Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition where the defective immune system causes skin cells to grow rapidly. It affects a significant number of people. Arthritis, which can be severe, is associated with the psoriasis in up to a third of cases. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it - roughly 10% of those susceptible will actually develop the condition. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriatic Arthritis, susceptibility to: An inflammatory condition where the defective immune system causes joint inflammation as well as skin cells to grow rapidly causing psoriasis. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriatic arthritis, juvenile form: A type of arthritis associated with psoriasis in children. Psoriasis and arthritis are both inflammatory conditions with one affecting the skin and the other affecting the joints. The arthritis tends to precede the psoriasis.
  • Radio digito -- facial dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormalities of the arm bones and facial anomalies.
  • Rajab-Spranger syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a skin fat disorder, mental retardation and deafnes.
  • Ray-Peterson-Scott syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by pelvic anomalies and joint contractures involving the legs.
  • Reactive arthritis: The inflammation of a joint
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: A condition characterized by pain and reduced range of motion in the shoulder and hand of the affected arm.
  • Reiterís syndrome: A form of reactive arthritis characterized by arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis and skin lesions.
  • Relapsing Polychondritis: A chronic disease that affects multiple joints resulting in inflammation and degeneration
  • Rheumatic fever: An inflammatory disorder that can occur as a complication of untreated streptococcal bacterial infection such as strep throat or scarlet fever. The condition may affect the brain, skin, heart and joints.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune inflammatory condition which primarily affects the joints
  • Rhizomelic syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short upper arm and thigh bones. Death frequently occurs in early childhood.
  • Richieri Costa Guion Almeida Cohen syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by premature fusion of skull bones, facial anomalies and various other abnormalities.
  • Riedel syndrome: A rare condition that occurs when fibrous tissue forms in the thyroid area and progressively destroys the thyroid gland.
  • Rolland-Desbuquois syndrome: A condition characterized by dwarfism, hydrocephalus, facial abnormalities and a narrow chest. Survival is possible past infancy. The condition is a less severe form of Silverman-Handmaker syndrome which is lethal.
  • Ross River virus: Mosquito-borne virus in parts of Australia and other countries
  • Say-Barber-Miller syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by immune system problems and a small head.
  • Scheie syndrome:
  • Schlegelberger-Grote syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, fingerlike thumbs and a blood disorder involving abnormally shaped blood platelets.
  • Schofer beetz bohl syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by brain calcification, mental retardation, short stature, diabetes insipidus and unusual facial appearance.
  • Scleroderma: A rare, progressive connective tissue disorder involving thickening and hardening of the skin and connective tissue. There are a number of forms of scleroderma with some forms being systemic (involving internal organs).
  • Scleromyxedema: A rare connective tissue disorder which causes the skin to become progressively thick and hard. The severity of symptoms is variable with lungs and circulation affected in some patients. The degree of resulting disability, disfigurement and response to treatment is variable.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Sensory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sensory systems.
  • Short stature -- prognathism -- short femoral necks: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, protruding jaw and a hip anomaly.
  • Shoulder Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the shoulder joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Silverman-Handmaker syndrome: A condition characterized by dwarfism, hydrocephalus, facial abnormalities and a narrow chest. The condition results in death during or soon after birth and is a more severe form of Rolland-Debuquois syndrome.
  • Skeletal dysplasia -- mental retardation: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation, a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Skeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skeletal system such as the bones.
  • Spasticity: When there are hypertonic movements of the muscles and they are stiff
  • Spherophakia brachymorphia syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, and craniofacial, eye, tooth and limb abnormalities.
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A rare condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the spinal and brainstem motor neurons. During fetal development excess primary neurons are formed. The body automatically destroys the extra primary neurons so that only some survive and mature into neurons. In spinal muscular dystrophy, the process that destroys the excess primary neurons doesn't switch off and continues destroying the neurons resulting in progressive motor problems. Various types of the condition range from mild to severe enough to cause death within a couple of years of birth.
  • Spinal arthritis: Inflammation of the spine joints. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Spine osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the spine as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda progressive arthropathy: A rare genetic disorder where abnormal bone development primarily involves the spine and epiphyses (end of long bones where growth occurs). Progressive arthropathy (joint disease) also affects most joints.
  • Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by reduced calcification of the spine and pelvis resulting in short stature.
  • Sprain: an injury which occurs to ligaments caused by a sudden overstretching.
  • Spranger-Schinzel-Myers syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by brain malformation, underdeveloped fingers and bone abnormalities. It is believed to be possibly caused by exposure to ergotamine and diazoxide which may be teratogenic.
  • Stiff elbow: Stiffness of the elbow joint
  • Stiff knee: Stiffness of the knee joint
  • Stiff skin syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by very stiff, thick skin that can affect the ability to move joints.
  • Stiffness: Reduced mobility or movement
  • Still's Disease, Adult-Onset: A form of arthritic inflammation characterized by fever, rash and joint pain that occurs in adults. The cause is unknown.
  • Synovial osteochondromatosis: A rare joint disorder where some of the tissue that lines the joint is replaced by bone-like tissue or cartilage. Usually only one joint is affected and it tends to be the knee, elbow or hip
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Tendinitis: a painful inflammation of a tendon
  • Toe Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the toe joints as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Trisomy 6 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 6 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Unusual facies, short stature, enamel hypoplasia, stiff joints and high-pitched voice: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, stiff joints, unusual facial appearance, high-pitched voice and underdeveloped tooth enamel.
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • Weill-Marchesani Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature and craniofacial, eye, tooth and limb abnormalities.
  • Wrist osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the wrist joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Wrist symptoms: Symptoms of the wrist area and joint

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Stiff joints:

The following list of conditions have 'Stiff joints' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Stiff joints:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Stiff joints' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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