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Symptoms » Sweating » Glossary
 

Glossary for Sweating

Medical terms related to Sweating or mentioned in this section include:

  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • AIDS-Related Complex: Patients with only mild symptoms of HIV infections.
  • Abdominal Aneurysm: Dilatation of a section of the abdominal aorta, usually due to a weakness in the wall of the artery
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Acrocyanosis: A condition where the body extremities sweat and turn blue and cold. Exposure to cold, emotional stress and smoking may trigger the condition. Also known as Raynaud's phenomenon or Raynaud's sign.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Acute adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute subtype tends to progress rapidly and is the most prevalent form of the condition.
  • Acute cholecystitis: Acute inflammation of the gall bladder, usually due to obstruction by a gall stone
  • Acute myelofibrosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute panmyelosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement. The disease often progresses rapidly and results in death.
  • Acute stress disorder: An acute anxiety state
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adult Panic-Anxiety Syndrome: A psychiatric disorder involving anxiety and panic attacks that occur for no obvious reason.
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • Adult T-Cell lymphoma: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The lymphoma subtype is aggressive and tends to affect the lymph nodes more than the blood.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol use: Use of alcohol (as a symptom)
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Alcoholic intoxication: The excessive consumption of alcohol can have toxic effects on the body and can ultimately result in death in severe cases.
  • Alternating Hemiplegia: Episodes of one-sided paralysis.
  • Alternating hemiplegia of childhood: A rare neurological disorder involving paralysis on one side of the body that is only temporary but occurs often. The extent of the paralysis is variable.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Amelo-cerebro-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving degeneration of the central nervous system, seizures and abnormal tooth development.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and usually consists of white blood cells and null cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anaplastic small cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and consists mainly of small cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Andropause: A symptomatic decline in male androgens that may occur as men age.
  • Anger: A strong feeling of displeasure and aggrevation
  • Angina pectoris: severe chest pain due to ischemia
  • Angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia lymphadenopathy: A rare immune system disorder which is similar to lymphoma. The condition is progressive but the course varies with some patients surviving a long time without treatment and others surviving only a short period of time.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood.
  • Anterior pituitary hyperhormonotrophic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the excessive production of various hormones (gonadotrophic, thyrotrophic, lactotrophic and pancreatrophic hormone).
  • Anxiety: Excessive worry, anxiety, or fear.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Anxiety-tension syndrome: Anxiety associated with physical symptoms such as tense muscles and fatigue.
  • Aortic dissection: A tear in the inner layer of the aorta (major artery in the body) which allows blood to escape into outer layers of the artery.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Arachnidism: Poisoning from a spider bite.
  • Arenavirus: A genus of viruses of the family Arenaviridae
  • Arenaviruses: Rare viral infection usually caught from rodents.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency: A rare inborn error of metabolism involving the deficiency of an enzyme (aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase) needed to process aromatic amino acids. This results in a deficiency of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. The condition manifests as movement and neurological problems.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Asthma in Adults:
  • Asthma in Children:
  • Asthma-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to asthma, or having similar symptoms.
  • Ativan withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ativan (Lorazepam) use is discontinued or reduced. Ativan is an anti-anxiety drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia: Autonomic dysreflexia is a condition characterized by instability of the autonomic nervous system and often results in sudden high blood pressure.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia syndrome: A complication caused by injury to the neck or upper back region of the spinal cord. Symptoms are induced by stimulation below the level of the injury which can be caused by such things as distended bladder, scratching the feet, squeezing the penis, stimulation of the rectum or accumulation of gas.
  • Autonomic nerve disorders: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Azalea poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • B-cell lymphomas: A group cancers involving the proliferation of lymphocytic B-cells. Examples include small lymphocytic lymphoma, immunoblastic lymphoma and lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • Babesiosis: A protozoal infection which is transmitted to human via the bite of certain ticks.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacteremia: A condition where bacteria is present in the blood.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Bacterial pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) due to a bacterial infection. It can occur as a complication of a bacterial infection in some other part of the body. It is most often a complication of a respiratory infection but skin and oral infections may also be a cause. Bacterial pericarditis may also occur after heart surgery. It occurs predominantly in males aged 20 to 50 years. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Bacterial septicemia: Sepsis of the bloodstream caused by bacteraemia.
  • Barbiturate abuse: Abuse of barbiturate medications
  • Basal cell carcinomas with milia and coarse, sparse hair: A rare disorder characterized mainly by skin cancer, milia and coarse, sparse hair. The milia tend to disappear without treatment by adolescence.
  • Benign Fasciculation Syndrome: Common movement disorder manifesting in a fine (fast) tremor; it is an inherited condition of unknown cause.
  • Benign essential tremor syndrome: A condition characterized mainly by tremor affecting usually then hands and head and the tremors may then slowly progress to other parts of the body.
  • Benzodiazepine abuse: Abuse of benzodiazepine tranquiliser medications
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Black nightshade poisoning: The Black Nightshade is a herb which bears small white or purple flowers and dull black berries. The plant originated in South America. The berries contain solanine alkaloid which can be toxic if eaten in large quantities. The leaves and unripe berries are considered toxic whereas the ripe fruit is possibly edible.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bland-Garland-White syndrome: A rare birth malformation where the left coronary artery comes out of the pulmonary artery instead of the aorta. Usually, infants are usually healthy for a few months after which they start having symptoms of heart problems. Occasionally, patients may be asymptomatic even into adulthood but usually death occurs during infancy.
  • Bland-White -Garland syndrome: A heart disorder where the left coronary artery comes out of the pulmonary artery.
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Body packer syndrome: Consuming packages of drugs for the purpose of concealing them for transportation.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Book syndrome: A rare condition observed in a number of generations within one family. It was characterized by excessive sweating
  • Brain Fag syndrome: A type of neurotic disorder that was first observed in white collar workers in Africa.
  • Breast Duct Papilloma: Benign tumour of the collecting duct of the breast.
  • Brown Recluse spider poisoning: The Brown Recluse spider is poisonous and is found mainly in southern and central areas of the US.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • CFS subtype 1 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 1 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression and cognitive, musculoskeletal and sleeping problems.
  • CFS subtype 2 ( musculoskeletal, pain, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 2 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression, pain and musculoskeletal problems.
  • CFS subtype 3 (mild): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 3 tends to have milder symptoms than other subtypes.
  • CFS subtype 4 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 4 tends to be dominated by cognitive symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 5 (musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 5 tends to be dominated by musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 6 (postexertional): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 6 tends to be dominated by excessive fatigue following exertion.
  • CFS subtype 7 (pain, infectious, musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal, neurocognitive, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 7 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being pain, infections, anxiety, depression and musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal and neurocognitive problems.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Carbamate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of carbamate insecticide drugs.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Carotid Paraganglioma: A rare, usually benign tumor found in the carotid artery in the neck. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow.
  • Carukia barnesi sting: The Irukandji jellyfish is a very small type of box jellyfish found mainly in the northern tropical waters of Australia. Their sting is not particularly painful by the ensuing symptoms can be severe and life-threatening.
  • Cathinone poisoning: Cathinone comes from the leaves of the Khat plant which is native to eastern Africa. Cathinone is a stimulant as well as have pain killing, weight loss and neuromuscular effects. The psychoactive effects are usually utilized by chewing on the leaves of the plant but sometimes dried leaves are used.
  • Chemical poisoning: Morbid condition caused by chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4-Aminopyridine: 4-Aminopyridine is a pesticide used mainly to control bird pests. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Alanycarb: Alanycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldoxycarb: Aldoxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyxycarb: Allyxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amidithion: Amidithion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aminocarb: Aminocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amiton: Amiton is a chemical once used as an insecticide and acaricide - it is no longer in use due to its nerve toxicity. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Athyl-Gusathion: Athyl-Gusathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinfos-methyl: Azinfos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinfosethyl: Azinfosethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinophos-methyl: Azinophos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos: Azinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-ethyl: Azinphos-ethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphosmetile: Azinphosmetile is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azothoate: Azothoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Barium: Barium is an element used in fireworks, glassmaking, contrast X-rays and in the electronics industry . The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bendiocarb: Bendiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benfuracarb: Benfuracarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benoxafos: Benoxafos is a chemical pesticide used as an acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bentazon: Bentazon is a chemical used mainly in herbicides for various crop plants. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos-ethyl: Bromophos-ethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bufencarb: Bufencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butacarb: Butacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butocarboxim: Butocarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butoxcarboxim: Butoxcarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cadusafos: Cadusafos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbanolate: Carbanolate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbofuran: Carbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbophenothion: Carbophenothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbosulfan: Carbosulfan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorfenvinphos: Chlorfenvinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloropyrifos: Chloropyrifos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorpyrifos: Chlorpyrifos is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorpyrifos methyl: Chlorpyrifos methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cloethocarb: Cloethocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Coumaphos: Coumaphos is used as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyanthoate: Cyanthoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Decarbofuran: Decarbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton: Demeton-S is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-O: Demeton-O is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-O-methyl: Demeton-O-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methylsulphon: Demeton-S-methylsulphon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-methyl: Demeton-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dialifos: Dialifos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicresyl: Dicresyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dieldrin: Dieldrin is a chemical used mainly to prevent termite infestations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. This chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimetan: Dimetan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethoate: Dimethoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimetilan: Dimetilan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxacarb: Dioxacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- EMPC: EMPC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endothion: Endothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethiofencarb: Ethiofencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethoate-methyl: Ethoate-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethoprophos: Ethoprophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethyl-guthion: Azinphos-ethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Etrimfos: Etrimfos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenchlorphos: Fenchlorphos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenethacarb: Fenethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenitrothion: Fenitrothion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenobucarb: Fenobucarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fipronil: Fipronil is a chemical used mainly in pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fonophos: Fonophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Formothion: Formothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furathiocarb: Furathiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Guthion (ethyl): Guthion (ethyl) is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Heptenophos: Heptenophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hyquincarb: Hyquincarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Iodofenphos: Iodofenphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isofenphos: Isofenphos is an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isoprocarb: Isoprocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Kratom: Kratom is a plant used to make a tea which produce similar effects to opium . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mecarbam: Mecarbam is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methacrifos: Methacrifos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methamidophos: Methamidophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl parathion: Methyl parathion is a chemical used mainly as an insecticide for various crops. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metiltriazotion: Metiltriazotion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metolcarb: Metolcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mevinphos: Mevinphos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mexacarbate: Mexacarbate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monocrotophos: Monocrotophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monosodium Methanarsenate: Monosodium Methanarsenate is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide or pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Naphthalene: Naphthalene is a chemical used mainly as a moth repellant, toilet deodorizer and the manufacture of other chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrilacarb: Nitrilacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen Dioxide is a chemical which has industrial applications but is also an air pollutant formed by burning fossil fuels such as gas, oil and coal as well as vehicle exhaust and industrial byproduct. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Omethoate: Omethoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oxamyl: Oxamyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, acaricie and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oxydeprofos: Oxydeprofos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oxydisulfoton: Oxydisulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion Methyl: Parathion Methyl is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pentachlorophenol: Pentachlorophenol is a chemical used mainly in fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, molluscicides, algicides and bactericides. It is commonly used as a wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenkapton: Phenkapton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phorate: Phorate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosalone: Phosalone is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosmet: Phosmet is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphamidon: Phosphamidon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phoxim: Phoxim is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pirimicarb: Pirimicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pirimiphos-methyl: Pirimiphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Primiphos methyl: Primiphos methyl is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Promacyl: Promacyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Promecarb: Promecarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propoxur: Propoxur is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Prothidathion: Prothidathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Prothoate: Prothoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pyrimitate: Pyrimitate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Quinalphos: Quinalphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Quintiofos: Quintiofos is a chemical pesticide used as an acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Azide: Sodium Azide is a chemical used mainly in nematocides, herbicides, explosives detonators and in vehicle air bags. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sophamide: Sophamide is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfotep: Sulfotep is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tazimcarb: Tazimcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetrachloroethylene: Tetrachloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as a fabric dry cleaner, degreaser, worming treatment for animals and in the manufacture of freons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiocarboxime: Thiocarboxime is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiodicarb: Thiodicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiofanox: Thiofanox is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiometon: Thiometon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tolclofos methyl: Tolclofos methyl is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Triazophos: Triazophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Triazotion: Triazotion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichlorfon: Trichlorfon is an insecticide used mostly in crops. It is considered motderately toxic to humans. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trifenfos: Trifenfos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trimethacarb: Trimethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, bird repellent, molluscicide and mamal repellent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vamidothion: Vamidothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- XMC: XMC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Xylylcarb: Xylylcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Chills: Excessive feeling of coldness.
  • Chinese Restaurant Syndrome: Symptoms caused by consuming food with a high MSG (monosodium glutamate) content. Reactions may range from mild to severe allergic reactions.
  • Chloroma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Chloromyeloma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Chronic Idiopathic Myelofibrosis: The bone marrow is consists of tissues which make blood cells and fibrous tissue supports these tissues that make the blood cells. In chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis, abnormal cells and fibres build up inside the bone marrow resulting in the production of fewer normal blood cells.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.3
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 3: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q34.1.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 4: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p25.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 5: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q24.1.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassified: A form of blood disorder characterized by the abnormal proliferation of myeloid precursors in the bone marrow. This category refers to cases of myeloproliferative disease which don't fit into any of the other specific type of myelproliferative diseases.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders: A group of blood cancers where excessive numbers of blood cells are made by overactive or cancerous bone marrow. The number of excess blood cells tends to grow slowly. Examples of such disorders includes chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. The symptoms are determined by which particular blood cancer is involved.
  • Chronic adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute form tends to progress relatively slowly and generally responds better to treatment than the other subtypes.
  • Chronic inflammatory diarrhea: Inflammatory diarrhea occurs when there is damage to the mucosal lining or brush border, which leads to a passive loss of protein-rich fluids, and a decreased ability to absorb these lost fluids.
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body.
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia: A slow-growing cancer of the white blood cells where the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells which eventually invade various parts of the body.
  • Chronic myeloid leukemia: Type of leukemia mostly in adults; rarely in children.
  • Chronic orthostatic hypotension: an excessive drop in blood pressure when the patient stands up causing light-headedness or dizziness
  • Ciguatera poisoning: Rare toxic food poisoning from eating contaminated fish
  • Classical Hodgkin disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted.
  • Cluster headache: Also known as alarm headache, more common in young men, presents with unilateral headache, rhinorrhea and lacrimation
  • Coastal leucothoe poisoning: The coastal leucothoe is an evergreen shrub which bears small clusters of bell-shaped, white flowers in the apex of the leaves. It also bears small capsulated fruit. The leaves and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which is very toxic and can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Cocaine abuse: Stimulant drug with various effects
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cocaine-induced hypertension: Cocaine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of cocaine. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking cocaine and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of cocaine use.
  • Codeine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Codeine use is discontinued or reduced. Codeine is a sedative pain-killer. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Cold & Flu:
  • Cold skin: The sensation of coldness located in ones skin
  • Cold sweat: Sweating when your body is cold or with chills
  • Colorado tick encephalitis: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Combat stress reaction: A term used in the military which refers to behaviors that result from the stress of fighting in a war.
  • Complete atrioventricular canal: A rare form of congenital heart disease where the there is a hole in the heart wall that separates the upper heart chambers, a hole the heart wall that separates the lower heart chambers and heart valve abnormalities (tricuspid and mitral valves). This results in excessive blood circulation in the lungs leading to congestive heart failure in untreated cases.
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Conn Syndrome-induced hypertension: Conn Syndrome-induced hypertension is high blood pressure associated with Conn Syndrome. It results from excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal glands. The high blood pressure often responds poorly to the usual medications. Death can result in severe cases.
  • Constrictive pericarditis: Constrictive pericarditis refers to an chronic inflammation of the sac that covers the heart (pericardium) that results in scarring of the pericardium.
  • Constrictive tuberculous pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) that occurs as a complication of tuberculosis. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Copperhead snake poisoning: The Copperhead snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in parts of North America. The toxicity of the poison varies among species but some species are extremely poisonous and readily result in death if the patient is not treated.
  • Corn Lily poisoning: Corn Lily is a poisonous plant native to the Sierra Nevada mountains. It's appearance is similar to the corn grown as a crop. The plant poison primarily affects the nervous system.
  • Corticosteroid-induced hypertension: Corticosteroid-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of corticosteroids. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking corticosteroids. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of corticosteroid therapy.
  • Cough: Any type of coughing symptom.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Crotalidae snake poisoning: Crotalids are snakes from the Crotalidae family. This group of snakes includes rattlesnakes which are usually found in America. These snakes are easily identified by the "rattle" at the tip of their tails. The toxicity of the venom can vary among species but some can result in death if prompt treatment is not given.
  • Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension: Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by a condition caused Cushing's syndrome where the adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of cortisol.
  • Cycad poisoning: Cycads are a green plant which has a thick trunk from the top of which sprouts palm-like leaves. Eating the seeds, leaves or unprocessed flour made from the trunk of the plant can cause various symptoms if large quantities are eaten. The harmful compounds in the plant are glycosides and BMAA
  • Cyclosporine-induced hypertension: Cyclosporine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking cyclosporine. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of cyclosporine use.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Da Costa syndrome: Cardiovascular symptoms caused by physical or emotional stress but may also be caused by conditions such as mitral valve prolapse and autonomic hyperactivity. The syndrome is often seen in soldiers during times of stress or in young adults who suffer emotional stress.
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Deadly nightshade (Solanum dulcamara) poisoning: The deadly nightshade is a woody vine and is considered quite toxic. It is found in Europe, Asia, North Africa and North America. There are a number of species of nightshade with variable toxicity. The Solanum dulcamara is considered less toxic with about 200 berries needed to cause death.
  • Delphinium poisoning: Delphinium is a member of the Buttercup family and contains toxic alkaloids. It's seeds are very toxic but other parts of the plant are also poisonous. As the plant ages, it becomes less poisonous. Toxicity varies amongst species.
  • Demerol withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Demerol use is discontinued or reduced. Demerol is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Diabetic hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar attack from insulin or diabetes medications
  • Diabetic neuropathy: nerve damage which maybe motor, sensory and autonomic
  • Diaphoresis: Excessive sweating.
  • Diencephalic Syndrome: A condition characterized by dysfunction of the diencphalon of the brain
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from follicular lymphoma in that it is a high-grade lymphoma that usually develops rapidly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Dilaudid withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Dilaudid use is discontinued or reduced. Dilaudid is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Discontinuation syndrome: Symptoms that can occur when a person suddenly stops taking their high blood pressure medication.
  • Disseminated infection with mycobacterium avium complex: Mycobacterium avium complex is an opportunistic bacterium which tends to occur mainly in patients with advanced AIDS. The infection can spread throughout the body and result in such things as blood infections.
  • Donepezil toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Double outlet right ventricle: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the location of the connecting hole in the heart and the exact location of the two arteries with respect to the heart.
  • Drug-induced hypertension: Drug-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking certain drugs or medications e.g. corticosteroids, cyclosporine, amphetamines, alcohol and estrogens.
  • Dumping syndrome: Dumping of undigested food from the stomach into intestine.
  • Dyskeratosis congenita of Zinsser-Cole-Engman: An inherited condition characterized by recurring painful mouth ulcers, skin pigmentation and nail abnormalities.
  • Earthball poisoning: Earthball is a type of mushroom usually found in the US. The mushroom is very poisonous and can result in death if eaten.
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Emotional stress: A condition which occurs when a person is under stress affecting their emotions
  • Endocardial fibroelastosis: A rare heart disorder characterized by a thickening of the heart muscle lining causing heart enlargement and heart failure.
  • Endocarditis: Inflammatory alterations of the endocardium of ones heart
  • Endodermal sinus tumor: A form of malignant germ cell tumor that occurs mainly in young children. They can occur in the testis, ovaries, uterus, abdomen, thorax, tailbone region, vagina, liver, retroperitoneum and pineal ventricle of the brain. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • English Laurel poisoning: The English Laurel is an evergreen shrub with elongated spikes of flowers and white fruit with a black stone. The seeds, twigs and wilted leaves of the plant contain chemicals (cyanogenic glycoside, amygdalin) which are very poisonous and can cause death if eaten. The chemicals result in cyanide poisoning.
  • Epidermalolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Cockayne-Touraine type: A form of skin disease where fragile skin blisters if it suffers some sort of physical trauma. The blisters do not cause scarring and are exacerbated by warm weather.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, simplex: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermolytic epidermolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Erythropoietin-induced hypertension: Erythropoietin-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking erythropoietin which is sometimes used to treat anemia in conditions such as chornic kidney failure. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of erythropoietin use.
  • Essential thrombocytosis -- same as essential thrombocythemia: A rare blood disorder where the blood contains too many platelets due to excessive megakaryocytes (platelet-producing cells). Platelets are essential for blood clotting but in essential thrombocythemia excessive platelets can cause the blood to form abnormal clots. If the platelets are defective as well then bleeding problems can occur. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Excessive diaphoresis: excessive sweating commonly associated with shock
  • Excessive sweating: A condition which is characterized by an abnormal excess of sweating
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Exogenous lipoid pneumonia: A rare disorder where lung inflammation results from inhalation or aspiration of fatty or oily material. Examples of fatty sources includes oil-based nasal inhalation drops, cosmetic oil. The severity of the condition can vary greatly depending on the amount of lipids involved.
  • Extra-upper Aerodigestive Tract NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes but is located in sites other than the upper aerodigestive tract, nasopharynx and nasal cavity. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor: A rare form of cancer that originates in germ cells that are found in areas such as the brain, chest, tailbone or abdomen rather than the ovaries or testicles. Germ cells are the precursors for male sperm and female eggs. The symptoms are determined by the location and size of the tumor.
  • Extramedullary Myeloid Tumor: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes. It usually in the nasal area but can also occur in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea, skin, liver and other soft tissues. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes and in particular, is located in the nasal region. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive. It is often associated with the Epstein-Barr virus.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes. It usually in the nasal area but can also occur in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea or skin. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive. Specific symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • False Hellebore poisoning: False Hellebore is a herbaceous plant which bears large clusters of greenish-yellow flowers on the ends of branches. The plant is found mainly growing in the wild in the US. The plant contains steroidal alkaloids which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Familial dysautonomia: An inherited biochemical disorder that primarily affects the autonomic and sensory nervous system.
  • Familial hypertryptophanemia: A rare genetic metabolic disorder characterized by high levels of tryptophan in the blood. The disorder tends to run in families (familial).
  • Fatal familial insomnia: A very rare inherited brain disease that severely affects sleep and causes progressive deterioration of mental and movement functions.
  • Fear: Excessive feelings of fear.
  • Fetterbush poisoning: Fetterbush is an evergreen shrub which bears elongated spikes of small, urn-shaped flowers. The plant is found mainly in the US. The leaves and flower nectar contain andromedotoxin which is very poisonous if eaten. Severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Fever: Raised body temperature usually with other symptoms.
  • Fire cherry poisoning: Fire cherry is a tree found mainly in the US. Ti bears round clusters of flowers and fruit with a large pit. The wilted leaves, stems and seeds contain cyanogenic glycoside and amygdalin which can be very poisonous if eaten. Severe cases of poisoning can result in death.
  • Fitz-Hugh syndrome: A complication of upper genital tract infections in females where the membrane lining the stomach (peritoneum) and tissues surrounding the liver become inflamed. The infections involved are usually Chlamydia or gonorrhea. In some cases the diaphragm is also involved
  • Flax poisoning: Flax is slender-stemmed herb which bears blue flowers and capsulated fruit containing smooth brown seeds. The plant originated in Europe but is found in many parts of the world growing wild. The plant contains a chemical called linomarin (a cyanogenic glycoside) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Florida leucothoe poisoning: The Florida leucothoe is a shrubby plant often grown in gardens. The leaves contain andromedotoxin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered very poisonous and can result in death if sufficient quantities of leaves are consumed.
  • Flu-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to flu, or exhibition flu-like symptoms.
  • Flu-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to flu including fever
  • Flushing: Involuntary skin redness usually of the face
  • Follicular Lymphoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Follicular lymphoma is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in that it is a low-grade lymphoma that usually develops slowly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Susceptibility type 1 means that a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.33 makes a person more susceptible to developing follicular lymphoma.
  • Follicular lymphoma: A form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in that it is a low-grade lymphoma that usually develops slowly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- MSG: An intolerance to MSG is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to a food additive called MSG which is used in a number of foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- amines: An intolerance to amines is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to amines which are found naturally in foods such as bananas, pineapples, vegetables, red wine, citrus fruit and many other foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the substance. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- food additives: An intolerance to food additives is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to food additives. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- salicylate: An intolerance to salicylates is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to salicylates which is an ingredient in aspirin but is also found naturally in various fruit, vegetables, herbs and spices. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the salicylate. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulfite: An intolerance to sulfites is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulfites which is often used as a preservative in a variety of foods and medications including meats, salads and dried fruits. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the sulfite. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Allergy: A food additive allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive or a food or drink containing to food additive. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Annatto: Annatto allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called annatto which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Carmine: A carmine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carmine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (red yoghurt, red popsicles, red drinks) as well as in some cosmetics The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- amaranth: An amaranth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called amaranth which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- benzoate: A benzoate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called benzoate which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- carageenan gum: A carageenan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called carageenan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- erythrosine: An erythrosine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called erythrosine which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- guar gum: A guar gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called guar gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum: A gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum acacia: A gum acacia allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum acacia which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum tragacanth: A gum tragacanth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum traganth (type of gum) which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- lecithin: A lecithin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called lecithin which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- locust bean gum: A locust bean gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called locust bean gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- quinoline yellow: A quinoline yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called quinoline yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- saffron: A saffron allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called saffron which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- salicytes: A salicylate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called salicylate which is used in a number of foods. Salicylates also occur naturally in a wide range of plant foods especially fruits. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite: A sulphite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite derivative: A sulphite derivative allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite derivative which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sunset yellow: A sunset yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called sunset yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- tartrazine: A tartrazine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tartrazine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (some breakfast cereals, cake mixes, chocolate chips etc.) The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- xanthan gum: A xanthan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called xanthan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Francisella tularenis infection: Francisella tularenis is a type of bacteria that can cause infection involving the skin, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. The nature and severity of symptoms varies depending on the location of the infection. The bacteria primarily causes localized tissue necrosis. The pathogen is considered a possible biological weapon.
  • Freire-Maia odontotrichomelic syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by tooth, hair and limb abnormalities.
  • Freire-Maia syndrome: An extremely rare syndrome characterized by tooth, hair and limb abnormalities. The abnormalities can be quite severe in some cases. The parents may have been related in the reported cases.
  • Fucosidosis type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-fucosidase) which results in accumulation of certain chemicals (glycosphingolipids) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. It is an infantile form of fucosidosis which starts early and rapidly progresses to early death.
  • Fucosidosis type II: A form of the biochemical disorder called fucosidosis where an enzyme deficiency (alpha-fucosidase) results in the accumulation of certain chemicals (glycosphingolipids) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Symptoms start later and progress slower than in type I and is distinguished by warty skin growths.
  • Funnel Web spider poisoning: The funnel web spider is a poisonous spider found mainly in Australia and America. The venom is toxic to the nervous system. There are two phases of poisoning - the first phase starts soon after envenomation and may result in death in severe cases. The second phase occurs one or two hours after envenomation where patients may recover somewhat but symptoms such as apnea and low blood pressure may develop.
  • Gallstones: A condition where biliary calculi form in the gallbladder
  • Gamstorp-Wohlfart syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by muscle weakness, low muscle tone, increased sweating and muscle twitching (myokymia)
  • Gastric lymphoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the lining of the stomach. The tumor may be primary or have spread there from other parts of the body. This type of tumor is more common in old people.
  • Generalised anxiety disorder: anxiety is a feeling of apprehension or fear
  • Gila Lizard poisoning: Gila lizards are one of the few venomous species of lizard. They are found in parts of America such as Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Glomus tympanicum: A rare, usually benign tumor found behind the ear drum. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow.
  • Graves disease: A condition which is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid resulting hyperthyroidism
  • Green gill mushroom poisoning: Green gill is a type of mushroom with a smooth cap and white gills eventually turning greenish. The mushroom is commonly found growing naturally in the US. This mushroom is very poisonous and causes severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Severe poisoning can lead to death due to complications such as dehydration and electrolyte imbalance.
  • HIV-1, CRF01_AE: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/E occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1, CRF02_AG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/G involves both And G subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/G occurs mainly in west and central Africas well as Taiwan.
  • HIV-1, CRF04_ cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/B involves both And B subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF_cpx is made up of a combination of subtypes A, G, H, K, and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cyprus and Greece.
  • HIV-1, CRF05_ D/F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF D/F involves both D and F subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF D/F occurs mainly in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF06_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF06_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G, J and K - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Burkina Faso and Mali.
  • HIV-1, CRF07_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF07_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF08_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF08_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF11_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF11_cpx is extremely rare and appears to include a mix of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G and J - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF12_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF B/F has been diagnosed in Uruguay and Argentina.
  • HIV-1, CRF13_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF13_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G, J and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF14_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF14_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Spain.
  • HIV-1, CRF15_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF15_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B.
  • HIV-1, CRF16_ A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF16_ A2D involves a combination of subtypes A2 and D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Kenyand South Korea.
  • HIV-1, CRF17_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF17_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF18_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF18_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, F, G, H, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF19_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF19_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, D and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF20_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF20_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF21_A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF21_A2D involves a combination of subtypes A, D and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF22_01A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF22_01A1 involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF23_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF23_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF24_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF24_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF25_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF25_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon and Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1, CRF26_AU: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF26_AU involves a combination of subtypes And U.
  • HIV-1, CRF27_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF27_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, G, H, J, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF28_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF28_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF29_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF29_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF30_0206: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF30_0206 involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and CRF06 (A, G, J and K).
  • HIV-1, CRF31_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF31_BC involves a combination of subtypes B and C.
  • HIV-1, CRF32_06A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF32_06A1involves a combination of subtypes CRF06 (A, G, J, K) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF33_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF33_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Malaysia.
  • HIV-1, CRF34_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF34_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Thailand.
  • HIV-1, CRF35_AD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF35_AD involves a combination of subtypes And D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Afghanistan.
  • HIV-1, CRF36_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF36_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF37_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF37_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF38_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF38_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF39_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF39_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF40_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF40_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF41_CD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF41_CD involves a combination of subtypes C and D.
  • HIV-1, CRF42_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF42_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F1.
  • HIV-1, CRF43_02G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF43_02G involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and G. This type has been diagnosed in Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype A is most prevalent in West Africa.
  • HIV-1A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A1 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A2 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A3: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A3 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype B is most prevalent in Thailand, Australia, Japan, Europe and America. This subtype tends to be transmitted mainly by homosexual contact and intravenous drug use i.e. infection occurs mainly through blood exposure.
  • HIV-1C: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype C is most prevalent in Nepal, India and Southern and Eastern parts of Africa. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype and is transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype D is most prevalent in the Eastern and Central parts of Africa and tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1E: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype E has to date not occurred on its own but has occurred in combination with subtype A in a subtype called CRF A/E. This subtype occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype F is most prevalent in Eastern Europe, South America and Central Africa.
  • HIV-1F1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F1 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1F2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F2 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype G is most prevalent in Africa and central parts of Europe. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1H: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype H is most prevalent in central parts of Africa.
  • HIV-1J: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype J is most prevalent in central America.
  • HIV-1K: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype K is most prevalent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cameroon.
  • HIV-1M: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1 group M is the most common form of HIV accounting for roughly 90% of cases worldwide.
  • HIV-1N: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group N is very rare and has only been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1O: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group O is very rare and has only been diagnosed in the western parts of Central Africa. This type is more difficult to diagnose and the standard test kits are not sensitive enough to pick up the virus.
  • HIV-2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-2 is very rare and is generally only diagnosed in Africa but a number of cases have been diagnosed in the US. HIV-2 is less easily transmitted than HIV-1 and the time between infection and symptoms tends to be longer in HIV-2.
  • HIV-2A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV-2B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Heart attack: An acute myocardial infarction
  • Heart disease: Any disease that affects that heart but particularly relating to its own blood supply
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Heat exhaustion: major cause of preventable morbidity worldwide
  • Heat stroke: it is a life threatening condition. It is hyperthermia in an advanced state
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Sassafras Oil: Sassafras Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat skin irritation such as insect bites. The herbal agent contains a chemical called safrole which can cause harmful effects if ingested .
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Betel Nut: Betel Nut is used as a herbal agent used alleviate pain and improve mood problems. The betel nut contains chemicals such as (arecoline on raw nut, arecaidine - after roasting)and the ingestion of excessive amounts of these can result in symptoms. Chronic ingestion as well as eating large amounts of the nuts can cause symptoms.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Lobelia: Lobelia can be used as a herbal agent to treat respiratory congestion, muscle spasms and to assist in quitting smoking. The herbal agent contains a certain chemicals which can imitate the effects of nicotine but which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Ting Kung Teng: Ting Kung Teng can be used as a herbal agent to treat arthritis and musculoskeletal problems. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 3: A very rare inherited disorder affecting the peripheral and autonomic nervous system and characterized by reduced tear production, excessive sweating, poor body temperature control, blood pressure problems, impaired sensation and poor muscle control.
  • Heroin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when heroin use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Herring poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some herrings contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the herring does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The herrings are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • High Blood Pressure/Hypertension:
  • High blood pressure: Excessive blood pressure.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Hirschsprung disease ganglioneuroblastoma: A rare disorder characterized by an intestinal defect tumors of the nerves.
  • Hodgkin disease, X-linked pseudoautosomal: An inherited form of Hodgkin disease which is a common cancer of the lymph node.
  • Hodgkin lymphoma, childhood: A type of cancer that originates from lymphocytes (white blood cells). It is more common during adolescence but can occur during childhood.
  • Hodgkin lymphoma, during pregnancy: A cancer of the lymph system that occurs during pregnancy. The dilemma is that treatment can't be initiated until the baby is delivered or terminated. If the pregnancy is in the early stages, termination is recommended. If the pregnancy is in the later stages when the lymphoma occurs, the baby is usually delivered as early as safely possible in order to commence cancer treatment as soon as possible. The more prompt the treatment, the better the prognosis.
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Sweating:

The following list of conditions have 'Sweating' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Sweating:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Sweating' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: Nov 12, 2003

 

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